Hudson River

barnsey
12th July 2010, 12:00
For the THIRD time tonight I will attempt to post this thread .... !!!

I sailed on 'Hudson River' courtesy of the Marine Supt. of Hudson SS Co. for a Summer holiday trip from Dagenham to Blyth in 1958. It was a very interesting trip and of course I have always held a soft spot for the her even though I am a Tanker man by trade. On my training ship at Greenhithe from 1955 to 1959 all 'The Worlds' ships went by to and from London ...and in those 4 years I came to know the features of all the ships colliers included..... I can still see a photo on Ships Nostalgia ... recognise her and am dead chuffed when I see her name. But Hudson River being one of the larger colliers but distinct from the Likes of 'Sir John Snell' and her sisters always stood out.

I am building a model of her ... Deans mrine in UK put out the model and in Jan 2006 I bought it for a retiremnt project, started her and had to shelve her. May was wet here, June even wetter and so as July came I got the box down and as it has turned out frosty and cold ....the model has come a long way in a short time ...

Deans said that she had wooden hatchboards originally.... can anyone confirm this please ... she had 3 slab MacGregors when I was on her.

Has anyone her complete history from building to scrapping .. in Spain I believe? She also seems to have had derricks added later in life when Hudsons sold her?

spartan
12th July 2010, 19:30
Barnsey her history was as follows
Launched 28.4.49 yard no 466,completed Aug 49 by Ailsa Troon.Sold in 1973 renamed IVE under the Panama flag.Sold to Spanish breakers at San Juan de Nieva Aviles work began 6.10.76
Cheers
Spartan

barnsey
12th July 2010, 21:48
Thanks Spartan ....now I need to know if she did indeed have wooden hatch boards when built ... can't see it myself?

Tankman
13th July 2010, 14:27
Barnsey,
If you can obtain a copy of the book "Hudson Steamship" by Graham Atkinson there is a good photo of "Hudson River" on page 13 showing her MacGregor steel hatch-covers. There is also a colour photo on the front cover of her and the hatch covers are open clearly showing that they are as you said, three slab steel covers.
The book "The Steam Collier Fleets" by J.A.Macrae & C.V.Waine states on page 207 that the "Hudson Strait", sister to the "Hudson River" had five holds and steel hatch covers. Were I building this model, that would be enough to convince me that MacGregor hatch covers should be fitted.

Chris

barnsey
14th July 2010, 06:58
Thanks Chris ... all organised now ...I really just wanted to put Deans marine right as they were fairly adamant she had wooden hatch boards as launched ... no way....they would have needed derricks to lift the beams and neither the "River" or the "Strait" had them ....

Will post a photo of the finished product ...

monty
16th July 2010, 23:21
I have a pic of the HR from above going through the Kiel Canal in a book "Black Diamond Fleets" and she has 3 slabs foreward of the bridge and 2 aft. Pete

barnsey
17th July 2010, 01:16
I have a pic of the HR from above going through the Kiel Canal in a book "Black Diamond Fleets" and she has 3 slabs foreward of the bridge and 2 aft. Pete

Monty,

thanks for this information ... any chance you could do a good scan for me and e-mail it to me?

David Barnes

japottinger
22nd July 2010, 17:07
For the THIRD time tonight I will attempt to post this thread .... !!!

I sailed on 'Hudson River' courtesy of the Marine Supt. of Hudson SS Co. for a Summer holiday trip from Dagenham to Blyth in 1958. It was a very interesting trip and of course I have always held a soft spot for the her even though I am a Tanker man by trade. On my training ship at Greenhithe from 1955 to 1959 all 'The Worlds' ships went by to and from London ...and in those 4 years I came to know the features of all the ships colliers included..... I can still see a photo on Ships Nostalgia ... recognise her and am dead chuffed when I see her name. But Hudson River being one of the larger colliers but distinct from the Likes of 'Sir John Snell' and her sisters always stood out.

I am building a model of her ... Deans mrine in UK put out the model and in Jan 2006 I bought it for a retiremnt project, started her and had to shelve her. May was wet here, June even wetter and so as July came I got the box down and as it has turned out frosty and cold ....the model has come a long way in a short time ...

Deans said that she had wooden hatchboards originally.... can anyone confirm this please ... she had 3 slab MacGregors when I was on her.

Has anyone her complete history from building to scrapping .. in Spain I believe? She also seems to have had derricks added later in life when Hudsons sold her?

Deans Marine not always correct.

steve sybenga38
2nd August 2010, 00:00
Hudson River did have steel lids I sailed on her A.B. Hudson Sound had steel lids for'ad but No3 was hatchboards and N4 was steel.Dont know why. maybe lids could only run forward and this would have blocked access to doorways to bridge accom.

barnsey
2nd August 2010, 00:08
Hudson River did have steel lids I sailed on her A.B. Hudson Sound had steel lids for'ad but No3 was hatchboards and N4 was steel.Dont know why. maybe lids could only run forward and this would have blocked access to doorways to bridge accom.

thanks very much for that Steve ... how interesting that she only had one hatch with boards .... there must have been a reason.

bet that was quite a job stripping that hatch ready to work cargo?

Pat McCardle
2nd August 2010, 09:06
good photos here

http://www.photoship.co.uk/JAlbum%20Ships/Old%20Ships%20H/index14.html

cueball44
2nd August 2010, 10:40
good photos here

http://www.photoship.co.uk/JAlbum%20Ships/Old%20Ships%20H/index14.htmlWell there is proof here that the hatch covers were steel slabs because the photograph shows them in the open position.(Thumb)'cueball44'.

barnsey
2nd August 2010, 10:53
Well there is proof here that the hatch covers were steel slabs because the photograph shows them in the open position.(Thumb)'cueball44'.

Thanks very much everyone for your help, experience from yesteryears and thoughts.

I am about to make the hatches and they will be slabs ... anyone remember how many wheels to a hatch by chance?

Wish I had taken a camera with me when I was abaodr her but we didn't run to such items and film plus developing was expensive ...

Pat McCardle
2nd August 2010, 17:18
Try this Barnsey.

http://www.brighthub.com/engineering/marine/articles/45796.aspx?image=22191

barnsey
6th August 2010, 10:39
Thanks Pat ... Hudson Rivers were more basic than those which all trundled back and stowed neatly in a sort of pit as you can see, made a hell of a clatter ... Hudson Rivers were just 3 slabs and hinged to stow vertically clear of the hatch.

Has anyone seen a clear resolution of the one of her passing under a bridge on the Kiel Canal .....Monty kindly sent me a photo of the phot which is fine but I'd love to get a copy of the real one....

fred watson
5th February 2011, 15:59
Hi Barnsey'
My first ship was the Hudson River. I signed on 18th Jan 1956 as junior R/O. At that time, as an R/O, you had to do the first six months under an experienced man. I got a telegram telling me to join the Hudson River at Blyth and had all sorts of fantasies about the St Lawrence and Hudson Bay etc but was mortified to find myself on a collier running between the North East and Dagenham. I managed to get off onto a deep sea boat after 2 months. While I was on I had to share my cabin with someone who was "following coal" on a trip from Blyth to Dagenham. He was a toff who advised me to leave the sea and do something more interesting. I mention this as your letter seems to indicate that it was a policy of the company to carry people like yourself. In 1956 she did have tin hatches. Unhappily I don't have any photo's but was glad of the photo of your model. At a later date I sailed on the Clintonia, a Stag line boat and remember that the two shipping companies were related in some way. Good luck with your project. I have a model of a Thames barge which has been under construction for the last 24 years.
Fred Watson