Crankshaft failure

double acting
21st July 2010, 17:11
A CalMac ferry, the Clansman, is at present out of service "due to mechanical problems" as they tell the Press. Apparently it has a broken crankshaft, can any one throw any light on what actually happened? In 15 years at sea I've never experienced such a breakdown.

Satanic Mechanic
21st July 2010, 17:36
Don;t know what has happened to the Clansman but they are not that unusual a failure.

Actual fracture is very uncommon but pin damage from an overheating bearing is well known. Basically the pin gets so hot that you get surface cracks which have to be ground out and an undersized bearing put in. This of course alters the load carrying capacity but normally a repair can be carried out at least once on a pin . The worst I saw was bottom end bearing on B&W 6S60MCC that we removed 8mm of the dia mter and still had enough meat left to repeat the repair without derating the engine.

Another favourite are 'lightseeking' con rods - usually a fracture caused by a casting fault - that is a crankshaft full replacement job. Nasty nasty job on a generator - truly horrible on a slowspeed main -you need to cut holes in the side and all sorts. I replaced a 4.8MW generator a couple of years ago because of this - everything except the actual bedplate. BIG JOB.

The last actual fractured crankshfrt I saw was a couple of months ago on a high speed gene, in this case it was a pretty obvious fatigue fracture initiating in the crank throw. I have got an endoscope video I took somewhere - might try and dig it out. In this case because of the size we just swapped it for a new one

albatross1923
21st July 2010, 20:10
This is a Crankshaft failure brought about starting the engine with a water leak in one of
the cylinders moving the crankweb round the pin the repair is very unique using 4 tons
of liquid oxygen
google
presidentschoice.imeche.org.uk./crankshaft

ALBATROSS 1923

John Dryden
21st July 2010, 20:41
I must admit that when a Bank Line ship lost power it was always mid ocean and our engineers were a spectacle to watch, changing the big bits with big spanners and the perfect silence broken by a newly repaired engine kicking in.After the silence.

surfaceblow
21st July 2010, 21:07
When I was on the Cape Hudson its sister ship the Cape Horn add to replaced it's crankshaft due to fractures found in the crank after undergoing a ABS bearing inspection. While the ship was in the Middle East some of the Main Engine Bearings had come due for ABS Inspection on a B & W K series engine. While I was having some of the Main Bearings inspected on the Hudson I found that the Computerized inventory system identified the Main Bearing Jack location but on opening the box the jacks had the Camshaft stamped on the jacks. Since the jacks are bigger than the Main Bearing Jacks they were not used to refit the bearings after inspection. On the Cape Hudson we had a new jack fabricated. On the Cape Horn had earlier had some of their Main Engine Bearings inspected by ABS and also had an outside contractor do the work.

The Cape Hudson left the Middle East and headed back to the US while the Cape Horn arrived in the US about six months after us. On the Cape Horn's arrival some more Main Bearings required inspection when it was found that the crankshaft suffered fractures.

Officially there was no reason found for the fractures but we assumed that the Cape Horn also had the Bearing Jacks misidentified and used the bigger camshaft jacks to overtightened the bearings and that they did not do a complete feel down on the engine after the bearing work.

To remove the crankshaft on the Cape Horn the top of the engine room was removed a second crane was installed in the cargo hold. The Main Engine was removed from the engine room in three sections. After the new crank was installed and all of the bits put back it took another month of adjustments to try to get to the like new clearances but that was never accomplished. While the deflections and clearances were better than before the work the clearances was nowhere near the new clearances.

uisdean mor
21st July 2010, 21:35
DA
Not gospel but as close to the horses mouth as you can get. Tail shaft bearing went and this was not picked up quickly enough. Threw the shafts out of line and significant further damage occurred.
As stated not gospel so treat with caution. My sources are passengers and some fellow engineers travelling ( or not ) regularly on the Barra run.
Rgds
uisdean

Winebuff
22nd July 2010, 15:51
I must admit that when a Bank Line ship lost power it was always mid ocean and our engineers were a spectacle to watch, changing the big bits with big spanners and the perfect silence broken by a newly repaired engine kicking in.After the silence.

It was one of the many things we were paid to do. Though if we did the rest of our jobs properly it did not happen too often.

Peter Smith

Alistair Macnab
22nd July 2010, 17:41
The Houston (Texas) Pilots had let it be known that the old twin screw blast jobs of Bank Line were unreliable within the confines of the Houston Ship Channel above Morgans Point. This lead to there always being a tug lying off the Point and offering its services to all Bank Boats. Ships had to be warned that unless there was some doubt about the ship's reliability, on no account was a tug service to be taken. Nevertheless, the Tug Boat Company always stationed a tug every time a Bank Boat came up Galveston Bay 'just in case'! It was long after the old blast jobs had departed from the fleet before the stand-by tug was discontinued.

An Tirisdeach
22nd July 2010, 21:36
DA
Not gospel but as close to the horses mouth as you can get. Tail shaft bearing went and this was not picked up quickly enough. Threw the shafts out of line and significant further damage occurred.
As stated not gospel so treat with caution. My sources are passengers and some fellow engineers travelling ( or not ) regularly on the Barra run.
Rgds
uisdean

There was no problem with the tail shaft, the crankshaft was not broken, but damaged by other failed components, and a new one is being fitted.

mrcanoehead
1st August 2010, 05:37
Was the Cape Horn & Hudson former BARBER boats, used to see them in Norfolk Virginia , at the lamberts point container terminal in the 1980's

surfaceblow
1st August 2010, 17:45
Was the Cape Horn & Hudson former BARBER boats, used to see them in Norfolk Virginia , at the lamberts point container terminal in the 1980's

Yes both were ex Barber Line ships. The Cape Hudson was the Barber Taif completed 1 June 1979 and the Cape Horn was the Barber Tonsberg completed 4 July 1979. Both ships were converted for military use and controlled by MARAD with outside contractors operating the ships. At the time I was onboard the vessels MTL had the contract to operate the three H's plus the Cape D's. I also spent some time at Lamberts Point.

Joe

borderreiver
1st August 2010, 17:58
Borderhunter doxford engine had crankcase fracture in Japan welded up come home of half power while a new one was made.

david freeman
2nd August 2010, 08:28
Deep water Trawlers out of Hull, could give an insite into interesting engine failures. One medium speed 2000hp main engine trawler was towed home with a completely fractured main crankshaft. This was alluded too an all welded bedplate not correctly secured to an all rivetted ship frames and shell. Hence the bedplate was free to walk, and the result was a broken crankshaft. All this in class up to date and insured vessel.

J Boyde
2nd August 2010, 08:46
The Ashburton had a small crakshaft problem. They started the engine with water in one, as I remember, unit. Result, the engine had the unit twisted 13 deg and the result of effects on the rest of the engine. Engine BW fourstroke. They dragged out from the wharf and left her sitting on the pick at Numeau.
I was one of three who flew from the UK to help bring her back. Metalex (?) from nz also joined the ship. The patched every head while in Fiji, then we spent 29 days crossing the pacific to Panama, where all new heads were put on. We broke day every day, interesting, it pn;y broke down when we were trying to sleep. Liverpool, we were not alowed to stop the engine until we had tigs on. Emptied then down to the Tyne where there pulled half the engine out to line it up. 3 months later, they haded he over the Manners. Al least they seemed to have a large number of fitters, along with the engineers whenthey took over.
Jim B

ted harrison
7th August 2010, 00:01
Reading the posts on cranckshaft failure reminds me of my time on the Iron Horse (4 cyl Doxford). We were outward bound from Birkenhead to Seven Islands (About Aug 62' I think). Crossing the Mersey Bar we managed to colloide with the pilot cutter. The emergency full astern was dealt with (not very competently by all accounts) by the 2/eng whose watch is was. After inspection by the Lloyds man a cement box was fitted to our damaged bow and off we went. Rounding the north coast of Ireland the crankshaft broke assunder followed by a crankcase fire. We had the excitement of a deep sea tow into Scotts of Greenock (where incidently she was built). The NEM in Wallsend-on-Tyne won the contract and off we went again under tow, first north about but after as many hours going backwards through the Pentland, turned about and round the other way to the Tyne. A new crankshaft was fitted and we sailed for Vitoria just before Christmas. I was 4th Eng at the time but moved up to 3rd and spent 23 months on her altogether. Great ship, Great company.

Ian J. Huckin
14th August 2010, 15:03
Does this qualify?? I can see some surface defects.........

Billieboy
14th August 2010, 18:46
Does this qualify?? I can see some surface defects.........

Looks like a bit of pitting on the mains!

averheijden
23rd November 2012, 20:44
This is a Crankshaft failure brought about starting the engine with a water leak in one of
the cylinders moving the crankweb round the pin the repair is very unique using 4 tons of liquid oxygen

ALBATROSS 1923

Full Story, mv EASTERN ROVER (http://users.telenet.be/doxford-matters/tekst/Re-alignment%20Eastern%20Rover.pdf)

Regards
Alfons (http://users.telenet.be/doxford-matters/doxforddamages.html)

nav
23rd November 2012, 21:35
Here is a major crankshaft repair on a brand new ship and engine.

http://capetownphotographer.photoshelter.com/gallery/G0000ABTLIqvgdds

Awesome engineering. must have been a Scottish Chief involved in the repair.

chadburn
23rd November 2012, 22:09
If you type MV Eastern Rover in google there are some interesting photograph's of Doxford Engine failure's.

forthbridge
24th November 2012, 14:41
Benlarig about 1962 I think probably second or 3rd voyage after she had been bought from Prince Line. A very loud bang while manoeuvering up the Elbe to Hamburg. Examination showed broken crankshaft coupling bolts.

JIMMY HAMILTON
24th November 2012, 15:53
many years ago we had a broken Crankshaft on an R6 kelvin in the calmac ferry Eigg,only indication of it happening was the revs dropped to less than normal idle speed, the engine continued to run on the back cylinder, the break was so clean that the other 5 cylinders were stopped.. cause was put down to the bottom end nuts had slackened off while torquing the heads.. the same bolt went right thro' holding the heads .. the cyl block.. and bottom ends.. think it happened to more than one of the Island class ferrys while they had R6 Kelvins..

Varley
25th November 2012, 00:44
I saw photo's of an oversped LS engine of a converted livestock carrier - I wish I could remember more details of her - Australia to Gulf run.

The overspeed had thrown out the bottom end (all of it!). To substitute for the crankshaft's missing pin a steel plate had been shaped around the two adjacent webs. I was told that the vessel did another round trip before the Autralian authorities said 'enough'.

The photo was from someone just employed as C/E on the newly (almost) delivered Kommandor Subsea - George?

RFARoy
25th November 2012, 14:31
Ref: Broken Crankshafts - Perhaps someone from the RFA brethren may confirm my hazy memory about the RFA Dewdale (9-cylinder B & W), whilst fully laden from the Gulf sailing south down the East African coast, probably around 1971; I think the crank cleanly sheared around No.6 cylinder probably forward of a main crank bearing therefore the crankshaft was still being supported fore and aft of cylinders No’s 7, 8 & 9 which were still connected to prop-shaft. The engineers somehow rigged the three remaining cylinders to fire in sequence and I think she came all the way back to the UK under her own power abet very slowly, not sure where she finally docked or if she had to have assistance once she reached the Channel approaches or not.

RFARoy

howardws
25th November 2012, 14:51
We had a bent crankshaft on the port Pielstick PC3 on MV Eagle. Although I was on leave I was purifier king and got the blame. It didn't do my career much harm, they needed a Second Engineer in a hurry in another port and someone remembered my name! I stayed there for the next 25 years.

Very interesting watching a main engine dismantled, the entablature lifted, the crankshaft moved outboard and then posted through a large letter box cut in the car deck.

Dumah54
26th November 2012, 05:41
(EEK)In my experience broken cranks are usually caused by misalignment. The jobs I was envolved with the few actually broken cranks let go at a web. I was ALWAYS cognisant of my deflections as I built the engine from the bedplate up and we insisted on a set of deflections immediately after the first flash. Never had a warranty problem on any of my alignments, not too shabby over 30 years [=D].

Cheers, Dumah,
Halifax, NS

averheijden
26th November 2012, 22:27
Here is a major crankshaft repair on a brand new ship and engine.
http://capetownphotographer.photoshelter.com/gallery/G0000ABTLIqvgdds
Awesome engineering. must have been a Scottish Chief involved in the repair.


Some more pictures, (http://www.triton.co.za/triton-services/triton-marine-structures/magsenger2-dec11.htm) in detail from this ship (Chinese built and owned ship)
Regards
Alfons (http://users.telenet.be/doxford-matters)

nav
26th November 2012, 23:24
Some more pictures, (http://www.triton.co.za/triton-services/triton-marine-structures/magsenger2-dec11.htm) in detail from this ship (Chinese built and owned ship)
Regards
Alfons (http://users.telenet.be/doxford-matters)

Any idea what the failure mode was?

Scots definitely involved, the fifth picture down has a guy in a red jacket wearing a see-you-Jimmy hat. Or is he being attacked by the ships cat?

averheijden
27th November 2012, 11:12
Any idea what the failure mode was?

Scots definitely involved, the fifth picture down has a guy in a red jacket wearing a see-you-Jimmy hat. Or is he being attacked by the ships cat?

Indeed, I have an idea, but no more than that!
I think - because the whole engine was dismantled - most probably severe problems with the crankshaft itself (cracks) or cracks in all the main bearing supports (saddles) in the bedplate.
Bedplate with crankshaft was transported to the factory, and that means something!!
But I try to find out
Regards
Alfons

chadburn
27th November 2012, 14:13
The engine most probably has been sat on the new type of composite chock's which may have collapsed?. Was this vessel built at the same Yard as the vessel on it's Maiden Voyage which cracked up after loading in Brazil recently.

chadburn
28th November 2012, 17:29
A Re- Constructed engine?, by that I mean that the engine is constructed ashore at the Shipyard or at the Engine Builder's and then tested, it is then De-Constructed and lifted into the Engineroom in bite size chunk's (depending on the Yard's Hammerhead lifting capacity) and then Re-Constructed by a dedicated Engine Squad under the Supervision of the Maker's Man or Engine-Shop Foreman when it is then subject to Dockside Trial's and then away for Sea Trial's, Builder's first and then Owner's.

makko
28th November 2012, 18:15
Attached a photo taken earlier in the year of the crankshaft of a MAN B&W 18V48/60 (18.9 kW, HFO).

The crack runs completely through the web and journal and is most probably the result of an inclusion in the crankshaft material. The engine actually continued to run until the wiped BE Brgs. set off the oil mist detector. Obviously, the crankshaft is toast! Due to flexing and loss of BE Brg. material both A and B cylinders contacted the head although no damage was done to the valves.

Rgds.
Dave

chadburn
28th November 2012, 18:35
Interesting Makko, by coincidence I was watching a programme about Web Folding today.

makko
28th November 2012, 18:53
Hi Chief,
I have seen several of these. Apparently, ultrsound testing will not detect inclusions below 1mm. Anothe possible cause is notching in the thread or bore of the counterweight holding stud in the crank web. Quite costly and difficult because the engine must be completely stripped (underslung crankshaft). Without giving away too much, this engine is on a power generation barge and there is no standing on the quayside for a crane of sufficient capacity. The plan was to construct rails and jack the pieces out.

When we consider the speed of these engines (515 rpm) and the forces on the crankshaft (18 cyls in Vee), it only takes a miniscule fissure a short amount of time to propagate through the entire material (probably 2 million cycles, about 30 to 60 running hours).

Just below the inverted Vee in the change of section is a temper spot - Presumably the point of final failure.

Rgds.
Dave

chadburn
28th November 2012, 19:26
Thanks for the further info Dave(Thumb)

Duncan112
28th November 2012, 19:56
What is frightening about crack propagation is the speed of the final failure once the crack has achieved it's critical length beyond which sudden failure is inevitable. At failure the crack propagates at the speed of sound in the material (in steel about 5 times the speed of sound in air.

The concept of critical crack length can be best appreciated by reading a newspaper outside and the wind catching it - up to a point you get minor rips which don't affect your ability to read or fold the paper, however beyond a certain length the page will rip right across. This length is the same whether you are reading the Telegraph or the Sun. Got interested in this when I was Chief on a ship that started to crack across the deck and eventually did my dissertation on life cycles in hull structures.

makko
28th November 2012, 22:13
I agree, Duncan. A fascinating subject! I unfortunately mention these losses to my Dad when I phone him - He is best described as a fanatic! The phone calls turn out very costly!
Rgds.
Dave

averheijden
29th November 2012, 08:47
Any idea what the failure mode was?

Scots definitely involved, the fifth picture down has a guy in a red jacket wearing a see-you-Jimmy hat. Or is he being attacked by the ships cat?

I got the following answer from South Africa:

The ship was built in China and the MAN quality requirements were not followed.
The whole ship was not cleaned in the shipyard and all oil tanks were contaminated with steel balls (from sand blasting) and these particles went right through the engine and damaged all bearings and the crankshaft and the bedplate.
The problem was solved by changing the bedplate and crankshaft.

The work took place on the repair quay in the Cape Town Harbor. The lead company was MAN Diesel and Turbo assisted by : Dormac Mammoth lifters and Target Cranes.

I suppose, next time they will be more careful!!
Regards
Alfons
Doxford Damages ( http://users.telenet.be/doxford-matters/doxforddamages.html)

Peter Short
29th November 2012, 13:34
The whole ship was not cleaned in the shipyard and all oil tanks were contaminated with steel balls (from sand blasting) and these particles went right through the engine and damaged all bearings and the crankshaft and the bedplate.


Alfons,

Thanks for finding that out.

However it raises the question - do these engines have filtration on the oil supply, or is the oil cleaned after going through the engine?

I am reminded of common stories of Chinese machine tools with casting sand in their gearboxes....

chadburn
29th November 2012, 13:46
I am reminded of those on this site who kept bleating on about how good the Chinese are at building ship's.

makko
29th November 2012, 15:11
Remember, this was a common problem in British shipyards too. The crud is left in, for exmple, the lube oil borings in the crankshaft - Thus, there is no filter to catch them before they go into a bearing. The worst case scenario is if the lube oil port blocks, the bearing overheats and its night-lights for the crankshaft.

I recently inspected a Hyundai MAN-B&W 18V28/32H which had suffered an overspeed. It appears that the governor (Woodward) jammed and when the load was taken off the generator, the engine went haywire in revs. Obviously bearing and gene damage. Although it is definitely not in my remit, I did take it upon myself to have a private word/joint inspection with one of the regional managers - All the inspection ports were opened including the camshaft, all heads off, pistons out. When they had removed insulation lagging or pipe clips, the plant workers had left the screws, mainly self tapping, wherever on the engine. I explained to the manager of the need for sterile conditions during engine work and the danger of screws, insulation or any foreign object for that matter within the engine. So, it is not only the manufacturers that can be blamed for similar losses.

P.S. Following any bearing failure, the engines are flushed through using flushing oil which is cleaned and the filters constantly changed. The cost is quite high and it may add a week to downtime.

Rgds.
Dave

oldseamerchant
29th November 2012, 15:41
Does the aforesaid not open up debate on whether the ships C/Engineer had the competence/authority to assess whether the main big end shells should be re-installed even though the manufacturers hours say they should be changed. The preliminary work involved in arriving at the position of changing shells hardly justified putting the old ones back.

chadburn
29th November 2012, 15:42
I accept what you say Makko about the old day's but you would not expect such an incident in today's shipbuilding world, this is a major failure in the commissioning proceedure CPP.

nav
29th November 2012, 16:06
Thanks Alfons et al. Fascinating stuff.

Duncan112
29th November 2012, 17:40
Sailed on a Sulzer engined containership that had had all its crossheads fail on trials - the reason being that the crosshead pumps took their suction after the fine LO filters and had no filter on their discharge side - when the IMO type pumps disintegrated there was no protection for the bearings.

makko
29th November 2012, 18:25
Duncan,
What ship/type of engine was that? In the deep, dark depths of my mind, I seem to remember someone mentioning an engine modification which might relate to this damage on trials.
Rgds.
Dave

Duncan112
29th November 2012, 18:45
Dave,

I'll pm you as there was a legal case over it - I assume it's been long sorted but...

nav
30th November 2012, 00:32
Supersized Earth - The Way We Move has ship construction in Korea at 33:15 on including manufacture of engines where the presenter hand polishes and greases bearing surfaces. Hmmmm.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b01p58r8/Supersized_Earth_The_Way_We_Move/

averheijden
3rd December 2012, 16:18
Thanks Alfons et al. Fascinating stuff.

I asked the South Africans involved in the repairs "Who was to blame for the costs "? (ms MAGSENGER2)

The answer:
The owner was Chinese, the engine maker (license build) was Chinese and the shipyard was Chinese. In the end effect the shipyard, the engine maker and the owner is to blame. The shipyard for not following procedures, the engine maker for not be present or insisting to be present and the owner not ordering MAN or the engine maker to be present.

Regards
Alfons
http://www.marinetraffic.com/ais/shipdetails.aspx?mmsi=477950400

averheijden
11th December 2012, 17:48
Broken Crankshafts DOXFORD ENGINES built in Holland

BTW: so far as I know, the forgings and sometimes a complete crankshafts, were supplied by Doxford Sunderland

"Mv Sologne":
Broke her crankshaft in the spring of 1956, near Marseille, France
A new crankshaft from Engeland was shipped to Rotterdam and later by train transported to Marseille renewed under supervision of Wilton-Fijenoord

“Ivinghoe Beacon”,
Her end came in late May 1974 when the main engine crankshaft broke in the Pacific Ocean near Britisch Columbia, Canada.
Repairs were deemed uneconomic and the ship was sold to shipbrokers in Tadotsu, Japan and broken up there in January 1975 by Miyachi
Salvage

DOXFORD SUNDERLAND, CRANKSHAFT SHOP (http://users.telenet.be/doxford-matters/crankshaftbay.html)
DOXFORD ENGINES built in HOLLAND (http://users.telenet.be/doxford-matters/tekst/DOXFORD%20ENGINES%20built%20in%20HOLLAND.pdf)


Regards
Alfons

Ian J. Huckin
13th December 2012, 15:35
The engine most probably has been sat on the new type of composite chock's which may have collapsed?. Was this vessel built at the same Yard as the vessel on it's Maiden Voyage which cracked up after loading in Brazil recently.

Are you refering to "Chockfast" or equivalent?...

chadburn
13th December 2012, 16:15
Are you refering to "Chockfast" or equivalent?...

Yes Ian, although I have never used it as it was used after my time, looking at the photograph's it appear's that the engine was sat on some sort composite chock's. Any thought's on why the Owner should be liable for the damage when the root cause was before H/O? Unless the Standby Engineer's knew about it and agreed to accept this missed element in the CPP.

Brendon Powell
13th December 2012, 17:47
Unfortunately for some fellow members of a MAN 48/60 User Group we set up some time ago it has been quite common over the past 10years.
Out of the 70 engines (all staitonary engines in Power Plants) that make up the group 7 failures have been reported (yes 10% - well done everybody with that one!!)
They have been mainly on the 18 cylinder (Vee) engines but a 12 cylinder (Vee) engine has also suffered a failure.
The total operating hours prior to these failures range from 4000 - 40,000 hours.
The crankshafts have been manufactured in 3 different factories in 3 different countries - Skoda, VSG, ALFING so can't blame it on bad manufacturing practices! Actually we can because investigations showed that every failure was a result of foreign particle inclusion during the initial manufacturing process.

Happy Days!!

chadburn
13th December 2012, 18:17
Thank's for the further info Brendon I am presuming they are folded web's judging by their profile. The problem with the vessel in South Africa as I read it was due to contamination in the Lub Oil tank which had not been de-contaminated and obviously not inspected, signed off in line with with the CPP.

makko
13th December 2012, 18:29
Unfortunately for some fellow members of a MAN 48/60 User Group we set up some time ago it has been quite common over the past 10years.
Actually we can because investigations showed that every failure was a result of foreign particle inclusion during the initial manufacturing process.

Happy Days!!

Brendon,
Our paths have crossed! If they were not confidential, I would say that you had "lifted" my photos! I know the group members and the affected plants..........See you around (Central America).
Rgds.
Dave R.

Satanic Mechanic
13th December 2012, 18:32
Chockfast is fantastic stuff, just blows fitted chocks out of the water in terms of load bearing and ease of fitting, but you do need to make sure it is installed correctly so it is normal to check the temperature mix and to have a end piece sample to assess air inclusion.

There has been an absolute raft of casting problems in the last few years almost entirely in my opinion due to Chinese yards going for quantity over quality and it has to be said outside the big two(and to a certain extent within the big two) quality can be a bit ropey to say the least. Given the choice for the moment I'd get my engines from Korea - no question.

Further to that there has also been a serious amount of casting failures coming out of Europe as well - these have been on a very particular engine - over capacity again and the use of sub standard subbys.

Satanic Mechanic
13th December 2012, 18:34
Unfortunately for some fellow members of a MAN 48/60 User Group we set up some time ago it has been quite common over the past 10years.
Out of the 70 engines (all staitonary engines in Power Plants) that make up the group 7 failures have been reported (yes 10% - well done everybody with that one!!)
They have been mainly on the 18 cylinder (Vee) engines but a 12 cylinder (Vee) engine has also suffered a failure.
The total operating hours prior to these failures range from 4000 - 40,000 hours.
The crankshafts have been manufactured in 3 different factories in 3 different countries - Skoda, VSG, ALFING so can't blame it on bad manufacturing practices! Actually we can because investigations showed that every failure was a result of foreign particle inclusion during the initial manufacturing process.

Happy Days!!


You still in Bermuda then?

averheijden
15th December 2012, 11:36
Also the mv CUXHAVEN broke her Crankshaft
Wilton-Fijenoord Doxford

Regards
Alfons (http://users.telenet.be/doxford-matters/crankshaftbay2.html)