First ship.

John Dryden
21st July 2010, 19:56
One thing I do remember is joining the Olivebank first trip at anchor off Gravesend and ending up in an engineers cabin in my uniform.How I ended up in there God only knows but the cabin was full of happy and pleasantly pi**ed folk all paying off and regaling me with tales of adventures in far off places.I did my best to fend off the endless bottles of beer but failed miserably and continued the session to the end.Fortunately one of the engineers,an Australian named Dave Alce was staying aboard and directed me to my cabin,the other apprentice had nicked the single cabin but there was only two of us and I got the double cabin,it was huge!
Next thing I remember is having a fag with the seacunny stood near the gangway,he was about 4foot 6 with a big smile on his face and an overcoat trailing on the deck.
Next morning the C/O introduced himself and away we went.

Alistair Macnab
22nd July 2010, 17:26
I have already written about my first ship which was building at Harland & Wolff's in Belfast in 1953. The "Fleetbank" seemed to be very large and the cabbie said when dropping me off "Oh that's a Weir ship" It didn't look 'wee' to me as I misunderstood what he was saying.

The night before I had come across on the "Princess Margaret" from Stranraer to Larne and quite misunderstanding my lowly status in the order of things, I had upgraded my travel voucher to First Class. What's more, I put the cost of the upgrade on the train and boat into my joining expenses which were duly paid in full! How audacious!

But soon reality fell down upon me. The Chief Mate was a tyrant and made it his business to belittle and browbeat Apprentices. Lime washing the hold bilges ready for the bitumen maiden cargo was only the precursor of the horrible job of cleaning out the same bilges from the spilled bitumen after the cargo came out in India. My first real sunburn blisters came from sorting and throwing dirty dunnage over the side between Bombay and Madras. I was so wet behind the ears that I thought I could bronzy along with the others, me with red hair and white skin!

We had Captain Palmer originally then Captain Kemp after Palmer had a heart attack in Buenos Aires. I think that in the first six months, we Apprentices had our shore leave stopped six times over some perceived infraction of the Mate's rules. Other Apprentices were Tom Pierce from Troon and Peter Cross from Essex.

Alan Rawlinson
22nd July 2010, 19:29
Joining the Forthbank ( first ship) in Cardiff in 1951, I was gobsmacked by the size of one of the Indian crew who were washing down the decks. He was a giant of a man, quite out of the average run of the mill Indian crew member, and for some strange reason I found him intimidating. My Mother had put me on the train at Paddington, and ( sob, sob) had emptied her purse on the platform, giving me all she had. It went on beer I seem to remember, and with a very guilty feeling....

Joining the Eastbank in Surrey docks a few years later, the cabbie pulled up alongside, and looking up at the sheer side by the gangway, said to me incredulously '' Your'e going away on this for how long, did you say? adding, ' Rather you than me , mate ''.

It seemed a funny reaction, and I thought at the time - What's the matter with him? Oh well, it takes all sorts..

John Campbell
22nd July 2010, 22:30
I joined the Southbank in Royal Albert Docks the week prior Coronation day. I traveled from the far north of Scotland , near Wick and it took me over 24 hours from home to gangway. After looking around this lovely new ship I was corralled by a couple of engineers who aided me in making out my expenses claim as I was directed by the Master Capt. Smith. Of course I claimed for breakfast , lunch and dinner and taxis etc and after submitting my claim there were howls of abuse from the Master who thought I was cheating the system. After he had calmed down and found where I came from he sheepishly said - Bank line should recruit staff from places not so far away.
Any way we sailed on Coronation day - we were supposed to get a holiday and a Sunday at Sea for that day I think but we also had a tyrant of a mate like Alistair,s one Thomas Orford who made us work like slaves also like Alistair we white washed the bilges, steamed out the deep tanks and loaded Bitumen in Trinidad. There the fiver and I landed in hospital with infected arms from being vaccinated for smallpox . We enjoyed a week in the luxurious Shell hospital and it was worth getting a jag of penicillin twice a day. It was hard going but I learned a lot and would do it all again.
AF

jimthehat
22nd July 2010, 22:45
First ship,remember it well,..maplebank white crew ,surrey commercial docks 25/8/52,once on board was told by somebody that my cabin was on the bridge deck and told to report to the c/o.
We were three first trippers and one senior and were hadded over to the bosun and told he would be our boss from then on,sailed about a week later and i was put on the 8-12 watch and found myself 2nd wheel going down the river ,never so scared in my life.

jim

david harrod
28th July 2010, 08:51
I joined the Testbank 22 Feb 1964 in Bunbury. The ship had discharged phosphate from Nauru and was at anchor in the bay. I carted my gear (including useless uniform whites) all the way down that long jetty and lowered it into the lifeboat they sent for me. It wa a Saturday and my dad was with me to sign the indentures with the old man...DJR Davies. Quiet day, reality struck Sunday...down No5 to dig phosphate out of the bilges. We sailed later in the week for Chalna...15 months later, I was back in Bunbury, same trip, same ship only this time I got off!

IBlenkinsopp
28th July 2010, 13:08
Joined the Springbank in Durban 1974, which had I believe a closed shelter deck, not having as good a memory as some, what does that mean again?

Thanks guys

Eddie Bl.

Alistair Macnab
28th July 2010, 15:31
Eddie....
"Springbank"s closed shelterdeck status was a misnomer by the time you joined her and indeed, she was not even built as such! You joined a full scantling tween-decker with a variable tonnage related to the tonnage mark engraved next to the plimsoll line on the ship's side. That's the one with the triangle point down.

David.....
Loved your laconic description of your first voyage on "Testbank", Oz to Oz via Chalna in fifteen months! Says a great deal and is typical of Bank Line service at that time.

All.....
I encourage all of you to record your first trip here. This is really good stuff because we all remember it for good or bad. I encourage engineers and leckies too. This is not just for apprentices/cadets.

Hamish Mackintosh
28th July 2010, 16:00
I have already written about my first ship which was building at Harland & Wolff's in Belfast in 1953. The "Fleetbank" seemed to be very large and the cabbie said when dropping me off "Oh that's a Weir ship" It didn't look 'wee' to me as I misunderstood what he was saying.

The night before I had come across on the "Princess Margaret" from Stranraer to Larne and quite misunderstanding my lowly status in the order of things, I had upgraded my travel voucher to First Class. What's more, I put the cost of the upgrade on the train and boat into my joining expenses which were duly paid in full! How audacious!

But soon reality fell down upon me. The Chief Mate was a tyrant and made it his business to belittle and browbeat Apprentices. Lime washing the hold bilges ready for the bitumen maiden cargo was only the precursor of the horrible job of cleaning out the same bilges from the spilled bitumen after the cargo came out in India. My first real sunburn blisters came from sorting and throwing dirty dunnage over the side between Bombay and Madras. I was so wet behind the ears that I thought I could bronzy along with the others, me with red hair and white skin!

We had Captain Palmer originally then Captain Kemp after Palmer had a heart attack in Buenos Aires. I think that in the first six months, we Apprentices had our shore leave stopped six times over some perceived infraction of the Mate's rules. Other Apprentices were Tom Pierce from Troon and Peter Cross from Essex.

Alistair ,you must have had Tommy on his second trip, I was with him on the Ivybank ,51/53 and I wonder if he ever mentioned to you what became of his "BIG" buddy fellow app and first tripper on the Ivybank "Jock" Wylie, the Bosun would refer to them as Laurel and Hardy when they were together

pete
28th July 2010, 16:08
My first trip was at the tender age of 18 Months with my father on the "Empire Parkestone" but my first working trip was on H.E.Moss's "Luxor" in February 1961. Arrived at the Agents Office dressed in full uniform and was told she was at anchor off Finnart. Car, then small launch to the ship which (to me) was enormous. It was blowing up a bit, so, by the time I had climbed the Gangway I was well and truly soaked.I cannot tell you what the Mate said, I would be banned from SN forever. After 4 Years in Tankers I joined the Laurelbank as 3rd Mate. I was lost. "Go down No4 Hatch and look after the Special Cargo Locker" meant nothing to me at all, but soon adapted to this alien lifestyle...................pete

John Rogers
28th July 2010, 16:25
My first trip on a big ship(previously sailed on two little coasters)was the Moraybank in Jan 1948,I was just one week over the age of sixteen,what a great trip for a kid my age, New Zealand, and then Tonga and Fiji Islands, and it was a short voyage for a bank Boat, seven months.Even now I can still smell the fragrance of the islands,and the Maori Farewell on the pier.

John.

Joe C
28th July 2010, 17:39
My first ship was the Moraybank which I joined in Rotterdam,in November 1954.
We had to meet in Liverpool Street station and the two first trippers must have been fairly easy to spot with our kit bags(yes kit bags)shiny new and packed with all manner of mysterious,never used gear.The boat train and ferry took us to the Hook overnight then we travelled the rest of the way by train.
The Moraybank was discharging copra and we were put straight to work sweeping the box beams as the copra level dropped upsetting many a Bombay Canary!
We were in Rotterdam for my 17th birthday,Christmas and New Year and the Dutch really knew how to throw a party.Having barely sniffed a cork before then I learned the hard way that I could either drink or smoke, but not at the same time without dire consequences, so I never smoked again!
It was a 12 month trip but the experiences you collected on your travels amounted to much more than your "standard"teenage year ashore!

John Rogers
28th July 2010, 18:30
Joe C, would that be the same Moraybank or the new one.


John.

Tony Shaw
28th July 2010, 19:05
I joined my first ship, Strick's "Baluchistan" in S.W.India Docks way back in 1959. I was deck cadet, dressed in full uniform (who the hell advised me to do this I can't quite fathom !) I left the taxi ,walked up the gangway, found my cabin, was introduced to the senior cadet, and within 2 minutes was on the quayside, hauling hoses and taking on fresh water, still in full uniform.Perhaps it was a new slant on finding the "golden rivet" !! I spent three and a half years on the same ship, and made only one voyage on the "Farsistan" before I sat my Second Mates.

Winebuff
29th July 2010, 10:32
First trip Engineering cadet, 1976, m.v.Beaverbank. Joined in Rotterdam so also my first trip out of the country or on a plane. Around European coast and UK before heading off to South America. Only away 3 1/2 months, then 10 days leave before joining Firbank in Sunderland for maiden voyage for 6 1/2 month.
Oh life on the ocean wave..

Peter Smith
74-84

Joe C
29th July 2010, 13:38
Moraybank "Mark One"of 1940s vintage John,none of your newfangled high speed cargo liners!

Joe C
29th July 2010, 14:00
John,not the best of photographs but this is the Moraybank loading phosphate at Ocean Island.

J C

Hamish Mackintosh
29th July 2010, 15:38
That picture must have been taken circa 1950/51?I have pretty much got an exact snap of the Ivybank in the same place,like you we took it going ashore in one of the loading "barges", the only place to get a close up of the whole ship

John Rogers
29th July 2010, 16:31
John,not the best of photographs but this is the Moraybank loading phosphate at Ocean Island.

J C

Joe, It was not fancy like you said, matter of fact its the same Moraybank, ON 169448,Doxford engine. I have a picture of her in my photo gallery.Most likely the apprentices were all gone by the time you joined her,one of the senior apprentice Dusty Miller I met five years later in Brisbane and he was the third mate on a Port Boat. If you look at my photos I have some pictures taken when I sailed on her.

John

John Rogers
29th July 2010, 16:53
Here are a couple of photos of the old ship.

JOHNKITTO
3rd August 2010, 14:25
Joined my first ship, the Pinebank in Gibralter in July 1966. Ian Goodall and I turned up at the hotel at Crystal Palace in full uniform. We flew from Gatwick with crew of the Ernebank. We stayed a night at the Bristol hotel in Gib then joined the ship the following day. Sailed from there to India, Burma, Pakistan and everywhere else in the world.

Johnnietwocoats
3rd August 2010, 16:51
This day 50 years ago I was in Hamburg on the Eastbank...We arrrived there on the 22nd of July 1960 and left on the 8th August 1960...

Seems like a long time in Hamburg. Our mean draught on arrival was 14Ft - 11 Inches..

I joined her on my first trip on the 13th july 1960.....

In full uniform I may add. Why did people let us do that....

Paddy Ramsey and Howard Wright were the other Apprentices....

Lidstone was the Master and Syd Mallory was the mate.

Arthurs was 2nd Mate and W. McLennan (Larne) was the 3rd mate

Chief was Harrison, 2nd was Brown from Lisburn.

3rd was Nesbitt, 4th was MacRaild, 5th was Bell and 6th was Thompson

Lecky was Todd and 2nd Lecky was Winters

Sparks was Hodgson

iain48
3rd August 2010, 19:27
First Bank Line voyage was Elmbank as 1st elect. Reported to Bury St. and flew out from London October 1973 to Philadelphia.
Full crew change (officers)except 2nd Eng and 3rd mate. Good night on the town in Philly on a Friday night staying in Ben Franklin Hotel.
If memory seves me right crew list as follows.
Master.... F. Abell
Mate ...Ian Booker (paid off early personal relieved by ???)
2nd Mate ...Mike Stevens
3rd Mate ... Mike Linley (stayed on from previous trip)
Apprentices...Andy ???(paid off early study ?)
Mike Bibby and Ray ???
R/O.........J Crerand
Ch Eng.....?? Cowie
2nd Eng....Graeme Murray(stayed on from previous trip)
3rd Eng...Dave Matthews
4th Eng....Ken ??? (paid off early 5th moved up)
5th Eng ...Frank Varley (up to 4th)
6th Eng ..Rab Reilly
6th Eng ...Graham Moncur (joined when 4th paid off)
1st Elect Iain McArthur (me)
2nd Elect Keith Yarham
Finished sugar discharge at Philly, light to Houston,grain to Vera Cruz,back to Houston and other Gulf ports loading for Australia. Through Panama Canal for Australia full discharge round Aus coast. Loaded sugar at Mourilyan for Singapore then dry dock at Keppel. Light to Calcutta and loaded there, Chalna, Chittagong, Madras and Colombo for South and West Africa. Paid off Lagos July 1974. Not sure that I liked it so much then but now I only remember good times and good comrades. Would love it all again.
Iain

Waighty
25th August 2010, 22:20
First Bank Line voyage was Elmbank as 1st elect. Reported to Bury St. and flew out from London October 1973 to Philadelphia.
Full crew change (officers)except 2nd Eng and 3rd mate. Good night on the town in Philly on a Friday night staying in Ben Franklin Hotel.
If memory seves me right crew list as follows.
Master.... F. Abell
Mate ...Ian Booker (paid off early personal relieved by ???)
2nd Mate ...Mike Stevens
3rd Mate ... Mike Linley (stayed on from previous trip)
Apprentices...Andy ???(paid off early study ?)
Mike Bibby and Ray ???
R/O.........J Crerand
Ch Eng.....?? Cowie
2nd Eng....Graeme Murray(stayed on from previous trip)
3rd Eng...Dave Matthews
4th Eng....Ken ??? (paid off early 5th moved up)
5th Eng ...Frank Varley (up to 4th)
6th Eng ..Rab Reilly
6th Eng ...Graham Moncur (joined when 4th paid off)
1st Elect Iain McArthur (me)
2nd Elect Keith Yarham
Finished sugar discharge at Philly, light to Houston,grain to Vera Cruz,back to Houston and other Gulf ports loading for Australia. Through Panama Canal for Australia full discharge round Aus coast. Loaded sugar at Mourilyan for Singapore then dry dock at Keppel. Light to Calcutta and loaded there, Chalna, Chittagong, Madras and Colombo for South and West Africa. Paid off Lagos July 1974. Not sure that I liked it so much then but now I only remember good times and good comrades. Would love it all again.
Iain

They (Personnel) tried for years to get Frank Abel and Charlie Cain (C/E) on the same ship!

My first deep sea Bank Boat was Avonbank joining in Millwall Docks in 1970. Walked on board as 3rd Mate but within the hour Clem Mossop promoted me 2nd Mate and got Austin Hall to sign me on as such; talk about fast promotion! The official 2nd Mate was a first tripper ex NZS I think - took one look and according to various folk said "nae bugger tells ye" and walked off. My actual first Bank Boat was Rowanbank for a coastal run; Les Steers was Capt

Scoddie
26th August 2010, 17:25
I joined my first ship the Lindenbank in Hull, May 1966, Capt Mills, other apps were Colin Smith and Peter Coupland. Had a fire in No 4 hatch after leaving Chalna. A good trip and a very happy ship
Scoddie

mackem
28th August 2010, 09:00
Joined the Hazelbank at night in Rotterdam Jan 1978 and due to sleet and snow and woefully dim lights, could not actually see very much. Next morning, what a shock to this land lubbers' system. With all the activity going on, it all seemed so chaotic as stores were being loaded for the engine room, provisions for the galley and no end of people were scurrying around whilst cargo was being loaded over our heads.

A few days later we were on our way and I was seeing the legendary Doxford huffing and puffing as we sailed down just down the road (or may be that should read channel) and into Hamburg for a few days.

Coming from Tyneside I already knew what a river full of ships looked like (I know, I know, its a long time ago) but after seeing Rotterdam and Hamburg, well I now knew what a really busy port looked like.

We then went through Biscay and round into the Med and Marseilles and Genoa. I was quite surprised by how much warmer the days were compared to northern Europe.

And then the bottleneck of Suez. The canal was a fantastic experience and the images, history and different cultural behaviour on display was a lot to take in for this novice seafarer.

This however was only a hint of what was to come.

Most of my time over the next couple of days or so were either on watch down below or getting some sleep. And so nothing beforehand had properly prepared my for the mind blowing heat of heading up the Gulf and into Bushire, Iran. Fully veiled ladies and scorching mid day sun was a shock and a few days later so was the Shat El Arab and Khorramshar.

Just to give you a brief idea of how naive I was back then, when we went up river to Basra, I was quite taken by the wonderful architecture of some of the buildings and took a few snaps of one particulary impressive place.

Before my camera had said 'click' a car had pulled up and 2 big guys 'offered' me a lift to their 'office' to talk about my 'visit' to Basra.

For a while, I had no idea whatsoever why they were so keen on my amateur photo's until it was pointed out to me that anyone (whether foreign or local) who takes photo's of their Naval headquarters is invited back for a chat. Oh, I see.

Lots of phone calls and repeated questions later I was delivered back to the ship, still in one piece and a story to tell which would almost make the weak faint and the strong go weak at the knees.

I would later see those same buildings in Basra and Khorramshar on headline TV news repeated day after day as a backdrop to the carnage going on in the Iran - Iraq war.

The next couple of weeks or so were spent at sea and thankfully I managed to stay out of trouble. The Bay of Bengal, Chalna and Chittagong were welcome periods of peace and tranquility.

Colombo and the regular daily tropical storms in the afternoon were interesting as were one or two 'nice' bars in town.

3 weeks at sea and then 3 weeks in the wonderful port of Durban. Oh, what bliss. I was at long last starting to enjoy my time at sea and ashore !!!

Port Eliazabeth and Cape Town were fabulous.

Another 3 weeks at sea and then freak storms and blizzards as we approached the southern tip of south America.

Through the Straits and up the west coast.

Chile (so many great memories of Chile), Peru, Equador and Columbia before another fabulous journey - the Panama Canal.

Out the top end and up we go to pay off in New Orleans.

But not before we experience a 'hurricane' or 3 in Pat O Brians.

Hazelbank - what a ship and what a great bunch of lads to sail with.

PS. It always makes me chuckle, when I remember the Chief explaining how he knew that this old work horse was ticking over beautifully because of the 'fish n chips' sounds it made as we set sail.

McMorine
31st August 2010, 14:54
Were to begin, I had just finished my apprenticeship with the English Electric Company and was now a draughtsman in the transformer drawing office. My "call-up papers" for National Service were looming on the horizon and I didn't fancy any of that. Some of my mates had joined the Merchant Navy, so I decided I would give it a go.
I trawled all the shipping company offices in Liverpool and having purchased the Journal of Commerce, wrote to nearly every company listed, including Bank Line. All to no avail, nobody had a vacancy for an electrician with no previous sea going experience. My Boss in the design office managed an interview for me with Blue Funnel, only to be told by their superintendent engineer, they needed someone with DC experience.
Arriving home from work one day, there was a telegram waiting for me, from The Bank Line no less. Would I join the Westbank at Bromborough Dock as 2nd Electrician, in two days time. Panic set in, what to do first? I hadn't got a clue. Phoned my Boss, gave my notice in. Had some photos taken, got all the relevant paper work sorted, had a medical, paid five shillings for my discharge book, had all my vaccinations. Signed on at Birkenhead on 30th September 1959. The Captain was Bill Ellerby, can't remember the names of anyone else.
I asked the Chief Engineer if I could have a few hours ashore to go home and say my goodbyes, (only four miles away) to which he replyed, "Ey Laddie, as long as you bring me a bottle of whisky when you return" Which I duly did.
I was put on watch with the 2nd Engineer and soon got into the swing of things, as we sailed to the Continent, the States and on to Australia.
I will always remember when loading sulphur in Coatzacolcos Mexico, all the silver cutlery and cruet sets turning black with the sulphur in the air and the Old Man balling the stewards out to get it polished.Crossing the Pacific, nets were rigged above the bulwark on the port side aft deck and on Saturday afternoon, those that were not working or sleeping, played cricket. The ball was a monkey fist rope knot, soaked in a bucket of water. The Chief Engineer couldn't run because of his age, so whenever he hit the ball, I used to do his runs for him. The fresh water was rationed to be used at the end of each watch only, my cabin wash basin had a cold water tap only. We were allowed two cans of beer each per day, if you wanted it.
I was really looking forward to my first visit to Australia, Sydney being the first port. (All the stories I would have to tell my family and friends when I got back home) A couple of days out from Sydney, I slipped and fell down the companion way from the boat deck to the main deck and landed astride the handrail where it joined the ladder. As I picked myself up, some of the lads were laughing (as they do) until a patch of blood appeared at my crotch. It turned out I was bleeding internally from a ruptured urethra and when we arrived in Sydney on the 16th December, an ambulance wisked me off to hospital.
I was in hospital for six weeks, where they operated on me and stiched me up inside, can you imagine the first time I was able to pee properly. I can't describe the pain. What a way to spend my first Christmas and New Year away from home.
I made many good friends during that time, think they felt sorry for me. When I was fit enough to leave hospital, they put me in the Metropole Hotel and all my new found friends insisted on showing me around Sydney and surrounding area, which was fantastic.
On the 5th February I was to fly out of Sydney, so with a great send off, I flew to Cairns and then an old DC3 flew me to Rabaul to rejoin the Westbank. Rabaul airport consisted of a grass airstrip and a wooden shed for a customs terminal.
The Chief Engineers first words to me, "All these lads have had to work extra hours because of you, so get yourself turned to Laddie"
The voyage home was quite uneventful, engineroom watches and assisting the first electrician with winch maitenance etc. Quite often, fuseboards that were very much overloaded, would burst into flames. Earth faults would frequently occur, due to cockroaches eating away the insulation to light fittings, mostly in the crews accommodation. The winches were Sunderland Forge manufacture, with the contactor gear housed alongside the motor, with a heavy steel lift up lid. The lids, due to rust, frequently leaked and were patched up with putty and canvas amongst other things. Whenever you saw one of the crew with a chipping hammer, you would have to follow him to make sure he wasn't going near the winches.
On arrival in the UK/Continent, the first electrician payed off sick and the Superintendent Engineer, I think his name was Thompson or Smith, asked me if i would stay on around the coast and thats how I got my promotion to the dizzy heights of 1st Electrician. Signed off at Dock Street London 19th April 1960. My first of many "Copra Ships"

Charlie Stitt
16th September 2010, 11:27
My first ship was the 5150 grt'' Myrtlebank'', built on the Clyde by Harland and Wolff in 1925 ,with two 6cyl diesel engines, she was a flying machine, doing all of 9 knots with a following wind.When I joined her in May 1955, she had been up dated, so I,( not like some poor sods on this site) had the pleasure of having running hot and cold water in the bathroom,Aaah, Luxury. Capt L W Thorne was the Master, and the Mate was an old gentleman who had sailed on sailing ships and who treated us Apprentices, well, the way one would expect, and hoped to be treated. From Tilbury Docks, where I joined, we sailed round to Falmouth Drydock then to Trinadad to load drum bitumum for Karachi, then just tramped around for 16 months. That old ship with little in the way of Home Comforts, was a happy ship, I really enjoyed the experience, and paid off a much wiser person.

Charlie Stitt
21st October 2010, 18:52
I wonder why it is, I remember more about my first ship than I do about my last ship with Bank Line. As a first trip Apprentice I remember my very first job on Myrtlebank was bolting down the two deep tank lids down number three hatch, prior to filling them with water ballast, I also remember the faces and names of all the officers. Joined the Forresbank eleven years later, my first job/task after joining ? hav'nt a clue, and although it was a good happy ship where we all got on fine, I only remember a few of the officers faces. I can also remember the accommodation layout of the first ship, but not my last one, WHY ?? Perhaps a first ship is like ones first true love, never to be forgotton. (Flowers)

Andrew Barnes
26th November 2010, 00:01
First Bank Line voyage was Elmbank as 1st elect. Reported to Bury St. and flew out from London October 1973 to Philadelphia.
Full crew change (officers)except 2nd Eng and 3rd mate. Good night on the town in Philly on a Friday night staying in Ben Franklin Hotel.
If memory seves me right crew list as follows.
Master.... F. Abell
Mate ...Ian Booker (paid off early personal relieved by ???)
2nd Mate ...Mike Stevens
3rd Mate ... Mike Linley (stayed on from previous trip)
Apprentices...Andy ???(paid off early study ?)
Mike Bibby and Ray ???
R/O.........J Crerand
Ch Eng.....?? Cowie
2nd Eng....Graeme Murray(stayed on from previous trip)
3rd Eng...Dave Matthews
4th Eng....Ken ??? (paid off early 5th moved up)
5th Eng ...Frank Varley (up to 4th)
6th Eng ..Rab Reilly
6th Eng ...Graham Moncur (joined when 4th paid off)
1st Elect Iain McArthur (me)
2nd Elect Keith Yarham
Finished sugar discharge at Philly, light to Houston,grain to Vera Cruz,back to Houston and other Gulf ports loading for Australia. Through Panama Canal for Australia full discharge round Aus coast. Loaded sugar at Mourilyan for Singapore then dry dock at Keppel. Light to Calcutta and loaded there, Chalna, Chittagong, Madras and Colombo for South and West Africa. Paid off Lagos July 1974. Not sure that I liked it so much then but now I only remember good times and good comrades. Would love it all again.
Iain

Hi Iain
I am the Andy (apprentice) who paid off early to attend college to do part of my ticket. Stayed at sea until 1982 then left to join police. I retire from police in 3 weeks.
regards
Andy

iain48
28th November 2010, 11:50
Hello Andy, Good to see you on here. I will send you a PM.
Iain