USS Dutton

Tmac1720
9th November 2005, 21:21
I recall a US ship calling into Harland and Wolff for some emergency repairs. This would be about July/August 1965. She was the USS Dutton and she was where I had my first taste of southern fried chicken. I'd love to know her fate so would appreciate any information any of you guys may have. I think she was some sort of research vessel as she had lots of radio antenna and radar dishes also many areas of the vessel were "off limits" to us dockyard hands.

ruud
9th November 2005, 21:53
Ahoy,

I think she was a "surveying" ship[AGS],could it be this?
http://img221.imageshack.us/img221/4900/ussdutton7df.th.jpg (http://img221.imageshack.us/my.php?image=ussdutton7df.jpg)

USNS Dutton (T-AGS-22) (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=USNS_Dutton_%28T-AGS-22%29&action=edit)

John Rogers
9th November 2005, 21:56
Dutton was a AGS 22 type ship
Looks like there may have been two, One AGS 22 and another AGS 8 "S' is for survey.
The old Dutton AGS 8

served in the Far East until returning to San Diego 20 January 1946. In the summer of that year she took part in Operation "Crossroads," the atomic weapons tests at Bikini. Between 3 February 1947 and 13 September Dutton conducted surveys of the waters surrounding Truk. She sailed for the east coast 11 July 1948, and after preparation at Norfolk, joined Hydrographic Survey Group I which put out from New York 9 September for the Persian Gulf. Dutton surveyed uncharted or poorly known waters off Kuwait and Bahrein until her return to Norfolk 2 June 1949. She was decommissioned at New York 26 August 1949, and sold 21 February 1950.

John Rogers
9th November 2005, 22:36
oul Hand, looks like there was two Duttons, I think the one you were talking about was the former Tuskegee Victory pictured above.
John

ruud
9th November 2005, 23:07
Ahoy,

Here some other pics:

http://www.clydeshipping.co.uk/viewalbum.asp?folder=USN+Victory+Ships+on+the+Clyd e

Alan Hill
10th November 2005, 12:10
I will let you all with quicker access to old files sort this one out but just for the record, if it helps, the vessel pictured is a USNS (US Naval Ship) versus a USS (United States Ship) which is shown by the colored bands on the stack. This might lean the identification, at least of the picture cited, as the USNS Dutton as submitted by RUUD. USNS ships have basically merchant marine crews under Naval direction and control, maybe a smattering of military sailors on board also for whatever specific project. Just thought maybe my two cents might help. Alan Hill Bridgeport, Pa. USA

Tmac1720
10th November 2005, 15:35
Many, many thanks to Ruud, John and Alan for the information and photograph. You all brought back so many memories especially to see her once again. I've also learnt something, the difference between a USS and a USNS vessel, a bit like our own RN and RFA.

Thank you once again gentlemen, I doff my cap to you in appreciation, however given the camaraderie of this site it's not surprising to receive such help. (Thumb)

Alan Hill
10th November 2005, 16:37
My sincere pleasure. It is hard enough to keep up with or even close to the nautical knowledge contained in the members of this site anyway so when I have something that might be unique (for a brief moment, not long) I have to jump in there! :- ) Alan Hill Bridgeport, Pa. USA

Bob S
10th November 2005, 19:07
I remember seeing her at Southampton many years ago. Got her noted as a transport with pennant number T-AGS22. I'll see if I have a photo from that time.

R736476
11th November 2005, 11:11
In the late 60s / early 70s the Dutton and sister ship Bowditch were quite frequent visitors to the Tyne for repairs at Swan Hunter Drydocks, Wallsend.
Rumoured they had something to do with subsea listening devices in the Iceland Gap.
Regards,
Alex

Alan Hill
11th November 2005, 16:13
Now that she has been tied to Bowditch no discussion that she was MSC. And the word you are hunting for is SOSUS for the underwater stuff. I was stationed in Fleet Sonar School, Key West, Fla in the middle 60s (year, not age!) and the next wing over had a section for that. That was when it was big time hush hush, theoretically you had to whisper the word and the door to their section was built like a bank door. Alan Hill Bridgeport, Pa. USA

rlw7143
15th February 2010, 02:47
In the late 60s / early 70s the Dutton and sister ship Bowditch were quite frequent visitors to the Tyne for repairs at Swan Hunter Drydocks, Wallsend.
Rumoured they had something to do with subsea listening devices in the Iceland Gap.
Regards,
Alex

I served on the Dutton from June 1969 to July 1970. Yes we had listening devices. Spent most of this period in England, Norway, Amsterdam and Denmark.. Dry docked in NJ in Jan/Feb 70.

rlw7143
15th February 2010, 02:55
Ahoy,

I think she was a "surveying" ship[AGS],could it be this?
http://img221.imageshack.us/img221/4900/ussdutton7df.th.jpg (http://img221.imageshack.us/my.php?image=ussdutton7df.jpg)

USNS Dutton (T-AGS-22) (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=USNS_Dutton_%28T-AGS-22%29&action=edit)

Yes, this is correct.. I served on the Dutton from June 1969 to July 1970