RFA Resource

japottinger
9th August 2010, 20:42
Built by Scotts' of Greenock. Any one out there sailed on her, spent a few years in DO on design of her turbines and pipework at AEI and Scotts'.

Kinnie
9th August 2010, 21:06
Yes, some of us were not too impressed with this class, but I wouldn't know about the mechanical bits.

hillshepherd
10th August 2010, 08:40
Delighted to hear of your work on the engineering design of this fine ship. I was appointed for the November 1966 sea trials and joined fully as First Officer the following summer - I think the last three months of fitting out before sailing. If you search the name you will find some of my photos taken on the first voyage to the Cape. I returned as Chief Officer summer 1969 just in time for the P of W visit at the Fleet Review in Torbay, and served a further year. I always hoped to return in command but that did not happen, but I did get two shots at Regent. These two were magnificent, tough ships, built literally like battleships, but they were hard to work and expensive to run, and I think that was in part due to the early design. For these and other reasons the class had their detractors, but perhaps the main problem was the regulatory regime which meant the ships rarely berthed alongside when loaded. None the less you should be proud of your part in their design.
Best wishes RC

Kinnie
10th August 2010, 09:02
Magnificent dinosaurs!

hillshepherd
10th August 2010, 09:40
Well, getting you to use the M word is a start, Kinnie !

dab
10th August 2010, 10:31
Totally agree hillsheperd. I joined for the last 4 months of fitting out at Scotts in Greenock and enjoyed the first year of her service,(loved it). Later joined in Gibraltar in 1970 and spent Christmas that year outside the breakwater at Portland.
Eddie Atkinson put on a great spread I remember. I had the wife and two small children staying on board and he went out of his way to make sure the young ones were well cared for. Happy memories.

Graybeard
5th September 2010, 14:44
I remember joining Regent by helo from Reliant in the Indian Ocean in August 1968 to serve as T/A 4/0 before going for my second mate's ticket. As I went from the flight deck, and walked along the main deck to go to the bridge, I was impressed that the deck did not bend as some did or have a tinny "clink". It was solid. And the ship was moving at nearly 20 knots and there was not a single "wobble" like an "O" boat at 20 knots.
The view from the bridge, forward of the break of the crest of the bow wave, was impressively high - and so little noise.
Constant security watches made life very wearisome for QMs and bridge-watching-keeping officers and the Navs. And those boat rides. Could they cope today, or rather would they? I think they are motivated enough to cope with most things.

wildcat45
26th June 2011, 14:10
It never occured to me that when loaded they could not come alongside. That explains why I used to see them at anchor in the Forth.

I remember them coming into the Tyne for refits at the then Smiths, North Shields.

They - and other RFA's - would arrive rusty and weather beaten. A month or two in the dock and they would emerge as smart, businesslike RFAs.

I take it they were a unique design. I have a pcicture in a book somewhere of a pre-production scale model. Slightly different from the final examples, a bit more streamlined.

That pair were very handsome ships. Everything there for a reason - with just a bit of style to make it look good.

markwarner
27th June 2011, 14:11
Spent a few weeks on her during the Falklands War, very big, poor food.

the brit
27th June 2011, 15:02
who was the chief cook ?????

markwarner
27th June 2011, 20:48
who was the chief cook ?????

Don't know, too busy trying to stay alive. We went from having a ship blown from under us to living on a ship full of ammo right in the middle of the action.

NoR
27th June 2011, 23:40
Spent the worst six months of my time at sea in RFA Regent. On arrival back at Plymouth after a trip to Singapore (amongst other places) I refused to sign the new articles and took myself off to places slower and greener. I did 3 RFAs, Black Ranger, Engadine and Regent didn't like any of them very much but Regent was the worst. The BS was unbelievable and there was a considerable amount of institutionalised bullying by senior officers on some of the juniors whilst the POs were a law unto themselves...I guess that's what happens in the Navy, but it doesn't sit too well with those of us with a background in commercial shipping.

markwarner
28th June 2011, 09:26
Spent the worst six months of my time at sea in RFA Regent. On arrival back at Plymouth after a trip to Singapore (amongst other places) I refused to sign the new articles and took myself off to places slower and greener. I did 3 RFAs, Black Ranger, Engadine and Regent didn't like any of them very much but Regent was the worst. The BS was unbelievable and there was a considerable amount of institutionalised bullying by senior officers on some of the juniors whilst the POs were a law unto themselves...I guess that's what happens in the Navy, but it doesn't sit too well with those of us with a background in commercial shipping.

The RFA is not the Navy.

NoR
28th June 2011, 10:32
The RFA is not the Navy.

I know that, just wonder if they did !

LouisB
30th June 2011, 00:59
Sailed on Resource late sixties/early seventies as elect/off. I agree that that she was very strongly built of fairly heavy guage steel, especially her main deck, which probably had something to do with the amount of oil she consumed at speed.

I remember going on turning trials after a refit and and being alarmed (scared) at the angle she took on full helm at maximum power. I learned later that the ballasting was incorrect when we sailed. Plenty of red faces followed by a change of subject shortly after.

It was a happy ship when I sailed on her and we had a very good time when the vessel was berthed in Bermuda. The Doc' had to stay up most of the night treating crew members who had driven their mopeds off the quay wall into the sea! We also had a small grass monkey (Herby) that somebody had brought on board. He used to sleep above the cable trays near the upper switchboard room. All was well until one evening at dinner alarms started ringing and sirens sounding as Herby, after watching various L/O's, decided to start pressing all the buttons below the Doughty indicators tripping a main alternator in the process. We never saw Herby again. :(

Many happy memories. Plenty of stories that were hilarious at the time. However, as I wish to retain my pension my lips are sealed :)

Pat Kennedy
30th June 2011, 15:45
I was working in Western Shiprepairers in Birkenhead, when Resource came in for a three month refit. During the course of the work, every electric motor on the ship was taken ashore to the ship elec shop where they were stripped down and rewound etc.
About three years later, Resource was back in for another refit, and again every electric motor was taken to the shop for the same process. (There must have been a couple of hundred motors on that ship)
The question is, why?
We did the same with Stromness, twice, and Pearleaf and Plumleaf twice, in a five year period
Why do RFA ships need these massive refits every few years? Ordinary merchant ships get a wash and brush up in drydock once a year, and voyage repairs as and when required.
I'm not complaining, these ships brought some much needed work to the town, and I sometimes feel that the government was using these refits as some form of social policy.
regards,
Pat

LouisB
1st July 2011, 21:45
I was working in Western Shiprepairers in Birkenhead, when Resource came in for a three month refit. During the course of the work, every electric motor on the ship was taken ashore to the ship elec shop where they were stripped down and rewound etc.
About three years later, Resource was back in for another refit, and again every electric motor was taken to the shop for the same process. (There must have been a couple of hundred motors on that ship)
The question is, why?
We did the same with Stromness, twice, and Pearleaf and Plumleaf twice, in a five year period
Why do RFA ships need these massive refits every few years? Ordinary merchant ships get a wash and brush up in drydock once a year, and voyage repairs as and when required.
I'm not complaining, these ships brought some much needed work to the town, and I sometimes feel that the government was using these refits as some form of social policy.
regards,
Pat


I think that with vessels like Resource and Regent there was always the requirement to have everything totally up to scratch. There was, in the design, double/triple and sometimes quadriple redundancy built into her safety , steaming and firefighting systems and they all had to be in proper working order. Because of the job that they had to do and at times their unique role within the fleet train everything had to be as good and reliable as possible.

Regarding the other vessels mentioned there was also a culture of not only having repairs carried out on defective equipment but also renewal or overhauls of anything else that was important to the ability of the ship to perform its role.

It must be remembered that a lot of RFA's whether built to commercial or naval design were by and large worked a lot harder than most merchant vessels,with constant rapid changes of engine speed (no gradually increasing/decreasing main engine rpm when replenishing or on exercise) plus the fact they carried a lot more machinary that was open to the weather and had to work. At the end of the day a lot of people were dependant on an RFA meeting its comittments on time and in whatever weather. These days as the role of the RFA has become ever more tightly intergrated with the RN the need for reliability for new systems, weapons and helicopter refueling etc etc are more than ever required.

LouisB

Bitwobbly
4th July 2011, 14:06
Having served many a year on both Regent and Resource, I found them to be very happy ships, I absolutely loved the old girls.
As an Engineer they were well designed with loads of steam crossovers so any leaks could be repaired. Only ever remember having one major breakdown when LP turbine rotor self destructed after a prolonged period on immediate notice (turning by steam) in Ascension when refuelling. Disconnected LP rotor and cross compounded HP exhaust directly into condenser, got us home nicely. Couldn't go astern though..........

As far as the leccy motors were concerned, most in the engine room were water cooled with sea water, often corroded and leaked, may explain large number of rewinds.

Happy days.

Dave

NoR
4th July 2011, 15:12
When I was there they were called toe Regret and Remorse, not tongue in cheek either. No doubt a great posting for the Naval stores folk, maybe a little different for yer actual seamen.

RFA Colin
5th July 2011, 01:14
Spent the worst six months of my time at sea in RFA Regent. On arrival back at Plymouth after a trip to Singapore (amongst other places) I refused to sign the new articles and took myself off to places slower and greener. I did 3 RFAs, Black Ranger, Engadine and Regent didn't like any of them very much but Regent was the worst. The BS was unbelievable and there was a considerable amount of institutionalised bullying by senior officers on some of the juniors whilst the POs were a law unto themselves...I guess that's what happens in the Navy, but it doesn't sit too well with those of us with a background in commercial shipping.

The RFA is not the Navy.

Really? It certainly isn't far off it mate. That's for better or worse by the way.

STRAWBERRY
5th July 2011, 20:28
I was a Young 16 year old Junior Deck Rating on my first ever trip at sea. Joined Resource on Dec 4th 1985. Not the best ship to start my RFA Career, But I enjoyed the trip emmensely. Even sailing to the Falklands, and returning to Portland for my pay off after 6 Months.... My next ship however...Was the best of the 26 Trips I done in my 14 years with the RFA. That ship was the wonderful "Tidespring" (Sighs Lovingly) My two trips on the Tidespring were wonderful! Happy days! A

NoR
5th July 2011, 20:45
I was a Young 16 year old Junior Deck Rating on my first ever trip at sea. Joined Resource on Dec 4th 1985. Not the best ship to start my RFA Career, But I enjoyed the trip emmensely. Even sailing to the Falklands, and returning to Portland for my pay off after 6 Months.... My next ship however...Was the best of the 26 Trips I done in my 14 years with the RFA. That ship was the wonderful "Tidespring" (Sighs Lovingly) My two trips on the Tidespring were wonderful! Happy days! A

Actually (just ex getting 1st Mates) I had been destined for a Tide boat then swapped to Regent at the last moment. Met the guy I'd been swapped with at Portland during work up at the beginning of my time on the ship. He had already done a trip on Regent and had no intention of repeating the experience, I know why.

LouisB
5th July 2011, 21:41
Really? It certainly isn't far off it mate. That's for better or worse by the way.

Militarily the world has changed since my eleven years with the RFA. The Falklands war was, in my opinion, the time that the RFA's role became more regularised/polarised with the RN. With an ever decreasing RN it had to be. RFA's became 'force multipliers' to fill in the gaps. Senior officers were/are sent on warfare courses, Gambo and Phalanx defensive weapons are/being fitted and crew members are trained in ship defensive techniques. (K)

There was (and deceasingly) still is the sniping of RFA/Merchant service. To contain the legality of RFA operations the various applicable parts of the Merchant Shipping Act(s) were altered (quite a bit) to allow the RFA to function within the law. I believe that something similar regarding 'RFA vessels active on Government service' was enacted by Orders in Council and quoted in BR 875 - that was the gist anyway, it's all a long time ago.

The fact that when in 'harms way', RFA ships companies sail under Reserve status rather removes/diminishes the Merchant Navy argument. I have always regarded the RFA as a separate 'Service'.

After all a police officer is a member of the Police Service and is a civilian whose powers are given to him by the Home Office. An RFA is manned by Civil Servants with different maritime regulations thus allowing them to take certain actions not normally allowed. It has to be this way or it wouldn't work.

My ten cents worth.

LouisB. (Jester)

Kenny MacRitchie
5th November 2011, 12:59
Hi! i enjoyed my time with RFA from Aug 88 to Oct 90 though in the begining it was different to what i was used to. The ships i sailed on were Fort Austin, Resource (twice) Fort Grange, Oakleaf & Olmeda. Enjoyable but different
Kenny

boulton
6th November 2011, 16:56
“Resource was one of several RFA replenishment ships certified to store and supply the fleet with nuclear weapons. After the end of the Falklands conflict, WE.177A live nuclear weapons from HMS*Hermes, HMS*Invincible, HMS*Broadsword and HMS*Brilliant were transferred to RFA Resource and Fort Austin for transport back to the UK.[1] Inert practice weapons and surveillance weapons (without fissionable material) were also transported.[2]”

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RFA_Resource_%28A480%29
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RFA_Regent


Whilst you fellas know what you are talking about, I’ve included a photo for those amongst us who need reminding . . .

Kenny MacRitchie
9th November 2011, 20:48
Built by Scotts' of Greenock. Any one out there sailed on her, spent a few years in DO on design of her turbines and pipework at AEI and Scotts'.
[QUOTE=Kenny:I sailed on the Resource 27/08/88 joining in Glen Douglas and left her 6/3/89 in drydock North Shields. Enjoyed my time on her but took a while to get used to her derricks as the last time i worked them was in the 60s. Dont know what happened to her in the end was she sold to the Indians is she still on the go or has she been scrapped i would like to find out what happened to her as i like to find out what the ships i served on how they finished up

Purser52
12th November 2011, 17:35
Renamed Resourceful for the delivery run to Alang, she sailed from Devonport to India under her own steam and arrived at the breakers in late August 1997.

G0SLP
12th November 2011, 18:06
Renamed Resourceful for the delivery run to Alang, she sailed from Devonport to India under her own steam and arrived at the breakers in late August 1997.

I remember seeing her de storing in the Forth not long before that, at Crombie Pier, iirc

She was taken out to India by a delivery crew, not RFA, I think? I heard some stories in that regard

japottinger
8th January 2012, 23:11
Having served many a year on both Regent and Resource, I found them to be very happy ships, I absolutely loved the old girls.
As an Engineer they were well designed with loads of steam crossovers so any leaks could be repaired. Only ever remember having one major breakdown when LP turbine rotor self destructed after a prolonged period on immediate notice (turning by steam) in Ascension when refuelling. Disconnected LP rotor and cross compounded HP exhaust directly into condenser, got us home nicely. Couldn't go astern though..........

As far as the leccy motors were concerned, most in the engine room were water cooled with sea water, often corroded and leaked, may explain large number of rewinds.

Happy days.

Dave

Hello Dave, I hope the LP cyl. cover contained the rotor when it blew up as I did the drawings for it!
Jim

dab
9th January 2012, 16:17
I served as a "Leckie" twice on Resource including her first year of service. As a new ship we did not have any corrosive problems with the E/R water cooled motors, but once we were on a buoy in the river Tagus and after heavy rain the intakes for the cooling water blocked up with debris washed downstream. I remember engineers in the bilges opening up flanges on the cooling pipes and removing all manner of foliage, timber etc.

Dave Burns.

Norm
14th January 2012, 01:58
I saw a documentary on TV a few years ago about either Regent or Resource going to the breakers in India. It was taken out by a RFA crew.(I'm not sure about that) The captain ordered full speed ahead and ran it on to the beach. The crew then climbed down a rope ladder and left. The captain said it was the best fun he'd had in his seagoing career.. The breakers started work with the gas axes immediately.

Brylcreamgirl97
17th March 2012, 21:50
Hi I don't know if any of you guys can help me, but I'm trying to find an old pen friend who as far as I'm aware is still serving with the RFA. At the time when I knew him in 1996/97, he was serving on the RFA Resource in the Balkans (Croatia I believe the ship was based in for most of the tour away)then went on to serve on the RFA Fort Victoria and the RFA Fort George. His name is Patrick Hughes and is from Dumbartonshire he should be in his early/mid forties now. He was an STO(N). Unfortunately we lost contact after I got married to my now ex husband and it would be nice to hear if he's okay and how his life has turned out so far. Can anyone help? If you can please message me on here. Many Thanks Antoinette Cooper (nee Benison)

Bitwobbly
19th March 2012, 13:26
Hi Jim,

Yup! you did a good job there,
The LP cover contained all the debris although we had some fun removing what was left of the blades. They were like marbles in the bottom of the casing where they'd come loose and run around the stages. Didn't 'arf vibrate a lot.

It's a testament to good robust design that we still managed to steam home after such a catastrophic failure,

happy days.

STRAWBERRY
14th April 2012, 11:35
I saw a documentary on TV a few years ago about either Regent or Resource going to the breakers in India. It was taken out by a RFA crew.(I'm not sure about that) The captain ordered full speed ahead and ran it on to the beach. The crew then climbed down a rope ladder and left. The captain said it was the best fun he'd had in his seagoing career.. The breakers started work with the gas axes immediately.

I can confirm that Resource was not sailed to India with RFA Crew. I work with an Engineer who took her down with a commercial crew. Andy(*))

Kenny MacRitchie
14th April 2012, 13:49
Hi everyone thanks for that information about Resource, i knew she went to the breakers in India but that was all i had on her about final voyage Kenny MacRitchie

micky stevenson
18th August 2013, 12:20
When I was there they were called toe Regret and Remorse, not tongue in cheek either. No doubt a great posting for the Naval stores folk, maybe a little different for yer actual seamen.
Aaaaarrrrrgggghhhhh. You ok mmmmmmate. Are you sure something more sinister didn't happen to you ?
After 30 odd years you seem very bitter over your RFA experiences. I suspect you may have suffered some kind of " physical abuse " that you've kept hidden all these years. Although I thought that you "actual " seaman loved that kind of thing.
Or if it was just a bit of bs that you couldn't handle then I do apologise

Nick R
5th November 2013, 13:22
The Resource was my very first ship, joined her in Berkenhead dry dock on June 8th. 1977 as a Catering boy, fresh out of Gravesend, got promoted to Assistant Steward in the December, stopped with her for the run to America in 1978 finally paid off ( before I was thrown off !) in August '78.
I believe the Captains name was Averill (?) followed by Harlcombe.