Salvesen whaling

stby
29th August 2010, 13:50
Salvesen was a major player in the whaling and am intresert in old photos from the ships and the people on board.

Andrew Craig-Bennett
8th September 2010, 12:38
My old mentor, Captain James Lough of the China Navigation Co Ltd, began his career at sea with Salvesens. Jimmy was descended from a long line of Eyemouth fishermen but his father advised him to go deep sea as there was no future in fishing, so he applied to Ben Line but was told he had to provide his own sextant, which funds did not run to, so he joined Salvesens, initially on their coasters, later on the factory "Southern Harvester" as 2/O before transferring to CNCo, where in due course he retired as Fleet Manager.

Jimmy had a slightly jaundiced view of Norwegians because in Salvesens only Norwegians were allowed to drive the catchers, and he wanted to. His seamanship was certainly quite outstanding, as he later proved.

david freeman
16th September 2010, 19:57
there were 2 Whalers belonging to Salvesens in 1962/3. One was the Southern Harvester the other Southern? I remember seeing the Southern Harvester In Brigham anf Cowans dd South Shields some time 62/63. The Shields gazzette may be a good place to seek photos and reminiences

Pat Thompson
16th September 2010, 20:05
Greetings,

Southern Harvester, Venture, Opal, Reaper but not too sure of the dates

Binnacle
16th September 2010, 20:55
[QUOTE=Andrew Craig-Bennett;453565]My old mentor, Captain James Lough of the China Navigation Co Ltd, began his career at sea with Salvesens.

James Lough joined Salvesen's Culter as cadet about 51/52 tramping around the world. The master "Paddy" Hunter was one of the old school, He insisted that the course blackboard in the wheelhouse be altered each time course was altered. Being a smarty pants third mate I thought that this was unnecessary during the hours of darkness as the helmsman couldn't see it. I was out on the bridge wing one night when old Paddy appeared and asked me what course we were steering. On being informed of the course he reckoned the helmsman, cadet Lough, was not steering this course. I immediately went into the wheelhouse and inquired from Cadet Lough what course he was steering, he replied giving the course steered prior to last alteration. I shone the torch on the steering board which fortunately showed the new course. On informing the cadet that he was steering the prior to alteration course he immediatel replied that there had been no course changes since he came to the wheel. Paddy knew that apart from the log book entry I would hardly alter the wheelhouse board without issueing the necessary instruction to the helmsman, and bawled out the cadet. I realised then that I could learn a lot from this Old Man. This is not a criticism of Lough who was a good and willing cadet, just an incident in the learning process for Lough and myself. I was glad to see from your post that he did well.
Happy times.

chadburn
16th September 2010, 21:36
Andrew, the Norwegian Skippers/Master's also fired the gun as I understand it, giving hand signals to the Driver who took over.

Polson
7th October 2010, 15:05
Salvesen was a major player in the whaling and am intresert in old photos from the ships and the people on board.

Book - Salvesen Of Leith by Wray Vamplew, is an excellent book.... Phil Polson (R549167)

TonyAllen
7th October 2010, 17:31
As an aside, my dad took me and my twin bro to see the Southern havester and the kister dan plus some catchers in gladstone dock Liverpool in the early 50s thru the gates right up alongside and the smell would knock you over, the the slop chesters alongside the gates did a roaring trade with with the crews
I always thought they were hero's becouse of MOBY DICK the book Tony

Blackal
8th October 2010, 19:16
Greetings,

Southern Harvester, Venture, Opal, Reaper but not too sure of the dates

It was 'Southern Venturer', Pat.

There are several photos from my father's time with Salvesens in the early '50s in my photo gallery.


Al :)

Scabby Rat
15th April 2012, 14:08
As an aside, my dad took me and my twin bro to see the Southern havester and the kister dan plus some catchers in gladstone dock Liverpool in the early 50s thru the gates right up alongside and the smell would knock you over, the the slop chesters alongside the gates did a roaring trade with with the crews
I always thought they were hero's becouse of MOBY DICK the book Tony

Yes I recall her at that time in Gladstone, My old fellers cousin was in one of her sister ships, Southern Princess, torpedoed in 1942, he survived. And your right about the stink, my auntie Rose could smell it in her house a good half mile away, still at least ships looked like ships in those days, not there powered mess tins you see today.

wully farquhar
22nd April 2012, 16:24
Salvesen was a major player in the whaling and am intresert in old photos from the ships and the people on board.

There is a book by Tom Gordon "Whalers thoughts Remembered" came out a few years ago,well worth a read,all about the whaling expeditions down at South Georgia with Salvesen.

What the Fug
22nd April 2012, 16:36
Some good pictures in the recent book about Alan Bristow, he started off flying helicopters to spot whales