Bankline regrets...

Alan Rawlinson
30th August 2010, 20:56
Sorry I didn't eat all the curry on offer - on the other hand, I might not be here now if I had!

Donald McGhee
30th August 2010, 23:09
I can honestly say Alan that I took all curries on offer and would love to be able to do so again!

However, nostalgia such as this is rapidly suppressed by the fact that it is and will remain a culinary memory, where I enjoyed them all.
I never got sick as a result and today shudder when offered the second rate rubbish our Indian immigrant restaurateurs serve up as authentic curry!

Give me a good old Bank Line curry anyday, any where that served chips for breakfast and curry at least once a day was heaven to me then and would be toady if the food & drink police ever relaxed it's vigilance.

Happy days mate, I probably ate your share!

(Thumb)

Duncan112
30th August 2010, 23:54
My only regret is not being 10 years older then I could have experienced the tail end of the glory days rather than the tale end of the company.

Regret leaving the lifestyle but it was a career decision - in respect the correct one.

Would I go back to what it was? no doubts on that one, bags packed tomorrow

Alistair Macnab
31st August 2010, 06:44
One of the first things I did when I married my Brooklyn-Irish wife was to get her aboard a couple of Bank Boats to check out the lunch-time curries so that she could duplicate them for ourselves. She eventually became a very accomplished curry maker haunting all the Asian markets in Atlantic Avenue Brooklyn for the proper and authentic ingredients. When we came to Houston, she quickly discovered the "Indian " section of this international city and would arrive triumphantly home with a rare special curry ingredient that she had learned from Mahadur Jaffrey's cook books. As a result of all this effort, we now have three adult children who are avid curry hounds in Los Angeles and Washington DC! Never did grow out of the taste myself and my cast-iron stomach seems none the worse for this indulgence even after nearly sixty years of curry and rice!

Ian Harrod
31st August 2010, 08:36
Let's see if anyone can come up with a definative list of the common ones found on a Bank line menu.ie:

Calcutta - mutton and cabbage. (I'm guessing there.)
Malay - mutton, coconut and fruit.
Boiled egg.
Tinned salmon
Madras
Cochin
Chicken (Sundays)
Bombay
etc, etc.

jimthehat
31st August 2010, 09:35
Let's see if anyone can come up with a definative list of the common ones found on a Bank line menu.ie:

Calcutta - mutton and cabbage. (I'm guessing there.)
Malay - mutton, coconut and fruit.
Boiled egg.
Tinned salmon
Madras
Cochin
Chicken (Sundays)
Bombay
etc, etc.

Always remember a fish curry was always very popular and a veg one.
Still maintain my love of currys,and dont forget the chinese crews ,always lots of imaginative oriental dishes.

jim

Strath101
31st August 2010, 09:52
I liked the curry and here are more of them taken from1970’s Bankline menus

Poona
Ceylon
Hindustan
Kashmir
Omelette (that’s what it says)

Just noticed ‘Mince Scallops’ for breakfast, and you could have ‘snow potatoes’ with that.

pete
31st August 2010, 10:01
I liked the curry and here are more of them taken from1970’s Bankline menus

Poona
Ceylon
Hindustan
Kashmir
Omelette (that’s what it says)

Just noticed ‘Mince Scallops’ for breakfast, and you could have ‘snow potatoes’ with that.

Have made Omelette Curry myself very sucessfully (even if I do say so Myself) It really does bring the memories flooding back......................pete

Alan Rawlinson
31st August 2010, 10:11
Always remember a fish curry was always very popular and a veg one.
Still maintain my love of currys,and dont forget the chinese crews ,always lots of imaginative oriental dishes.

jim

Hi Jim,

You triggered a memory mentioning imaginative chinese food! I had a love of Dim Sum ( little sealed pastry bites) when living in HK until picking up the paper one day and reading about missing cats and dogs that had been used and the owner prosecuted.

Reverting back to curry names, anyone remember the name of the picturesque one with shimmering rainbow hues - usually with eggs floating in it? Was it just egg curry or something more exotic? It had vivid hues of yellow and purple and all shades inbetween.

P.S. I loved that minced scallop and snow potatoes for breakfast - would set you up for a mornings work.

david harrod
31st August 2010, 11:02
I liked the curry and here are more of them taken from1970’s Bankline menus

Poona
Ceylon
Hindustan
Kashmir
Omelette (that’s what it says)

Just noticed ‘Mince Scallops’ for breakfast, and you could have ‘snow potatoes’ with that.

You had menus?

Kofta curry was always a bit suss, but on one ship I sailed on, the cook did a magnificent cabbage curry; I can still taste it...

Who remembers Kromeskies?

McMorine
31st August 2010, 11:09
My favourite curry was Jalfrezi, always tried to get second helpings. Also never missed my morning Chapati from the crews Bhandari when doing my pre- breakfast check of all the electrical equipment.

My only regret, is not keeping a diary of all the exotic ports visited, all the crews sailed with and all the great times enjoyed during twenty years with the Bank Line.

Strath101
31st August 2010, 11:14
Bankline regrets –

Should have taken more care in choice of camera and film, the camera I had worked fine but there was room for a massive improvement and used whatever film was available, black and white, colour and big mistake was film for slides as all the slides have disappeared over the years. The projector was as cheap as the camera and was not replaced so the slides became useless and were thrown out during a house move.
I kept some of the menus, telegrams Bankline sent etc but threw out the slides, that is definitely one big regret as they can be brought back to life now with the aid of a scanner, which I have.

rcraig
31st August 2010, 12:15
Alas, three years + of Bankline curries finished me for years. It was not the taste of the curry itself, it was the way it was so often used to disguise the gristle and fat in the meat of the curry, unsuccessfully. My recollection is of good meals for the first couple of days out of Calcutta as the Butler tried to impress, followed by a descent into indifference before perking up on arrival at B.A where the Old Man had so many German friends, and then perking up again just before returning to Calcutta (on the gunny run to S. America)

The result was that I went off curries for years before coming back to them and have been making them for many years, but to this day, a meat (other than chicken) curry is never my choice in a restaurant and rarely made at home, except an occasional lamb curry.

Waighty
31st August 2010, 13:12
You had menus?

Kofta curry was always a bit suss, but on one ship I sailed on, the cook did a magnificent cabbage curry; I can still taste it...

Who remembers Kromeskies?

Kromeskie a la Russe being the correct name but yes I loved them. You can find a basic recipe for them on the web taken from the MN cooks course book published many years ago.

What about Boulli Hash? Anyone remember that yellowish stew?

Memorable quote by one steward on Moraybank circa late 70s when asked what the curry was that day: "same curry different name"! If it had pineapple in it it became Singapore curry; dessicated coconut it became Ceylon curry. Great currys all in all although crew curry by the bhandary was best. Fresh parahta on the brdige at 0600 was always a treat.

Alistair Macnab
31st August 2010, 15:57
What about the greatest curry of them all? Remember the magnificent giant prawns we used to get at Chalna either from the Agent or the Stevedore and sometimes direct from the river fishermen? Made the best curries I have ever tasted! The particular prawns' diet of you know what in the Pussur River must have given then that special taste!

Joe C
31st August 2010, 18:18
I spent four weeks in Colombo (Jan 1958) transferring from the Fleetbank to the Ivybank on my way home and this became my" ultimate curry experience "
The hotel was not even half a star rated and if I had'nt kicked up a fuss I would probably have died from blood loss from all the beasties that feasted on me every night. Even the chairs were infested!
The food was inedible until I tried the curry and I ate nothing else for four weeks,it was as good as the English style food was bad,and the condiments served in a round segmented plate were amazing.
The Indian food served in the U K doesnt appeal( Except my wifes curries of course,she might read this)But when working in the East End in the seventies we found a Bangladeshi place where they cooked for their people and it was real!I was back on the Irisbank!

Charlie Stitt
31st August 2010, 19:49
Alistair, if I remember right, in Chalna, we got those big King Prawns in exchange for old runner wires. Yes, we had to haggle a lot, but were always convinced we come out on top. As you say, they were yummy prawns.(Eat) Regrets, let me see, yes one would have to be, drinking too much of that local beer etc in Calcutta. Cor what a hangover, spent most of the next morning down a hold sitting on a gunny bale with my head in my hands. ( Hoping the Mate would'nt find me ) (Cloud)

iain48
31st August 2010, 21:15
[QUOTE=
Kofta curry was always a bit suss, QUOTE]
I always enjoyed the kofta (meat ball ) curry the meat probably was suss, but the flavour was all there, served with alloo paratha if I remember right. Tried it at home but have not quite got it right.

jimthehat
31st August 2010, 21:20
What about the greatest curry of them all? Remember the magnificent giant prawns we used to get at Chalna either from the Agent or the Stevedore and sometimes direct from the river fishermen? Made the best curries I have ever tasted! The particular prawns' diet of you know what in the Pussur River must have given then that special taste!

Alistair,
you will probably have the answer to this,slightly off thread, "when did Bank line finally get rid of their Chinese crews??

jim

Alistair Macnab
1st September 2010, 00:42
Bank Line always had one or two Chinese crewed ships going back to the "Tinhow" on the Oriental African run. I sailed on two Chinese crewed ships, the "Ettrickbank" and the "Carronbank" also on the O/A Line and both changed over in Hong Kong from Indian crews whilst I was on both of them. The "Ettrickbank" had been on the run for years yet only became Chinese crew in 1956. As for the "Carronbank" she became a captive Oriental-Africa ship in 1961 and the Indian crew was changed to Hong Kong Chinese towards the end of that year.
John Penn told me that our Bank Line crewing master was Chung Wah, the same fellow that was used in Calcutta for the Chinese carpenters. There seemed to be a connection going back over many years.
I don't think there was ever more than a handfull of Chinese crewed ships and I have no idea when this ceased but possibly when the Bank Line (China) Ltd. was closed down and Penn moved to Sydney which I think was in 1976 or thereabouts.

Ian Harrod
1st September 2010, 03:39
What about the greatest curry of them all? Remember the magnificent giant prawns we used to get at Chalna either from the Agent or the Stevedore and sometimes direct from the river fishermen? Made the best curries I have ever tasted! The particular prawns' diet of you know what in the Pussur River must have given then that special taste!

I remember the Chalna prawns well. Despite the prawns probable diet, I don't recall getting crook. I think most of us had cast iron stomachs!

Donald McGhee
1st September 2010, 04:51
Most of us old timers (those over 60 that is) still have good intestinal workings, although the rest is starting to get a bit creaky!!
I remember the prawns too, what a treat!
The other curries were Simla (very simla to the one we had yesterday), Korma curry and the peppery, spicy, tubular thingies down aft cooked by the crew bhandarry were really something!

being a pig I would have a few of them before turning up for the omellette and chips breakfast. No harm came of this indulgence, as we worked hard and sweated it out. Not so now, it would probably kill me!

Alan Rawlinson
1st September 2010, 08:18
Most of us old timers (those over 60 that is) still have good intestinal workings, although the rest is starting to get a bit creaky!!
I remember the prawns too, what a treat!
The other curries were Simla (very simla to the one we had yesterday), Korma curry and the peppery, spicy, tubular thingies down aft cooked by the crew bhandarry were really something!

being a pig I would have a few of them before turning up for the omellette and chips breakfast. No harm came of this indulgence, as we worked hard and sweated it out. Not so now, it would probably kill me!

Hi Donald,

We did eat well, and we did work it all off - as Apps anyway! Can recall going home on leave with my rib cage showing, which was no big deal, I thought. However, Mother immediately started cooking steak puddings to fatten me up a bit. Could'nt wait to get back to the ships, but at that time it never occurred to me to ask the company if I could cut my long leave short.

jimthehat
1st September 2010, 09:37
Hi Donald,

We did eat well, and we did work it all off - as Apps anyway! Can recall going home on leave with my rib cage showing, which was no big deal, I thought. However, Mother immediately started cooking steak puddings to fatten me up a bit. Could'nt wait to get back to the ships, but at that time it never occurred to me to ask the company if I could cut my long leave short.

Alan,"cut long leave short"?
First and second trips leave was 20 and 22 days only long leave was ticket leave.

jim

david harrod
1st September 2010, 10:29
What about the greatest curry of them all? Remember the magnificent giant prawns we used to get at Chalna either from the Agent or the Stevedore and sometimes direct from the river fishermen? Made the best curries I have ever tasted! The particular prawns' diet of you know what in the Pussur River must have given then that special taste!

Macabre, I know but Chalna prawns were always better after a cyclone...and you got a hell of a lot of them for an old runner wire...I also made my first acquaintance with that grand old culinary delight the chip buttie in Bank line; usually whne, as an apprentice, we were passing the engineer's duty mess...'nuff said!

Alan Rawlinson
1st September 2010, 16:04
Alan,"cut long leave short"?
First and second trips leave was 20 and 22 days only long leave was ticket leave.

jim

Jim, You set me thinking, so looked in the old discharge book...

The really long stays at home were for tickets in 55,57, and 60, but I found

15 jan 53 to 21 april 53 - 3 months 1 week! ( far too long)
5 dec 53 to 21 jan 54 - 6 weeks
21 aug 60 to 30 nov 60 - 3 months 1 week!

In the early years the Malaya shindig was on, and National Service meant that friends at home were called up and doing their time, but guess I must have been a bit of a sad case, waiting to go back to sea!!

In the spirit of the thread then, my regret was that leave periods were too long.

Charlie Stitt
1st September 2010, 19:14
Do you remember, after being away for quite a long time, the first couple of days you come Home, you meet someone, OH you are Home, When do you GO AWAY AGAIN?? Yes nice to see you too.

Charlie Stitt
1st September 2010, 22:44
One of the first things I did when I married my Brooklyn-Irish wife was to get her aboard a couple of Bank Boats to check out the lunch-time curries so that she could duplicate them for ourselves. She eventually became a very accomplished curry maker haunting all the Asian markets in Atlantic Avenue Brooklyn for the proper and authentic ingredients. When we came to Houston, she quickly discovered the "Indian " section of this international city and would arrive triumphantly home with a rare special curry ingredient that she had learned from Mahadur Jaffrey's cook books. As a result of all this effort, we now have three adult children who are avid curry hounds in Los Angeles and Washington DC! Never did grow out of the taste myself and my cast-iron stomach seems none the worse for this indulgence even after nearly sixty years of curry and rice!

NO Alistair, I am not going to let you get away with Brooklyn-Irish Wife, you mean, IRISH - BROOKLYN WIFE, yes ?

Charlie Stitt
1st September 2010, 22:51
What about Dhall Curry , it was different. My only regret was not taking three eggs instead of two from the curry bowl, like some of those greedy shipmates of mine did.(Jester)

John Dryden
1st September 2010, 23:18
I loved the Dhall curry even if the eggs had all been eaten.There was always the round dish with about 8 segments containing raw onion,dried onion,chopped tomatoes,sultanas and coconut to pile on top and spicy pickles in brylcream jars from Calcutta.
I never ate any of the Chalna prawns but caught loads just by putting a bit of bait in a bucket,lowering it to the bottom on a line,waiting a few minutes and heaving it up.At that time after a bad flood and the war there were quite a few bodies floating past,very sad to see.

Macphail
1st September 2010, 23:37
Bank Line Sustenance.

Pork was a common main course
Not very palatable.
The steam puddings where always very good, and would set you up for the next 24 hours.
Black Cap pudding, Syrup Sponge and Bake well Tart, and the rest.

John.

Johnnietwocoats
2nd September 2010, 18:42
Do you remember, after being away for quite a long time, the first couple of days you come Home, you meet someone, OH you are Home, When do you GO AWAY AGAIN?? Yes nice to see you too.

I think that was an Irish trait Charlie. Happened to me all the time....

I'm glad to see someone else was subjected to that.

Johnny

Johnnietwocoats
2nd September 2010, 18:45
What about Dhall Curry , it was different. My only regret was not taking three eggs instead of two from the curry bowl, like some of those greedy shipmates of mine did.(Jester)

I still make Dhall Curry to this day.....

I always have a stock of Pappadams in the cupboard as well

My 15 year old Grand Daughter loves them. Curry as well....

Johnnietwocoats
2nd September 2010, 18:46
Always loved getting the Heel of the fresh bread from the Galley in the morning....Sometimes two...Yum Yum

Alistair Macnab
2nd September 2010, 21:02
Sailed with a few; one who was more the Chief Engineer than her husband who nominally held the rank and another who was the nicest memsahib to the Apprentices and all of the officers. These were the older generation but some of the newer wives came from mission dances, hospital nurses' homes or waterfront bars and didn't quite have the same style as the traditional 'wives aboard' who had lived long enough to acquire a certain 'presence'.

And we sailors found our future spouses all over the world. I myself 'married one of the natives' in that I found her at BOAC and she was from Brooklyn, NY. I note that one of our brethern has commented on my description of her as being Brooklyn-Irish. He prefers the description: Irish-Brooklyn which may seem the right way round from an Irish point-of-view. But when you have an airline background ('We take good care of you!') and come from Brooklyn, you get to call yourself anything you want!

Mary's antecedents came to New York from Northern Ireland in the 1880s and have not strayed from Brooklyn ever since. They are married into the "Murphia" - Gannons, Maguires. Murphys, Coreys and Careys- from both sides of the Irish Border and when they get together, they might as well have never left Ireland!

Can you imagine me being completely overwhelmed by all this Irish-ness? At least aboard ship we could always point to the port-of-registry on the stern (either Belfast or Glasgow) and feel superior if the city was "ours". But latterly, when they had London on the stern or even Douglas IOM, then the ship was foreign-flagged and populated by Home County Limeys and their wives. Should have realized that the rot had settled in!

Alan Rawlinson
2nd September 2010, 21:34
Sailed with a few; one who was more the Chief Engineer than her husband who nominally held the rank and another who was the nicest memsahib to the Apprentices and all of the officers. These were the older generation but some of the newer wives came from mission dances, hospital nurses' homes or waterfront bars and didn't quite have the same style as the traditional 'wives aboard' who had lived long enough to acquire a certain 'presence'.

And we sailors found our future spouses all over the world. I myself 'married one of the natives' in that I found her at BOAC and she was from Brooklyn, NY. I note that one of our brethern has commented on my description of her as being Brooklyn-Irish. He prefers the description: Irish-Brooklyn which may seem the right way round from an Irish point-of-view. But when you have an airline background ('We take good care of you!') and come from Brooklyn, you get to call yourself anything you want!

Mary's antecedents came to New York from Northern Ireland in the 1880s and have not strayed from Brooklyn ever since. They are married into the "Murphia" - Gannons, Maguires. Murphys, Coreys and Careys- from both sides of the Irish Border and when they get together, they might as well have never left Ireland!

Can you imagine me being completely overwhelmed by all this Irish-ness? At least aboard ship we could always point to the port-of-registry on the stern (either Belfast or Glasgow) and feel superior if the city was "ours". But latterly, when they had London on the stern or even Douglas IOM, then the ship was foreign-flagged and populated by Home County Limeys and their wives. Should have realized that the rot had settled in!

Alistair,

Met mine afloat, but not in the Bankline. Shortly afterwards, I was an officer on a cruise ship around the Scottish Lochs and islands, and she first heard my dulcet tones over the Tannoy announcing something like '' Basking sharks on the starboard bow '' or some such tosh... Ann was down in the bowels of the ship in the hairdressing salon, curling hair, and I was poncing around on the bridge. Regret I didn't meet her sooner, All together... Aaah..

Johnnietwocoats
2nd September 2010, 22:58
Sailed with a few; one who was more the Chief Engineer than her husband who nominally held the rank and another who was the nicest memsahib to the Apprentices and all of the officers. These were the older generation but some of the newer wives came from mission dances, hospital nurses' homes or waterfront bars and didn't quite have the same style as the traditional 'wives aboard' who had lived long enough to acquire a certain 'presence'.

And we sailors found our future spouses all over the world. I myself 'married one of the natives' in that I found her at BOAC and she was from Brooklyn, NY. I note that one of our brethern has commented on my description of her as being Brooklyn-Irish. He prefers the description: Irish-Brooklyn which may seem the right way round from an Irish point-of-view. But when you have an airline background ('We take good care of you!') and come from Brooklyn, you get to call yourself anything you want!

Mary's antecedents came to New York from Northern Ireland in the 1880s and have not strayed from Brooklyn ever since. They are married into the "Murphia" - Gannons, Maguires. Murphys, Coreys and Careys- from both sides of the Irish Border and when they get together, they might as well have never left Ireland!

Can you imagine me being completely overwhelmed by all this Irish-ness? At least aboard ship we could always point to the port-of-registry on the stern (either Belfast or Glasgow) and feel superior if the city was "ours". But latterly, when they had London on the stern or even Douglas IOM, then the ship was foreign-flagged and populated by Home County Limeys and their wives. Should have realized that the rot had settled in!

Alister...I am afraid that my esteemed Irish Friend is wrong in the defination of your love wife.

As the President of the White Rock (BC Canada) Irish Club and one who knows these things you are correct in her description.....

If you come from Brooklyn (Born and Raised) and have Irish heritage one is Brooklyn/Irish.

If one is from Ireland (Born and raised) and you move to Brooklyn then you are Irish/Brooklyn...

Same as me being Irish/Canadian.......LOL

Hope that solves things....(Read)

Ian Harrod
3rd September 2010, 02:27
Sailed with a few; one who was more the Chief Engineer than her husband who nominally held the rank and another who was the nicest memsahib to the Apprentices and all of the officers. These were the older generation but some of the newer wives came from mission dances, hospital nurses' homes or waterfront bars and didn't quite have the same style as the traditional 'wives aboard' who had lived long enough to acquire a certain 'presence'.

And we sailors found our future spouses all over the world. I myself 'married one of the natives' in that I found her at BOAC and she was from Brooklyn, NY. I note that one of our brethern has commented on my description of her as being Brooklyn-Irish. He prefers the description: Irish-Brooklyn which may seem the right way round from an Irish point-of-view. But when you have an airline background ('We take good care of you!') and come from Brooklyn, you get to call yourself anything you want!

Mary's antecedents came to New York from Northern Ireland in the 1880s and have not strayed from Brooklyn ever since. They are married into the "Murphia" - Gannons, Maguires. Murphys, Coreys and Careys- from both sides of the Irish Border and when they get together, they might as well have never left Ireland!

Can you imagine me being completely overwhelmed by all this Irish-ness? At least aboard ship we could always point to the port-of-registry on the stern (either Belfast or Glasgow) and feel superior if the city was "ours". But latterly, when they had London on the stern or even Douglas IOM, then the ship was foreign-flagged and populated by Home County Limeys and their wives. Should have realized that the rot had settled in!

Reminds me of when I was 3rd mate on the Taybank with Captain Thomas and her husband Peter.

Charlie Stitt
3rd September 2010, 16:02
Regrets ? sometimes I regret opening my mouth to comment on something I know nothing about, yes I admit, I know nothing about Broohlyn/Irish, Irish/ Brooklyn. It must be different to referring to Americans, born and bred, who have some Irish Ancestry, like the Kennedy's, and other recent Presidents who call themselves IRISH AMERICANS, not American Irish. John,'' Irish Canadian''? I always thought you were a blown away Irishman.(Jester) ( Give me a day to get my armour on)

Johnnietwocoats
3rd September 2010, 18:25
Regrets ? sometimes I regret opening my mouth to comment on something I know nothing about, yes I admit, I know nothing about Broohlyn/Irish, Irish/ Brooklyn. It must be different to referring to Americans, born and bred, who have some Irish Ancestry, like the Kennedy's, and other recent Presidents who call themselves IRISH AMERICANS, not American Irish. John,'' Irish Canadian''? I always thought you were a blown away Irishman.(Jester) ( Give me a day to get my armour on)

LOL Charlie.....

There hasn't been a recent American President who knew what he was talking about(Jester)

Remember Charlie there are only two types of people on this Earth.

Those that are Irish and those who want to be......B\)

Regards. John

jimthehat
3rd September 2010, 18:37
LOL Charlie.....

There hasn't been a recent American President who knew what he was talking about(Jester)

Remember Charlie there are only two types of people on this Earth.

Those that are Irish and those who want to be......B\)

Regards. John

And where does that put me I wonder,long Scottish linage on my fathers side ,and equally long irish linage on my mothers side,All I know is i love to see England lose at Rugby.

jim

Bob Murdoch
3rd September 2010, 19:51
LOL Charlie.....

There hasn't been a recent American President who knew what he was talking about(Jester)

Remember Charlie there are only two types of people on this Earth.

Those that are Irish and those who want to be......B\)

Regards. John

Got it wrong Sport. Those who are irish and those who are glad they aint.[=P]
Bob

Charlie Stitt
3rd September 2010, 20:02
Jim, that leaves you in a dilemma, should I have a large Scotch, or a large Bush. Have both and the same again. Regrets in the morning.(Ouch)

Andy Lavies
3rd September 2010, 20:28
Never mind curry - The chinese cook in "Ettrickbank" came up with "Springing Frog in the Fried Potato." Turned out to be Toad in the Hole!
Andy

Johnnietwocoats
3rd September 2010, 20:33
And where does that put me I wonder,long Scottish linage on my fathers side ,and equally long irish linage on my mothers side,All I know is i love to see England lose at Rugby.

jim

LOL.....

Johnnietwocoats
3rd September 2010, 20:34
Got it wrong Sport. Those who are irish and those who are glad they aint.[=P]
Bob

I must assume that you are Scottish. LOL

pete
4th September 2010, 10:10
Never mind curry - The chinese cook in "Ettrickbank" came up with "Springing Frog in the Fried Potato." Turned out to be Toad in the Hole!
Andy

An Indian Ch.Steward once came up with "Bopplesqueaker" meaning Bubble and Squeak...................pete

Bob Murdoch
4th September 2010, 10:12
I must assume that you are Scottish. LOL

Too right mate. Scots Aussie living in Belgium. How's that for a mixture(Jester)
Bob

Hamish Mackintosh
4th September 2010, 16:14
LOL Charlie.....

There hasn't been a recent American President who knew what he was talking about(Jester)

Remember Charlie there are only two types of people on this Earth.

Those that are Irish and those who want to be......B\)

Regards. John

There are those that term an Irishman as-A simple machine, created by god to turn Guiness into p-ss
Now I'll head for the stokehold

Winebuff
6th September 2010, 00:02
Regrets always come with the benefits of hindsight.

Wish i had stayed the extra 2 years or so to get the sea time in to finish my Chiefs ticket, don't know what difference it would have made now but I doubt I would have stayed married.

It was time to go, the fun had stopped.

Peter Smith

1974-84

jimthehat
6th September 2010, 00:26
Never mind curry - The chinese cook in "Ettrickbank" came up with "Springing Frog in the Fried Potato." Turned out to be Toad in the Hole!
Andy

Ettrickbank keeps on popping up in this thread,I wonder how many of bank liners sailed on her and enjoyed a chinese crew,I was on her for 2 years as 2/0,one of those mates that certain leckies seem to rubbish.

jim

Joe C
14th September 2010, 15:48
Alistair,

Met mine afloat, but not in the Bankline. Shortly afterwards, I was an officer on a cruise ship around the Scottish Lochs and islands, and she first heard my dulcet tones over the Tannoy announcing something like '' Basking sharks on the starboard bow '' or some such tosh... Ann was down in the bowels of the ship in the hairdressing salon, curling hair, and I was poncing around on the bridge. Regret I didn't meet her sooner, All together... Aaah..
Met my hairdresser before I went to sea but after two years away on my second trip with no sign of returning to the U K received the dreaded "Dear John"letter!
However I got my revenge when I was fired at the end of my Apprenticeship and we've been married for fifty one years.
Shouldn't have written that letter!!

Alan Rawlinson
14th September 2010, 18:35
Met my hairdresser before I went to sea but after two years away on my second trip with no sign of returning to the U K received the dreaded "Dear John"letter!
However I got my revenge when I was fired at the end of my Apprenticeship and we've been married for fifty one years.
Shouldn't have written that letter!!

Hi Joe, Welcome back after your Saga seagoing - don't suppose it bore much resemblance to the Bankline days? Hot and cold running water , I expect, but bet you didn't get curry on offer for breakfast!

On the thread topic, don't know if anyone else shares my regret re all the slack time we had. Sleeping and watchkeeping, yes, but I keep thinking about all the missed opportunities to fill the hours with my latest passion - painting in watercolours, pastels, acrylics etc .... Probably because at this ripe old age there is so much to do, and an unknown amount of time remaining to paint that masterpiece....

Joe C
15th September 2010, 16:03
Hi Joe, Welcome back after your Saga seagoing - don't suppose it bore much resemblance to the Bankline days? Hot and cold running water , I expect, but bet you didn't get curry on offer for breakfast!

On the thread topic, don't know if anyone else shares my regret re all the slack time we had. Sleeping and watchkeeping, yes, but I keep thinking about all the missed opportunities to fill the hours with my latest passion - painting in watercolours, pastels, acrylics etc .... Probably because at this ripe old age there is so much to do, and an unknown amount of time remaining to paint that masterpiece....

Subtle difference, as a passenger.Bridge visit conducted by the Cadet,Heidi! The navigational equipment,engine controls,radar etc.,looked like Spaceship Enterprise to me.
But,there's always a but,after a week of sunshine we sailed from Stavanger to Dover in a force nine!
The call went out to Hughie and it wasn't just the memories that came back!

jimthehat
15th September 2010, 16:36
Subtle difference, as a passenger.Bridge visit conducted by the Cadet,Heidi! The navigational equipment,engine controls,radar etc.,looked like Spaceship Enterprise to me.
But,there's always a but,after a week of sunshine we sailed from Stavanger to Dover in a force nine!
The call went out to Hughie and it wasn't just the memories that came back!
was it an official bridge visit? P&O stopped doing them a couple of years ago ,claiming security,but a private note to the old man mentioning I was ex MN always got me up and as you say "space age.

jim

boatlarnie
15th September 2010, 18:10
An Indian Ch.Steward once came up with "Bopplesqueaker" meaning Bubble and Squeak...................pete

Les Steers once explained to the Chief Steward, or tried to, that one could make a nice stock by boiling bones left from a roast in water. Next day we were treated to Bone Soup!!
Boatlarnie

Alan Rawlinson
15th September 2010, 20:18
was it an official bridge visit? P&O stopped doing them a couple of years ago ,claiming security,but a private note to the old man mentioning I was ex MN always got me up and as you say "space age.

jim

I remember in the Bank line being ' ordered ' to teach the chief's wife some navigation on a series of visits to the bridge.... Didn't get very far.. I was a bit bolshy about it!

The ferrymen will remember the shinanigans that took place on the night ferries, with regular visits by drunks, people wanting to scatter ashes ( which inevitably blew all over the funnel ) and all and sundry. This despite our best efforts to keep them away.

Jim....... I had the headmaster of our sea school, LNS Woolverstone, ( can only remember his nickname, which believe was ' Tapper ') stagger up to the bridge one night on passage to a meeting in Belfast, much the worse for wear. It was quite a few minutes in the dark before we both realised the school link - and there was me having him and the others on some sort of pedestal. He got the same treatment - strong armed down the ladder by the quartermaster on duty. Spared him the handcuffs, though.

Joe C
16th September 2010, 15:30
was it an official bridge visit? P&O stopped doing them a couple of years ago ,claiming security,but a private note to the old man mentioning I was ex MN always got me up and as you say "space age.

jim

An official visit Jim, I don't suppose us "Saga Louts"represented much of a threat!

McMorine
17th September 2010, 12:57
was it an official bridge visit? P&O stopped doing them a couple of years ago ,claiming security,but a private note to the old man mentioning I was ex MN always got me up and as you say "space age.

jim

We've just done a cruise on the Celebrity Eclipse and due to health and safety and security, no tours of the bridge or engineroom were allowed. There was a good video tour of both, including some during the building in Germany, all shown on your stateroom TV. Not the same as the real thing though. When we did a cruise with Thompsons, at least they allowed passengers to go on the bridge.

Joe C
17th September 2010, 15:08
We've just done a cruise on the Celebrity Eclipse and due to health and safety and security, no tours of the bridge or engineroom were allowed. There was a good video tour of both, including some during the building in Germany, all shown on your stateroom TV. Not the same as the real thing though. When we did a cruise with Thompsons, at least they allowed passengers to go on the bridge.

Poor old Kelvins balls were banished to the monkey island but for the sake of decorum they were swathed in canvas....no sorry,plastic!

Alan Rawlinson
17th September 2010, 16:12
Call me old fashioned, but I still think in a crisis on the bridge, everything reverts back to ' eyeball 1 ' as the military say!

Alistair Macnab
18th September 2010, 18:33
Everyone except the officers on watch on the bridge, radio room or down below had a post curry lunch siesta that lasted until 15:30 when the tea and tabnabs arrived discretely at your elbow. Even in retirement I cannot justify an afternoon nap. Too bad! I'm sure we'd all live a little longer with the afternoon siesta!

Alan Rawlinson
18th September 2010, 21:45
Everyone except the officers on watch on the bridge, radio room or down below had a post curry lunch siesta that lasted until 15:30 when the tea and tabnabs arrived discretely at your elbow. Even in retirement I cannot justify an afternoon nap. Too bad! I'm sure we'd all live a little longer with the afternoon siesta!


Never miss it, myself....

Can recall one C/O on the Forthbank, after lunch, would announce to all and sundry in a loud voice '' Oh well, must go and strike the horizontal! '' It became a nickname for him. Can't recall the gent's name but he had narrowly escaped death or injury when he was alongside a vessel in Gibraltar that had exploded suddenly in the months before we joined the Forthbank in 1951.

Alistair Macnab
18th September 2010, 21:50
Didn't we call the afternoon siesta "Egyptian PT" or "Deckhead Survey"?
'Strike the Horizontal' is a new one on me and I am sure there are other equally descriptive terms for the exercise?

Alan Rawlinson
19th September 2010, 08:35
Didn't we call the afternoon siesta "Egyptian PT" or "Deckhead Survey"?
'Strike the Horizontal' is a new one on me and I am sure there are other equally descriptive terms for the exercise?

Yes, remember those...

" In the Pit" was used a lot on the ferries to describe anyone turned in

Much prefer the Grandchildren's expression - " having a Power Nap "

Charlie Stitt
19th September 2010, 10:42
Orrrr, I'm off to count the rivets.