Bankline - Exceptional shipmates

Alan Rawlinson
10th September 2010, 17:57
Here I'm thinking about the shipmates that left a truly lifelong impression, and who are fondly remembered 30,40, or 50 years later......

There are a few of course, but the one who triggered this thread in my mind was a certain Doug Christie from Aberdeen, and fate ( and the Banline crew Dept) threw us together, way back on the old Ernebank in the early 50's.

Doug was 19 going on 29, and a true hardman, but with a very gentle character. He was a do-er not a talker, and he opened my eyes to a world that I had only dreamed about. It was mainly booze and birds, to be fair, but all action and no fuss. In Birkenhead the scene was set in the first few days when we made ourselves at home in a local pub, and downed umpteen pints before walking local girls home. It went steadily downhill from there!

We sometimes played chess together at the after end of the boat deck, puffing our way through those round tins of 50 ciggies. ( Shudder) After paying off in Liverpool, Doug fulfilled a promise, and sent me a full box of Aberdeen kippers, which he claimed were the best! Great memories.

Anyone else have a similar tale?

Charlie Stitt
10th September 2010, 19:04
Alan, I also sailed with Doug Christie, once on the Ericbank 1957 he was 2nd Mate, I was Appy/ Act 3rd Mate, and again on Laganbank 1959/60, he was 2nd Mate, I was 3rd Mate, he would go a mile out of his way to help me in any way, and was always fair when it come to nights on board etc, great shipmate. I sailed with so many exceptional shipmates, both in the Bankline and on ASN ferries,and believe it or not, the ones on the ASN ferries were ex Bankline, what does that tell you?

jimthehat
10th September 2010, 23:14
Alan, I also sailed with Doug Christie, once on the Ericbank 1957 he was 2nd Mate, I was Appy/ Act 3rd Mate, and again on Laganbank 1959/60, he was 2nd Mate, I was 3rd Mate, he would go a mile out of his way to help me in any way, and was always fair when it come to nights on board etc, great shipmate. I sailed with so many exceptional shipmates, both in the Bankline and on ASN ferries,and believe it or not, the ones on the ASN ferries were ex Bankline, what does that tell you?

Well I suppose there were a few exceptional shipmates, but the one that stands out was when I was senior app on the Clydebank and that was Wilkie Rutherford who was mate, taught me most of what i know, was strict when he had to be ,and when the need arose was a good drinking and leasure companion where rank had no part.
Unlike Charlie there were no ex bankline shipmates in the southern ASN fleet,but still some good shipmates and masters.

jim

John Dryden
10th September 2010, 23:45
My last trip on the Shirrabank the Chinese chippy was a good shipmate.On pay off day the old man informed me I had the highest bar bill for the trip with the chippy a close second.He had a fine sense of humour and we had some good times.

Alan Rawlinson
11th September 2010, 02:15
Alan, I also sailed with Doug Christie, once on the Ericbank 1957 he was 2nd Mate, I was Appy/ Act 3rd Mate, and again on Laganbank 1959/60, he was 2nd Mate, I was 3rd Mate, he would go a mile out of his way to help me in any way, and was always fair when it come to nights on board etc, great shipmate. I sailed with so many exceptional shipmates, both in the Bankline and on ASN ferries,and believe it or not, the ones on the ASN ferries were ex Bankline, what does that tell you?

Charlie,

If I remember correctly, Doug had a heart attack at a very early age - I thought on the Ericbank. - Was it in your time there?

Seems a few of us moved on to the ferries after Bankline, and I was sailing out of Heysham with BR ( Sealink). Don't remember too many ex Bankline apart from Jimmy Scobbie and myself, but we had a good mix including one chap who had been 4th Mate on the Queen Mary in his earlier days, and some from the Orient Liners!

Johnnietwocoats
11th September 2010, 03:59
My best shipmate was on my first trip as an Apprentice on the Eastbank. Dave (Paddy) Ramsey was my Senior Apprentice.
We sailed together for exactly one year.
He was from Dundalk in the South and I was from Belfast. He came to my home while we were both on leave from the Eastbank and spent the 12th of July 1961 fortnight with us.
He fell in love with my sister and eventually married her and so became my Brother in Law.
He ended up as Senior Master with Stena on the Larne Stranraer run and sadly passed over the bar in December 2003.
RIP David (Paddy)....Johnny

Charlie Stitt
11th September 2010, 10:02
No Alan, Doug (Chris) did'nt suffer from any heart condition when I sailed with him, always appeared to be in good health except for the occasional hangover. I still have a vivid picture of him, after having a few cans, giving us a good serious rendering of'' The Northern Lights Of Old Aberdeen''.His favourite party piece. Yes Happy Days.

mclean
11th September 2010, 18:01
Charlie, did you ever come across Brian Buchanan, from Belfast, an apprentice with Bank Line 1957/1961. He ende up owning an insurance company , making far too much money and now resides somewhere in the Med. Rgds. Colin

Charlie Stitt
11th September 2010, 21:20
Colin, I dont recall meeting a Brian Buchanan, but that dos'nt necessarily mean I never met him, either at sea or later in business. I most certainly would have remembered him if he owed me money. (Jester)

Alan Rawlinson
12th September 2010, 07:59
No Alan, Doug (Chris) did'nt suffer from any heart condition when I sailed with him, always appeared to be in good health except for the occasional hangover. I still have a vivid picture of him, after having a few cans, giving us a good serious rendering of'' The Northern Lights Of Old Aberdeen''.His favourite party piece. Yes Happy Days.

When we were working round the deck, Doug Christie sang a plaintive slow song that he seemed to know every word of. So much so, that we also knew the words after a while! Still do, come to that. It was only years later that I identified it as a Hank Williams country classic '' Cold Cold heart ''.

Charlie Stitt
12th September 2010, 09:56
When we were working round the deck, Doug Christie sang a plaintive slow song that he seemed to know every word of. So much so, that we also knew the words after a while! Still do, come to that. It was only years later that I identified it as a Hank Williams country song called '' Cold Cold heart ''.
He was a very sentimental person and, like myself was a big Country and Western / Jim Reeves fan. The first time I looked at his face, I thought, blimey, this looks like a hard nut. I could'nt have been more wrong. In Bankline, I had the privilage to sail with good shipmates, great shipmates, and occasionally, shipmates who had that ''Something special'', Doug was one of those. Yes like everyone else, I met, and sailed with a few dipsticks, but I never let them get me down, they just succeeded in making themselves miserable.