"Ettrickbank"

Alistair Macnab
20th September 2010, 17:17
Several of SN regular contributors seem to have fond memories of m.v."Ettrickbank" of 1937 (same vintage as myself!) She was a small nearly-Doxford Economy but with a four cylinder oil engine instead of the standard three-cylinder. Nevertheless she was only good for about 11 knots and was consigned captive to the Oriental African Line for many years. Although Glasgow was the port of registry, it might as well have been Durban which was her home port.
Some features were worth mentioning.
She had full wooden decks fore and aft. They were originally through-bolted over a light steel deck to the deck beams. I know this because when caught in the eye of a South China Sea typhoon in 1956, the working of the ship in the ferocious seas caused many dowels to pop out and seawater to enter the tween deck through the badly corroded deck holding down bolts and drilled holes. This caused maximum destruction of the tween deck cargo of paper-bagged pyrethrum powder going to Shanghai from Beira.
She was completely overhauled on the following year at her 20-year survey in Japan. The wooden deck sheathing and many of the deck plates were renewed but this time the sheathing was held down by studs welded to the steel deck. Can you imagine a full working deck of Oregon Pine laid in Japan in 1957!
In typical Bank Line fashion, this beautiful clean wooden deck was immediately compromised by a deckload of oil-leaking second-hand school busses from Yokohama to Manila!
Other main upgrading features were that the original suite of girder derricks, except for the jumbo, was replaced by tubular derricks, a welcome improvement, as was the introduction of hot and cold running water throughout the midships house. Before the Special Survey, the loading of logs around the Philippine Islands and North Borneo had been conducted using the groaning open girder cargo booms flexing longitudinally and shedding paint and rust in showers down upon anyone daft enough to walk underneath the stressed equipment.
Altogether my favourite ship where more happened on a two-year trip than any other that I experienced. Some SN members have expressed the opinion that the older ships were the happiest. I tend to agree.

Andy Lavies
20th September 2010, 17:52
And all this excitement happened in the first few months of my first trip as a fifteen year old. And I'd only been in the ship for two days when Alistair plied me with beer on Saturday afternoon. I didn't like it!
Andy

jimthehat
20th September 2010, 18:18
Several of SN regular contributors seem to have fond memories of m.v."Ettrickbank" of 1937 (same vintage as myself!) She was a small nearly-Doxford Economy but with a four cylinder oil engine instead of the standard three-cylinder. Nevertheless she was only good for about 11 knots and was consigned captive to the Oriental African Line for many years. Although Glasgow was the port of registry, it might as well have been Durban which was her home port.
Some features were worth mentioning.
She had full wooden decks fore and aft. They were originally through-bolted over a light steel deck to the deck beams. I know this because when caught in the eye of a South China Sea typhoon in 1956, the working of the ship in the ferocious seas caused many dowels to pop out and seawater to enter the tween deck through the badly corroded deck holding down bolts and drilled holes. This caused maximum destruction of the tween deck cargo of paper-bagged pyrethrum powder going to Shanghai from Beira.
She was completely overhauled on the following year at her 20-year survey in Japan. The wooden deck sheathing and many of the deck plates were renewed but this time the sheathing was held down by studs welded to the steel deck. Can you imagine a full working deck of Oregon Pine laid in Japan in 1957!
In typical Bank Line fashion, this beautiful clean wooden deck was immediately compromised by a deckload of oil-leaking second-hand school busses from Yokohama to Manila!
Other main upgrading features were that the original suite of girder derricks, except for the jumbo, was replaced by tubular derricks, a welcome improvement, as was the introduction of hot and cold running water throughout the midships house. Before the Special Survey, the loading of logs around the Philippine Islands and North Borneo had been conducted using the groaning open girder cargo booms flexing longitudinally and shedding paint and rust in showers down upon anyone daft enough to walk underneath the stressed equipment.
Altogether my favourite ship where more happened on a two-year trip than any other that I experienced. Some SN members have expressed the opinion that the older ships were the happiest. I tend to agree.

have said it before and now again two great years on her as 2/0 on the far east run,joined in Singapore and left in calcutta,dont know how we got there on the far east run.

jim

Alistair Macnab
21st September 2010, 05:59
Andy accuses me of trying to lead him astray by plying him with beer!
How awful! How wicked! Him a mere 15 years old and I a bad influence as three years his senior! Shows you what an apprentice's life in Bank Line was like in those far off days. Corruption of a poor innocent first tripper 'prentice boy by a hardened sailor of 18! Arrrr! Jim lad, men was men in them days!

IRW
21st September 2010, 14:45
Transferred from Northbank(Kent) to Ettrickbank (Lynch) as 2/O Aug 62. Cheese and chalk. Fantastic feeding and a happy ship with a very cosmopolitan mix of. mates and engineers. Got used to overhead steam-pipes and not cracking head on port above bunk. Rats were a pest stealing socks etc. Left ship in H.K. when sold after weeks off Stonecutters Island in Jan 63

jimthehat
21st September 2010, 14:51
Transferred from Northbank(Kent) to Ettrickbank (Lynch) as 2/O Aug 62. Cheese and chalk. Fantastic feeding and a happy ship with a very cosmopolitan mix of. mates and engineers. Got used to overhead steam-pipes and not cracking head on port above bunk. Rats were a pest stealing socks etc. Left ship in H.K. when sold after weeks off Stonecutters Island in Jan 63

yes Bert lynch was a first rate master ,also sailed with him when I was 3/0 on the isipingo and he was mate.

jim

Andy Lavies
22nd September 2010, 20:37
It WAS the beer I didn't like, not Alistair. Sailed with him in Inchanga, too.
Andy