Loading Whisky in Grangemouth

EBenarty
1st October 2010, 21:50
We used to load a lot of whisky in Grangemouth. I remember the dockers loading the cases on pallets on the quay and very often there was a case stowed very dubiously on the top ready to fall off!!
Once the crane driver got over the hold he would let the load swing and the load would swing and the case fell off. All the dockers would be ready with their tin mugs and strained the whisky into their mugs. They were supposed to work until 2200 but by 2100 they finished as they were well under the weather!!!!

Thats another Story
1st October 2010, 22:35
i don't blame the knocking off early them fumes down the hatch they sting your eyes boys come on them poor holdsmen???

James_C
1st October 2010, 22:49
Ebenarty,
Even when the practice was fully sealed and containerised it wasn't unusual to see a lot of very merry dockers around the ship!

Thats another Story
1st October 2010, 22:53
jim it's the fumes?(Jester)

NZSCOTTY
2nd October 2010, 22:11
I was first trip cadet in Grangemouth on cargo watch loading whiskey. Foreman says to me "do you want cago loaded with no damage?" Yes says the inocent boy. Well turn your back whilst we take this case out of sight. Cago loaded with no dammage and billy cans all full to brimming. Cadet learnt his first lesson in life!

MikeK
3rd October 2010, 09:52
Similar situation in Glasgow loading a full 'tween deck of booze for the various West African Empire builders' social clubs. First tea break a dockie offered me a school milk bottle full of a frothy liquid that turned out to be lager. (Only writing now do I realize the significance of yellow frothy liquid, ah innocence !) Accepting that diplomacy was better than the option of blowing the whistle (I did want to go ashore to the same area these hard blokes lived !) I drank it. Later the whole thing was repeated and assuming it was again lager I threw my head back and took a good swallow.........you guessed it, whisky ! They all thought it was hilarious, but my joining in had the same effect as Scotties, very little damage found on discharge 'up the creeks'
Sending a young - still wet behind the ears - kid to oversee a bunch of blokes who had cargo broaching down to a fine art was purely a token gesture to cover the mate's backside !

Mike

Ron Stringer
3rd October 2010, 11:50
I sailed on ships that loaded Scotch Whisky in Glasgow, others that loaded in Leith. Even on ships that loaded Scotch in certain ports near the mouth of the River Mersey. In all instances, that cargo was sealed in designated steel lockers in the hold. In all loading ports, the dockers appeared half-cut during loading.

At all discharge ports the cargo was found to be missing cases, or the correct number of cases were present intact but many were found to be missing one or more bottles.

The ingenuity of man. [=P]

Mike S
3rd October 2010, 14:13
One case from the first pallet slid just behind the door of the locker and a perfect outurn in Dunedin in the South Island.
I even reckon they loaded one extra to give a perfect outurn!
There were far worse examples of pilfering cargo than the whiskey trade.
We actually stopped work at No 3 hatch on the Northumberland in Brisbane one night. Expensive china ware from USA appeared under the hatch coaming 30 mins before knockoff. The VO was called and shown the evidence.
Interesting result. Nothing......... however we did not loose any more china!
I would do the same again..........there are limits.

Bob Murdoch
3rd October 2010, 15:15
59360]I sailed on ships that loaded Scotch Whiskey in Glasgow, others that loaded in Leith. Even on ships that loaded Scotch in certain ports near the mouth of the River Mersey. In all instances, that cargo was sealed in designated steel lockers in the hold. In all loading ports, the dockers appeared half-cut during loading.

At all discharge ports the cargo was found to be missing cases, or the correct number of cases were present intact but many were found to be missing one or more bottles.

The ingenuity of man. [=P]

How did you manage to load whiskey in Scotland?
I never saw it in the sixties in NZ either.
Plenty of whisky though [=P]

Ron Stringer
3rd October 2010, 16:24
How did you manage to load whiskey in Scotland?
I never saw it in the sixties in NZ either.
Plenty of whisky though [=P]

Deep apologies - I blame the spell-checker! (Jester)

I have no excuse - -there is a bottle of 12-year old Glenlivet standing on the desk in front of me!

Ron Stringer
3rd October 2010, 16:28
Correction - a part bottle of 12-year old.....

Bob Murdoch
3rd October 2010, 16:46
No sweat Ron, just send it over and I will give it a good home
Bob

Ron Stringer
3rd October 2010, 17:05
Wow, I never knew they had resumed giving money back on the empty bottles!

I've been putting them in the glass recycling containers. If I get a few together it will maybe pay me to drive up to Scotland and return them.

China hand
3rd October 2010, 19:16
Thursdays used to be Spirits, Mail and Specie days in Blue Star Line South America Blood Boats. Loads of extra cadets roped in from other BSL's to tally. Same theft, same loss, lotsa happy shore gang, customs, dockers; we always left on time.(Jester)

nautibuoy42
3rd October 2010, 20:41
As a first trip cadet I was detailed down No3 hatch to tally in whisky with a post office mail bag counter, waste of time, after about an hour of trying to keep up with the dockers moving cases around the hold, one of them said to me, with a dockers hook held casualy in his hand, "one or two bottles might go missing but you won't see it will you", No I replied, nearly sh**ing myself! Some time later I went to my cabin, and lo and behold in the bottom of my locker were two bottle of Bells. How they got there to this day I will never know as my cabin door was always locked in port. The ingenuity of a Liverpool docker never ceased to amaze me!

ian keyl
21st October 2010, 22:03
It was always a night mare from being a cadet to a mate you had to have radar and a keen smell to seek out the men that were taking it and drinking it.
When i was on the coast we loaded whisky in nearly every hatch we had a locker in and on the valla armin class it was 6 lockers .Every brand you could think of and many you had never heard of.

Cadets and sailors were posted in the lockers or hatch squares but a complete waste of time as you were never going to beat them, You could smell it every where but hells could find a bottle, the dockers were reeking of it and you would pick up thier stoved black billy tea cans and they were also full of it not tea.
Wer also used to load Hogs heads of whisky for blending in Japan with Santori and Nikka whisky companies.

One coast we had 280 tons of it and some went down the the four deep tanks in N0 7 hold on the Wyvis , we had a shore chippie there doing the dunnaging and making platforms for the barrels, as soon as he had finished he left a six inch nail and a hammer , Along came a docker knocked the nail into the head of the barrel and filled can after can of this thick syrup which was top proof and must have blown thier heads off.

Once you had left G'mouth you would be looking around the hatches and you would find velvet draw string bags which had contained crystal Chivas Regal bottles for the top Japanese Market, the amazing thing wa you would find these in the hatches where there was no stows of whisky.

One FG trip out on the Wyvis we were discharging in Shimazu at the roads in to lighters and i went down the hatch just to see what was going on, there was this typical Japanese docker in his bound leggings black plimsols and helmet he was just staring at me and laughing and i knew then they were into the spirits. I walked around and found some mt JB bottles hidden on top of some CKD cases so I walked into the locked and took the hatch foreman out and showed him , didnt know anything about it . Our laughing wee man was by this time making a real spectale of himself so I threatened to call the police.
I climbed out of the hatch onto the main deck and as i left the hatch i heard screams then I saw our wee friend in a cargo net going over the side into a barge.
When he landed and rolled out of the net the deck supervisor shouted something and then the other dockers in the barge gave such a kicking you had never seen in your life ,worse than that you may get any back street in the UK.

I asked the supervisor what it was all about and he said he has brought shame on us all and has been disrespectful to you. He also said he would not work again. I then said but others down the hatch and maybe on the barge have had a drink of good Scotch and he looked at me and smiled.

Well maybe not every one who knicked our whisky got away with it.

OH to be there now.

Best regards ,
Ian.

lakercapt
21st October 2010, 23:00
Wow, I never knew they had resumed giving money back on the empty bottles!

I've been putting them in the glass recycling containers. If I get a few together it will maybe pay me to drive up to Scotland and return them.

Here in Ontario we are charged a deposit on all liquor and beer bottles and you must take them to the "Beer Store" for a refund.
Don't see many in the re-cycling bin any more!!!!

John David Mair
22nd December 2010, 05:29
Early May 1963 I joined the Trentbank in one of the London docks, and as I was making my way to the gangway there were police all over the place. When I got onboard I asked the 3rd Mate what was going on and he told me that the dockers had managed to load the spirits and somehow bumped them! The police were there to escort the rather wobbly legged dockers off the ship. That was my introduction to general cargo vessels, we were loading for Papua Newguinea and the Pacific Islands.

haasenpeter
31st December 2010, 02:27
hey guys,
you think this does not happen in the times of container? In Ireland they use to go into the empty tank container which they used to bring whisky or whiskey "concentrate" to the filling shops at europes mainland. There is still enough remain inside an empty tank container to get a nice hangover...

fair winds,
Peter

Donald McGhee
2nd January 2011, 21:46
You guys ain't seen nothin compared to the Donaldson boats in the sixties. We loaded almost full cargoes of grog, Whisky, Gin, you name it and took it across the pond to Canada.
Us appies were delegated "cargo watch", what a joke! No way in the world were we kids ever going to keep ahead of the Glasgow and UK wharfies, not a show pal! I have to admit that this is where I developed a taste for whisky, as I was fooled into having a cup of "tea", which was 100% whisky. The second cup tasted OK too, but when I was taken out of the hold in a cargo net the Mate decided that shore leave for yours truly would perhaps lessen my liking for "tea"!
No sense of humour. The crowd were West Highland men, mainly from the islands and they were a great bunch when sober. The whole crowd would get pissed ashore and refuse to sail resulting in mass bollockings and loggings, especially when they had been "preparing' cargo prior to docking, the shore jaunt was a continuation of the fluid transfers already undertaken. Great days.

Waighty
1st March 2011, 23:24
We used to load a lot of whisky in Grangemouth. I remember the dockers loading the cases on pallets on the quay and very often there was a case stowed very dubiously on the top ready to fall off!!
Once the crane driver got over the hold he would let the load swing and the load would swing and the case fell off. All the dockers would be ready with their tin mugs and strained the whisky into their mugs. They were supposed to work until 2200 but by 2100 they finished as they were well under the weather!!!!

The other well known method was banging the corner of the wooden crates against a bulkhead or frame and draining the golden nectar into their tea mugs. This was a common practice by dockers at G'mth, London and Southampton, so a lot of what you loaded at G'mth was drunk at the other ports! When I was on Benvannoch (circa 1969) a Southampton docker fell from the top of No2 hatch onto a mini in the lower hold due to the whisky he'd drunk. The car had to be discharged but he was fine - loose with the drink. Strange after all those years I ended up as Assistant Harbour Master at Grangemouth!