Merchant Navy Fare - merged threads

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Mike lawrence
7th November 2006, 18:04
Pete , just reading that menu takes one back to all those x-mases at sea.
Pity restaurants don't have menus like that.

Mike , great receipe , one to try out. Thanks.

JC

Cook on the Esso Stockholm Denis Reagan (56/57) use to serve this up and it was ace. Wife wont let me near the stove, and I taught her all she knows.

terval
13th November 2006, 11:09
Greetings. I remember sailing on the old Ailsa Princess on an MOD charter to see if mines could be laid at full speed in any weather from the rear ramp on the car deck. Previous to this charter the feeding rate was about £2.70 a day, but it went up to £10.50 on charter. Never seen such a display of nosh at 0400 coming off watch.
Cheers.
Terry R556919.[=P] [=P]

Cap'n Pete
14th November 2006, 18:43
For interest, the feeding rate on ex P&O Nedlloyd ships is US$5.75/day reduced by 5% to take account of the cost of procuring the cash to pay for the stores. This rate has remained unchanged now for over 5 years.

BarryM
10th December 2006, 20:39
The very first post on this thread referred to "kromeskis" and now we seem to have come full circle. I have just finished reading a restaurant review which raved about "cromesquie" - a new term to the writer - made of "molten foie gras encased in breadcrumbs". Is that the sound of cooks putting their heads into their own mincers I hear?

niggle
16th December 2006, 19:09
Having perused this thread from page one it has brought back many memories of my seatime 76/87 with many familiar dishes. Do any of our catering corespondents know of a definitive publication with recipies that we are harking back too so that we may in the confines of our shoreside catering confines (domestic kitchen) can recreate to bring a bit of nostalgia and rose tinted recollection to our sea faring days. I have great personal memories of a cook on the ACT7 namely Sandy Baird a genial scot with a great sense of humour but a damm good cook to boot.

Les_Blues
16th December 2006, 21:06
I must say the kromesky brings back memories from the 70s. Sausage wrapped in bacon, battered and deep fried! it makes a MacBurger look like vegans snack.

Egg Flourentine, Glasgow Scallops, Glasgow Caviare, Oxe-tail Jardiniere, these were classics and I must admit to making some of these dishes from time to time. Devilled kidneys are still a favourite of mine but I have moved on from the regular ships curry that was made from anything with a heap of curry powder added. Mulligatawny soup usually appeared on the menu a couple of days after the curry!

One of the less imaginative dishes was asparagus (tinned) on toast.

jazz606
28th January 2007, 20:34
I sailed with an old chief steward who always replied when we asked him what was for lunch or tea "you'll like it son you'll like it" and quite often we did. Has anyone mentioned tramp ship hours here? Breakfast at 8, Lunch at 12, Tea at 5, sandwiches after that.

steviej
28th January 2007, 20:58
John you have whetted my appitite. Are you going to give us this recipe for Korean Stew.I still do myself the odd "ham and cheese beano" for an evening snack.

At South Shields Marine and Tech college it was "sandwich spread" sandwiches EVERY evening for supper for us cadets.

I still long for the steamed puddings from my first trip-- a FANTASTIC 2nd Cook and Baker, who's name i'm ashamed to say I cannot recall, used to cook these 2 feet long containers, like an aluminium torpedo, full of delicious sponge pud.

Cooked beetroot with butter was a regular vegetable on the Bamburgh Castle.

The only thing that kept me going thru the inevitable seasickness when keeping an 8/12 evening watch in the stormy North Sea in 2000dwt chemical tankers (I never got used to "small ship" motion) was a mug of hot chocolate made with lashings of "connie milk"-- I bought a can the other week in my perambulations around my local LIDL store, but it tasted vile!

My last trips were with Korean crew-- the BEST was the cook's version of Bulgogi/bulkoki, more like a stir fry-- I still have his fantastic recipe and make it occasionally-- I ordered Bulgogi in a West End Korean restaurant, there subtitled "Korean BBQ", and it wasn't a patch on the shipboard stuff. But, I'd kill for some of the crew's kimchee to accompany it!

Derek Roger
29th January 2007, 00:52
Not quite at sea but !
When at Riversdale Tech in 62/63 and being on 14 Pounds 10 shillings a month ( plus subsistance ; which the land ladys took plus a bit ! )
Our lunch ( between 3 ) consisted of going to the baker and buying a loaf of bread and have him cit it into 3 and then going to the " chippie " for a sixpence of chips . All was shared and we would stuff the bread with chips and let it " moisten ' a bit then eat the dam thing .

This was washed down with a half pint of mild ( being the cheapest ale one could buy )

Oh happy days !

That was a "Real Chip Buttie ; alas with no butter .
We were able after a while to collect various sauces from tables in the canteen etc . which made the thing somewhat more palatable . If "flush " we would buy a " chunk of tasteless margarine which made the exercise almost palatable .
We had to conserve our limited cash to be able to play Rugby on a weekend and have a few pints and buy a tin of "rolllie tobacco " which had to last the week .

Derek

John Cassels
29th January 2007, 08:53
Happy days indeed Derek, reminds me ............

JC

Binnacle
29th January 2007, 10:12
"one ship I was in didn't have a freezer, just an Ice box so when the ice run out we were on curried everything"

Sailed on a ship with no frig. Two ice boxes on boat deck, one for meat, the other for fish. Roast pork for lunch one day, well roasted, lovely cracknel, then noticed it was crawling with weevils. Always wary of pork ever since.
Happy Days

Joe Whelan
10th February 2007, 14:44
Seeking receipe for Panagalty, spelling may be incorrect.

Moulder
10th February 2007, 14:56
Seeking receipe for Panagalty, spelling may be incorrect.

Hi Joe,

Think it may be "Panacalty"? - I remember having it once on a ship - the recipe was given to the cook by the electrician. Think it's a Geordie dish with main ingredients of bacon, onion and potatoe - I may be wrong - it was a lifetime ago. (Eat)

Regards,

Steve.

steviej
10th February 2007, 15:56
Found this book of recipes available from Amazon etc.
The Centaur's Kitchen
A Book Of French, Italian, Greek And Catalan Dishes For Blue Funnel Ships
Gray, Patience
Written in 1964 as a manual for the Chinese cooks of the Blue Funnel Line's Centaur cargo liner, this book features recipes by Gray, who died in 2005 and was the author of other recipe books. Everything from appetizers to entrees and desserts are included with illustrations, as well as cooking instructions and necessary kitchen staples and cookware

airds
10th February 2007, 16:17
[QUOTE=Steve Chalkley;107687]Hi Joe,

Think it may be "Panacalty"? - I remember having it once on a ship - the recipe was given to the cook by the electrician. Think it's a Geordie dish with main ingredients of bacon, onion and potatoe - I may be wrong - it was a lifetime ago. (Eat)
[QUOTE]

Two seconds on Google

http://snipurl.com/19t8r

Joe Whelan
10th February 2007, 22:29
Thanks for the info lads, it corresponds with info from Razor. Hope to have a meal of it this week. Joe.

kottemann
10th February 2007, 23:45
We had a cook from Cape Verde called Antonio he was a narky little fecker. He did not own a single cook book or have any recipes written down but if you asked him to make something he didnt even ask the ingredients its just arrived on the table at lunch, Irish Stew Shepherds pie. We decided to test him one day and asked for Coddle unless your from Dublin you probably wouldnt know what that is and he turned it out for lunch just like my Ma used to make. Have to say the Germans knew how to feed the crew cooked breakfast every morning 3 course lunch and a cold buffet for tea. Thing I miss most is pea soup on a Saturday loved the stuff maybe you can send me a recipe Ruud and Tony used to make falafel as a snack for us in the evenings magic as well as all that when we went to fishing ports we would always do deals with the fisherman for fresh prawns or sardines and fire up the barbeque happy days.

Portred
18th March 2007, 15:41
I posted this under ''SS Maidan 1963'', before I read in this posting about the infamous Fred!

"Quote";

Thu, 1 February 07 17:25


When I sailed with Ben Lyon, from Redcar, on the Mahout in 1974 he was quite a large lad then.

He was part of ''the Gang of Three'', along with a Fred Thompson, Purser/C/O from Liverpool and the Chief officer.

All three were of similar build.

I recall that while the rest of the ship were on limited fresh food supplies, one could always observe trays of ''Fresh'', food being delivered to their respective cabins.

We actually ran out of drinks!

While in the port of Hodeidah in the Yemen, I observed crates of drinks and whisky going ashore with the agent and this was after many days being a 'dry ship'!

In the Officers Bar later that evening, with the most of us sipping mixers, like tonic etc.
I announced that I was going ashore, there was a silence in the room.

Fred the P/C/O laughted and said, ''Ashore here, there's nothing ashore here''!

I said, ''Oh yes there is, there's at least, 10 cases of coke-a-cola, 12 cases of cordial, 20 cases of beer and about 7 cases of whisky''!

Because I saw them going ashore this evening!

The silence was stunning!

Fred abused me and stormed out of the bar!

Needless to say that the remainder of my trip was a tad unpleasant when faced with any of the ''Gang of Three''!

I just couldn't stand those ''thieving baskets'', treating us like that, after all they were senior officers and should have the best welfare of the Company and it's employees in mind and not filling their own mouths and pockets!

Shame on them, even to this day!

trotterdotpom
18th March 2007, 16:28
John you have whetted my appitite. Are you going to give us this recipe for Korean Stew.

I tried that "bulgogi" in Korea and thought it was sh*te. It seemed to be the favourite dish to serve up to foreigners and we all came to know it as it "bulldoggy".

This may not have been too far from the truth as it was rumoured that only the dogs with brass studs in their ears were pets, the rest were fair game!

As for "panackalty", great stuff, County Durham's answer to Liverpool's Scouse - all the leftovers chucked in a pot and cooked!

John T.

shipsivanhoe
18th March 2007, 17:03
(K) i have enjoyed reading this post as i was a cook for 6 years.it is surprising that most of the posts were quite positive as to become a second cook & baker you only had 6 weeks training at the college.then to reach the dizzy hieghts of chief cook you had to do a year at sea then 6 weeks in college.not a lot of training if you think how much training they do ashore. a strange thing is i have put on weight since i stopped cooking [i wonder why]

Portred
26th March 2007, 04:19
I can fully understand Trotterdotpom and his opinion about Korean Bulgogi.

I lived in korea for several years and like anywhere else, it really depends on the quality of the restaurant and in particular, the cook!

Koreans will eat almost anything that moves.

If I get a fishbone in my meal then I proceed like as if it was a minefield.

Whereas, my Korean colleagues just chomp through bones, gristle, fat, skin, eggshells and sand etc.

Needless to say that their idea of a nice piece of meat and my idea of a nice piece of meat are very different indeed.

In Japan, they like Marbled Steak but I prefer lean steak.

I have cooked both ''Bulgogi'' and a hot stew called ''yukejan'' with good quality lean meat and enjoyed it very much.

The same applies to ''Kimchee'', there is ''fresh'' Kimchee, winter Kimchee and summer Kimchee, all with a different taste.

It can be made with a variety of vegetables but mostly with Korean Cabbage

I was very fussy about where I would eat when in korea.

Certain cultures have different ideas about hygiene.

KIWI
26th March 2007, 09:38
Hi Guys,
I sailed with Standard Vacuum and the food was streets ahead of anything we were served on Blue Star,we even had fresh milk for as long as it lasted and then it was cans of Carnation Milk. Our ships sailed under the British Flag but the company was owned by Standard Oil. On a Sunday we were give 2 beers each by the company, I think on American ships they were'nt allowed beer,but the company rule gave us free beers,we were also allowed to buy beer and spirits from the captains bond. The feeding was excellent but we still complained!
Neil Mac.

I also sailed with Standard Vacuum on Stanvac Canberra.For three months the food was out of this world & I had come from first class fare in P&O.It was really unbelievable,grills to order & the fridge at night was full of the most unusual & tasty selections.We changed skippers & the catering was still more than reasonable but no where near the previous standard.Wonder where
the savings went? We had two free beers on a Sunday but had to buy our own at each port.Would guess someone got a commission.Stocking up on Schlitz in Beaumot was a disaster.It was terrible booze. Kiwi

rstimaru
26th March 2007, 15:26
Palm stew pinched from the fore deck kroo boy,s pot on Elder dempsters ships

NINJA
26th March 2007, 18:35
When running on the South American east coast we had a chief steward who could have gone on Mastermind and his chosen topic would have been how many different names can you think of for meals made from lamb.

Ian Dickinson
10th April 2007, 16:45
Hi everyone

P& O B.S.D. fed us well, Evening meal was the full 5 course. But the food I remember best was lunchtime. China Chow Chow, Dry mince curry with Dahl sauce.

Dick S
10th April 2007, 21:16
Denholms Hong Kong Crews served up a Nasi Goring with pork satay(sic?) with a fried egg on top.... EVERY sunday lunch.
I really enjoyed my sunday roast after 6 months!!!!

Dick

purserjuk
29th May 2007, 13:53
I have just finished trawling through this thread and what memories of ship's food! No-one has mentioned Henderson Line as far as curry is concerned. All Elder Dempster pursers' staff will remember with "affection" the K boats but they has West African crews. I sailed for a year on "Bhamo" when she still had a Burmese crew. The saloon curries were passable but my Writer and I got the Deck Bhandari to supply the crew's curry to us each day - marvellous!
I also sailed on a chartered German ship ("Transeuropa") and they used to have the thick pea soup with sausages floating in it on Saturdays.
I saw reference to lime juice. We loaded concentrated lime juice at a Ghanaian surf port once. It was in wooden casks and one fell from the sling onto the deck and burst. The deck began to bubble and smoke as the juice bit into it and hoses were hurriedly rigged to wash it away. I've never touched the stuff since (except watered down with gin!).

trotterdotpom
29th May 2007, 16:27
PurserUk, I remember that thick soup with sausages from some German ships I sailed on - delicious. Can't for the life of me remember the name. Anybody help?

John T,

John Cassels
29th May 2007, 19:44
In holland they call it "snert ". Any help ?.

Tony D
30th May 2007, 00:39
Here yer go, Snert.

Erwtensoep
(Dutch pea soup)
This national Dutch glory--also called snert--is prepared differently in every household--and traditionally it is made a day ahead. Why? To improve the flavor, but also to concentrate it to the preferred thickness; viz., so that a spoon will stand upright in it. This is a time when microwave reheats are ideal--no more burning the bottom of the pan trying to reheat such a thick paste. I like the nutmeg in this recipe--it recalls the time when the Dutch had the Banda Island nutmeg trade sewn up in a monopoly. It's traditional to serve the soup with slabs of bacon on pumpernickel bread. Serve hot to 4-6 people as a hearty meal. Click HERE for more on Dutch cuisine and dining in Amsterdam at www.SpecialBites.com.

* 1 pig's foot
* 6 cups water
* 3 cups dried split green peas, rinsed
* 1 smoked ham hock
* 2 potatoes, peeled and diced
* 1/2 cup sliced leeks
* 1/3 cup sliced onions
* 1/4 cup sliced celery
* 1 teaspoon thyme, rubbed into the soup
* 1/4 teaspoon nutmeg
* 1 Tablespoon lemon juice
* salt and pepper to taste
* 1/2 pound cooked kielbasa or other smoked sausage, sliced thin

Parboil the pig's foot for 5 minutes, then drain, discarding liquid. Bring the water to a boil in a large heavy pot, then add the peas, pig's foot, and ham hock. When the water reboils, reduce the heat to a simmer and let cook, partially covered, for 2 hours. Stir it from time to time.

Stir in the rest of the ingredients (except the kielbasa) and simmer for 30 more minutes, stirring from time to time. Remove the pig's foot and ham hock, cut away the meat, and return it to the pot with the sliced kielbasa. Simmer for 10 minutes or so.

When ready to serve, reheat and ladle into bowls, with lots of thick bacon and bread on the side.

(Thumb)

trotterdotpom
6th June 2007, 03:43
Thanks John - I'd read about "snert" on other SN threads by the coaster men. It sounds very similar but it was called something else on the German ships. The sausage they put in it was chopped into large pieces and had lumps of fat in it - tasted great.

Thanks for that recipe Tony - I'll pass that on the manager and see what she can do, on second thoughts, maybe I'll just do it myself.

John T.

purserjuk
6th June 2007, 09:45
Does anyone remember the "armoured" haggis served up on occasion on Henderson's "K" boats?

skymaster
13th August 2007, 15:22
I was just looking back through some of the menus that are posted.Great gastronomical feeds.However questions arose.What the heck is a Chipolata
Sauce?Answer please.I am sure this is not the only question on the food we all ate long ago.

skymaster

Mick Spear
13th August 2007, 15:26
To put it in plain terms: gravy with cipolata sausages diced up in it, served with Roast Turkey.

Mick S

Chouan
13th August 2007, 16:18
The menus always looked better than they really were.

sparkie2182
14th August 2007, 01:19
yesterdays sausages left over from breakfast.... dropped in bisto

happy days.............:)

trotterdotpom
14th August 2007, 01:36
Chipolatas are spicy little sausages, about two or three inches long. As mentioned they used to be served with roast turkey. They can be very tasty.

I don't know if the little sausages that come in the tins of baked beans are chipolatas or not but they taste great after a couple of years soaking up bean juice.

John T.

lakercapt
14th August 2007, 16:02
I think that the chief stewards AKA the grocer had great poetic liscense and used to look up dictionaries to find obscure meaning to load their menus and make the most aweful muck sound interesting!!

Chouan
14th August 2007, 16:17
"Kromeskies a la Russe" for example.

Santos
14th August 2007, 17:54
All I can remember is that the soup used to start as Consomme ( clear and often tasteless ) on the Monday and finish up as Thick Pea Soup you could stand your spoon up in by the following Sunday. Various things ? being added during the week to increase its constiuent content.

Chris.

Tony D
14th August 2007, 18:15
Ah! pea soup an sippits, put hairs on yer chest that did, only ever got chipolata sauce wi the Christmas Turkey.
(Thumb)

K urgess
14th August 2007, 18:24
I can still taste that pea soup and the novel use for ancient bread. Not necessarily a bad memory.

Bit of a shock to the system for a working class lad from 'Ull.

Hungry Hogarth's wasn't too bad. A bit like an slightly upmarket transport caff that hadn't had any fresh deliveries for a few months.

PSNC was something completely different. Excellent nosebag at all times. The Old Man considered me a department head and therefore must sit at the big table with the passengers. Probably because he didn't want certain passengers at his table. Trouble was a lot of the menu I'd never heard of let alone knew how to eat. Managed without drinking the finger bowl but my first experience of globe artichokes and butter sauce must have been wondrous to behold.

Kris

barrypriddis
14th August 2007, 19:56
Pepper soup was a great favourite in Palm Line. Very hot and spicy with predictable results, but great on a Sunday with a few beers beforehand and deckhead survey afterwards.

Chouan
14th August 2007, 22:31
Beetroot and onion salad once you'd been at sea for a couple of weeks

Santos
14th August 2007, 22:40
How many of you bridge watch keepers remember those cold and congealed fried egg sandwiches on the tray at night time ?

Chris

K urgess
15th August 2007, 00:05
Luxury, Chris.

I mostly remember curly dog sp..... sandwiches in greaseproof paper every night.
Still can't stand sandwich spread.

Kris

Keltic Star
15th August 2007, 04:44
How many of you bridge watch keepers remember those cold and congealed fried egg sandwiches on the tray at night time ?

Chris

Never remember the luxury of a fried egg sandwich, congealed or not, all I remember were sardines or sandwich spread.

tunatownshipwreck
15th August 2007, 06:38
I remember US ships would set out a feast for the men on watch. There would always be sliced beef and ham, bread, mayonnaise, hard-boiled eggs, cheese, several types of pie, coffee, milk, chocolate milk, butter, as well as canned meals like beef stew.

Chouan
15th August 2007, 09:04
Breaking through the warm blanket of nostalgia comes the awful coffee powder, and the choice between powdered milk, shaky milk or condensed milk.

Peter4447
15th August 2007, 10:50
Two Grey Funnel favourites were Werner Schnitzel and Saute Kidney on Toast, the latter for breakfast.

Peter4447(Thumb)

K urgess
15th August 2007, 11:53
When my wife came away with me they had to increase the order for condensed milk. She loved it.

Quite a few ships I sailed on left the officer's pantry open so that you could go and help yourself to what was left after dinner. Kept warm in the baine-marie or cold in the fridge. This was mostly on tankers, from small ones to VLCCs. Especially the "world's favourite tanker" where deep fried chicken wings and catering tins of baked beans would always be available in the midships pantry.
On one, sparkies sauces were well appreciated in the "Knakkered Ned Bar" when the prawns were dished up.
The "mousetrap" on most was exceptional as well and, on one occasion, much appreciated by our brothers in the RFA.

andysk
15th August 2007, 12:28
Aaaah !

Kromeskis a la Russe

Pigs in Blankets

Clan Line Spew aka sandwich spread

Connyonnie (sp ?)

One egg a day, and picking the lock on the galley doors for more to hard boil in the bridge kettle at night.

Being on Hector Heron away from the usual routes meaning an (almost) unlimited feeding rate.

Watching the PCO, out of his brain one lunchtime, go face first into the tomato soup, then stagger off to his cabin with his shorts on back to front (how he achieved that nobody ever found out !) He was a good feeder though !

Aaah ! memories

Moulder
15th August 2007, 12:41
"Kromeskies a la Russe" for example.

Or Oxtail Jardinaire! = Cows a r s e in the garden!!!!

Steve.
(Thumb)

Peter (Pat) Baker
15th August 2007, 13:38
I still remember (with fondness) a breakfast dish which consisted of chopped up kidney in a rich brown sauce served on fried bread.

I have tried for years to order it in whilst eating out, asking chefs if they had a name for it, and trying to find a recipe.

Can anybody out there help? An ex Harrison Chief Steward or Chief Cook could probabaly help.

Peter (Pat) Baker.

trotterdotpom
15th August 2007, 13:42
Probably "devilled kidneys", it was offal but I liked it too.

John T.

awateah2
15th August 2007, 13:51
Haven't we already had a thread on this subject under 'Merchant Navy Fare', I seem to recall many of the delicacies mentioned there.

Peter Fielding
15th August 2007, 13:52
I still remember (with fondness) a breakfast dish which consisted of chopped up kidney in a rich brown sauce served on fried bread.

I have tried for years to order it in whilst eating out, asking chefs if they had a name for it, and trying to find a recipe.

Can anybody out there help? An ex Harrison Chief Steward or Chief Cook could probabaly help.

Peter (Pat) Baker.

Sounds a bit like what B.I. used to dish up as "Kidney Turbigo." (Kidneys that have been through the turbine?)

K urgess
15th August 2007, 14:23
Always good to revisit a favourite subject, awateah2.
One of the first questions was always "Is she a good feeder?".

I did see a tin of devilled kidneys in Tesco's once. Probably been removed now under some Euro PC directive or other. I'll have a hunt next time I volunteer to brave the battleground.

Just like the army marches on it's stomach it applies even more to afloat. Our foraging trips for fresh tucker were a bit more limited.

awateah2
15th August 2007, 15:08
Totally agree , so if we re-open the original thread it avoids repetition but rekindles memories

WilliamH
15th August 2007, 15:46
When I was on Cory's ore carriers, Knightsgarth, Monksgarth and Dukesgarth, curry and rice was always served at breakfast time. Also on the Knightsgarth the highlight of the week, Saturday tea time we had salmon and chips, i.e half a tin of salmon usally still in the round form as it had come out of the can with chips.

clankie
15th August 2007, 20:39
Ah hhhh I can see and smell it now, devilled kidneys, aka s**t on a raft.
(Smoke)

alexmackinnon
15th August 2007, 20:44
Ah hhhh I can see and smell it now, devilled kidneys, aka s**t on a raft.
(Smoke)

Hi Clankie, I remember the first time I heard it called s**t on a raft, I almost choked on it.

clankie
15th August 2007, 20:44
Ah hhhh I can see and smell it now, kidney turbigo, aka s**t on a raft or "babies heads" also known as steak and kidney pudding. (Smoke)

ARRANMAN35
15th August 2007, 20:47
Always good to revisit a favourite subject, awateah2.
One of the first questions was always "Is she a good feeder?".

I did see a tin of devilled kidneys in Tesco's once. Probably been removed now under some Euro PC directive or other. I'll have a hunt next time I volunteer to brave the battleground.

Just like the army marches on it's stomach it applies even more to afloat. Our foraging trips for fresh tucker were a bit more limited.

Hi, No longer stocked by Tesco, have been told that Morrisons have them, Happy hunting.
Archie.

sparkie2182
15th August 2007, 22:17
snake and pygmy pie.............

and on the brock boats............

indian crew curry................there was always a "less powerfull" european version available, but the bandhari always supplied the nuclear powered indian curry for the more discerning palates........straight from the crew mess.......

:)

Derbyroy
15th August 2007, 22:50
Surely all hands here assembled must have been told at signing on ANY
Ship , That the food was "Sunday dinner Every day" and " Christmas Dinner Every Sunday", at least thats what we were promised .........
Most Tankers were great some of the Cargo vessels left a lot to the imagination.
But Steak on Saturday afternoons was best..
regards
Derby[=P]

sparkie2182
15th August 2007, 23:22
with cunard it was pub lunch on saturday..............

and steaks for dinner...............


yum :)

K urgess
15th August 2007, 23:58
Although the food was great on VLCCs, including free wine, you could tell the day of the week by the menu most of the time.
If it was steak it was either Thursday or Sunday.[=P]

Peter (Pat) Baker
16th August 2007, 12:39
I did once order devilled kidney for lunch in a very upmarket pub.

This turned out to be a couple of whole kidneys fried (or grilled) in some sort of hot spices.

Whilst it was quite decent it was not a patch on the s..t on a raft of glorious memory.

I am still hoping that somebody will be able to supply us all with a recipe.

Peter (Pat) Baker.

andysk
16th August 2007, 13:16
Hi Pat ...

Here's one : http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/database/devilledkidneysontoa_85068.shtml

Not sure how many Cooks would have done it this way, it's probably a bit upmarket for most of them of my acquaintance !

I did stay at a great B&B in Osmington Mills (near Weymouth) a few years ago, she served them for breakfast without warning, nobody else was very happy, but I thought it was great, and managed four portions !

Cheers

Andy

Peter (Pat) Baker
20th August 2007, 13:26
Andy,

many thanks for your reply, and the recipes.

They sound great and I will definitely try them.

However, the dish I am thinking of was chopped kidney in a rich brown sauce (beefy) and served on fried bread rather than toast.

I will live in hope that we may all receive that recipe eventually.

As I said earlier and old Harrison Line Chief Steward or cook may supply this.

Regards,

Peter (Pat) Baker.

Moulder
20th August 2007, 14:00
I sailed with a chief steward - John "Raviolli" Rout - in Kuwait Shipping Company - what a character!
Apparently on one ship he put on Sausage 'n Mash for evening dinner and the Old Man took offence and said it was a dinner only fit for peasants - "Ravi" then repeated this meal (after I'd joined) but called it Peasants Delight! - I was on the quick 15 meal break then back to get the Portishead traffic list - so read the menu as Pheasant Delight - "Ummm - I'll have some of that" thought I.
What a disappointment.

Regards,

Steve.
(Thumb)

Mick Spear
20th August 2007, 14:10
Folks

Most dishes/fare has been mentioned and it's a great thread. Different companies had their different specialities; the recipe for the MN renowned 'Cheese Beanos' varied from both company and cook. But has anyone heard of "chuck Wagon Grinder"?

This was a dish associated with Shell tankers - well when i was there anyway in mid eighties. Not sure if it's known outside of MN circles? It consists of:

1.Half a bread bap (made fresh on board), this is then slightly grilled (i prefer to grill both sides as it keeps it crispy). A spreading of butter is optional.
2. A circle of processed ham is placed on this.
3. Then a ring of pineapple (drained of juice) placed on the ham.
4. Spoon an even layer of freshly made coleslaw on top (not too drenched with mayo).
5. Grate some chedder cheese on top.
6. Then place under the grill untill the cheese is bubbling and slightly brown in colour.

Is your mouth watering? It's good folks, believe me.

Mick S

Chouan
20th August 2007, 16:30
Seeking receipe for Panagalty, spelling may be incorrect.

My mother's (Gateshead), and grandmother's (Hartlepool) version:
Potato, onion, corned beef, sliced and layered in a dish, well seasoned with salt and pepper, covered with stock and then cooked in an oven until the potatoes are done. Ideally served onto slices of bread to soak up the sauce. I never had it at sea.

Ron Stringer
20th August 2007, 22:17
Don't know the correct spelling either but if you Google "panacalty" you come up with more recipes than you will cook in a month. Mostly the same ingredients, with only minor variations.

Enjoy.

Chouan
20th August 2007, 22:33
Hugh ;
I sailed with Les and he was a good feeder ! Not from Dundee though as I was living in Dundee at that time and would have remembered . Les was an "English " but a good lad nonetheless .

Brocklebanks crewed the Mahout from Newport News by sailing us all over to New York on the Queen Elizabeth . ( an error of judgement on the part of head office ; we had a ball ! ) I was 5th Eng at the time and the 3 rd mate was Alex Smith from St Monance in The Kingdom of Fife . He became a very good shipmate . He Andy Brett ( from Dundee ) and myself were all at the same Cabin Class table ; we had to wear our uniforms at meal times to impress the fare paying passengers !

First day at breakfast we were looking at the Menu and Alex Shouts out " Steward you've given me the wrong menu ; this is the luch menu ! Steward takes a look and says " No sir this is the breakfast Menu "
Alex says " Breakfast ??? Who ever heard of Oinion Spoup for Breakfast ???
Much hilarity ensued . Alex then said " keep your soup and bring me a Kipper "

The Old Man ; Chief : Mate and 2nd Eng . all were in first class ; the rest of us in Cabin except the Chippy and apprentices who travelled tourist . Talk about the British Class Distinction . ( I was OK with it when I became Chief ! )
Happy Days Derek

The "Officers' Club" at the American owned Alcoa loading facility at Paranam in Surinam was for Masters and Mates only, so snobbery is not only British.

captkenn
22nd August 2007, 21:42
what about the exotic sounding soups creme du barry ..cauliflower soup potage breton...butter bean soup muligatawny and bron windsor or beef consomme ..oxo had better taste turkey and chicken al a king coronation chicken egg mayonaise boston bake beans and how many different ways to use and call potatoes or the goulash

We had a cook who made superb soups but he gave them exotic names according to where we were. 'Consomme de Canal' (Suez), 'Soupe a la tete de Pierre' (Peterhead) [=P]

captkenn
22nd August 2007, 21:53
Hi Joe,

Think it may be "Panacalty"? - I remember having it once on a ship - the recipe was given to the cook by the electrician. Think it's a Geordie dish with main ingredients of bacon, onion and potatoe - I may be wrong - it was a lifetime ago. (Eat)

Regards,

Steve.

The Geordie dish is called Pan Haggerty

450g (1lb) Potatoes
110g (4oz) Cheddar or Lancashire Cheese
2 medium Onions
25g (1oz) Butter
1 tbsp Vegetable Oil
Salt and Pepper

Thinly slice the potatoes and onions and grate the cheese.
Combine the butter and oil in a large frying pan.
Remove the pan from the heat and place layers of sliced potatoes, onions and cheese, reserving a little of the cheese.
Cover and cook gently for about 30 minutes or until the potatoes and onions are cooked.
Pre-heat the grill five minutes before the end of the cooking time.
Sprinkle the reserved cheese over the top of the mixture, place under grill until the cheese is golden brown and bubbling.
Serve straight from the pan.

Bridie
23rd August 2007, 21:27
We had a cook who made superb soups but he gave them exotic names according to where we were. 'Consomme de Canal' (Suez), 'Soupe a la tete de Pierre' (Peterhead) [=P]
On the Dorsetbrook the grub was nothing to write home about (that's me being diplomatic!). The "cook" ("who called the cook a ****?" "who called the **** a cook!") had 3 catering size tins of Knorr soup mix - Chicken, Spring Vegetable and Onion. He also had a continuous soup pot that he added all sorts of dubious things to and then topped it up with water. If you asked what the soup was, he added a single spoonful from one of the tins and that became the "soup de jour" (EEK)

Steve Hodges
23rd August 2007, 21:43
On the Dorsetbrook the grub was nothing to write home about (that's me being diplomatic!). The "cook" ("who called the cook a ****?" "who called the **** a cook!") had 3 catering size tins of Knorr soup mix - Chicken, Spring Vegetable and Onion. He also had a continuous soup pot that he added all sorts of dubious things to and then topped it up with water. If you asked what the soup was, he added a single spoonful from one of the tins and that became the "soup de jour" (EEK)

Ah, soup! always tastes best if nicked from the galley and brewed up on the HP turbine nozzle box at 2 in the morning.
I spent a few weeks in the old Mariner's Hotel on Commercial Road in London,many years ago. The evening meal always started with soup which uncannily resembled the remains of the previous days main course. When asked what flavour it was, the dear old waitress invariably replied " Mariner's Soup!"

John Campbell
23rd August 2007, 22:10
There was the famous story about the "Goose for Christmas".
In the 1950s ships used to carry chicken coops on the poop deck and on my first ship there were two between the docking bridge on the stern.

The oldman decided when we were in Freemantle to purchase two live Geese and so have fresh goose on the Xmas menu. One goose was for the Deck Dept.and the other for the Engineers - we had Indian Crew. It was the Deck Apprentices' job to feed the birds and they used to let then out for a a little walk about sometimes. There being some ten days until Xmas - we were heading for Beira at the time.

The Captain and the Chief Eng were having a yarn one day standing on deck looking aft at where the Apprentices were engaged in taking water and corn to the geese when suddenly a goose was seen to flap its wings and flopover the side into the sea. Watching the bird disappear rapidly astern in the wake the Master was heard to say "My god , there goes the Engineer's goose".
JC

timeout
24th August 2007, 00:50
Having never been in the service, but having suffered Merchant Navy Fare selected by FGM acting as Marine Superintendent in West Africa, and still thinking they were running a ship, ( 2 bob a day per man for food, and proud to tell you they were in budget!!!!)

Palm Oil Chop after the bar on sundays, Chicken a la King on fridays, yuk you needed 4 large ones just to smell it, and woe betide anyone going in to the fridge and making a sausage sarnii for supper, or perhaps scoffing an Haiwwian Toast somebody hadnt fancied as a starter,i got away with it because i wasnt a "gentleman" i hadnt been in the Merch, and therefore didnt understand protocol, and my strange ways were tolerated and questioned only once in 5 years (i dont know if he ever did manage to extract those sausages)

captkenn
25th August 2007, 00:23
Grace

"For what we are about to receive may the Cook be duly forgiven."

tillo
26th August 2007, 17:51
Have you ungrateful buggers never heard the phrase " Never bite the hands that feed you?"
Only said b'cause you never knew when the damn things had last been washed!
Why do you think there was so many very tasty soups?

kernewekmarnor
28th August 2007, 13:00
i have just 2 words for you................chessie beano's
classic British Merchant Navy fare(Eat)

Steve Woodward
28th August 2007, 13:03
Cheesy Hammy Eggy

K urgess
28th August 2007, 14:24
Sardines on toast.

Usually sardine on toast definitely singular and the toast soaked in oil.
Perfect for stormy weather[=P]

tillo
28th August 2007, 15:01
i have just 2 words for you................chessie beano's
classic British Merchant Navy fare(Eat)


"Chessie" What's Chessie?

Now Cheese Beano's, Ham or spam, Beans, cheese and to make it seem posh....A Pineapple ring,
But don't tell that bloody grocer before hand.

Allan Wareing
28th August 2007, 15:28
Have you ungrateful buggers never heard the phrase " Never bite the hands that feed you?"
Only said b'cause you never knew when the damn things had last been washed!
Why do you think there was so many very tasty soups?

tillo, Why is a hotdog the best kind of dog?-----because it feeds the hand that bites it. Allan.

tillo
28th August 2007, 22:07
Nice one skipper,

Always willing to learn something new from my peers!

Tillo.

kernewekmarnor
29th August 2007, 14:21
whats "chessie" he says, you been down under too long me old sausage.
pineapple ring? (EEK) on a chessie beano? not on a blue star ship brother, never.

tillo
29th August 2007, 17:54
Wind up a Grocer and watch him panic, Yep I do know about Vitamin 'c' deficiency on star boats, We liked to think that was the reason they could never beat NZS crews at footy!!!!
Well it must have been some such reason because we were c--p!

offcumdum sanddancer
7th September 2007, 14:03
I posted this in the BP forum, but after talking to various people I now realise that this recipe is common throught the Merchant Navy, and as far as I know has never been seen in an Indian, Pakistanni or Bangladeshi curry house?

BP DAHL CURRY

Dahl curry. This was a favourite for Sunday lunch menu during the mid seventies, if I remember correctly. Sunday lunch for us dayworkers (and 4-8 watchkeepers) then was followed by a study of the deckhead followed by a closer study of the back of the eyelids. I had not seen it or heard of it for many years and, when real spices were available here in sunny South Shields I decided to have a go at recreating it. If you have had a search for it on google or the like you will only find recipies for the dahl bit, rather than the BP creation or 'made up BP only' recipe, as a whole.

First on the plate is a bed of plain white boiled rice, I find that basmatti rice gives the best results.

The dhal or dal or dahl is the lentil puree bit next on the heap, and can be made from either one, or a mixture of various dahls. You can experiment to get the best result. Try standard red lentils, or any of these:- Toor, chana, kala, mung, urad, masoor or rajma dahls. See here http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dal

Third up was the dry fried minced meat. Try either beef, lamb, or even turkey. I think that beef would be most authentic, if authentic is the correct description for what I think was a wholy contrived dish, devised at sea school?

Topped off with crispy fried onion or battered fried onions.


Now for the recipe which is my latest try:

Rice.
You don't want me to tell you how to cook rice, do you? T'will be directions for sucking eggs next!

Dahl.
6 to 8 ounces of dahls
1 large onion chopped up finely
couple cloves garlic
spices - teaspoon each of ground cummin, coriander, tumeric, chilli, black pepper and garam masala. If these are not readily available try buying a packet of Shan dal curry mix, (available from Ahmed's food supermarket, near the mosque in Laygate) If not living 'on Tyne', try a couple of tablespoons of mild curry paste mix such as Nazir's or Patak's.
1 -2 tablespoons concentrated tomato puree.


Clean and soak desired dahls for minimum of an hour. Drain. Cover with water to about twice their volume, and bring to the boil. Cook until the water is absorbed by the lentils and they are quite soft. Add boiling water if necessary to keep from becoming too thick and burning on the bottom. Not too much water either, don't want it too runny. Meanwhile, cook the onion and garlic in a little oil or ghee and when transparent add the curry paste or powder. After a few minutes, when the spices are infused, tip the lot into the boiling dahl. Stir in the tomato puree. You may also want to add a very small pinch of MSG (I do) The dahl is done when it becomes a smooth puree. This is assisted by using one of those high speed mini food mixers such as the Moulinex turbomix, whilst still in the pan, though not required if lentils soaked enough and cooked long enough.

Curried minced meat.
10 to 15 oz minced meat
Large onion chopped fine
Curry paste, hot, 2 - tablespoons.
Oil or ghee

Fry the onion in the oil until transparent, add curry paste, cook for a few minutes and then add the minced meat. Cook on low for a few minutes until the mince is cooked, stiring it to stop it sticking. Add a little oil if required. Try not to let it get too oily though.

Fried onions.
I buy mine ready cooked, from speciality asian foodstores.

Build the meal.
Spoon a bed of fluffy white boiled rice onto a plate, spoon over a layer of dahl puree. Next, an ample helping of fried mince. Sprinkle over the top a little (ha ha) layer of fried onions. Eat, drink lager, and proceed to ones scratcher for a little shuteye.

Enjoy, Keith Perriman

Ali Bain
8th September 2007, 09:28
Ah, soup! always tastes best if nicked from the galley and brewed up on the HP turbine nozzle box at 2 in the morning.
I spent a few weeks in the old Mariner's Hotel on Commercial Road in London,many years ago. The evening meal always started with soup which uncannily resembled the remains of the previous days main course. When asked what flavour it was, the dear old waitress invariably replied " Mariner's Soup!"
Aye Steve, it did not matter where you were the 12/4 used to eat and survive pretty well as I recall.
Regards-Ali. Bain ex. professional 3/e(Thumb)

Duncan112
9th September 2007, 12:09
Cooked my girlfriends's 8 year old son cheese beanos for breakfast this morning - polished off 2 of them and he is a notoriously fickle eater!! Obviously a young lad with taste.

I had clean forgotten about them until this thread started. BP pub lunch staple as I recall.

Duncan

Bill Davies
14th September 2007, 21:50
I could never understand why anyone complained about ships food. It was invariably better that what one received at home if the truth was told.
The biggest complainers were usually those whose diet at home only varied with what they were having with chips and peas (Pie or Fish).

Landlubber
15th September 2007, 08:57
This would be the case if the same standards applied to every vessel. I have sailed on ships where the catering was to the standard of a five-star hotel. I have sailed on others where it was not fit to feed to pigs. It did not depend solely on the type of vessel. I have sailed on a cargo ship where the food was better than that served on a passenger vessel. Some of the best food I had was on a drill ship owned by a British coastal company, some of the worst was on other vessels of that same company.

Ed.

quietman
15th September 2007, 18:46
Whilst on board Stevie Clarkes Ashington the cook served up mint potatoes. They turned out to be a large dollop of bright green mashed potatoes. My wife was on board at the time had a hard job controlling her laughter.

john strange
17th September 2007, 08:34
On the Dorsetbrook the grub was nothing to write home about (that's me being diplomatic!). The "cook" ("who called the cook a ****?" "who called the **** a cook!") had 3 catering size tins of Knorr soup mix - Chicken, Spring Vegetable and Onion. He also had a continuous soup pot that he added all sorts of dubious things to and then topped it up with water. If you asked what the soup was, he added a single spoonful from one of the tins and that became the "soup de jour" (EEK)

Ther are three types of cook, Cooks, cuckoos, and wilful bloody murders.(K)

Bill Davies
17th September 2007, 15:39
Judging from the above, would it be fair to say that the poor feeders were those with British cooks/catering staff???

Landlubber
17th September 2007, 16:05
Not from my experience. I've had good and bad food with British, Indian, Chinese and West Indian cooks.

Chouan
17th September 2007, 21:19
I could never understand why anyone complained about ships food. It was invariably better that what one received at home if the truth was told.
The biggest complainers were usually those whose diet at home only varied with what they were having with chips and peas (Pie or Fish).

The number of times I've heard that one, usually from an Old Man, or a Chief Steward to justify poor feeding, and I feel embarrassed to read it on this forum.

Binnacle
17th September 2007, 21:52
[QUOTE The number of times I've heard that one, usually from an Old Man, or a Chief Steward to justify poor feeding, and I feel embarrassed to read it on this forum.[/QUOTE]

Chouan,
I thoroughly agree with you, the reflection on our home feeding standards I also found to be particulary distasteful, my mother having fed the family well on a lowly wage budget. Provision related Merchant Shipping Acts necessary to enforce minimum compliance were and are very necessary.

John Campbell
17th September 2007, 22:01
I sailed with an Irish Master who graded the lunch time Caltex Curry as HOT, BLOODY HOT or BEJESUS. Nothing ever could beat a good lunch curry followed by an afternoon kip - when you were mate and on the 4-8.
JC

Chouan
17th September 2007, 22:56
Not from my experience. I've had good and bad food with British, Indian, Chinese and West Indian cooks.

Exactly, quality was dependent upon the honesty and character of the Chief Thief and the Old Man, the ability of the cook, and the culinary imagination of all three.

For example, when Havtor (I won't name the particular ship to avoid embarassment) took over the P&O Gas Tankers, the P&O people who stayed on wanted to keep their Saturday curry lunches. Good for them (I wasn't one of them), I could understand their feelings, but the crew were Filipinos, who don't "do" curries. They do excellent rice and spice based food of their own of course, but not the Indian curries that the ex-P&O people were used to and wanted. But, rather than compromise, we had the Saturday curry lunches, with Filipino versions of the traditional Indian curries, without the proper recipes, with the same complaints every Saturday "These Filipinos are no good, they can't cook a proper curry". Suggestions of Pork Adobo instead were greeted with "But we have curry for lunch on Saturday wth P&O".

dredgeman
17th September 2007, 23:15
In my many years on Dredgers i found that the majority of complaints regarding food nearly always came from the crew members that were fresh from Deepsea, maybe they were pampered too much there and thought they were slumming it on a small Boat...

Orbitaman
28th November 2007, 15:45
The Geordie dish is called Pan Haggerty

450g (1lb) Potatoes
110g (4oz) Cheddar or Lancashire Cheese
2 medium Onions
25g (1oz) Butter
1 tbsp Vegetable Oil
Salt and Pepper

Thinly slice the potatoes and onions and grate the cheese.
Combine the butter and oil in a large frying pan.
Remove the pan from the heat and place layers of sliced potatoes, onions and cheese, reserving a little of the cheese.
Cover and cook gently for about 30 minutes or until the potatoes and onions are cooked.
Pre-heat the grill five minutes before the end of the cooking time.
Sprinkle the reserved cheese over the top of the mixture, place under grill until the cheese is golden brown and bubbling.
Serve straight from the pan.

'Panacalty' as I remember it comes from Hartlepool and consisted of sliced corned beef, potatoes and onions, layered in a roasting tin and then cooked until the potatoes are cooked. The top is then grilled to brown the top layer of potatoes.

John Campbell
28th November 2007, 20:38
When we apprentices in Bank Line lucky enough to get to Buenos Aires got a run ashore in the early fifties we dined on the sizzling bife de lomo (filet mignon) and juicy sweetbreads with papas fritas the like I have never seen since. Washed down with a bottle of lovely red wine or a cerveza Quilmes. All for a few pesos. Does anyone else recall those lovely meals.?
JC

Landlubber
28th November 2007, 21:14
I remember the bife lomos from my couple of Royal Mail trips down to B.A. They were really cheap. Even cheaper were the eye fillet steaks which we would pilfer from the cargo, whilst on cargo watch, and cook in the P.O.'s mess. I have never tasted steaks as good as these since. I never will now as I am a vegetarian.

K urgess
28th November 2007, 21:14
Oh Yessss! Most definitely.
Bifi de lomo completo a dos huevos i patatas fritas, por favor.
(apologies to our Spanish members [=P])
About the quivalent of 3 bob when I was there and more than you can eat.
The bars up the Avenida as well where a round of beers got you prezels and a round of Cuba Libres got you the table full of goodies in places like the Sam Houston.

Bob Preston
28th November 2007, 21:15
Yes.

Bob

Burned Toast
28th November 2007, 21:26
You poor boys never been fed so bad!! Sheeps heed and stottie.

Get real.

Tony D
29th November 2007, 10:52
Beware the shops of the north are awash with forged stottie now,they look like stottie they feel like stottie but stottie they int.(EEK)

Chris Isaac
29th November 2007, 11:00
Also in BA I remember when on night cargo going to a little cantina in the docks for bife sandwiches. A thick crusty baguette with a fantastic steak in it!!
I was in Saint Line then and outbound we were in the old docks which is where the cantina was. Then we went up river to Rosario and back to BA to the new docks. Each time we stayed in BA for about 2 weeks... fantastic...me just a cadet then. This is back in 63/64

Govanbill
29th November 2007, 12:20
Sunday breakfast on BI ships was Fried york ham , egg and chips. It was indeed a treat

tedc
29th November 2007, 20:22
Christmas Dinner, on board ship, remains the most memorable for me.

It was always (in my experience) an excellent meal, mixed with lots of very heavy nostalgia, super stories being told, etc, etc.

As "Sparkie" a key role was to get the Queen's Speech down to the mess wherever the ship was - not always the easiest trick to complete! Pretty much always achieved though although static interference was commonplace .
The speech still brings a lump to my throat!

Peter Martin
30th November 2007, 18:01
John.
yes I remember the good old Kromesky.

Another I remember is' Beef a la Mode' which was beef having been penetrated with whole carrotts and then pot roasted. Beef Olives was another .

The poor old Cornish Pasty went under a variety of names depending on what company you were in . I have come across it in three diferent guises, Armadillo, Sealed Orders and worse of all *****s Handbags (cos you never knew what was within)

regards
Dave MacVicker
Anybody remember "Palm Fruit Sundae" - ED's special - was ice cream with crystalised fruit mixed into it - never been able to replicate it so any hints most welcome!

Peter Martin
30th November 2007, 18:02
A fellow Middy had a theory about Roast Beef a la Mode - He said the cook had a sort of carrot firing gun which was used to pump the beef full of carrot as oposed to lead!

TIM HUDSON
30th November 2007, 18:36
Exactly, quality was dependent upon the honesty and character of the Chief Thief and the Old Man, the ability of the cook, and the culinary imagination of all three.

For example, when Havtor (I won't name the particular ship to avoid embarassment) took over the P&O Gas Tankers, the P&O people who stayed on wanted to keep their Saturday curry lunches. Good for them (I wasn't one of them), I could understand their feelings, but the crew were Filipinos, who don't "do" curries. They do excellent rice and spice based food of their own of course, but not the Indian curries that the ex-P&O people were used to and wanted. But, rather than compromise, we had the Saturday curry lunches, with Filipino versions of the traditional Indian curries, without the proper recipes, with the same complaints every Saturday "These Filipinos are no good, they can't cook a proper curry". Suggestions of Pork Adobo instead were greeted with "But we have curry for lunch on Saturday wth P&O".

i joined Havtor at P & O change over to them and was amazed at wonderful living i hadn't seen since leaving Ellermans 12 years earlier.! The Filipino crew were OK but maybe they were as surprised as me. Christmas Day was a mess
especially the mince pies made with....you guessed it .....mince beef. think someone had been too ambitious when submitting menu. tim H

pete the pirate
30th November 2007, 19:28
During the 70's, Esso deep sea fed very well, proper menu's at every meal.
Fresh bread and rolls' every day.
Wine on Sundays, with steaks, Kromeski and Nasi goreng often appeared as starters, also
Shark on a raft, (sardines on toast)
Train smash,as part of the main course ( fried potatoes with tinned tomatoes, supossed to represent the gory bits from a train accident).

Usually a choice of 2-3 starters, 2-3 main courses, and 2 sweets, so a possible 7 courses available, especially on a Sunday evening.

Heard 2 new cadets joined one ship a Sunday, and thought you had to eat the lot, so waded through all 7 courses.

Also the breakfast menu was considerable, but certain things you did not order, young third engineer's wife on her first day, looked at the menu and decided on the hot cakes and syrup for breakfast, (no one ever asked for it).

Loads of banging and noisy crashing of pans in the galley, with smatterings of bad language coming out, when the steward took the order through, a very red faced young lady at the table, ( I think the galley staff where just doing it as a wind up), she got her hot cakes, but never ordered them again.

On the other side of thing, lobster Thermidor would appear on one ship after taking stores at capetown, so goodness knows what the feeding budget was.

On coasters, the best cook i can remember was Maltese, and gay, but one of the few that cooked his own bread every day, instead of today's buying it and freezing, which seems to be the way it is now done on a lot of ships.


Some happy memories

Tony Morris
30th November 2007, 19:32
When I was with Ropners on the Stonepool mid 70's the Grocer (C/Stwd) had a motto "I'm not here to feed you, I'm only here to keep you alive".

K urgess
30th November 2007, 21:03
I agree with the Esso feeding, Pete.
Stored up in Lisbon leaving drydock and again in Capetown.
I used to know what to expect because I had to send the 500 word storing message.
Texaco were almost as good.
Got to have something to beat the boredom.
I hadn't seen anything like it since PSNC.
Best bread rolls by far were by an Indian cook on a Mobil tanker.

lakercapt
1st December 2007, 23:01
When I was with Ropners on the Stonepool mid 70's the Grocer (C/Stwd) had a motto "I'm not here to feed you, I'm only here to keep you alive".

Guess they never changed since I sailed with them in the 50's.
It was duff that kept us going. What won't fatten will fill.
Bill R

jAdUwallah
29th December 2007, 08:59
Anyone remember TANG? High it Vit-C.
I went down the Falklands on the British Trent, blah blah, no land-fall for 4 months. We ran out of fruit 'n' veg after a while (most food-stuffs actually),
as there was nowhere to take stores on. We were a bit desperate. Eventually, when we took a load of armed forces people on board for repatriation, a load of fruit appeared .We fell upon it like wolves.

trotterdotpom
29th December 2007, 16:50
Couldn't you have popped into Buenos Aires?

John T.

jAdUwallah
29th December 2007, 18:50
Couldn't you have popped into Buenos Aires?

John T.

Good one mate,(Jester)

Duncan112
29th December 2007, 19:26
Now the "Turkey Fever" season is reaching its close can anyone oblige with a recipe for Turkey Kazwalla, a sort of curry *** soup *** stew that used to appear shortly after Christmas in both BP and P&OCL?

Many thanks,
Duncan

trotterdotpom
31st December 2007, 13:54
Hands up who liked pea soup and sippets? It turns out you can still get it if you ask for "croutons".

Duncan, is it possible the BP Chief Steward who invented Turkey Kazwalla moved to P&OCL with you? Personally, I reckon the best part of the turkey is the gobble.

John T.

John Cassels
31st December 2007, 19:45
Hands up who liked pea soup and sippets? It turns out you can still get it if you ask for "croutons".

Duncan, is it possible the BP Chief Steward who invented Turkey Kazwalla moved to P&OCL with you? Personally, I reckon the best part of the turkey is the gobble.

John T.


Yes John , Pea soup and sippets - a classic.
Bye the bye , still hoping someone can tell me how to make devilled kidney.
Have tried numerous times but still cannot get it to taste like it used to be.

K urgess
31st December 2007, 20:08
I'm sure the devilled kidney we got served on toast was out of a tin, John.
Used to be able to get it in Tesco's but not sure now what with the mad cow scare and offal, etc.

John Cassels
1st January 2008, 11:03
I'm sure the devilled kidney we got served on toast was out of a tin, John.
Used to be able to get it in Tesco's but not sure now what with the mad cow scare and offal, etc.

That would be great Kris , except that we don't have Tesco's over here.
( remember a previous thread).
Maybe something else for the shopping list when we're back in the UK in
April !.
Good new year to you.

K urgess
13th January 2008, 23:29
Have to revisit my appraisal of Texaco feeding.
My letters to the Memsahib show that the food had taken a turn for the worse on the way from Rastan to Genoa in November 1974.
Apparently we had nearly run out of everything but hoped this would be rectified at Capetown when we stored.
A catering superintendent was joining in Capetown to assess the situation and everyone was keeping their fingers crossed in the hope that things would improve.
My next letter, written as we approach Genoa in December 1974, reports that the Chief Steward had been "confined to his cabin and sacked for cooking the books". My next comment was to the effect that we wished he'd done that literally 'cos we might have got something tasty to eat.
He not only fiddled the company but had been getting cheques made out for bond & bar bills to himself by crew members. One such trusting crew member had even given him his cheque book.
My next paragraph complains that we'd run out of cigarettes and were running out of beer. (EEK)
Apart from that the auto alarm had given up the ghost for 40 hours and we'd been going slowly for weeks even spending a day drifting aimlessly totally busted.
Just goes to show how the memory can make everything rose-coloured.
Apparently Texaco deck officers were not to be trusted with strong drink so I had to buy it ashore in Genoa. Luckily the Danish technician that fixed up the broken engine room had been bribed with a bottle of whisky to tone down his report and, since he didn't like it, he gave it to me.
Attached are my flimsies for typical stores SLTs to Capetown. Probably a bit naughty but at least 30 years old and now historical documents.[=P]
These are not a patch on the Esso ones I used to send and I'm sure this was my second trip with Texaco. I remember the rainbow trout!(==D)

Ron Stringer
13th January 2008, 23:58
Kris,

Seeing Robbie Armstrong's name at the bottom of the message took me back in an instant to 1966. I sailed with Robbie on the Regent Pembroke (later Texaco Pembroke), which was my last ship before taking a shore job.

We fed like kings during the 18 months that I was on her, so things must have slipped in Texaco by your time.

K urgess
14th January 2008, 00:27
Sailed with Robbie twice, Ron.
A true gentleman.
A pity he crossed the bar so soon after retirement and didn't get to enjoy his favourite pastimes.
So you'll recognise him 8 years on.

sparkie2182
14th January 2008, 00:33
marconi sahib.........

always a little tricky sending such a list on w.t.

but why bother with s.l.t.?

couldnt texaco afford full qtc tariff?

K urgess
14th January 2008, 00:47
I supose they thought a couple of quid for the two as SLTs would be a saving on the hundred quid they would've cost to SA as MSGs.
I've got some charging info somewhere that I can't find but I think it was about 10p a word coast station charge to SA for a standard MSG. No ship station charge for MSGs of course but still a hefty bill for a couple of stores messages like that.
Besides there was no rush in a VLCC doing 10 knots at the time.[=P]

sparkie2182
14th January 2008, 00:58
fair enuff.........

just hoped they didnt get lost in the post...........eh?

:(

Riptide
19th January 2008, 14:48
WE had a varied diet on most of the ships I sailed on,more than can be said for most people these days.I enjoyed most of it.Kenny.[=P]

jaydeeare
15th February 2008, 00:35
I apologise for resurrecting this older thread and for this not being Nautical but it seems to fit the bill.

One dinner time at R.A.F. Henlow in Bedfordshire, I had the last portion of meat pie. As the cook entered the kitchen with the empty tray, he called out to the other cooks, "They've eaten it! They've damn well eaten it!" I looked at my plate and still wonder what it was.

There was a corporal cook there, and whenever we had roast chicken, he always insisted on carving and serving it. The only roast he did this. The reason was quite simple. When a WRAF girl came and asked for chicken, he could then legitimately ask if she wanted stuffing!

Generally the food in the RAF was good. Plenty of choices, but I found that the bigger the Station, the more choice the was, but the quality went down.

trotterdotpom
15th February 2008, 10:32
Has anybody mentioned Boston Baked Beans? The shipboard version was baked beans with chopped up spam chucked in it, but the real McCoy should have rum and all sorts in it. I've tried to find a recipe but they all just come up with molasses - could I be kidding myself here? Is there anybody from "Beantown" with the proper recipe?

John T.

Landlubber
15th February 2008, 10:43
The authentic Boston Baked Beans should contain molasses. Here are a few New England recipies:
http://gonewengland.about.com/cs/recipes/a/aabakedbeans.htm

trotterdotpom
15th February 2008, 11:13
Thanks Landlubber, I'll check it out - isn't it OK to little bit of rum in it?

John T.

Landlubber
15th February 2008, 14:44
I don't think that there's anything to stop you putting rum in your baked beans. In fact you could even put it on your breakfast cereal, if you want.

:)

Tony D
15th February 2008, 15:37
Brown Windsor Soup? haven't seen that since I left the sea,forgot what it tastes like although I do recall I liked it, don't think Mr Heinz or Mr Baxter makes it or anybody else for that matter.
:)

Chris Isaac
15th February 2008, 16:26
If you are going to add rum to the baked beans then for goodness sake do not bend over, and if you do the be careful not to aim at anyone.

Chris Isaac
15th February 2008, 16:27
Brown Windsor soup is not made...... it just accumulates!

John Williams 56-65
15th February 2008, 22:17
One of the best stews I ever had was cooked by the Chef on the old Devonshire especially for the Liverpool dockers when they came aboard to unload passengers baggage on our return to UK. The chef had an arrangement with the boss docker for this. I think it had just about every sort of meat in it with with plenty of vegetables, and it was delicious. After a few beers in the mess a couple of us would raid the galley late at night and help ourselves as it was left on the stove to simmer overnight. Not tasted anything as good since.

trotterdotpom
16th February 2008, 10:30
I don't think that there's anything to stop you putting rum in your baked beans. In fact you could even put it on your breakfast cereal, if you want.

:)

What a Lubberly idea - I could be cornflaked out by morning tea time!

John T.

K urgess
16th February 2008, 12:08
An idea worthy of a first tripper, John T.? (Jester)
http://www.thefreedictionary.com/lubber
A word that hasn't sprung up in one of our many quizzes.

derekhore
16th February 2008, 14:22
Brown Windsor soup is not made...... it just accumulates!

Actually, a recipe can be found here! ......

http://www.soupsong.com/rwindsor.html

sailingday
16th February 2008, 15:14
I was on the avonwood (constantines of middlesbro), one morning I served the 2nd engineer a shredded wheat, he poured milk on it added sugar, broke into it with his spoon, unfortunatly cockroaches had made a nest inside it, and they fled in all directions. This was 1952, and I remember the engineer's name was Geddes

jodalo
16th February 2008, 16:53
Baked beans and rum.......fatal!

Tom McNeill
16th February 2008, 17:40
With stars like Alex Rougie the Denholm food could be better than any restaurant and I never came across the legendary potatoes that were only suitable for "Pigs and merchant seamen". One thing still puzzles me; when there were three or four choices of main course how did they always seem to know how many of each were needed? Never seemed to be much waste and costs were kept low.

JimC
18th February 2008, 19:28
Saw a remark about chicken legs. As I remember them; they were termed 'Board of Trade chicken' as no matter how many were sitting down - every single person got a leg (the 'old man' got two!).
It has been remarked earlier that feeding on the Denholm ships was pretty good. By MN standards I would agree but there were times in the early days when things 'could be better'. I am reminded of a pair of cooks on one of the tramp ships on the S. Pacific run. They were named 'Bill and Ben' after a (then) new childrens TV programme. Both had been captured by a german Raider while on a Denholm ship and handed over to the Japs. They spent the rest of the war in a prision camp. Nowadays it would be politically impolite to criticise these lads but not so in the early 50's when most of the senior members of crews had served throughout the war! These two were outstanding. When asked for bread and butter pudding they stated it was not possible as there was no stale bread. Food on board was almost inedible. We had to fight the weevels in the corn flakes for a share. The popular belief was that the two of them had been greasers when captured but had graduated from the camp cookery academy with flying colours. One thing we did learn was that when you add 'shaky' milk to tea it becomes a trap for trocus flies (little flies which feed on the leftovers in a trocus shell). As soon as the milk hit the tea it was immediately covered with this delightful but un asked for adition to our protein daily recommended doze.
However, the Denholm cooks rewarded those who trained them on one specific occassion.
After the Suez invasion; ships which took part were not allowed to enter N. African ports to re-supply. All the ports in Cyprus, Malta and Gib. were full of naval vessels. Our ship had been one of the amunition ships and also an R&R vessel for army patrols as we had done in Cyprus for the previous three months. We had not taken on dry stores since the beginning of the three months when we were stationed in Famagusta bay. It followed; that by mid November, we were running out of everything. We were therefore ordered to return to Middlesburgh in the UK to re-victual.
The day before we arrived at Middlesborough; we had about two dozen eggs and a sack of flour left. The cooks made a load of flour/egg type pancake sort of things which was rationed out to all hands on the morning before the day of arrival. That following morning we arrived at Middlesborough to be met by the Denholm Marine Superintendents and a truck loaded with bacon, eggs, potatoes sausages and fresh milk.... what a feast!

Jim C.

Riptide
19th February 2008, 16:33
What about good old Hotcakes at breakfast & board of trade Duff at lunch & then beef curry with a cover of salad cream for dinner."great".Kenny.

CEYLON220
19th February 2008, 17:42
The breakfasts that come to mind on some of the RN ships were:
(1) Kidney on fried bread.
(2)Yellow Peril(smoked haddock)-put me off it for life!!!
(3) Sheeps hearts
(4)Kippers.
(5) Tripe
(6) Tinned Australian sausage----these were triangular shaped.
All washed down with pussers tea and tinned milk which if in the Far East/Middle East contained the usual cockerroaches which you spooned out of your tea sometimes , the odd one would go down with the tea.
Oh, happy days.

jaydeeare
19th February 2008, 18:22
This isn't MN, but at R.A.F. Henlow when I got up in time to have breakfast I always liked to have a beaker of juice from the grapefruit tray.

One morning, a corporal cook got at me for doing this saying It was there for grapefruit not as a drink. so I promptly sponed out a piece of grapefruit and plopped it into the beaker. He couldn't argue with that!

I must admit that the breakfasts in the R.A.F. were really good. Plenty of everything.

At Fleetwood College, morning breaks were always either toast or fresh made potato cakes - loved 'em!

lakercapt
19th February 2008, 19:56
Sailed from Italy with a full load of stores (we were told) on Ropners
s.s. Ingleby to Newport News to load for Rotterdam.
Past Gibralter and several days into Atlantic got a change of orders to go to Porto Ordaz (where ever that was) in Venezvala. This was in 1956 and that port had not been long in operation and there was nothing there.
First noticed that the Ch. Steward was concerned and found out why. Only enough stores to get to N.N.
Got to the mouth of the Orinoco river and had to wait several days for a pilot to take us up to the loading berth in the middle of nowhere. Not a thing ther but iron ore and a gazillion bugs the likes of some I am sure Darwin would have collected. No stores there and a very worried c/s.
It wasa few more days before we set out for Sparrows Point and the food now was abysmal (thats saying something for Ropners standards were not cordon bleu).
Menu of these tinned triagluar sausages (brought to mind in above post) and rice three meals (sic) a day.
Long message for stores on arrival and when we arrived there was a truck waiting.
Crowd informed the mate no unbattening until we had a decent meal so we unloaded what the cook wanted had our first meal for days then unbattened.
Never ate rice for years afterwards and never did see those triangualar sausages again. The C/S was soon ashore sick and another of the same ilk joined. There was never a fat soul on board

Big Kezza
20th February 2008, 01:34
I can remember back in the Sixties when i was at sea here on the Aussie coast Sundays was always Omelettes sausages bacon and chips for Breakfast for lunch it was a Chicken soup (noodle,rice or vegetable) Roast seasoned chicken all the vegies also baked ham and ice cream tea was Grilled steak ,chips Cold chicken and ham along with salads and the ubiquitous Big Sister fruitcake. Some of the cattle that was slaughtered for their beef i dont think they were slaughtered i think they surrended needless to say the cold chicken Ham and salads were the go. The Ice cream was made by the cooks from a mix and it was like breaking into a block of concrete.
Once on the River Burnett being one of the Delegates we fronted the Chief Cook and asked him why we were getting Pea Soup 4 times a week his reply was well you having Ham, Pickled Pork, Corned Beef i have to use the bones up etc . I ask you where the hell are the bones in corned beef.

spongebob
20th February 2008, 11:04
MERCHANT NAVY FARE

All this talk of food gets the salivary memory glands going.

The “Rangitane was in Lyttelton about to load frozen cargo for Britain and I was promoted/demoted from Junior Engineer to 3rd Freezer for watch keeping back to the UK.
We set 8 hour watches while in port and as my stint was the midnight to 8 am watch, it was my responsibility to ensure that the hold and tween deck locker temperatures were within limits when work started in the morning
Too cold and the “Wharfies” would not enter, too hot and the Ministry of Agriculture inspectors would not allow loading to start. Thank goodness for a good experienced Fridge Greaser to hold my hand on my first watch
My other overnight task was checking the cheese. A rake of railway wagons filled with NZ tasty and mild Cheddar had arrived alongside just before midnight and the Second Freezer had quickly shown me how to sample and check the produce. The cheeses were packed in slatted crates each holding two 56 pound round cheeses wrapped in the old fashioned cheese cloth rind and the drill was to use a sampling auger, rather like a apple corer on a long stick, to bore into a few random cheeses in each wagon and extract a core sample for inspection as to odour, moisture, texture and lack of mould etc.
It was a pretty quick lesson, he had more pressing business elsewhere, but I knew my cheeses from way back and I was confident that I could handle this task
Around 2 am I was on the wharf boring away, sniffing, viewing etc and finding no faults when along came the lonely figure of the local Bobby on the night beat. He took an interest in what I was doing and on completion of the job I invited him on board to the Engineer’s pantry where we brewed a cup of tea and melted a few sticks of cheese over some toast, a very nice early morning tea indeed.
The Chief Freezer checked my remaining samples in the morning and approved my judgment so it was off to bed with pride over my first watch.
The next night, same procedure, a new rake of wagons to inspect so at 2 am I am down on the wharf sampling again and who should appear but the same constable but with another and his Sergeant, the whole watch house. I wasn’t slow, I caught on as quickly as they did and I soon made an excuse that I was needed below.
I often wondered what was thought when the odd corner grocer in Britain sliced through a big Cheddar to find it looking more like a Swiss cheese.

salvina
20th February 2008, 19:04
In Salvesens a popular item on the breakfast menu was Norwegian black pudding made from whale blood, not so popular was the white fish which was generally referred to as "Fairtry rejects". On the La Colina we had a cook who made the best mullagatawny soup I have ever had, you could almost stand the spoon in it! Any Ben boat I was on always had Bombay Curry on the breakfast menu. No wonder I have digestion problems now!(Thumb)

Mike Vanko
22nd February 2008, 17:03
How about:-

Oxtail aka 'S--thouse door'
Sardines on toast, aka 'Sharks on a raft'
Also, I have never eaten a black eyed pea since leaving the merch as one 'Board of Trade' chief steward bought bags of the things on the cheap and we had them with every meal until they ran out weeks later.(Pint) (Pint) (Pint)

Riptide
23rd February 2008, 21:41
Food glorious food,412 posts on food alone.Kenny.[=P] (Thumb)

Big Kezza
26th February 2008, 02:29
Hey Rippy
414 posts now. Lunch time here my stomach is starting to rumble and my tastebuds are getting the juices running think i'll go and get my lettuce leaf and tomato on wholegrain sanger.
Big Kezza

marinero
6th March 2008, 12:48
I was on the avonwood (constantines of middlesbro), one morning I served the 2nd engineer a shredded wheat, he poured milk on it added sugar, broke into it with his spoon, unfortunatly cockroaches had made a nest inside it, and they fled in all directions. This was 1952, and I remember the engineer's name was Geddes

On our ship cockroaches were classed as fresh meat, so by rights you should have taken the shredded wheat back.
Regards(Jester)

pete
6th March 2008, 12:58
How about:-

Oxtail aka 'S--thouse door'
Sardines on toast, aka 'Sharks on a raft'
Also, I have never eaten a black eyed pea since leaving the merch as one 'Board of Trade' chief steward bought bags of the things on the cheap and we had them with every meal until they ran out weeks later.(Pint) (Pint) (Pint)

We used to call them S**t House Lids but it all comes down to the same thing......S**t (Frogger)

Burned Toast
8th March 2008, 20:28
(Thumb) You never had it so good[=P] Ashore now back to your mince pies and chips(Jester)


Kromeskies
Beef Olives
Ox Tails
Chicken a la King

Who called the cook a !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!![=P]

tabnab2
24th March 2008, 11:24
One of the worst jobs i had as a galley boy for blue flue was to prepare the yarmouth bloaters for breakfast. The smell was awful. The only consolation was that only a few had to be prepared because not many people liked them.

Dimondd
10th April 2008, 21:49
Things have changed so much these days to what some lads had to put up with in the 50's and 60's. But even in the late 70's when I was on a container ship running up the "gulf" we had a "grocer" who replied when asked (by a very shy mess boy) "hey Chief can I have some more Nescafe for the messroom?" He looked at his calender for a long time and then said to me "come back on the 14th that is when they are due more" Going back to the lads and telling them they had to wait another few days before they were allowed more coffee was not fun...and I am not takin the piss here...that is what he said to me...not fun being a mess boy on that ship!!!!
Things are so much better these days...companies still try to squeeze the budget as much as they can because the catering department is the one that costs money and does not make money (I beg to differ, but that is what the peanut counters say!!!) so it is the first target in an attempt to cut costs, sad but true, fact of life.

omcgarry
10th April 2008, 23:21
On one deep sea trip what was nearest to hand in the store is what you got as a result you had 7/8 days of the same fare till it was all gone breakfast was ham n eggs and water melon / dinner ham cabbage /potatoes ,tea ham n eggs again then pork beef etc and so on even when stores came on there was just the same carry on and it turned out to be a 6 month trip but over the years with various outfits some great fare & excellant cooks

Jim Harris
11th April 2008, 15:54
Have long wanted to start this thread, rather dear to my heart (and stomach).
Most of us have sailed on pretty terrible feaders but on average the majority
were pretty good. Even in the 60's on the Denholm ore carriers, the food was rather good. A favourite entree was "Kromeski a la Russe .which was just a sausage wrapped in bacon the deep fried. Seemed simple but tasted great after a day on deck. Another favourite entree was devilled kidney on toast. Even after 40 years trying I've never been able to make it the same way.
Remember braised steak and onions. With a slab of bread to mop up the gravy, you hardly needed a main course. When I was super,once visited one of our ships around lunchtime. Main course was mince pie,peas and chips.
Having eaten in some fancy places all over the world,I swear I have never
enjoyed a meal like that. Ch,cook said the lads needed something to soak up the lunchtime beers.
The point of this rigamole is; seeing some of the food which is dished out nowadays in restaurants, I don't think we fared so badly. Most of us will have pretty fond memories of good feeders.
I have even tried to get hold of a copy of the Merchant navy cookery book written by a chap called (I think) Atkinson, but still no success.
Perhaps RUUD will be able to contribute.
Anyone got any good old fashioned MN recepies?.

JC



Don't have any old fashioned recepies, John, but I used to enjoy
the onion and chilli omelettes that Andrew Weir's would serve
for breakfast! [plus chips!]

And rightly or wrongly, I've got this philosophy that the dreaded
cancer that whispers around us all, is scared off by the eating
of hot chillis....
The hotter the better.

Regards,

Jim.

Dave Wilson
11th April 2008, 16:07
On one deep sea trip what was nearest to hand in the store is what you got as a result you had 7/8 days of the same fare till it was all gone breakfast was ham n eggs and water melon / dinner ham cabbage /potatoes ,tea ham n eggs again then pork beef etc and so on even when stores came on there was just the same carry on and it turned out to be a 6 month trip but over the years with various outfits some great fare & excellant cooks

Sounds like Irish Shipping to me.

Lewis
11th April 2008, 16:15
Make custard so thick it sets solid. Cut it into slabs 4in by 3in. Dip in batter and deep fry. Serve with syrup.
We were served this on the Vennachar and the old man threw it at the Chief Steward.
Same ship arrived at the mouth of the Columbia river to load logs in Portland for Japan, just at the start of the salmon run. The C/S bought so much salmon that we were eating it for months. Still not keen on fresh salmon but OK with the "real thing" from a tin.

Shipbuilder
11th April 2008, 20:20
Aboard the iron ore carrier SAGAMORE in the early 60s, the 3rd mate & myself (sparks) would invest in a quantity of canned baked beans at sixpence per tin. In the late evenings, after I had come off watch at 2200gmt. The bridge watchman would go below & prepare two one-inch thick slices of toast that we referred to as "deep sea toast." By the time it came up, we had heated up two of the small cans of beans in the kettle. These were poured into the hollow in the middle of the toast & we were able to eat them "with care" without dropping a single bean. Those feasts remain in my mind as sheer culinary luxury that is seldom surpassed even today, more than 40 years on.

Similarly, aboard the reefer RICHMOND CASTLE (1944 vintage)a few years later, I would exchange the odd can of lager to the pantry boy for a couple eggs that the 3rd mate & myself would boil in the kettle. The RICHMOND CASTLE was a very "hungry" ship in 1964 & these small illicit feeds kept us going.

After RICHMOND CASTLE, it was "full & plenty" aboard the U-C Mail steamers.

The best Christmas dinner I ever had at sea was aboard the Silver Line log carrier BANDAMA in the late 70s - Adrian Cooper (Chief Steward ex U-C). All hands pitched in to help make the meal what it was & I never forgot it. Philippino Cooks & Stewards invited into the saloon for a drink in appreciation - Captain Norman Tuddenham presiding. A very happy ship.
Bob

tunatownshipwreck
11th April 2008, 21:16
Same ship arrived at the mouth of the Columbia river to load logs in Portland for Japan, just at the start of the salmon run. The C/S bought so much salmon that we were eating it for months. Still not keen on fresh salmon but OK with the "real thing" from a tin.

Yes, I feel your pain. That's why we set up a smoker. Yum.

Derek Hughes
15th April 2008, 23:44
I remember on Nzs...Hertford....favorite soup was Potage Garbure in the salon named by the infamous Chief Steward Geogie Ford...made from the stock pot ....absolutly wonderfull ...said Mate Charlie Whale....has some delightfull flavors that linger on the tongue.....spot on Charlie thanks to the ABs passing through the galley having dropped 3 pair of ladies panties in the stock pot.....I allways wondered whether the girls from Ma Gleesons missed them.fondest memories....Derek Hughes.

Pat McCardle
16th April 2008, 22:44
Welcome aboard Derek. Luckily you never kept the recipe hey, or did you?

Walter Clarke
17th April 2008, 15:10
Cannot believe no one mentioned PLUM DUFF & Custard. I always asked for seconds on Megantic. Capt. Wheatley placed a bet on me when they put a full tureen of it in front of me. Needless to say he won cause I ate the lot.
Best regards,

Walter

Norm
24th April 2008, 06:19
On Nigerian National Line you could try the Nigerian food if you wanted. Being adventurous I tried out the Pepper Pot Soup and ready made Garri a few times. It stood me in good stead when i went to work later in Nigeria for Phillips petroleum. As the boss of the production station I gave the cook a good work out on day one by asking to see the pepper pot soup and garri.
Being made a chief by the Oba is another story however. I had sailed on the Oba Overami, the great great grandfather of the current Oba (king). However I am rabbiting on a bit, so I'll stop now..

spongebob
24th April 2008, 09:03
This isn't MN, but at R.A.F. Henlow when I got up in time to have breakfast I always liked to have a beaker of juice from the grapefruit tray.

One morning, a corporal cook got at me for doing this saying It was there for grapefruit not as a drink. so I promptly sponed out a piece of grapefruit and plopped it into the beaker. He couldn't argue with that!

I must admit that the breakfasts in the R.A.F. were really good. Plenty of everything.

At Fleetwood College, morning breaks were always either toast or fresh made potato cakes - loved 'em!

Johnny,
Your mention of good RAF food reminds me of my brief stint in the RNZAF as a compulsory military trainee. The NZ Air Force had just "imported" Grahame Kerr from the UK to act as chief catering officer and to brighten up the services menus.
He went overboard and we had wide ranging and delicious meals including one meal I well remember and that was roast leg of lamb with the joint studded with baked apricot halves, so delicious that I went home and asked my mother to copy the idea. Prime rump or fillet steak was on the menu at least three times a week.

Grahame Kerr did not last long in the job, perhaps he blew the defence budget, but he later appeared on NZ television with his own very popular cooking programme.
I believe that he eventually went back to the UK and carried on with a TV cooking programme there.

Pat Kennedy
24th April 2008, 09:25
Regarding breakfast; in my experience in the MN, cooks specialised in rubber fried eggs. Was this part of the curriculum in cook's school?
Pat

Dave Wilson
24th April 2008, 10:30
My fondest memories were breakfast after the 4-8. Never had a complaint.
Complaints from the galley wondering if I had hollow legs.
Cooks could vary from being top class (usually on Tankers) to the darn right awful. No experience of Passenger ships where I would expect high standards.

Pat Kennedy
24th April 2008, 11:46
Re Passenger Ships.
The quality of the food depended on where you were in the pecking order. Officers got the same grub as the passengers, but the stuff served up in the crew galley bore no relationship to food.
when I was in the Empress of Britain, I discovered on day one that if you wanted decent nosh, you paid a steward, and he would get you a passenger meal.
On that ship, almost everyone had some kind of racket going on. There were bookies, bookies runners, shoeshine guys, shirt pressers, and even one bloke who rented out sexy books and magazines.
All these guys paid someone else to do their real job.
Pat

Dave Wilson
24th April 2008, 12:01
Re Passenger Ships.
The quality of the food depended on where you were in the pecking order. Officers got the same grub as the passengers, but the stuff served up in the crew galley bore no relationship to food.
when I was in the Empress of Britain, I discovered on day one that if you wanted decent nosh, you paid a steward, and he would get you a passenger meal.
On that ship, almost everyone had some kind of racket going on. There were bookies, bookies runners, shoeshine guys, shirt pressers, and even one bloke who rented out sexy books and magazines.
All these guys paid someone else to do their real job.
Pat

Pat,
Intrigued! If you started a new thread appropriately named maybe some from the catering department could contribute.
Dave

Norm
27th April 2008, 11:38
Grahame Kerr did not last long in the job, perhaps he blew the defence budget, but he later appeared on NZ television with his own very popular cooking programme. I believe that he eventually went back to the UK and carried on with a TV cooking programme there.

Graham Kerr - AKA The Galloping Gourmet popular on UK TV around 1970.

tunatownshipwreck
27th April 2008, 20:08
Galloping Gourmet was also carried on US tv in 1970 and later. He toned down his humor as he got more religious and the show got dropped by most tv stations. He came back with a more sedate cooking show called "Take Kerr" around 1980. A few years ago he was doing something more like the old Galloping Gourmet.

grant1
27th April 2008, 21:42
Not sure if this is the right link,but why were "Tabnabs" so called.

Pat Kennedy
27th April 2008, 23:16
Not sure if this is the right link,but why were "Tabnabs" so called.

I dont know the answer to that one, but on some of the ships I was in, they were the only edible food in the whole day, along with the cold meat and salad left out for the watchkeepers

John Cassels
28th April 2008, 10:58
I'm sure the devilled kidney we got served on toast was out of a tin, John.
Used to be able to get it in Tesco's but not sure now what with the mad cow scare and offal, etc.

Kris ; Tried everywhere , Tesco's in Greenock and the new super Tesco in
Port Glasgow . Even tried Asda , Morrisons and Saisburys but no devilled
kidney.
Filled the car up with Frey Bentos steak and kidney pies though !!.

albert.s.i
28th April 2008, 11:22
i remember one ship i was on the lord gladstone 1949 there were no freezers just loads of ice and salt boxes full of herring and a veg room and the most popular meal was irish stew and battleaxe tins of corned beef and the 2nd cook and baker made bread every 10 days there was no al la carte but plenty of al la crap there were moans and groans but no improvements but times have changed and did improve cheers. albert.s.i

K urgess
28th April 2008, 14:48
I'm disappointed, JC.
Must be something to do with mad cow disease, maybe.(Jester)
Glad you found the Fray Bentos on your extended shopping trip!
Geniet van uw steak en nieren vlaaien.
(Before you say anything that's cheating using Google) [=P]

Cheers
Kris

Burned Toast
28th April 2008, 18:09
Pat seems to have had a raw deal regarding the nosh in the MN:sweat:
Never mind Pies and Mushy Peas went down well after the Ale in the bar!!![=P]

trotterdotpom
29th April 2008, 02:33
.....Filled the car up with Frey Bentos steak and kidney pies though !!.

Thanks for reminding me about Fray Bentos, don't think their products are available in Australia. Weren't they tied up with Vesty in Argentina?

At the beginning of the Falklands war, I remember reading about a yobbo tossing a can of Fray Bentos corned beef through the window of the Argentina embassy in London. At his court appearance he said: "I'm not a vandal, I'm a patriot!"

The name Fray Bentos comes from the name of the port (in Uraguay) where the meat for the pies was exported from - it is on the Uraguay River bordering Argentina.

Good luck with the search for Devilled Kidneys - have you Googled "666"?

John T.

John Cassels
29th April 2008, 09:51
Yes John , Fray Bentos were indeed part of the Vesty group.

Like you , they are nowhere to be found in Holland so took the chance to
fill up when we were back in UK.
In fact , any sort of meat pies are not part of Dutch Cuisine !.

david young
2nd May 2008, 10:39
all galley boys who went on to become cooks alway had to buy
practical cookery by cesserani and kinton

trotterdotpom
2nd May 2008, 12:26
Yes John , Fray Bentos were indeed part of the Vesty group.

Like you , they are nowhere to be found in Holland so took the chance to
fill up when we were back in UK.
In fact , any sort of meat pies are not part of Dutch Cuisine !.

Bad luck, John, I'd find it hard to live without the odd meat pie - luckily we have the famous Aussie meat pies here, even though I've never been able to tell the difference between them and English ones, also passable pork pies have made an appearance in Australia in the last few years.

I'm sure things aren't all bad there - a young Dutch lady gave me some home made Ollie Bollen the other day - yum yum.

Keep piling the mayonaise on your chips.

John T.

jaydeeare
2nd May 2008, 13:04
david young wrote:all galley boys who went on to become cooks alway had to buy
practical cookery by cesserani and kinton

From a number of the above posts, I thought "Home Cooking" by Lucretia Borgia would have been more apt!

John Cassels
3rd May 2008, 21:53
Thanks John , but mayonaise on chips is one Dutch custom I have not taken
over.

Must admit , the Dutch customs guy at Ijmuiden did give me a strange look
when he looked in the boot and saw what I had brought back !!!.

holland25
4th May 2008, 01:36
Thanks for reminding me about Fray Bentos, don't think their products are available in Australia.
John T.

Just been in the local branch of Safeway here on the Mornington Peninsula Victoria, and there are 6 tins of Fray Bentos Steak and Kidney pies for sale,pricey though at $5.25. They also have Steak and Mushroom. Mind you we are a bit of a Pommy ghetto down here,

trotterdotpom
4th May 2008, 12:42
Thanks Holland, I'll have another look.

John T.

Norm
7th May 2008, 05:38
<At the beginning of the Falklands war, I remember reading about a yobbo tossing a can of Fray Bentos corned beef through the window of the Argentina embassy in London. At his court appearance he said: "I'm not a vandal, I'm a patriot!" >

During the falklands war Fray Bentos changed the labels of the corned beef cans from: Product of Argentine to Product of Brazil.

24039062
11th May 2008, 23:53
Can't help with cooking but can remember sailing around the Panama Canal area in August with a Chief Steward who (apparently) had seven menus - one for each day of the week. Soups, Roast Pork, Beef, Lamb, Chicken etc. and an array of "Board of Trade Duffs" for puddings. Strangely, when we were coming back up the English Channel in November he decided to break out the ice cream (Truly !!!)

martinh1
12th May 2008, 00:37
Does anyone recall ' cheesey beanos'. This was a Bank line special treat,
beans on toast with cheese on top! Top class!!
Or how about ' Whales on rafts'?.........happy days.

trotterdotpom
12th May 2008, 01:29
Quote.....During the falklands war Fray Bentos changed the labels of the corned beef cans from: Product of Argentine to Product of Brazil.[/QUOTE]

Thanks Norm. Funnily enough, at the time of the Falklands' war, Fray Bentos were a British owned company - business is business. At least they didn't show the Argentinians how to arm Exocet missiles - c'est la guerre.

John T.

grant1
12th May 2008, 20:50
Maiden voyage Shaw Savills Majestic,Chinese cooks,and chinese food. Didnt like foreign food in those days so ate "ordinary" grub, foolish boy.

ron fletcher
12th May 2008, 22:28
On the British Gannet we always had a curry on the breakfast menu. Just the thing after a run ashore the night before.

Harvey Williams
3rd June 2008, 23:04
When I took my Cooks ticket in 74, the Cooks Bible was Practical Cookery by Cessarani & Kinton, and also The Theory of Catering by the same authors. I have still got mine hidden around the house somewhere.

John N MacDonald
13th June 2008, 01:08
For Breakfast one morning on the LT Cortesia we had scrambled egg with ravioli. I didn't think I'd enjoy it but I did!
I tried it myself on returning home but it didn't taste as good maybe it was the brand of ravioli!

tunatownshipwreck
13th June 2008, 02:10
For Breakfast one morning on the LT Cortesia we had scrambled egg with ravioli. I didn't think I'd enjoy it but I did!
I tried it myself on returning home but it didn't taste as good maybe it was the brand of ravioli!

I used to try cooking at home what I ate on the ships, but it usually tasted bad. Found out my oil had gone sour.

spongebob
13th June 2008, 08:50
One ship that I was on had an elderly radio operator that had a yen for spicing up his breakfast of bacon and eggs with loads of Lea and Perrins Worcestershire sauce plus Colemans hot English mustard.
I normally sat with him at the mess table and was drawn in to copying his habit.
Very good one you got used to it and, on rare occasions, I sometimes do the same today

Pat Kennedy
13th June 2008, 09:03
Bob,
I discovered Lea & Perrins worcesteshire sauce while at sea, and found it could improve the taste of almost anything. I particularly like it with scrambled egg on toast.
Pat

Dave Wilson
13th June 2008, 12:33
Tabasco with everything!!!

Chouan
13th June 2008, 14:35
During the falklands war Fray Bentos changed the labels of the corned beef cans from: Product of Argentine to Product of Brazil.[/QUOTE]

Not strictly true, the labelling was changed to "Packed under the supervision of the Brazilian Government", otherwise they would have been subject to prosecution under the Trades Description Act.,

david freeman
22nd June 2008, 20:39
The trips could be routine the company faily predictable and the menu, Inpirational. Like all ex seamen some of the menu delights are expressed. Heres one 'n*****s in the snow' sounds good filled you up and made your bowls open. (Prunes on rice or ground rice). Not PC these days, however.

jaydeeare
23rd June 2008, 00:48
Heres one 'n*****s in the snow' sounds good filled you up and made your bowls open. (Prunes on rice or ground rice). Not PC these days, however.

Following on from this, in the RAF, current pie was always known as 'dead fly pie'.

degsy
23rd June 2008, 02:31
When I went to sea, the food language barrier was quite a hurdle. Going threw this thread has brought a lot back. Kromskies a la Russe, S**T on Shingle, Burma Road and Landmines ,Puppy Sick Sarnies and the old faithful Tab Nabs . I came from a family of plain feeders so when I saw the menu's it was like the doors of heaven had opened. Complainers used to p##s me off. Luckily I never sailed on a bad feeder, only once during the fuel crisis 5 weeks across to China then 4 weeks at anchor in Dairen, got a bit dire then.
A thing I will never forget is strong coffee with conny onny, best thing in the engine room. Degsy

Philthechill
23rd June 2008, 16:30
We had a Welsh bloke, all of 35 years old who, in his own words, "had always wanted to go to sea".

When National Service was knocked on the head, in 1960, he was able to fulfill his dreams as loads of pukka, shipyard-trained blokes left the MN as soon as the abolition happened, leaving many shipping companies short-handed, engineer-wise. Brock's, where this all occurred, being no exception!

Anything remotely connected to engineering was acceptable and so entered, "Taff, Typewriter Mechanic"!

The very first morning, of his MN "career" got him off to a bad start as he never turned-to, with the rest of us, and only deigned to grace us with his presence at breakfast, in the Engineer Mess.

Not only was he late for work his dress-code wasn't exactly aimed at "looking-too-keen-to-get-stuck-in" and he appeared in the Messroom in his PJ's, and Paisley-pattern dressing gown, looking like an economy version of Noel Coward!

The 2/E (Ben Lyon) gave him a bollocking for (1) not turning to and (2) coming into the Messroom looking as if he was about to turn in! He then said he would overlook the Noel Coward look so's he, Taff, could get his breakfast.

Taff steadily worked his way through the menu having first, the cereal, then the kipper, followed by egg, bacon, sausage etc.etc.

When we all thought he'd finished he said, in his Welsh lilt, "I'll try some of them preserves please!"

When he was presented with "them preserves" he said, in great disappointment, "Well it's only marmalade!"

Just about every meal was a source of wonderment to him so God knows what his diet in Welsh-Wales had consisted of!! (Probably lamb, lamb and lamb and, obviously, marmalade!!!!!).

By the way does anyone know how to make Cod Portugaise? It was a great favourite of mine in Brock's. That, devilled kidney's and braised sweetbreads!

Incidentally Taff did 11 voyages----------------1 out and 1 home!!!Salaams, Phil(Hippy)

Tony D
23rd June 2008, 17:31
I remember a dish called Fish Portugaise do not recall any particular fish being specified,it seemed to involve some white fish portions soused in tomatos and onions,I never liked it so I didn't really take note of how twere manufactured.
Now a dish I did like was Boston Baked Beans,but taking into account the length of this thread it has prolly been covered already.

degsy
25th June 2008, 21:21
:sweat: :sweat: Tabasco with everything!!!

SAILED WITH A THIRD ENG EVERY MORNING HE HAD 6 hard boiled eggs covered in tabasco. As he put it it was a good opener. He had been down the West Coast for years a real BUSH Man .
Degsy

Duncan112
25th June 2008, 21:28
By the way does anyone know how to make Cod Portugaise? It was a great favourite of mine in Brock's. That, devilled kidney's and braised sweetbreads!

Salaams, Phil(Hippy)

This sounds familiar - got my doubts about the wine though

http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/database/bakedcodportuguese_12217.shtml

Jim Yates
29th June 2008, 18:47
Merchant Navy Food.
As a cook/Chef on all sorts of ships cargo passenger container. I have at one time cooked them all (and heard all the comments been called all the names)
Sadly 30 years in the oil rig catering trade had robbed me of the receipes.
Plus the rig food is not all that good nowdays (Budgets to keep. cheap stores.)would put old merchan navy food up against rig food anyday.
regards Jim

Jim Yates
29th June 2008, 19:34
Cod Portugaise.
Cuts of white fish covered in tinned tomatoes lightly drained with a dash of perrins sliced onions sprinkled (now and then) with mixed herbs.
Own Receipe..
Braised sweetbreads
Calf or lambs sweetbreads. soak with water for 30 mins.drain cut in half dip in seasoned flour panfry in butter/oil untill brown both sides cover and cook slowly for 20 mins blend in a little seasoned flour with water and add to Pan cover and cook for a few min more
receipe from Purnell,s Complete cookery about 1955/60.
Devilled Kidneys.wash kidneys cut up into pieces dip in seasoned flour.cut up onion and cook in butter or marg removed onion add more butter /marge add kidneys cook until brown add onion salt pepper beef bouillon (A dash of tobasco optional) small amount of water boil approx 15/20mins add small amount of sherry or white wine.seve on toast..
receipe from above book..
Cannot remember last time i saw or cooked above dishes
regards JIm Y

John Cassels
30th June 2008, 08:15
Jim , thanks for the recepies......... great stuff.

John N MacDonald
30th June 2008, 19:02
I was looking through a Rickmers in house publication when I noticed that one ship had 4 Eastern European crew members one of whom was the cook.The rest of the crew were Filipino. I could just imagine a hulking great Ukranian telling the Filipinos that they did like his food!(==D)

Jim Yates
2nd July 2008, 22:31
Ceserani and Kinton.
Hi Harvey Wiliams I have a copy of that book (Sixth Edition 1982) Quite modern for me. But a good book all the same.Was in the Vndi with a Harvey Williams in 60 and sailed with him on the Port vindex. in 69 until71. not you was it.
regards Jim

Harvey Williams
4th July 2008, 21:44
To MrJim Yates.
Hello Jim, like I said I still have my books around the house somewere, cant put my hand on them right now, but great books all said and done.
Sorry I am not the Harvey Williams of 60s Vindi, I only joined up in 1965 and left in 1978.
Looking at your list of ships you seved on Jim the only two we have in common are the Elizabeth and the Mary, 65 to 66, where you on either just then?
Kindest Regards.
Harvey.

trotterdotpom
5th July 2008, 12:58
.......
Devilled Kidneys.wash kidneys cut up into pieces dip in seasoned flour.cut up onion and cook in butter or marg removed onion add more butter /marge add kidneys cook until brown add onion salt pepper beef bouillon (A dash of tobasco optional) small amount of water boil approx 15/20mins add small amount of sherry or white wine.seve on toast....regards JIm Y

Jim, just tried your devilled kidneys - great stuff, I could have been in the mid-Atlantic. Gordon F. Ramsay, eat your heart out! My "dash" of Tabasco may have been a little large - wife said "Aaaaaaaagh" (probably Australian for "yum"), but it is called "Devilled Kidneys" after all.

Thanks. John T.

Clive Kaine
10th July 2008, 18:32
Wow, what a great thread. I sailed in P&O Bulk Shipping in the 70s, with Goanese catering crew, and this has really brought back some of the old favourites.

Cheese beanos I still enjoy to this day.
Dry mince curry and dhall - I'd completely forgotten about that, how is that possible? I have to have a go at making that.
We used to have a curry option at lunchtime every day of the week, as well as a "European" dish and salads. Sunday lunch was *always* chicken curry and poories, there'd have been a mutiny if we'd been served anything else.
I remember Hamburg steak and Vienna steak, both essentially home made burgers, I could never tell the difference.
But my personal, absolute favourite was Lisbon Steak - thick slices of steak braised in a hot, spicy, tomatoey paprika sauce with potatoes and sliced tomatoes - I'm salivating just thinking about it. Anyone else remember this?

Doxfordman
12th July 2008, 09:24
Clive,

I'm with you mate, I sailed with BSD and with GCD on Indian crew ships, Goanese catering crew, absolutely brilliant food - still eat curry at least a couple of times a week.

degsy
22nd August 2008, 11:53
Wow, what a great thread. I sailed in P&O Bulk Shipping in the 70s, with Goanese catering crew, and this has really brought back some of the old favourites.

Cheese beanos I still enjoy to this day.
Dry mince curry and dhall - I'd completely forgotten about that, how is that possible? I have to have a go at making that.
We used to have a curry option at lunchtime every day of the week, as well as a "European" dish and salads. Sunday lunch was *always* chicken curry and poories, there'd have been a mutiny if we'd been served anything else.
I remember Hamburg steak and Vienna steak, both essentially home made burgers, I could never tell the difference.
But my personal, absolute favourite was Lisbon Steak - thick slices of steak braised in a hot, spicy, tomatoey paprika sauce with potatoes and sliced tomatoes - I'm salivating just thinking about it. Anyone else remember this?

Lisbon steak sounds good , any chance posting a recipe.

tom roberts
28th August 2008, 00:52
Hi sailed dek boy British Supremecy 1954 polish cook made some wonderful meals out of crap ingrediedents second cook and baker was i think called Mc Cabe best ive ever come across we had jam on her made of water melon i as peggy was the only one who ate tins and tins of it it has taken me almost 55yrs to find it again and i found it on holiday this summer in France oh such joy fond memories another great cook John Cole crew chef and he deserverd such an honour made a dish CHICKEN POT PIE it is said the old man held galley inspection on the day he put it, on just to sample that glorious dish ,and finaly BEEFY LOMO ? and BEEFY COMPLETE?in B.A who can forget such meals for half a crown or whatever it was in pesos

Clive Kaine
2nd September 2008, 12:37
I can't find a recipe that matches the Lisbon steak we used to get, Degsy - believe me I've looked! There are some recipes out there if you google, but they all seem to involve mushrooms and cream - nothing like the dish I remember.

tom roberts
3rd September 2008, 00:35
Re my comments on John Cole a great chef i ommited to say that he was onthe Parthia, I near caused my doctor a heart attack the other day when i told him i had a bowl of burgoo every day for breakfast he thought i said burgers mind you like me old age is playing tricks on his hearing

tom roberts
3rd September 2008, 00:45
Oops computer jumped ahead of me wanted to add a bit about a cook on one of Johnny Monks coasters Sprayvilleused to give him 30 bob a week for food he went ahore and blew the lot on ale and came back with a bag of carrots i wonder how many other coasting lads have sufferd the same exprience?

degsy
3rd September 2008, 13:38
I can't find a recipe that matches the Lisbon steak we used to get, Degsy - believe me I've looked! There are some recipes out there if you google, but they all seem to involve mushrooms and cream - nothing like the dish I remember.

Thanks Clive , I shall EXPERIMENT , let ya know what happens if I survive.(Thumb)

ROBERT HENDERSON
3rd September 2008, 14:08
In answer to Tom Roberts, I spent almost fifty years at sea most of the time on coasters. I have only sailed on two really bad feeding ships, one was the Baron Douglas about 1949.
The other an Everard ship where we paid fifty bob a week for feeding, we had egg, bacon, sausage, beans and tomatoes every morning for breakfast.
One day the egg, next day the bacon,next the sausage, then beans on toast followed by tinnned tomatoes on toast. I was 1st mate and complained to the master together with the second and third engineers, the ABs also complained, the two engineers were sacked as soon as we tied up to the buoys at Greehithe on a Sunday evening, I went for a drink with them in the evening and got sacked the next day after Everards office had closed. The second mate was promoted to mate.

Robert
(Jester) (Jester) (Jester)

BLADECHEF
3rd September 2008, 16:37
Great stuff

Pampas
3rd September 2008, 22:07
1st ship I remember for breakfast the routine, was fried egg every other day or you could have poached egg every day, (Never worked that one out) Fish every meal on Popes day. I loved the duff with custard,can taste it now. Gordon

ALAN TYLER
15th September 2008, 16:58
When I took my Cooks ticket in 74, the Cooks Bible was Practical Cookery by Cessarani & Kinton, and also The Theory of Catering by the same authors. I have still got mine hidden around the house somewhere.

I also had this cookery book when I took my ticket in 1968, unfortunately it was never returned after I lent it to a 2nd cook. It was a very good cookbook, I wonder where mine ended up!!!

Baulkham Hills
19th September 2008, 15:29
Hi there,
I sail on ships where quite often I am the only european onboard, the cooks
are Pakistani and have usually been with P&O many years ago.
Cheese Beano, Welsh rarebit, Apple pie a la mode, Oxtail jardiniere, Manchester tart and various duffs appear on a regular basis,.
I can't say I have ever eaten any of these dishes anywhere else except on a ship, but the traditional dishes of English ship's cooks are alive and well, and of course if you don't like these there is always the mandatory curry and dhall.

Cheers

Clive Kaine
26th September 2008, 16:53
Sounds like good grub, BH, and very familiar to an ex-P&O hand! What flag are the ships you sail on, and what do the non-europeans make of such delicacies?

Baulkham Hills
28th September 2008, 15:24
Sounds like good grub, BH, and very familiar to an ex-P&O hand! What flag are the ships you sail on, and what do the non-europeans make of such delicacies?

Hi Clive,
I sail on Saudi flag and owned ships, the non-europeans as a general rule seem to be happy with it.

Rgds

R58484956
1st October 2008, 17:04
Sailing on the QE(1) we had Dover sole out of Southampton, Cherbourg sole out of France and Boston sole out of New York. All put on board in Southampton.

ernhelenbarrett
2nd October 2008, 09:59
In the B.I. ships on the Indian Coast we used to give the Bhandari live chickens to cook us a proper Bhandari curry. We would strip off to just a towel and polish off the curry with a cold beer...lovely. Think the two worst feeders I was on was the British Gratitude/MAGQ back in 1955, lunch was a very weak curry...and if you want any more, bring back what youve got left!! and the Hamilton Sleigh/VRBO where the fridge door seals didnt seal, the cook
(Chinese) cut the green mold off the carcases..and curried it!!. I used to buy my own Noodles/grub in Japan to last me to the Persian Gulf and back to Japan
Salaams Ern Barrett

Huytonbrian
13th October 2008, 13:13
When I took my Cooks ticket in 74, the Cooks Bible was Practical Cookery by Cessarani & Kinton, and also The Theory of Catering by the same authors. I have still got mine hidden around the house somewhere.

My Practical Cookery book was purchased in 1962,( I think that this was the 1st edition ) for the start of my twelve months training at, The Nautical Catering College, Oldham Street, Liverpool.

This little green book and the other book of culenary terms by, Escoffier, where the two bibles according to Mr Beggs, the Principal of the college at the time.

These books went with me on every ship I sailed on, and when I left the sea to get married my Wife took owner ship of the books and used them for over thirty years.

The Practical Cookery book became a health hazard with all the tab nab stains and was looking a bit worst for ware, so for her last Birthday I purchased the 10th edition from Amazon, and the book still has pride of place in our kitchen.

ALAN TYLER
13th October 2008, 13:54
Hi Brian, noticed the picture on your posting, is it the Carinthia I sailed in her in 1965 to 1968 in the bakehouse. Jimmy Mac was 2nd baker from Huyton, staunch Evertonian!. Did you ever sail in her? Anyway all the best from an ex Cunarder Alan T.

Huytonbrian
13th October 2008, 15:01
Hi Alan, was on the Sylvainia, late 1964, then on the Carinthia, Jan 1965 - April 1966. I got a VNC after leaving her on sailing day via ferry in mid river during a seamans strike early in 1965, do you remember that.

I do remember Jimmy Mac, John Butterworth butcher, Jago in the scullery and the infamous Joe Stanton tourest class winger who was one of my blood's. Plus many more, I have some photo's packed away some where of various members of the crew on one of our footy matches ashore.

lakercapt
13th October 2008, 15:37
Its our Thanksgiving today where we serve Roast turkey.
Seem to remember it was always Roast Tom Turkey with chipolatta sause but memory fails as I don't know what that was.

john fraser
13th October 2008, 22:03
Its our Thanksgiving today where we serve Roast turkey.
Seem to remember it was always Roast Tom Turkey with chipolatta sause but memory fails as I don't know what that was.

Chipolata Sauce.-Chipolatas,were a small sausage.similar to a cocktail sausage.They were added to the turkey gravy.If no chipolatas on board.chop up a hot dog or frankfurter.The ships culinary experts never knew the difference.

trotterdotpom
14th October 2008, 01:09
Chipolata Sauce.-Chipolatas,were a small sausage.similar to a cocktail sausage.They were added to the turkey gravy.If no chipolatas on board.chop up a hot dog or frankfurter.The ships culinary experts never knew the difference.

Yes we did, we just appreciated your efforts and were too polite to criticise.

John T.