Merchant Navy Fare - merged threads

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orcades
14th October 2008, 04:24
Like Cunard we on the Orcades had to eat same as the first class, even in the engineer mess, it was hard but someone had to do it, was once told by the steward , sorry sir you cant have that its the name of the ship and no thats the date. well we tried,

ALAN TYLER
16th October 2008, 14:24
Hi Alan, was on the Sylvainia, late 1964, then on the Carinthia, Jan 1965 - April 1966. I got a VNC after leaving her on sailing day via ferry in mid river during a seamans strike early in 1965, do you remember that.

I do remember Jimmy Mac, John Butterworth butcher, Jago in the scullery and the infamous Joe Stanton tourest class winger who was one of my blood's. Plus many more, I have some photo's packed away some where of various members of the crew on one of our footy matches ashore.

Hi Brian. I certainly do remember the strike as I,d just had the previous trip off to get married (the good ladies still with me!). I remember John&Joe, struggling a bit with Jago.One character that I remember is Freddie Over (FWO) who used to make Lobster men. He always used to say the FWO initials had something to do with not working overtime!! I think he ended up in the crew galley. Jimmy Mac used to run the Tote outside the bakehouse. Happy memories.
Where did you work? Best go now the breads burning!! Alan.

Huytonbrian
16th October 2008, 16:50
Hi Alan, I worked in the larder with Freddie Over, and shared a cabin with him for a while, he must have been in his sixties then, spent many an hour making drums. trumpets and guitars for his lobster men's bands that he did for the midnight buffets, he taught me how to make them and I could still do it today.I also worked on the sauce corner and first class grill.

When I packed in I went to work at Ford's and shortly after Joe Stanton, also came to work there, he had got fed up and probably to old to defend his title as hardest crew member.

Jago, was a great guy, he had a terrible stutter brought on by being torpedoed two or three times during the war working on the Atlantic convoys.

I am sure other names will come flooding back to me now that this enjoyable chapter in my life has been revisited.

Take care,

Brian.

ALAN TYLER
19th October 2008, 12:28
Hello again, Its starting me on a nostalgia trip now. I was big mates with Gavin Newport (veg chef) and Derek Charlton (confectioner). We were the famous D.A.G. or so we thought!! Gavin went into the pub trade in north Wales, unfortunately Derek passed away several years ago. One person I think you,ll remember is "Gloria" a winger, one night in the midships pig&whistle she was getting earache from a greaser. I,ve never seen a bloke laid out so quickly to this day!! Oh such happy memories. Were you on board the night she took the big "roll" in the St Lawrence, that was scary. I,ll leave on that note hoping a few more memories might be jogged. All the best, Alan.

Huytonbrian
19th October 2008, 17:21
Gloria, I remember her well also Sadie and I think the name was Tony Keogh, who were also wingers, hard as nails all three.

I was not onboard for the big roll you mention, but I was when she done it homeward bound in Liverpool bay, I sh*t myself, I heard that the cause was due to a malfunction in the stabiliser mechinisim as they were bringing them in one stuck in the out position.Talk was that one more degree and she would not have righted herself, it happend during first tourist class sitting it was absoloute chaos as it was fairly calm nothing was tied down or railed off on the ranges in the galley.
Cheers Brian

degsy
21st October 2008, 01:14
Gloria, I remember her well also Sadie and I think the name was Tony Keogh, who were also wingers, hard as nails all three.

I was not onboard for the big roll you mention, but I was when she done it homeward bound in Liverpool bay, I sh*t myself, I heard that the cause was due to a malfunction in the stabiliser mechinisim as they were bringing them in one stuck in the out position.Talk was that one more degree and she would not have righted herself, it happend during first tourist class sitting it was absoloute chaos as it was fairly calm nothing was tied down or railed off on the ranges in the galley.
Cheers Brian

Hi Brian I never sailed on the passenger boats, and did'nt get away to sea till 1969. Is Sadie you talk of did she work in Caledonian an alehouse on Lime Street in the sixties long gone now if its the same guy she also worked in the Big House (Vines)

Huytonbrian
21st October 2008, 13:23
Degsy, I believe that she did work in pub's in Liverpool, so I think it wiill be the same person.
Brian

David W
28th October 2008, 19:47
In the late 60's Sadie also worked in a pub at the top of Ritson Street, Lodge Lane, Liverpool 8, I think it was the Grovenor. It was a proper local family ale house until Sadie and her friends arrived, it was never the same afterwards. I can still see the faces of the locals, gobsmacked wasnt in it

stuartc
28th October 2008, 20:41
Best feeders in BP were in my opinion the Indian crew ships. The tables (not just on these ships) were always properly laid, silver napkin rings etc. and for every meal starting with breakfast the Chief Steward had prepared a menu typed on the Company Menu card. Full English breakfast with juices, egg choice, hot cakes followed at midday by, you guessed it, a curry (Kopta, Madras, Dahl.....) with trimmings or/and English Fayre finishing off with dessert and cheeses. And if that wasn't enough an omelette for tea @ 17:00? No problem. To imagine I sacrificed all this for cereals and hard-boiled eggs, gristle with Sauerkraut and Rote Grütze followed at teatime by yes, black or grey bread and sliced sausage. German Merchant Marine Fayre A.D. 1978. Mind you, some of the Stewardesses weren't bad. ;-))
Sailed With Texaco for some time Indian Bhadari's were superb chefs great chappatis and the tine potatoes in the curry, bar lunches with chicked marinated in curry....drool drool

Fieldsy
3rd November 2008, 18:23
Gloria, I remember her well also Sadie and I think the name was Tony Keogh, who were also wingers, hard as nails all three.

I was not onboard for the big roll you mention, but I was when she done it homeward bound in Liverpool bay, I sh*t myself, I heard that the cause was due to a malfunction in the stabiliser mechinisim as they were bringing them in one stuck in the out position.Talk was that one more degree and she would not have righted herself, it happend during first tourist class sitting it was absoloute chaos as it was fairly calm nothing was tied down or railed off on the ranges in the galley.
Cheers Brian

Was Gloria Jimmy Sanderson? Think he's been dead quite a few years now. Knew him in Harrison Line but he also worked in the Crown (Lime St) occasionally.

Huytonbrian
26th November 2008, 10:48
That's him, I also knew him fom my time with T&J Harrisons, worked with him on a shore gang once.

olddog96
5th December 2008, 02:24
I remember my first trip as a galley boy the drunken chief steward instructed me to give them plenty, one each. I think I was the only person on the ship that he trusted the storeroom keys with.

Kevin Wright
5th December 2008, 02:51
Does any one remember "Bubble and squeek"" I myself did not really like it but a lot of the crew did, however in the Aussie Merchant navy it could not be called Bubble & squeek it had to be called ""Pan fried Fresh vegertables" if you tried putting on the menu and calling it Bubble and squeek there would be a meeting called straight away.

olddog96
5th December 2008, 04:26
Hi Kevin, I remember "bubble and squeek" even before I went to sea,It mostly depends on who cooks it ,if you like or dont.We always had it on Mondays at home left overs from Sunday tea which was nearly always roast Beef and yorkshire pudding and all the veg. Leftovers monday cold beef "bubble and squeek" and pickled onions always good . Vern.

doric
5th December 2008, 06:18
I sailed with Shaw Savill & Albion for five years, otherwise known as "Slow Starvation & Agony. But I had no complaints, the food was excellent on every ship I sailed on.

I then sailed with The British Phosphate Commission for four years, Their food was well above excellence. Terence Williams. R538301.(A)

ALAN TYLER
5th December 2008, 16:49
I remember my first trip as a galley boy the drunken chief steward instructed me to give them plenty, one each. I think I was the only person on the ship that he trusted the storeroom keys with.

A drunken Chief Steward I find that hard to believe!!! Whats this one each,, surely you meant "Give them plenty one between twenty"
Happy days Alan.

chrisw789
12th December 2008, 10:07
when I worked for blue star line you could tell the day of the week by what was the main course in the dinner menu, Sunday was always Steak! and was a bloody work -up for us Stewards and Cooks,........

double acting
12th December 2008, 10:48
See the menu amongst my pictures. I remember a Chief Electrician sending the lobster salad back because he had been served South African crayfish instead

FrankGil
12th December 2008, 11:02
when I was in Denholms with philipinne crew we used to get Nasi Goreng with satays,it was a favourite but everyone checked each others plates to make sure we all got the same number of satays otherwise there was much muttering

ray.c
12th December 2008, 11:20
I joined the Emporer(glasgow)at Tilbury to south shield and onto glasgow
just before we sailed on xmas eve the cook deceided to pay off as i was
galleyboy of just 16 i was promoted to cook, on chistmas day at breakfast
i told the skipper i did't know how to cook the chicken, c.eng said when
its brown its done and when black its f d helpfull bugger, so i f d one
of the legs and give to him. the skipper laught so much he nearly choked
and i ran[=P]

jim.child
12th December 2008, 15:22
Very surprised that there has been no thread discussing menus and recipes so far. I still try to recreate that favourite of Sunday lunch, the Dahl curry. (Then a little sleep for us dayworkers) It consisted of a bed of white boiled rice, a dollop of dahl, and topped off with a layer dry fried curried mince. Sprinkled over with fried onions. Am I correct? I like to think that my own creations are actually better than we were given, but I would very much like to compare my recipe with what was possibly taught at sea-school.

Are there any other recipes that are wanting to be done, possibly kromesky a la russe?, or that dish of beef? shot full of carrots, with an air gun, obviously.

Any catering supremmo's out there, or any one else with unrequited food desires?

Keith
sandddancer Ilive between the college and the sea could why we are called sandancers ? I do

Lofty Shears
16th February 2009, 17:44
anyone mention Kedgeree for breakfast, favourite on't Shell Tankers

jim barnes
23rd February 2009, 01:16
anyone mention Kedgeree for breakfast, favourite on't Shell Tankers
I remember it well Lofty, must have got a liking for it as i often make some for myself for breakfast out of left over boiled rice mixed with plain sardines or yellow fish and add a bit of curry powder.......definatley a aquired tast(==D)

willmac
23rd February 2009, 04:11
I remember having Corned beef Fritter which was wedge of Corned beef done in batter and deep fried

willmac
23rd February 2009, 04:21
Just had a though what about the great Salads? i e Russian salad consisting of i think a tin of mixed veg and a dollop of salad cream

ALAN TYLER
23rd February 2009, 14:15
My favorite was Cole Slaw, cabbage, carrot, apple and onion made with a proper dressing. Oil vinegar, lemon juice sugar pepper. Not like the rubbish you get in pub grub made with mayonaisse or salad cream.

ccurtis1
3rd March 2009, 19:51
What about savoury croquets.
What on earth were they and what went into them. When on the menu a rousing version of "savoury, savoury crockets, kings of the bad cuisine", sung to the tune of Davy Crocket

degsy
3rd March 2009, 21:54
My favorite was Cole Slaw, cabbage, carrot, apple and onion made with a proper dressing. Oil vinegar, lemon juice sugar pepper. Not like the rubbish you get in pub grub made with mayonaisse or salad cream.

Splash of TABASCO went well innit

ronmac6
5th March 2009, 23:23
hi all

What a great thread, brought back a flood of memories. some reflections :

Nasi Goreng on Denholms ship every Sunday Tea- times, 2 days later you were still enjoying it every time you belched!

China Nav _ Usually a Sunday Buffet featuring various strengths of curry, I used to visit the galley whilst the O/M was doing the Sunday rounds & found the cook finalising his curries. The OM had insisted on the Curries being regulated & rated as Hot, very Hot & Mild. You all know what I'm going to tell you! Yes All curries were dished out of the same huge pot to their various different dishes. I found it hilarious when the experts would comment on the different Strengths & attributes of the exactly identical curry.

On a slightly different note I remember (Denholms ship ?) when the mates wife arrived on board & the HK Chinese steward tried to be effective by labeling her napkin ring with what he thought was the appropriate tag.
Unfortunately Chief Officers Wife transcribed as COW.

jg grant
5th March 2009, 23:55
I don't think that anone has mentioned that old breakfast treat!
Bubble and squeek.
God awaful stuff using last evenings potatoes and cabbage.
Called bubble and squeek as that was the noise it made when the cook was doing it in a large frying pan

Tenakwe laker capt.I think the term bubble and sqeak referred to the noise the bowels made for a day after the consumption of said B&S. Cauliflower natural was the one that always got me a smile. In one stroke doc could flourish his culinary French while doing absolutely SFA! Brilliant. Regards Ronnie

Burned Toast
14th March 2009, 19:50
(Thumb) Ahh the good old days, When first trippers could not fathom the Knifes and forks plus Fish knifes and forks, plus demi tasse coffee cups on the table(Jester) never mind the menu(Jester) (Thumb)

trotterdotpom
15th March 2009, 12:17
What's happened to fish knives? I've never seen one in Australia, even in quite flash restaurants. They were great for lifting the fish meat from the bones with a bit of style and in one piece.

John T.

Tony D
15th March 2009, 12:43
Still have a set of fish knives and forks in me cutlery draw,inherited from the folks,can't say I ever saw them in use since I left the sea,or even before I went to sea for that matter.

alex clark
16th March 2009, 13:22
Anyone ever heard of the book I mentioned in my introduction and if so where
I can get hold of a copy ?.

JC

Hello John.Yes i still have a copy of this book,and i was with denholms for many years.Still some good old fashion receipts in it. Reg alex clark

John Cassels
16th March 2009, 21:39
Hello John.Yes i still have a copy of this book,and i was with denholms for many years.Still some good old fashion receipts in it. Reg alex clark


Thanks Alex ; might ask you for a few recepies some time.

22logan
12th April 2009, 23:25
I've been lurking for a few weeks, and this is my first post. You see where my mind is; on my stomach. I've never been a part of a ships crew although I've been aboard a few and eaten on them (not cruise ships) USN. Also, I've spent a little time doing grunt work at the Naval War College at Monteray California. Since it's a flag officers school I imagine I was exposed to some of the best food the USN had to offer. The EM mess looked practically like a three star restaurant and even had the little refrigerated merry-go-round for slices of desert pie. Boy they had good lemon merange(SP?) pies.

Reading through this entire thread, it sounds like there's enough knowledge to start three or four five star restaurants.

What I'd like to do if everybody's up to it is to compile a short recipe list. So, with all of the culinary masters (and I do mean that as a compliment) here could some of you all chime in with the names and recipes of some of the best fare you've had in your combined thousands of years at sea.

We're in the US so I know some of the ingredients might be slightly different, and/or differently named. Man, this chow sounds good.

Thanks for any of your help.

Logan

(Thumb)

kevjacko
13th June 2009, 18:24
What about savoury croquets.
What on earth were they and what went into them. When on the menu a rousing version of "savoury, savoury crockets, kings of the bad cuisine", sung to the tune of Davy Crocket

Hi ccurtis 1. Look on the BP forum there's a thread there BP culinary triumphs. I recently posted the recipe, on request I might add, for savoury rissoles (same thing as croquettes) with onion gravy. There's even a photo of dickyboys finished product, which don't look to bad for an AB.

kevjacko
13th June 2009, 18:29
Does any one remember "Bubble and squeek"" I myself did not really like it but a lot of the crew did, however in the Aussie Merchant navy it could not be called Bubble & squeek it had to be called ""Pan fried Fresh vegertables" if you tried putting on the menu and calling it Bubble and squeek there would be a meeting called straight away.

Bubble and squeak is a great hangover cure, as is the previous days leek & potato soup which will have thickened over night and can be served on toast.

Alistair Macnab
13th June 2009, 18:59
I always believed there had to be a cooking school in Calcutta and Chittagong for cooks who were assigned to Indian-crewed British-flag ships. The menus were always along the same lines so they have to have been learned somewhere.
Looking at some of the white-crew menus mentioned in this thread, makes me realize that somehow we all had the same unusual items - for example I certainly remember a curried Krumeski a la Russe!

ALAN TYLER
20th June 2009, 10:46
I always believed there had to be a cooking school in Calcutta and Chittagong for cooks who were assigned to Indian-crewed British-flag ships. The menus were always along the same lines so they have to have been learned somewhere.
Looking at some of the white-crew menus mentioned in this thread, makes me realize that somehow we all had the same unusual items - for example I certainly remember a curried Krumeski a la Russe!

Hi Alistair, Kromeski a la rousse curried!!!! Is that the same Kromeski thats sausage wrapped in bacon and deep fried in batter? Original if nothing else, what did it taste like?

ALAN TYLER
20th June 2009, 10:58
Just been looking through my old B.O.T. cook book. " Sakusta", Take an oblong block of ice and place it in a napkin on a silver dish. Range on the block of ice a row of Oyster shells filled alternately with Caviare and Prawns, a layer of sliced tomatoes and thin slices of Ham (smoked). Sausages are next ranged on either side, garnish with sprigs of parsley and thin slices of lemon!!! Has anyone ever had the pleasure of this dish, if so when and where?

TonyAllen
20th June 2009, 11:34
Alan.Never seen it or heared of it but my wife says if you have a spare hour or two you can come and prepare it ,she will supply the ice, the same block shes going to hit me with if I read out any more mouth watering delicacies.You wont find many of them in the high street resturants. Regards Tony Allen

billyboy
20th June 2009, 11:53
Just been looking through my old B.O.T. cook book. " Sakusta", Take an oblong block of ice and place it in a napkin on a silver dish. Range on the block of ice a row of Oyster shells filled alternately with Caviare and Prawns, a layer of sliced tomatoes and thin slices of Ham (smoked). Sausages are next ranged on either side, garnish with sprigs of parsley and thin slices of lemon!!! Has anyone ever had the pleasure of this dish, if so when and where?

Never tried it Alan.
But I will leave the door open if you want to pop over and demonstrate mate...LOL (Thumb)
Sounds delicious

ALAN TYLER
21st June 2009, 14:45
I,d love to prepare this lovely dish for you mates but I,m busy scrubbing the new potatoes for Sunday lunch and then I,ve the washing up to do. I,m the boss in this house!!!!

TonyAllen
22nd June 2009, 18:42
Alan.now dont forget the dobi after the dishes.sounds like we are both the bosses in our houses.Regards Tony

ALAN TYLER
23rd June 2009, 15:25
Hi Tony, Its getting worse the good lady has gone off to Wimbledon for the week. No ready meals in the fridge,oh woe is me. Looks like pub grub, life is tough!!!!!

marinero
23rd June 2009, 16:35
Hi Tony, Its getting worse the good lady has gone off to Wimbledon for the week. No ready meals in the fridge,oh woe is me. Looks like pub grub, life is tough!!!!!

Hi Alan.
We were never out of the pub. Can you remember the meals we used to supply for the party nights at the "Wolsingham" outside the Dock Gates in North Shields? Your big pots of curry went down a treat. Also the vast quantities of meat we supplied for the old folks of North Shields. I also remember Bruce who worked nights but went ashore and brought us back cans of beer for morning smokoes. Oh Happy Days and Lock Ins.
Regards (Thumb)

George Simpson
25th June 2009, 09:36
Hi Tony, Its getting worse the good lady has gone off to Wimbledon for the week. No ready meals in the fridge,oh woe is me. Looks like pub grub, life is tough!!!!!

Alan your spoiling her next thing you know you will be letting her do the hoovering and ironing lol

George Simpson
25th June 2009, 09:39
Leo I still remember Alans currys and the lock ins at the Wol and Wullie Ross serving behind the bar pissed. I also remember playing pool winner got first choice of girls at the Jungle (I made sure I lost) lol

marinero
25th June 2009, 11:24
Leo I still remember Alans currys and the lock ins at the Wol and Wullie Ross serving behind the bar pissed. I also remember playing pool winner got first choice of girls at the Jungle (I made sure I lost) lol

Hi George.
Yes, we certainly had some good times there. Wullie Ross was a real character. The girls at the Jungle were from very good families in Shields i'll have you know and the fact that they wore donkey jackets and wellies was just to blend in with us low life.
Regards
Leo (Thumb)

G0SLP
25th June 2009, 11:41
Apologies if it's been mentioned before, but I still remember a certain B & C Purser's notorious Cauliflower Fritters...

George Simpson
25th June 2009, 11:58
Hi George.
Yes, we certainly had some good times there. Wullie Ross was a real character. The girls at the Jungle were from very good families in Shields i'll have you know and the fact that they wore donkey jackets and wellies was just to blend in with us low life.
Regards
Leo (Thumb)

Aye Leo and didn't Houlders supply the donkey jackets and wellies, see such a caring sharing company![=P]

doric
25th June 2009, 12:39
I sailed as an Electrical Engineer wth the Shaw Savill Lines on the following ships :-

Dominion Monarch, Wairangi, Taranaki, Gothic, Waiwera, & Suevic.
I know they were called Slow Starvation & Agony, but I must admit that every one of the above mentioned ships were good feeders, the quality of food served was excellent.
Terence Williams.(A) (Thumb) R538301.

ALAN TYLER
25th June 2009, 20:37
Hi Leo/George, Yes they were good days on Tyneside, Tom & Peggy were good hosts at the Wolsington I don,t suppose its there now. I recall a night out at Seaton Delaval Hall for a medieval banquet, a superb night. Can,t remember whether i was on the Oregis or U.J. at the time, the night was "sponsered by Smiths.
How are things in Spain Leo? trust alls well.
All the Best Alan.
P.s. Don,t remember anything about women or Jungle!!!!!

Old Janner
26th June 2009, 07:18
I remember on Nzs...Hertford....favorite soup was Potage Garbure in the salon named by the infamous Chief Steward Geogie Ford...made from the stock pot ....absolutly wonderfull ...said Mate Charlie Whale....has some delightfull flavors that linger on the tongue.....spot on Charlie thanks to the ABs passing through the galley having dropped 3 pair of ladies panties in the stock pot.....I allways wondered whether the girls from Ma Gleesons missed them.fondest memories....Derek Hughes.

Brilliant ! now those were the good old days.

ccurtis1
1st July 2009, 14:48
Russian Salad. Only ever seen on ships, and I loved it. Looked for it in salad bars in Morrisons/Asda etc but with no success. Even local delis when I enquire of it come over with a glazed look.
Florida Salad, another favourite, which is so difficult to find, certainly here in the NE.
Breaded sweetbreads, another delicacy I've only come across on ships, and a taste to be remembered. It wasn't all bad, our food at sea, and Ted Landsdowne, a Chief Steward with the Palm Line made the most delicious pea soup and sippets known to mankind. You could stand your soup spoon vertical in it. Magnificent

kernewekmarnor
3rd July 2009, 13:56
A popular "entree" on Blue Star vessel's was Egg Curry.
Take a boiled egg, cut her in half, stick on top of a pile of "patna" rice (i always remember it being half white and half yellow) and pour some curry sauce on the top.Voila!
'Ansome job, and thats no error!

GeeM
4th July 2009, 17:20
I sailed on the Safmarine Astor Cruise Ship as 2/E between 86 and 89. We had a great old German Baker on board who lived In Chile. He got very agitated when he heard we were scheduled to visit several US Ports on a particular cruise. When we got to Fort Lauderdale the FBI came and got him. Turns out he was an ex concentration camp guard. You would never have guessed It .

wireless man
4th July 2009, 21:24
This is a great thread but I havent read it all yet. After about three pages I end up in ther fridge looking for something to eat

nauru drifter
14th July 2009, 12:27
In Harrison's on the bulkers, 'almost' everyone's favourite entre was 'Guano Kon Tiki' - great taste and a top name. The polite term is Kidney on Toast.

Peter (Pat) Baker
14th July 2009, 13:19
Altough I never heard the name "Guano Kon Tiki" (which I imagine treanslate as sh-- on a raft) I remember, with great fondness, from my years in Harisons of Liverpool.
I have been searching for the recipe for a long time and have now found it on the BP Culinary posting (thanks to Marconi Sahib) and I look forward to having a shot at making it for myslef shortly.
Peter (Pat) Baker.
.

Peter (Pat) Baker
14th July 2009, 13:22
Re. my last post, for " treanslate" please read "translates"
Peter (Pat) Baker.

Steven Lamb
15th July 2009, 06:02
Think Bankline were possibly one of the leading contenders in the abysmal food stakes !
Okay - curry was on the go 24/7 if you wanted it, but on one Bank boat I was on, they'd overloaded on Mutton and Mutton curry became a joke !
The "Gingers" got fed up of surfacing from the E/R to face yet another mutton curry that in the end they went on a bender and renamed the bar "Muttonbank" Oh happy days ! (K)

The one that takes the biscuit - was when I was on a tanker (non names / no packdrill) and I was served "good old Macedonia veg" which had been fried in ghee !!

Some of the names that were conjured up on the menu cards use to make me laugh, "Brown Windsor" & "Potage St Julienne" - crickey I haven't seen either of those in years.

For all that said - my waistline hasn't suffered over the years !

Steven Lamb
15th July 2009, 06:10
Before I forget..... on a Diamond-D bridge boat (Avon Bridge) I sampled the best "Chow Fan Satay" & "Nazi Goreng" ever. Well done to those HK Chinese crew - cos after a few beers in the bar and a plate full of either - my Sunday was complete !

sinbadbooth
12th June 2010, 13:32
John, I believe we sailed together as 2nd & 3rd Mate on NAESS TALISMAN (Capt. George Paton) 1967-8. A Panamax Bulkcarrier, worldwide trading, wonderful. I retired 7.6.2010 as Marine Superintendent at one of Libya's main oil & gas exporting Terminals. Talking about food! I joined my 1st ship in 1962, a P.& O. cargo ship, a seperate menu for each meal, probably 7 courses, but the number of different names that could be given to similar types, for example of cooked potatoes, always surprised me. The food on NAESS TALISMAN was not very good but on my next ship, NAESS SOVEREIGN, it was good. I served on ARISAIG & CRINAN. The food & life on modern oiltankers, and no doubt most other ships is pretty awful. Regards David Booth.

sinbadbooth
12th June 2010, 13:36
John, I believe we sailed together as 2nd & 3rd Mate on NAESS TALISMAN (Capt. George Paton) 1967-8. A Panamax Bulkcarrier, worldwide trading, wonderful. I retired 7.6.2010 (this week) as Marine Superintendent at one of Libya's main oil & gas exporting Terminals. Talking about food! I joined my 1st ship in 1962, a P.& O. cargo ship, a seperate menu for each meal, probably 7 courses, but the number of different names that could be given to similar types, for example of cooked potatoes, always surprised me. The food on NAESS TALISMAN was not very good but on my next ship, NAESS SOVEREIGN, it was good. I served on ARISAIG & CRINAN and finished my career with J & J Denholms when I joined the OBO, SPEYBRIDGE as a new ship in Japan. The food & life on modern oiltankers, and no doubt most other ships is pretty awful. Regards David Booth.

Burned Toast
12th June 2010, 13:45
My favorite was Cole Slaw, cabbage, carrot, apple and onion made with a proper dressing. Oil vinegar, lemon juice sugar pepper. Not like the rubbish you get in pub grub made with mayonaisse or salad cream.

Some diced chillies to give it a bit of a kick(A)

Burned Toast
12th June 2010, 13:48
I remember my first trip as a galley boy the drunken chief steward instructed me to give them plenty, one each. I think I was the only person on the ship that he trusted the storeroom keys with.

The old saying give them plenty one between twenty(Jester)

R58484956
12th June 2010, 14:48
Greetings David and a warm welcome to SN. Bon voyage.

John Cassels
12th June 2010, 19:40
John, I believe we sailed together as 2nd & 3rd Mate on NAESS TALISMAN (Capt. George Paton) 1967-8. A Panamax Bulkcarrier, worldwide trading, wonderful. I retired 7.6.2010 (this week) as Marine Superintendent at one of Libya's main oil & gas exporting Terminals. Talking about food! I joined my 1st ship in 1962, a P.& O. cargo ship, a seperate menu for each meal, probably 7 courses, but the number of different names that could be given to similar types, for example of cooked potatoes, always surprised me. The food on NAESS TALISMAN was not very good but on my next ship, NAESS SOVEREIGN, it was good. I served on ARISAIG & CRINAN and finished my career with J & J Denholms when I joined the OBO, SPEYBRIDGE as a new ship in Japan. The food & life on modern oiltankers, and no doubt most other ships is pretty awful. Regards David Booth.


David , welcome to the site.

Yes by goodness , we did sail together - Naess Talisman witn George Paton as Master and Mike Feltham as Mate.
Did I not come and visit you after we got home , Macclesfield was it not ?.

John Cassels
13th June 2010, 10:53
Sorry David , it was Bob ( R.M.) Paton not George Paton.

He was relieved by "Black Duncan" MacDonald on the trip we went up to Puerto Ordaz.

Ian Brown
17th June 2010, 04:39
John, I believe we sailed together as 2nd & 3rd Mate on NAESS TALISMAN (Capt. George Paton) 1967-8. A Panamax Bulkcarrier, worldwide trading, wonderful. I retired 7.6.2010 (this week) as Marine Superintendent at one of Libya's main oil & gas exporting Terminals. Talking about food! I joined my 1st ship in 1962, a P.& O. cargo ship, a seperate menu for each meal, probably 7 courses, but the number of different names that could be given to similar types, for example of cooked potatoes, always surprised me. The food on NAESS TALISMAN was not very good but on my next ship, NAESS SOVEREIGN, it was good. I served on ARISAIG & CRINAN and finished my career with J & J Denholms when I joined the OBO, SPEYBRIDGE as a new ship in Japan. The food & life on modern oiltankers, and no doubt most other ships is pretty awful. Regards David Booth.

Hello David,
I think I met you at Zueitina when I was Master on Naftomar's finest, the Gaz Fareast and Gaz Symphony.
I never realised we had been contemporaries in the Diamond D.
Thanks for the book swaps.

Ian

Billy Brown
31st July 2010, 16:41
Hi All, this thread will never die,not while we all have such good memories.
Over the last few years me and the good wife have been on several P&O cruises for our holidays. Needless to say the food in the restaurant for dinner is exceptional, I discovered that if you have lunch in the buffet restaurant then a lot of what we have been talking about is there!
Wonderfully tasting, quite dubious looking, soups.
Potatoes of every kind including the famous 'savoury croquets'.
The square ships bread baked fresh every day.
Russian salad, but they dont call it that.
Beautiful curries my favourite being green in colour, Those Goan cooks know how to do a proper curry.
Kromeskies.
And my favourite of all Steamed duffs of every type with lashings of that really thick custard, the type that if you let it go cold you can cut chunks of it off.
Now if that doesnt lead to a deckhead survey then you must be dead already.

Billy

cookietwo
11th August 2010, 22:34
the mince in dhall curry should be dry and not need the bisto to thicken it

Anthony Atkinson
12th August 2010, 00:08
Has anyone ever heard of Babies Heads. I think it came from the north east. Kidneys and onions all boiled in a rich dark gravy, and served in pastry. Disgusting, to those of us who enjoyed fish and chips. Anthony Atkinson

chris thompson195
16th August 2010, 23:29
I was once given the choice of Bismarck Herring, which I declined almost in favour of sandwiches, till told it was a hamburger with an anchovy on top,discard anchovy and eat your fill.
We had a cook from South Shields on one ship, he used to make Stotties early on, great with an egg in the middle and a can of beer as the sun came up!!! us geodies always stick together.

kingorry
17th August 2010, 06:53
Whilst working as an assistant purser on the Cunard liners in the 1960s, we had our own table in the first-class restaurant (cabin-class on the 'Queens'). We were expected to take our meals there, and after a while we just longed for some good basic cooking. On the CARINTHIA there was a pantryman named Stan Everett (anyone remember Stan?) who, once a voyage, always made the purser's staff a 'special' - either a pan of scouse, or a a shepherd's pie, which we ate in the crew purser's office.
When I left Cunard Line in 1969 and joined Harrison Line, it was such a relief to get away from passenger ship food and enjoy some good basic cooking. A 'cheese beano' to start, followed maybe by fish and chips and mushy peas, and a slice of 'manchester tart' to end. Who could ask for anything more? Harrison Line feeding was invariably good, at least on the ships I sailed on.
During my three summers with the KING ORRY on the Isle of Man run, we had our own table in the first-class dining room, and had some really good meals dished up by 'Abba' (? - anyone remember Abba on the KING ORRY in the early 1970s?).
John Shepherd (kingorry)

ALAN TYLER
17th August 2010, 11:32
Hi John Our paths must have crossed as I was on the Carinthia from Aug 65 to Dec 67, all my time in the bakehouse, I remember Stan. Additionally I,ve a picture of the King Orry somewhere when she broke free of her moorings at Glasson Dock and ended up high and dry on the marshes at Conder green. If your,e interested I,ll dig it out and send you a copy.
Alan T.

Burned Toast
17th August 2010, 11:33
I was once given the choice of Bismarck Herring, which I declined almost in favour of sandwiches, till told it was a hamburger with an anchovy on top,discard anchovy and eat your fill.
We had a cook from South Shields on one ship, he used to make Stotties early on, great with an egg in the middle and a can of beer as the sun came up!!! us geodies always stick together.



Canna beat a Stottie sarni with loads of bacon and blackpudd[=P](Thumb)

Ray

Pat Kennedy
17th August 2010, 17:25
[quote=kingorry;448523]
When I left Cunard Line in 1969 and joined Harrison Line, it was such a relief to get away from passenger ship food and enjoy some good basic cooking. A 'cheese beano' to start, followed maybe by fish and chips and mushy peas, and a slice of 'manchester tart' to end. Who could ask for anything more? Harrison Line feeding was invariably good, at least on the ships I sailed on.

Manchester Tart!
Thats a blast from the past, I only ever saw that in school dinners in the 1950s, jam tart with a layer of custard on top and sprinkled with shredded cocoanut, I'd forgotten all about it , now I'm going to ask the wife to make one.
Regards,
Pat(Thumb)

jg grant
22nd August 2010, 03:32
Hi from NZ. I was on a ship or two where we had left over duff fried next day for breakfast. It was blurdy good too with bacon and eggs. Ronnie

Burned Toast
22nd August 2010, 20:19
Hi from NZ. I was on a ship or two where we had left over duff fried next day for breakfast. It was blurdy good too with bacon and eggs. Ronnie

Deep Fried Plum Duff[=D](Pint)(Fly)

Ron Dean
9th November 2010, 17:41
Hi from NZ. I was on a ship or two where we had left over duff fried next day for breakfast. It was blurdy good too with bacon and eggs. Ronnie
Similar - The left over beans & tomato from breakfast went into the meat pie served for lunch to make a meat & veg pie.
(aka - "savoury mince pie" if the meat had run out, or just "savoury pie" if devoid of meat or mince). :D

chefman
13th November 2010, 18:39
Hi guys,
ever heard the saying sunday dinner every weekday, Christmas dinner every sunday?
chefman

Burned Toast
14th November 2010, 12:32
Hi guys,
ever heard the saying sunday dinner every weekday, Christmas dinner every sunday?
chefman

Only in the merch:sweat:

Ray

stan mayes
14th November 2010, 12:55
Hi - To all 'good feeders' I have posted a 'Scale of Provisions'
in the gallery -
Stan

Burned Toast
14th November 2010, 13:40
Hi - To all 'good feeders' I have posted a 'Scale of Provisions'
in the gallery -
Stan

Stan, Some of the crews that work the offshore ships moan when you run out of Snickers and Mars bars. And fresh water that's only for showers and the galley, they like bottled water:sweat: different breed now[=P]

Ray

ernie dixon
20th November 2010, 20:50
allo all,just up to page 12 on the grub pages.a lot of what has been written has hit a raw nerve and has tears rolling down my cheeks.when i tell you i was an ex chief thief with ropners you will undersatnd.will have to read the rest later.i have a few things to post but will bide my time.good luck all. ernie dixon.

Billieboy
21st November 2010, 10:00
Welcome aboard Ernie, there's plenty more to interest you on this site, have you tried the Photo gallery yet? there's a stack of Menus you used to dream of!

Burned Toast
21st November 2010, 11:27
Welcome aboard Ernie, I bet we could tell a few tales[=D]


Ray(Pint)(Pint)(Pint)

ernie dixon
21st November 2010, 14:41
This is a true story(we all say that)my mate who is a regular contributor to this page was called to that saloon one day and asked about the sweet."its only plums and custard he says"so on closer inspection the plums turned out to be PLUM TOMATOES.nice combination i thought.tomatoes and custard.He will without a doubt reply to this.keep smilin` ernie dixon.

ernie dixon
21st November 2010, 14:43
forgot to mention it was pakistani crew.if you ask politley he might even tell you about THE TOPAZ on the old mans inspection.

Burned Toast
21st November 2010, 20:23
This is a true story(we all say that)my mate who is a regular contributor to this page was called to that saloon one day and asked about the sweet."its only plums and custard he says"so on closer inspection the plums turned out to be PLUM TOMATOES.nice combination i thought.tomatoes and custard.He will without a doubt reply to this.keep smilin` ernie dixon.

Quite true, but it was Plum crumble and custard, pakistan crew. Good laugh. Petroship.

Ray(Pint)(Pint)

Burned Toast
21st November 2010, 20:25
forgot to mention it was pakistani crew.if you ask politley he might even tell you about THE TOPAZ on the old mans inspection.


Now that would put you of your dinner[=D][=D]

better in the pocket(Pint)

Ray(Scribe)

BOB.WHITTAKER
21st November 2010, 21:40
THE BEST FEEDER,Houlder Offshore/Houlder Marine Drilling on their dive support vessels and rigs and I have the figure to prove it,still the M.N. as we were "on articles".I give a few names to remember at different levels in the system, Mervyn Underwood/Alan Tyler/Gary Jones/Lennie Farrar/Malcolm Gardiner/Dave Dunnet/Rod McCormick/Peter Winmill/Geff Bloor. I apologise to anyone I have left out but you were all known for the contribution you made to life onboard those units. Best regards to all,Bob Whittaker.

ernie dixon
22nd November 2010, 00:15
whoops sorry ray,petroships eh.Ras tan to Jeddah for 4 months.Al safaniayah and the Al mahad what an experience,no bacon/ham/spam/pork how did we survive ha ha.i used to "visit " other ships in RasTan and sky or bum off my opposoite number a couple of pounds of bacon.mission accomplished,once at sea it was all the officers from the old man down to a locked down galley for bacon butties.Bacon sarnies were never so good as these illegal ones.would hate to think what would have happened if i was captured on the oil jetty with carrier bag of bacon.

Burned Toast
22nd November 2010, 10:22
whoops sorry ray,petroships eh.Ras tan to Jeddah for 4 months.Al safaniayah and the Al mahad what an experience,no bacon/ham/spam/pork how did we survive ha ha.i used to "visit " other ships in RasTan and sky or bum off my opposoite number a couple of pounds of bacon.mission accomplished,once at sea it was all the officers from the old man down to a locked down galley for bacon butties.Bacon sarnies were never so good as these illegal ones.would hate to think what would have happened if i was captured on the oil jetty with carrier bag of bacon.

Probably still locked up Ernie, tried the breakfast beef crap(?HUH) Never mind was nearly thirty years ago.
Ray(Pint)(Pint)

ALAN TYLER
29th November 2010, 12:17
THE BEST FEEDER,Houlder Offshore/Houlder Marine Drilling on their dive support vessels and rigs and I have the figure to prove it,still the M.N. as we were "on articles".I give a few names to remember at different levels in the system, Mervyn Underwood/Alan Tyler/Gary Jones/Lennie Farrar/Malcolm Gardiner/Dave Dunnet/Rod McCormick/Peter Winmill/Geff Bloor. I apologise to anyone I have left out but you were all known for the contribution you made to life onboard those units. Best regards to all,Bob Whittaker.
Thanks Bob, they were good feeders as we weren,t too tied to a victualling rate. Just back from sunny/hot Gran Canaria. Sorry for not getting to meet up this Summer hopefully next year. All the best Alan

andy60e
5th January 2011, 19:52
What about Currie & Rice at breakfast that of course after around of eggs & bacon.
This was Harrisons [ two of fat one of lean Harrisons ],who said they were hungry.
Have had me hooked on currie ever since. (Thumb)

I seem to remember curried corned beef and rice being served at breakfast on one of Denholms box boats...canny mind which one now......cook had been ex BP and said it was a staple of bp tankers

andy60e
5th January 2011, 20:59
I sailed with an Irish Master who graded the lunch time Caltex Curry as HOT, BLOODY HOT or BEJESUS. Nothing ever could beat a good lunch curry followed by an afternoon kip - when you were mate and on the 4-8.
JC

Sailed with a Welsh cook on the Sig Ragne....good cook normally....but his boast was that he made curries so hot that not even the Indians could eat them....never seen the sense in that.

guinnessmick
7th January 2011, 15:13
Boston Baked Beans:
Haricot beans soaked overnight
Tinned tomatoes
Tomato puree
Belly pork
Molasses. Drain the beans mix in with tomatoes and tomato puree. Add molasses. Cut into small cubes the belly pork after removing rine fry until tender with thinly sliced onion and garlic. Add altogether in a roasting tin stir and allow to simmer on low heat in oven. Serve with crusty bread and a nice light ice cold beer.

spot on mate but i used to leave the belly pork in slices

guinnessmick
7th January 2011, 22:24
what about houlders deepsea i was on the swan river it was a great ship a good feeder and single birth accomadation we had steak twice a week sirloin on a wednesday filet on a sundayi had never known that before or since and them argentine filets where huge

kevjacko
8th January 2011, 11:25
I seem to remember curried corned beef and rice being served at breakfast on one of Denholms box boats...canny mind which one now......cook had been ex BP and said it was a staple of bp tankers

Nah Andy,

I'd dispute that. I did 8 years with BP in the 80's and I never saw or heard of it. We had to many other things to do with the dog, ie Stovies, panacalty, fritters, rissoles, sarnies, salads, steamed, baked, fried, roasted, you name it but never curried. LOL

andy60e
8th January 2011, 19:00
Aye, very versatile was corned dog....what would we do wothout it?

Maybe it was just a staple of that particular cooks ships then.....but he blamed BP for it...lol

radioman1969
10th January 2011, 12:43
Seconded to Cory Line Dukesgarth/Monksgarth in 1976 for a few trips from Cunard.

'Hands up for soup' was the cry from the galley hatch and everybody that wanted soup obliged with a show of hands.

Same routine for main course.

'Do you want custard, Captain' ? - Yes please was the shouted response.

Fantastic grub, great bunch of blokes both crew/officers and great runs ashore/parties up the Lakes.

In Cunard, it would have been crisp white tunic clad waiters 'swanning around the dining room' and taking your orders.

'Would you like wine or water with your meal, sir ?'

In Cory's, it was beer with everything and you got it yourself !.

Happy days indeed.

lawrence Croxford
18th February 2011, 18:48
On Union Castle cargo we had a sunday night treat, egg surprise, but after 11 months the surprise bit wore off, egg surprise= one upturned apricot with white custard.
Chief steward bought barracuda and tried to pass it off as herring, but the 12/4 had seen them in the frig room and after a few beers mentioned this to CS, we had free issue beer for a longtime afterwards. Egg suprise = 1/2 upturned apricot on a digestive biccy with white custard over,, first trip engineer although listed as a dessert on menu amazed all in the officers dining room by putting plenty of tomato sauce on cutting into it and shocked said "OH ITS a PEACH " result peels of laughter from everyone..Larry Croxford chief Cook BP retired..R 582413

borderreiver
18th February 2011, 18:53
Lucky to have a digestive biccy commons just on top of creamed rice(just)

john blythe
6th July 2011, 23:36
dont mater what is cooked ! someone will mone

julianne
14th July 2011, 11:53
The list that was displayed on board ships was a copy of the ships agreement (articles) and that showed the minimum (chief stewards thought it was maximum) food allowances with permitted substitutes. Commanly know as your wack.
Not many went to these extremes but I all depended on whither the chief steward had enough saved to buy his retirement pub

board of trade regulations,on federal ship "cumberland" the galley boy was seasick for at least a week. crew were entitled to a minimum of 3 eggs a week,but the cook decided to give the boy some hard boiled eggs to calm his stomach,ate the "valuable "eggs,and went straight to the side and vomited,cook was furious,"bring those bloody eggs back!" gt

john hardy
20th September 2011, 13:50
been nearly 40 years since i was at sea, sailed for WHSN, Dagleish, Souters, Bowrings and Everards, every one a good feeder, this thread brings back many memories. my old man was a cook/steward from 1928-68, long time with ropners, 20 years with stevie clarkes. i can relate to MN feeding better than civvies, i was born in 1950 when we still had rationing, the old man used to supply the family with meat, butter etc. must have had to much on the ship eh?

muldonaich
21st September 2011, 19:15
been nearly 40 years since i was at sea, sailed for WHSN, Dagleish, Souters, Bowrings and Everards, every one a good feeder, this thread brings back many memories. my old man was a cook/steward from 1928-68, long time with ropners, 20 years with stevie clarkes. i can relate to MN feeding better than civvies, i was born in 1950 when we still had rationing, the old man used to supply the family with meat, butter etc. must have had to much on the ship eh? as an ex poor shipowner ill be at you door in the morning for my money for the stores lol kev

alan ward
22nd September 2011, 08:44
Shame on you chaps! no Apple Daddy, surely there must be someone from T&J Harrisons, Terry

Memories of Harrisons catering include seeing chilli con carne for breakfast also curry ,not a problem as obviously people were coming off watch and maybe wanted something more substantial.The chilli in the mid 60`s was a real novelty,I`d never seen it before,however it was baked beans instead of kidney and a water biscuit in place of tortilla.It stuck with me and when I became a Purser/Catering Officer later on,it became a good stop gap if something quick was needed.

I also remember a Chief Steward called Harry who when asked where the veg was to accompany the brown stew shouted into the saloon`It`s in the ******* stew`

alan ward
22nd September 2011, 08:55
What a great thread. The two that spring to mind on Bluey's was Nasi Goreng, and Kedgeree. On Elder Dempsters Kumba we were asked if we would like to try Palm Oil Chop. We all declined the offer after seeing the Ch cook come out of the poop mixing the chop with his hands and a lady of the night hanging round his neck. Strange ship that Kumba. Opposed piston Doxford and steam recip auxiliaries, including the turning gear. 110 volts DC, and the lights used to dim when we showed a movie. West African stewards and engine room hands, boy could they swing a hammer in the crankcase, Happy days. all the best lads Succour

I sailed on the Kohima in 1966 as Cadet Purser,a liner split off the Escravas Bar and everybody had to turn to and lend a hand having installed the spare we set off up the creeks having loaded another liner went so we called into Freetown and an engineer flew out from the uk and repaired the split.K boats,no a/c,ice water from a chained tap in the pantry only allowed about an hour a day and my lovely mohair suit going mouldy in the wardrobe,african grey parrots everywhere for £5(with cage),final blow the steering ram went in terrible weather in Biscay and went into Vigo for repairs.Happy days eh?

alan ward
22nd September 2011, 09:23
The list that was displayed on board ships was a copy of the ships agreement (articles) and that showed the minimum (chief stewards thought it was maximum) food allowances with permitted substitutes. Commanly know as your wack.
Not many went to these extremes but I all depended on whither the chief steward had enough saved to buy his retirement pub

Oh come on Lakercapt,by the time you consider the Mates dunnage,water and assorted back handers,the Chief Engineers bunker commission and the Old Mans exchange rate fiddles on crew cash advances and share of everyones baksheesh the Chief Steward was very low on the horizon when it came to the black market.
yours from my retirement pub,
Al

Burned Toast
22nd September 2011, 09:28
(Jester)(Jester)(Pint)(Pint) Those Brown Envelopes again, mind dinna have a pub!!!!.

Ray

WilliamH
22nd September 2011, 09:56
Alan Ward I was on the Kohima from 20th July 1965 until 1st March 1966, you must have joined after I left. It was a happy ship though the work was hard
and conditions were as you described them. The purser while I was there was called Sadler, I can't remember his christian name, I heard he later married an Italian girl, he met while the ship was in Genoa, I remember my wife and I were invited to the girl's parents apartment to meet her parents, it was quite a "posh" apartment if I remember correctly.

alan ward
22nd September 2011, 13:53
I joined in the autumn of 66 after that familiar first trip on a mail boat,in my case the Accra.Don Cadman said of me`You got bolshy from mixing with the junior engineers but you`re a good human being`Unlike many of the rather`scholarly`Cadet Pursers I had been brought up in a MN family and always wanted to go away,first attending Riversdale as a radio student but the commute from Birkdale to Aigburth combined with my discovering teenage girls conspired aainst me and before I knew it I was tallying bales of rubber and enormous logs in Calabar,Warri,Sapele and Burutu!not at all what I expected.the Purser was one Peter Scott from Meols,he didn`t like work much and having a subordinate made his day.When I meet someone who is bone idle I mentally compare them to Pete,no-one has ever come close.The Sparkie was called Coulson known universally as Callsign.After Kohima,which would keep on breaking down I did 2 trips on the Owerri which were tremendous fun and the start of my finally learning how to behave as a man and a seaman,I left and my seaoing life really began.Fond memories though but what a very old fashioned company ED`s were back then,stuck in a 50`s timewarp

alan ward
22nd September 2011, 14:02
Les produced what, for us in Brocklebanks, was the definitive list of curries. Regional and other names with the list of main ingredients. I saw one once, in the days before photocopiers so never got a proper copy, and long regretted that ommission.

That was probably copied and passed around,now somewhere I have one in my old menu/souvenir files if I can find it i`ll post it for you

alan ward
22nd September 2011, 14:22
Aaaah !

Kromeskis a la Russe

Pigs in Blankets

Clan Line Spew aka sandwich spread

Connyonnie (sp ?)

One egg a day, and picking the lock on the galley doors for more to hard boil in the bridge kettle at night.

Being on Hector Heron away from the usual routes meaning an (almost) unlimited feeding rate.

Watching the PCO, out of his brain one lunchtime, go face first into the tomato soup, then stagger off to his cabin with his shorts on back to front (how he achieved that nobody ever found out !) He was a good feeder though !

Aaah ! memories

This website is ensuring I don`t do any work at all today.I was once told a story about when Cayzer Irvine took over the King Line and a Catering Superintendent was explainin to some old shell-back chief steward all about Slop Chest,Inventory and Catering Account Books he handed them over to the old boy and when the vessel returned some months later asked him`Have you got your books for me?``Yes he replied they`re where you left them on my day bed`I knew many PCO`s all combined by one thing,they ALL loved a drink.I blame Alec Bannerman from the Clan Menzies for my downfall

alan ward
22nd September 2011, 14:23
I still remember (with fondness) a breakfast dish which consisted of chopped up kidney in a rich brown sauce served on fried bread.

I have tried for years to order it in whilst eating out, asking chefs if they had a name for it, and trying to find a recipe.

Can anybody out there help? An ex Harrison Chief Steward or Chief Cook could probabaly help.

Peter (Pat) Baker.

Kidney Turbigo?

alan ward
22nd September 2011, 14:52
Galloping Gourmet was also carried on US tv in 1970 and later. He toned down his humor as he got more religious and the show got dropped by most tv stations. He came back with a more sedate cooking show called "Take Kerr" around 1980. A few years ago he was doing something more like the old Galloping Gourmet.

I remember him,at the end of his show he would taste the food and a look would come over face as if he was being s=====ed off by a Yokohama Hooker just out of camera shot

alan ward
22nd September 2011, 15:03
I also had this cookery book when I took my ticket in 1968, unfortunately it was never returned after I lent it to a 2nd cook. It was a very good cookbook, I wonder where mine ended up!!!

Having a drink with a mate I mentioned Repertoire de la Cuisine,a chefs printed notebook (you have to know how to cook already to use it,it`s like an aide memoire as we classical trained chefs say!)Well he was so classy he nicked it!Years later I joined the Clan Malcolm as AP/CO opened my desk drawer,I had a little cubbyhole of my own in the Pursers Office,and found my book still with my mates name in it the cheeky sod.

alan ward
22nd September 2011, 15:08
Hi Brian I never sailed on the passenger boats, and did'nt get away to sea till 1969. Is Sadie you talk of did she work in Caledonian an alehouse on Lime Street in the sixties long gone now if its the same guy she also worked in the Big House (Vines)

Sadie did indeed work in the Big House

alan ward
22nd September 2011, 15:18
John, I believe we sailed together as 2nd & 3rd Mate on NAESS TALISMAN (Capt. George Paton) 1967-8. A Panamax Bulkcarrier, worldwide trading, wonderful. I retired 7.6.2010 as Marine Superintendent at one of Libya's main oil & gas exporting Terminals. Talking about food! I joined my 1st ship in 1962, a P.& O. cargo ship, a seperate menu for each meal, probably 7 courses, but the number of different names that could be given to similar types, for example of cooked potatoes, always surprised me. The food on NAESS TALISMAN was not very good but on my next ship, NAESS SOVEREIGN, it was good. I served on ARISAIG & CRINAN. The food & life on modern oiltankers, and no doubt most other ships is pretty awful. Regards David Booth.

would that be George Paton from Anlaby Hull by any chance?

Peter (Pat) Baker
22nd September 2011, 17:30
Alan Ward,

I'm sorry for the delay, but I have only just read your reply
to my query about Harrisons chopped kidney in gravy.

The name was definitely not kidney turbigo.

After all these years I am wondering if this was served
in Palm Line rather than Harrisons.

The thing is that nobody else seems to remember it,
which makes me think I may have dreamed it.

Were you in Harrisons after your ventures into the
joys of the West Coast?

If so when and what ships if you will pardon my nosiness.

Cheers and best regards,

Peter (Pat) Baker

TonyAllen
22nd September 2011, 23:39
Pat its funny you mentioned kidneys,I have never liked it but my wife made a big frying pan full the day before yesterday for her evening meal, and 3 plastic containers for the freezer,she called it Kidneys and freb Tony

Peter Martin
23rd September 2011, 08:51
Alan Ward,

I'm sorry for the delay, but I have only just read your reply
to my query about Harrisons chopped kidney in gravy.

The name was definitely not kidney turbigo.

After all these years I am wondering if this was served
in Palm Line rather than Harrisons.

The thing is that nobody else seems to remember it,
which makes me think I may have dreamed it.

Were you in Harrisons after your ventures into the
joys of the West Coast?

If so when and what ships if you will pardon my nosiness.

Cheers and best regards,

Peter (Pat) Baker
I seem to remember them being described on the breakfast menu as 'Deviled Kidneys on Toast'; or perhaps that was something different.

Burned Toast
23rd September 2011, 12:39
Kidney Turbigo?

Devilled kidney on a raft[=P]

Ray

paul rennison
23rd September 2011, 15:26
Devilled kidney on a raft[=P]

Ray

AKA Minced collops (usually minced something or other, but often incorporating several types of offal) as long as the gravy was tasty never had it sent back, on the subject of kidneys, once in the early
70's as cook/steward offshore on Ekofisk Bravo I was preparing kidneys for S&K pie the Texan toolpusher saw what I was doing and exclaimed "make sure you boil all the piss out of those kidneys boy"

Peter (Pat) Baker
23rd September 2011, 16:03
Peter Martin and Burned Toast.

I'm afraid that devilled kidney was not the name.

That was something different in that it had some sort of spicy
coating to make it hot. Hence the name "devilled".

I only wish that some oldtime Harrison or Palm line cook
or Chief Steward would pop up with the name and a recipe
for the dish that I am seeking.

I would dearly love to taste that delicious dish once more.

It is definitely on my "bucket" list.

Cheers all,

Pat Baker.

Peter (Pat) Baker
23rd September 2011, 16:08
Tony Allen.

Kidneys & freb I have never heard of.

Was it chopped kidneys in a rich brown sauce?
If so please ask her for the recipe for me.

Regards,

Pat Baker

Stephen J. Card
23rd September 2011, 16:14
Good news chaps! I remember the names as Kidney Turb..... something or other.

Quick search on Google produced.... Kidney TURBIGO and it is made thus:

Ingredients
4 kidneys
12 button mushrooms
3 cloves garlic
8 button onions
6 pork chipolata sausages
1 ½ wine glasses of red wine
1 drop Tabasco sauce
2 shakes Worcestershire sauce
1 tbsp chopped coriander
1 tbsp chopped tarragon
1 tbsp tomato puree
1 400g tin tomatoes
2 oz butter
2 drizzles olive oil
1 salt and pepper to season

Prepare the kidneys (if you haven't got a nice butcher like mine.) by cutting in half and removing all the white tissues.
Pre-heat oven to 160c
Heat the olive oil and add the onions and mushrooms.
Next add the sausages, kidney, garlic, herbs and tomatoes.
Stir for a few minutes,then season with salt and pepper.
Add the wine Worcestershire sauce,tomato puree and Tabasco sauce.
Place in the oven for 15 minutes.
Remove the pan from the oven and return to the stove top.
Shake the pan,add the butter and heat until melted (this gives it a shine).
Garnish with fresh coriander leaves and chopped herbs.
Serve with riced Cauli or cauliflower mash if IPD'ing or rice or potatoes if your not!


Seems a bit posh... especially with the wine. Perhaps we had a more simple version at sea.

Overall I thought the food with Denholms was good to excellent. One favoutite was the Pork Pajorski... like a Salisbury steak made from pork. The nosh on SCOTSPARK esp sweet and sour pork was better than I've ever had in ANY restaurant and thank Allah that I asked the cook write it down for me. MSG Rules!

Peter (Pat) Baker
23rd September 2011, 16:28
Steven J. Card,

I'm afraid that the name was definitely not turbigo,
and that recipe with all those ingredients, especially
the chipolata sausages was way out.

My apologies for that but the dish I am after was
a very simple one i.e. probably only kidneys, onions,
some sort of flavouring and the brown sauce
Not that I can be sure of that, but it is an uneducated
guess.

All the best,

Pat Baker

Stephen J. Card
23rd September 2011, 17:23
Steven J. Card,

I'm afraid that the name was definitely not turbigo,
and that recipe with all those ingredients, especially
the chipolata sausages was way out.

My apologies for that but the dish I am after was
a very simple one i.e. probably only kidneys, onions,
some sort of flavouring and the brown sauce
Not that I can be sure of that, but it is an uneducated
guess.

All the best,

Pat Baker


Pat,

Yes, the kidney dish I remember was as you describe but the name the Ch Stew used to type on the menu card was Kidney Turbigo!
STEPHEN

james killen
23rd September 2011, 19:37
Does anyone have any idea where I could get a standard copy (early '60's) of "Copy of Crew Agreement", including the provisions list?
I've sailed on quite a few ships where it was BOT whack - often less.
On some of those ships the officers ate well but in the crews mess it would be a very different story.
My children will not believe me when I tell them how hungry some ships were.
How the Chief Steward and the Old Man would often fiddle the stores---stealing our groceries was our opinion.
How we were often fed garbage and it was a case of eat or go hungry!
P.S. I can still eat a kipper, head, bones, tail - the lot.....a habit I picked up during those days when the most you ever saw was half a kipper on your plate and very often not much else!
Also sailed on coasters where you paid for your own provisions.
All said and done - sailing as A.B., with numerous outfits, I'd say three out of four ships were between "not-too-bad" ~ fairly good.

Regards,

Tugboat Tim

Burned Toast
23rd September 2011, 19:51
Peter Martin and Burned Toast.

I'm afraid that devilled kidney was not the name.

That was something different in that it had some sort of spicy
coating to make it hot. Hence the name "devilled".

I only wish that some oldtime Harrison or Palm line cook
or Chief Steward would pop up with the name and a recipe
for the dish that I am seeking.

I would dearly love to taste that delicious dish once more.

It is definitely on my "bucket" list.

Cheers all,

Pat Baker.

Pat it need not be a ex Harrison or Palm Line Ch.Stwd or Ch.Cook, It was very popular on most British Flag Vessels in the 60s and 70s.

Ox Kidney cleaned and diced - Chopped Onions - Garlic chopped - dash of chilli powder or fresh chillies if you have. Water. Plain Flour - bisto browning.

Coat Kidney in the seasoned flour, Sauté kidney in pan with knob butter, add onions garlic table spoon tomato paste add bisto granules and dash of chillies, season to taste, simmer for 20 minutes, Done.

Kidney dishes were either Devilled or Tobago just a different seasoning

Ray Retired Ch.Cook and Ch. Purser.

will.
23rd September 2011, 20:22
Yep,definatley had Kidneys turbego in Blue Star, only on the Reefers it was called Kidneys Turbo, anyone been to that awful anchorage in Columbia !?

Stephen J. Card
23rd September 2011, 20:56
Yep,definatley had Kidneys turbego in Blue Star, only on the Reefers it was called Kidneys Turbo, anyone been to that awful anchorage in Columbia !?



Reefer food....

Roast Cargo.

Boiled Cargo.

Fried Cargo.

Steamed Cargo

and when on the Chiquita run ... CARGO and CUSTARD!

Stephen

TonyAllen
23rd September 2011, 23:51
Tony Allen.

Kidneys & freb I have never heard of.

Was it chopped kidneys in a rich brown sauce?
If so please ask her for the recipe for me.

Regards,

Pat Baker

Pat yes it was indeed . FREB stands for fried bread Gedit
will send you a recipe regards Tony

Peter (Pat) Baker
24th September 2011, 18:46
Tony Allen.

Blimey Tony I am getting slow (fried bread).

Many thanks to you, I will certanly look forward
to that recipe.

Pat Baker

muldonaich
24th September 2011, 21:47
Good news chaps! I remember the names as Kidney Turb..... something or other.

Quick search on Google produced.... Kidney TURBIGO and it is made thus:

Ingredients
4 kidneys
12 button mushrooms
3 cloves garlic
8 button onions
6 pork chipolata sausages
1 ½ wine glasses of red wine
1 drop Tabasco sauce
2 shakes Worcestershire sauce
1 tbsp chopped coriander
1 tbsp chopped tarragon
1 tbsp tomato puree
1 400g tin tomatoes
2 oz butter
2 drizzles olive oil
1 salt and pepper to season

Prepare the kidneys (if you haven't got a nice butcher like mine.) by cutting in half and removing all the white tissues.
Pre-heat oven to 160c
Heat the olive oil and add the onions and mushrooms.
Next add the sausages, kidney, garlic, herbs and tomatoes.
Stir for a few minutes,then season with salt and pepper.
Add the wine Worcestershire sauce,tomato puree and Tabasco sauce.
Place in the oven for 15 minutes.
Remove the pan from the oven and return to the stove top.
Shake the pan,add the butter and heat until melted (this gives it a shine).
Garnish with fresh coriander leaves and chopped herbs.
Serve with riced Cauli or cauliflower mash if IPD'ing or rice or potatoes if your not!


Seems a bit posh... especially with the wine. Perhaps we had a more simple version at sea.

Overall I thought the food with Denholms was good to excellent. One favoutite was the Pork Pajorski... like a Salisbury steak made from pork. The nosh on SCOTSPARK esp sweet and sour pork was better than I've ever had in ANY restaurant and thank Allah that I asked the cook write it down for me. MSG Rules!all the denholm ships were good feeders well the ones i sailed on any way kev.

sidsal
24th September 2011, 21:51
Many years ago when some ships had no regfrigeration our feeding was varied. On the western ocean a stock pot was placed on the galley stove and kept there for days on end. The cook would add meat and potatoes and carrots etc . On coming off watch at night one wouold go into the galley, get a big mug and ladle the stew into it and have a good feed before turning in. On one occasion I was in the galley eating this delicay and the quartermaster came in having been relieved from his stint at the wheel (no autopilots in those days)
He ladled some stew into his mug and there was a plop. He fished a well cooked mouse out and dumped it, emptied the stew back into the pot and ladled a fresh lot into his mug and ate it !

Brandane62
24th September 2011, 21:51
Reefer food....

Roast Cargo.

Boiled Cargo.

Fried Cargo.

Steamed Cargo

and when on the Chiquita run ... CARGO and CUSTARD!

Stephen

Yep. Did 2 reefer trips with P&O. Frozen lamb New Zealand to UK.. Roast lamb, curried lamb, lamb chops, lamb stovies, lamb on toast, lamb sandwiches, lamb casserole. Repeat all these items with the word lamb substituted by mutton and you pretty much have the menu for a 4 month trip!

The other trip was citrus fruit, a full cargo of oranges and grapefruit from South Africa to Europe. No chance of scurvy on that trip!

alan ward
6th October 2011, 14:48
Alan Ward,

I'm sorry for the delay, but I have only just read your reply
to my query about Harrisons chopped kidney in gravy.

The name was definitely not kidney turbigo.

After all these years I am wondering if this was served
in Palm Line rather than Harrisons.

The thing is that nobody else seems to remember it,
which makes me think I may have dreamed it.

Were you in Harrisons after your ventures into the
joys of the West Coast?

If so when and what ships if you will pardon my nosiness.

Cheers and best regards,

Peter (Pat) Baker

Pat,I`ve quoted your reply in full to ensure that this post doesn`t get lost in the general melee of what is a busy thread.My philosophy has always been why use one word when six will do?I couldn`t be doing with ED`s,I didn`t like the West Coast or the job itself.Given my time over I would have transferred over to Catering Cadet but didn`t even know you could do such a thing.I always cooked at home from the age of 8 when my mum taught me how to cook an omelette in the correct manner and really wasted my first two years away.In 1967 I left ED`s and joined Harrisons as an Assistant Purser,I should never have done it because I didn`t know the job well enough.I did a coasting job on the Astronomer on my own and then joined the Adventurer single handed did a Cape run and did just **** it up,then I was sent to complete my education on the Astronomer on a great trip taking machinery and whiskey out to Barranquilla,Punta Cardon,La Guaira etc.Coming home I jacked it and went to the Nautical Catering College took 2nd.Cook and Bakers and sailed on the Empress of England for a while,then private yachts,Clan Line,Sugar Line as PCO then Whitco for 4 years as PCO finally finishing after 10 years and becomin a publican,a job I still do at 62

Peter (Pat) Baker
6th October 2011, 16:42
Alan Ward,
Many thanks for your reply.
You joined Harrison Line about the time that
I swallowed the anchor.
I imagine that if you did not get along
with the Pursers job you made a good move
when you elected for the Catering college,
but finished as Purser/Catering Officer in the end.
You can't keep a good man down eh!
Where was your pub by the way?
I had one in Birkenhead myself.
Cheers
Pat Baker

alan ward
7th October 2011, 15:49
In the words of Frank Sinatra`Pubs,I`ve had a few but then again too few to mention`Right,after 10 years away I had to join Greenall Whitley as a HCITB Trainee Manager and started pulling pints in Rupert Road Huyton at the Swan.I ot my first pub The Royal Oak in Prescot,then the Tailors Arms(Cooksons)in Ford,God that was rough but I saved enough in 2 and a half years to buy a tenancy in rural Staffordshire,then to Leek(don`t ask)where I had three,Roebuck,Quiet Woman and Cock inn,so far 6 pubs in 35 years and not finished yet.

Peter (Pat) Baker
9th October 2011, 16:30
Alan,

my one and only pub was the Lord Exmouth in Birkenhead.

I rather like the names of two of your pubs.
the Quiet Woman and the Cock Inn,
that'll keep them quiet every time!

Cheers, hope to hear from you again.
Pat Baker.

alan ward
12th October 2011, 20:36
it`s just come to me as a crossword puzzle answer does about 5 hours too late.Kidneys Espagnol with rice was another spicey offal dish that I recall.

Tony the pilot
9th November 2013, 17:48
I'm trying to recall all those memorable menus that we all ate from in our time aboard ships under the red ensign in the 1970s.
I have a friend who is retiring in the next couple of years and I'm thinking of arranging a nostalgic meal that'll take him back to his early days as an apprentice with Harrisons of Liverpool when he retires.
I remember the odd items such as green pea soup with sippers, garfield potatoes, Singapore curry.
I'd love to hear and remember what other delicacies we had served up in those heady last days of the British Merchant Navy.

All will be gratefully received.

kevjacko
9th November 2013, 17:50
I'm trying to recall all those memorable menus that we all ate from in our time aboard ships under the red ensign in the 1970s.
I have a friend who is retiring in the next couple of years and I'm thinking of arranging a nostalgic meal that'll take him back to his early days as an apprentice with Harrisons of Liverpool when he retires.
I remember the odd items such as green pea soup with sippers, garfield potatoes, Singapore curry.
I'd love to hear and remember what other delicacies we had served up in those heady last days of the British Merchant Navy.

All will be gratefully received.
Hi Tony

Devilled Kidneys is a must

Michael Taylor
9th November 2013, 18:15
When the fresh lettuce and tomatoes where gone it was time for a Russian Salad....peas and mayo.

Tony the pilot
9th November 2013, 18:16
Nice one, thanks Kev.

Tony the pilot
9th November 2013, 18:22
Thanks Mike, and I remember a similar one- which was beetroot in vinegar with sliced onion. You knew the cupboard was bare !

John Cassels
9th November 2013, 19:18
See the thread I started years ago - Merchant Navy Fare .

Farmer John
9th November 2013, 21:41
See the thread I started years ago - Merchant Navy Fare .

Tried that, 489 matches using advanced search. If you know were it is could you post a link. Food is a subject that interests me, 1970s food might need some thought.

Sister Eleff
10th November 2013, 01:05
See the thread I started years ago - Merchant Navy Fare .

John's thread can be found here:

http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/showthread.php?t=3646

Shipbuilder
10th November 2013, 06:48
I remember "Ye Olde Sausage Rolls," on one menu, together with a pencilled note added by some joker "Ye Olde Fish" as well! (Jester)

I sailed with a catering officer on a Silver Line bulker who would, from time to time, put on "Lamb Armistan! The first time it was on, I asked him if he knew what it was, with a sheepish grin, he said he did, but in all the years he had been putting it one, I was the only one who twigged as to where he got it from!(Jester)

Google it for the answer!!:sweat:

Bob

Farmer John
10th November 2013, 19:11
John's thread can be found here:

http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/showthread.php?t=3646

Thank you so much, I am now on page 5, a real good read. Going to finish it.

calvin
11th November 2013, 12:23
kromanski ala russ fried sweetbreads fish kederee currys plum duffs treacle tarts memories

stevesherratt
11th November 2013, 16:43
Calvin thanks for that!

"Kromeskies" probably the same thing, and Muligatwny to die or Fart for.

Regards Steve R770014

Farmer John
11th November 2013, 20:49
Now on page 21 of the flagged thread, great stuff, I have read far worse books and plenty that told me less. Should this be added on the end? It has been done on the Merchant Navy Fare before.

calvin
25th November 2013, 20:09
spam fritters shrimp foo yung cheese beanos braised oxtail saute kidneys
duchess pototoes creme du barry soup singapore hot sweet
soup

Alistair Macnab
25th November 2013, 20:27
What surprises me more than anything is how the same menu items appeared whether you had an Native or a White crew. The exception, of course, were the curries, Mmmmmm!

bill thompson
26th November 2013, 20:34
The Chief Steward on one of Smith's ships told me that the Master had said to him,"Give them all the chips they can eat and you will never have a complaint"

My GP said to me, "Bill,Why is your *****ole square"???

madbob
2nd December 2013, 01:04
Winter on the UK Coast. A warmer used to be Corned Beef Curry, straight out of the tin and curried. Only seen it on one particular ship with one particular cook. After 4 /5 hours on watch it was pretty good. Amazing how easily pleased we were !!!

nobby clark 117
2nd December 2013, 17:34
don't forget train smash all breakfast leftovers mixed together ,corndog fritters another oldie and of course corndog hash lol

john blythe
13th January 2014, 23:49
Duck board curry when the fridges were cleand at the end of the mouth

bluemoon
18th January 2014, 10:32
"Fricassee of Fridge-boards", coming up the channel on the way home.

But not with the company I worked for.


(apols to John Blythe, I was too lazy to even read the post prior to mine)

jaigee
18th January 2014, 11:29
Here's one I saved from 1968:

http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/17612/title/dinner-menuraphael/cat/all

Sounds very good, but in practice was usually pretty mundane.

trotterdotpom
18th January 2014, 11:44
I liked all that, apart from the poached fish sh*te (always tasteless and dry). Not a bad tea apart from that, but one man's meat is another man's poisson.

John T

borderreiver
18th January 2014, 11:45
Stake and kidney pud but ending using beef mince and herbs. still good.

Mikkum
20th January 2014, 10:31
I still have the Menu Book from my first trip to sea on the Common Brothers' products carrier Hindustan in 1978 when I was a catering boy. One that has me puzzled is Coupe Edna May.
Anyone remember what that is ?

trotterdotpom
20th January 2014, 11:20
Mikkum, I just Googled "Edna May" and it turns out she was an American actress and singer who became successful in the UK (early 1900s). Never heard of "Coupe Edna May", presumably it was a dessert. Maybe somat like Peach Melba (named after Dame Nellie Melba), basically peach with icecream.

John T

ALAN TYLER
20th January 2014, 15:35
Coupe Edna May......Garnish Vanilla ice cream and compote of cherries cover and decorate whipped cream and raspberry puree, it rang a distant bell for me but had to check up in my " Le Repertoire de la Cuisine.

trotterdotpom
20th January 2014, 17:27
Thanks Alan, great how there nearly always seems to be someone on the site with the answer to a query.

John T

Mikkum
20th January 2014, 18:47
Yes Alan, cheers for the info. When I next get home on leave I will have a rake through and see if I can find any more strange culinary delights.

Pat Kennedy
20th January 2014, 20:12
Stake and kidney pud but ending using beef mince and herbs. still good.

You had to look out for splinters though.
Pat(LOL)

ALAN TYLER
21st January 2014, 16:00
Yes Alan, cheers for the info. When I next get home on leave I will have a rake through and see if I can find any more strange culinary delights.

Mikkum, If you,ve an old B.O.T cook book like mine believe there,s plenty of strange culinary delights. Some I certainly wouldn,t class as delights!! Is that Fisher,s of Barrow you,re sailing with?

Mikkum
21st January 2014, 16:23
Alan, yes I am in Barrow, but our ships are now managed by Serco after Fishers lost the contract two years ago. The menu book I have is just the daily menus that were written down by the chief cook on the voyage day by day, Regards Mick.

Waighty
24th February 2014, 15:01
I'm going to post some MN recipes that I found on a website, as written, from a book called Nautical Cookery or somesuch. I've put explanations where I think they're needed. They make for interesting reading:

OLD BRITISH MERCHANT NAVY FOOD RECIPES

Beef Croquettes:

1 lb cooked meat, 1 oz fat, 1 oz flour, 1 gill (5 fl oz) stock, 1 egg, 2 oz finely chopped onion, pepper & salt,
pinch of herbs.

Trim the beef free from fat and gristle and mince very fine. Melt fat and fry the onion a light brown. Stir in the flour and cook for 5 minutes. Then add the stock, minced beef and onion. Carefully season with pepper, salt and herbs, bind with egg and allow to cool. Shape like corks, brush over with egg-wash or batter and dip in breadcrumbs. Fry until brown in deep fat.

Beef Rissoles:

Proceed as for croquettes (above) but shape into flat round cakes.

Serve a good brown gravy and mashed or snow (riced) potatoes with either rissoles or croquettes.

Kromeskies of Meat:

½ lb cooked lean meat, panada (mushy bread soup - bread soaked in water or stock and boiled until a soup like texture), 6 ozs thin rashers bacon, flavouring herbs, pepper and salt, batter, deep fat.

Chop the meat finely adding just enough panada to bind. Flavour and roll a dessert-spoon full of the mixture in a rasher of bacon. Dip in batter and deep fry until a golden brown.
Serve with brown sauce

Kromeskies of Chicken, Veal, Kidney:

Proceed as for kromeskies of meat (above) and vary the fillings with chopped mushroom, pickled walnuts, hard boiled eggs, nuts etc.

Dry Hash:

2 lbs cooked potatoes, ½ lb cooked meat, 4 ozs onion, 1 tablespoonful mixed herbs, 1 oz fat,
seasoning.

Mince the meat and onion fine. Mash the potatoes. Mix all the ingredients together, season to taste and put into a greased baking dish. Mark into portions and bake in a slow oven.

Devilled Beef:

1lb beef, ½ oz flour, ¼ oz mustard, 1 oz fat, 3 gills stock, 1 dessertspoonful vinegar, 1 lump sugar, cayenne, salt, 1 tablespoonful Yorkshire relish.

Cut the beef into 8 slices. Make the fat hot and fry the slices of meat brown, take up and stir in the flour, cook 5 minutes, add the stock, bring to the boil, add all the other ingredients except mustard, and simmer for 40 minutes; add the mustard and serve.

Devilled Kidneys:

4 sheep's kidneys, ¼ teaspoon salt, pinch cayenne, ½ teaspoonful mixed mustard, 8 squares toast, ½ oz fat.

Skin and split the kidneys, take out the middle fat and soak kidney in warm salt and water for ½ hour. Skewer lengthways, coat with the mixture, grill over a clear fire, turn constantly, put a half kidney on each square of toast and serve.

Irish Stew:

4 lbs mutton or pork, 1 lb onions, 4 lbs potatoes, pepper and salt, 1 oz cornflour.

Cut the meat into pieces and put into a stewpan with the onions sliced, cover with water and season, cook for 1 hour, add the potatoes peeled and cut all one size, and cook altogether for ¾ hour. Thicken with the cornflour mixed with a little cold water and serve.

Jugged Hare:

1 hare, 6 onions (small), 6 cloves, 2 bay leaves, ½ lemon, 1½ pints brown sauce, 1 oz fat, 2 doz forcemeat balls, 1 glass port, 2 tablespoonfuls red currant jelly, 1 oz flour.

Joint the hare, dust with the flour and fry in fat to a light brown, put in a jar with all the other ingredients except the port, flour and forcemeat balls, tie down and cook in a moderate oven for 3 hours. Just before serving add the port and season to taste. Pile on a hot dish, remove the bay leaves and garnish with the forcemeat balls and grilled rolls of bacon.

Plum Duff:

12 oz flour, pinch salt, 2 teaspoonfuls baking powder, 4 oz fat, 4 oz sugar, 6 oz plums, water.

Stone the plums, sieve the flour, salt and baking powder together, put the flour mixture into a basin, work in the fat, add the remainder of the dry ingredients and make into a medium dough with cold water, tie in a cloth and boil for 3 hours, Serve with a sweet sauce.

Plum Duff (Cabin):

½ lb flour, ½ lb breadcrumbs, ½ lb suet, 3 oz currants, 3 oz sultanas, 3 oz raisins, 1 oz peel, 1 tablespoonful syrup, 1 teaspoonful spice, 3 oz sugar, 2 eggs, milk to mix, pinch salt.

Clean and stone the fruit, chop the suet and peel and mix all the dry ingredients together thoroughly, warm the syrup in a little milk and add to the dry ingredients, beat up the eggs with sufficient milk to make the mixture to a dropping consistency, put inot a greased basin, cover with greased paper and steam for 4 hours.

Enjoy!! :sweat:

expats
9th March 2014, 09:17
In the late 1960s I was R/O on the 'Chelwood'....The Cook (Potts??) made the most wonderful 'pot pies' using 'Fray Bentos' steak and kidney cans as a mould....
I used to manage two; with mashed potatoes and gravy...the taste still lingers....

trotterdotpom
9th March 2014, 10:08
Those Fray Bentos steak and kidney pies were pretty good too. Never had one on a ship though. Mind you, I never had jugged hare on a ship either. Come to think of it, I've never had jugged hare anywhere.

John T

tiachapman
9th March 2014, 10:39
goulash god and the cook only knew what went in it

alan ward
9th March 2014, 11:33
If you visit the Maritime Museum in Liverpool there a display case with the daily menus or as it was called by the old boys Bills of Fare book on show along with a good selection of familiar everyday stuff from Shaw Saville

tom roberts
9th March 2014, 13:18
Maybe Ive posted before but the memory is not what it used to be,Board of Trade Salad,beetroot and onions sliced,as peggy on a B.T tanker I had tons of melon jam to myself no one liked it,oval tins of pilchards,again not a popular dish but as I have posted before in St Lucia they were swapped for a night with my first dusky maid.One dish I could not face was Brawn laid out on a tray and melting in the heat yuck,and coasting cooks were often the worst pi**heads I ever sailed with one guy went ashor in Birkenhead with our food money came back pi**ed with a bag of carrots.Many memories of shipboard food and great cooks they need a thread all to themselves.

trotterdotpom
9th March 2014, 13:59
I think the dusky maiden I met in St Lucia may have had one of your tins of pilchards, Tom. Very nice. Personally, I was quite fond of them ... pilchards that is. If you were careful, you could remove the backbone like a zip. That may have been the beginnings of my OCD.

John T

Leratty
9th March 2014, 17:41
After my early life at boarding school food at sea was splendiferous + plenty of it, however there were a couple of bad feeders BSL being the worst. I recall certainly in the early days you knew what day of the week it was by the menu.
Breakfast was always my favourite at sea & that is when I loved kidneys but the devilled kidneys spoken of here are a delight. We use Worcestershire Sauce in our gravy, also a variation is a dish called Kidneys Tobago a real serious cholesterol hit but lovely. Reckon recipe would be on the net try it kidney lovers.

John Cassels
9th March 2014, 20:04
Those Fray Bentos steak and kidney pies were pretty good too. Never had one on a ship though. Mind you, I never had jugged hare on a ship either. Come to think of it, I've never had jugged hare anywhere.

John T

Always bring a supply of FB steak & kidney pies back after a UK trip
John. Great food and they keep for years ! ,

Varley
10th March 2014, 01:50
After my early life at boarding school food at sea was splendiferous + plenty of it, however there were a couple of bad feeders BSL being the worst. I recall certainly in the early days you knew what day of the week it was by the menu.
Breakfast was always my favourite at sea & that is when I loved kidneys but the devilled kidneys spoken of here are a delight. We use Worcestershire Sauce in our gravy, also a variation is a dish called Kidneys Tobago a real serious cholesterol hit but lovely. Reckon recipe would be on the net try it kidney lovers.

Bad Luck. My schools didn't include a bad feeder. My only experience of that was Conoco Europe. But in 2014 to see "splediferous" in print? spiffing!

Leratty
10th March 2014, 08:35
We always had a good load of their FB's S&K, beef as well as chicken pies when cruising as they are so easy to cook up then make up some mash with a green. Usually one per crew.
Varley, our school food was pretty bad overall except breakfast. This mainly as there was just not enough to go around. However I still love the old puddings we used to get & Boss Cocky has become quite adroit at cooking them, jam rolly polly, spotted dick, apple etc suet pudding, steamed chocolate, treacle pudding ginger bread with custard hmm oh the list goes on.

alan ward
10th March 2014, 10:50
A friend on mine is an ex-marine working as security on ships negotiating those dodgy waters off Somalia,at the moment he`s on an MSC box boat enjoying curry every lunchtime for 41 days with no signs of changing his or his mates diet he thinks he`s in paradise.

tom roberts
10th March 2014, 11:19
Not ships grub, but The Liverpool Sailors Home so it has connections to the sea, the egg sarnies made in the big recreation room were and still are the best I have ever tasted, the ladies making them were aware that we were skint and waiting for a ship loaded you up,the home provided three meals a day not five star maybe but o.k.for £2.9pence a week and you got kippers every breakfast as well as greasy bacon and eggs, again the ladies were very generous in their helpings knowing our poor state of finance.Carrying on in a similar vein who can forget the wonderfull aroma of bacon sarnies wafting from the Stan Waters cafes along the dock road in Liverpool, the aroma dragged you in and by God what sarnies they were with plenty of brown sauce ,again delicacies never to be found again, lost like the wonderfull years of our time at sea.

alan ward
10th March 2014, 11:32
Not ships grub, but The Liverpool Sailors Home so it has connections to the sea, the egg sarnies made in the big recreation room were and still are the best I have ever tasted, the ladies making them were aware that we were skint and waiting for a ship loaded you up,the home provided three meals a day not five star maybe but o.k.for £2.9pence a week and you got kippers every breakfast as well as greasy bacon and eggs, again the ladies were very generous in their helpings knowing our poor state of finance.Carrying on in a similar vein who can forget the wonderfull aroma of bacon sarnies wafting from the Stan Waters cafes along the dock road in Liverpool, the aroma dragged you in and by God what sarnies they were with plenty of brown sauce ,again delicacies never to be found again, lost like the wonderfull years of our time at sea.

and Frank Smiths dock road cafe down by the town end,he represented England in Judo short but very heavy set bloke,not a man to tangle with.

alan ward
10th March 2014, 11:34
A friend on mine is an ex-marine working as security on ships negotiating those dodgy waters off Somalia,at the moment he`s on an MSC box boat enjoying curry every lunchtime for 41 days with no signs of changing his or his mates diet he thinks he`s in paradise.

Not about food just changing times,due to good internet connections he`s talking to us everyday.Remember when you got a letter once in a blue moon?

expats
11th March 2014, 10:31
A friend on mine is an ex-marine working as security on ships negotiating those dodgy waters off Somalia,at the moment he`s on an MSC box boat enjoying curry every lunchtime for 41 days with no signs of changing his or his mates diet he thinks he`s in paradise.

On the 'City' boats I had curry four times a day (counting Kegeree for breakfast and a midnight 'crew curry' delivered mid-ships for us)...Luverley....