Merchant Navy Fare - merged threads

Pages : [1] 2 3

John Cassels
21st November 2005, 20:08
Have long wanted to start this thread, rather dear to my heart (and stomach).
Most of us have sailed on pretty terrible feaders but on average the majority
were pretty good. Even in the 60's on the Denholm ore carriers, the food was rather good. A favourite entree was "Kromeski a la Russe .which was just a sausage wrapped in bacon the deep fried. Seemed simple but tasted great after a day on deck. Another favourite entree was devilled kidney on toast. Even after 40 years trying I've never been able to make it the same way.
Remember braised steak and onions. With a slab of bread to mop up the gravy, you hardly needed a main course. When I was super,once visited one of our ships around lunchtime. Main course was mince pie,peas and chips.
Having eaten in some fancy places all over the world,I swear I have never
enjoyed a meal like that. Ch,cook said the lads needed something to soak up the lunchtime beers.
The point of this rigamole is; seeing some of the food which is dished out nowadays in restaurants, I don't think we fared so badly. Most of us will have pretty fond memories of good feeders.
I have even tried to get hold of a copy of the Merchant navy cookery book written by a chap called (I think) Atkinson, but still no success.
Perhaps RUUD will be able to contribute.
Anyone got any good old fashioned MN recepies?.

JC

Gulpers
21st November 2005, 20:21
John,

Omelettes always came in three varieties – cheese, Spanish or plain – or as one 4/E I sailed with insisted in calling plain omelettes, egg!

How about oxtail for an entrée – that was always one of the favourites and Brown Windsor soup was a certainty the next day!

On the GTVs we had our first experience of microwaves – they certainly weren’t common household items in the 70s. How many eggs did you explode after carefully selecting which coloured plastic timing strip to feed into the machine? We didn’t know you couldn’t boil eggs in their shells! (Thumb)

Pilot mac
21st November 2005, 20:29
John.
yes I remember the good old Kromesky.

Another I remember is' Beef a la Mode' which was beef having been penetrated with whole carrotts and then pot roasted. Beef Olives was another .

The poor old Cornish Pasty went under a variety of names depending on what company you were in . I have come across it in three diferent guises, Armadillo, Sealed Orders and worse of all *****s Handbags (cos you never knew what was within)

regards
Dave MacVicker

john g
21st November 2005, 20:49
Coney Island Quail ? does that bring back any memories ? Thanks for the reminder on "beef a la mode"...now you've got me thinking back to the Cunard Brock days..john g

lakercapt
21st November 2005, 22:07
Serving my time in Ropners was not in the same world as good feeding (except for my last voyage on "Daleby" which had 12 passengers and we ate in the saloon.)
Thing I remember was the DUFF we were served on Thursday and Sunday. Wish I knew how the cooks did it. (what won't fatten will fill)
Closeset thing was when I had a cook from Newfoundland and his "figgy duff" was the nearly as good. Alas before that was salt fish and bruis or Jiggs dinner. Don't ask what they are as they are Newfie culinary delights along with flipper pie!

tell
22nd November 2005, 01:04
Shame on you chaps! no Apple Daddy, surely there must be someone from T&J Harrisons, Terry

ruud
22nd November 2005, 02:25
Ahoy,
Labscous,Boston Baked Beans,American Hash,Irish Stew,Chicken Curry,Curry 'n Rice, does that rings a bell?But there were a lot more!!!!! Mostly when those were on the menu, it was often said, 'eeh, the fridges have been cleaned' because of all the left overs, where mixed together.On the Dutch MN, it was also, "a tradition" on Saturdays having "Snert"[Thick green peas soup, with trotters,also called "Erwtensoep"] and the other saturday "Groningse Rijsttafel"[Captain's Dinner nowadays called]These were brown beans with all kind of garnitures, like different made onions,bacon,goulash,pickles,piccalily, potatoes and rice.Even in the tropes, and often as dessert "pancakes"[natural,cheese,bacon].In the early days,from the '50's on,you don't needed a calender to see what day it was, you knew it by what was been served as dinner,on Sundays always Chicken and French Fries,Garden Peas,Applesauce, and once in a while "Rijsttafel"[Indonesian way] as served as Bami or Nasi Goreng, with a lot of garnitures as well.Friday always fish, mostly flatfish like plaice.Wednesday meatballs, made from minced meat and lot of bread.(*)) Talking about bread; every morning at 04:30 made my dough,hand made!!! to get fresh bread at breakfast, which started at 07:30,and had 4 hrs. overtime each day, most of the times about 120-150 hrs/monthly:$$$, but none is left(Eat)
http://www.kallenberg.nl/Illustraties/brood.jpg

RCHARLTON
22nd November 2005, 03:02
All in all Cunard Brocks food was pretty good. Much as I enjoyed the curries on Brocks ships however, I did draw the line at curried baked beans and curried hard boiled eggs. The Chief Steward was really scraping the bottom of the barrel with those.
Ray

cboots
22nd November 2005, 03:37
When I started out as a deck apprentice in the mid sixties there was a very simple rule of thumb, if you had the twelve passengers onboard you fed okay, when you didn't it was usually crap. I put that down to a number of factors not related to the company's feeding rate which was perfectly adequate. Drunken and imcompetent cooks, likewise captains, and some rather shifty chief stewards. Perhaps the latter two I should explain. All "wine accounts" were inspected by the company head office and some of those old, and not so old masters could only survive on a couple of bottles a day; so who was best placed to cover that up? Why the good old chief steward of course, always the richest man on the boat. So when all but the rubbish cuts of meat had been sold over the wall, and you were getting shakey milk in West India Docks, who was going to complain, not your illustrious commanding officer. However, by the time I packed it in, late seventies, on the whole things had much improved and the feeding could be almost too good for someone like me who puts on weight very easily. I also agree with a previous poster that Brocks food was always pretty good though some of those curries could make you sweat.
CBoots

DMA
22nd November 2005, 04:04
What about Currie & Rice at breakfast that of course after around of eggs & bacon.
This was Harrisons [ two of fat one of lean Harrisons ],who said they were hungry.
Have had me hooked on currie ever since. (Thumb)

lakercapt
22nd November 2005, 04:06
Wasn't kegerre a rice and curry dish served at breakfast?

tunatownshipwreck
22nd November 2005, 08:05
I ate well on a number of British ships as a kid with the requisite bottomless stomach. I started visiting ships at my small town port at the age of thirteen. I remember well chowing down on steak and chips, meat pies and some great puddings in the late 1960s and early 1970s on ships like the Pacific Stronghold, Pacific Northwest, Loch Loyal, Loch Ryan, Loch Gowan, Harpalyce, Graiggwerdd, Prometheus, Amalric, among many other UK ships with crews and cuisines mainly from India and Hong Kong. I always loved the much superior chocolates and toffees of Britain.
One thing I remember is a wall poster of what every man on board was entitled to in nutrition and meal allotments, I think it even got down to the minimum entitlement in salt. There was some colloquial term for the poster that I have long since forgotten. I really wish I had been able to get one of these posters for my collection, just as I would have loved the Indian Government's own issue of this chart. The whole thing was as big as a wide door, covered in text.

Oz.
22nd November 2005, 08:05
Best feeders I had were supply boats to the Australian Rigs. Why?. NO COOKS! An AB voluntered to be cook for the three week trip, and we were lucky, we had a would be Cordon Bleau chef, He was brilliant. He did his own ordering and we were never without Sydney Rock Oysters, Lobster,Prawns and steaks that just melted in the mouth!. One time in Fremantle he had ordered 80 dozen Rock Oysters, but only 40 dozen were delivered. The crew refused to sail until the other 40 doz arrived, air express from Sydney!. Five flavors of ice cream, and even though the ships were 'dry' we never were short of some wonderful Australian red and white wines. Ah, the good old days!!.

Mac
22nd November 2005, 08:22
Capt. Bill.

"Khichri" is an ancient Indian dish consisting of lentils and rice and spices.

When the British arrived in the seventeenth century they adopted this dish as a breakfast dish with flaked fish substituted for the lentils. In time they dropped the spices, added hard boiled egg, anglicized the name and "Kedgeree " was born.

Source: The Raj at Table. David Burton, Faber and Faber 1993.

Mac.

John Cassels
22nd November 2005, 09:45
Anyone ever heard of the book I mentioned in my introduction and if so where
I can get hold of a copy ?.

JC

ruud
22nd November 2005, 10:44
Ahoy John,

I know a woman, Catherine Atkinson, she has written several Cooking books, but there are 1000's of them, and also with special recipes from the MN.
But my favourites still are Larousse and my best book is from Auguste Escoffier 'Le guide culinaire'
http://img515.imageshack.us/img515/8031/leguideculinaire9ag.th.jpg (http://img515.imageshack.us/my.php?image=leguideculinaire9ag.jpg)

John Cassels
22nd November 2005, 11:27
Thanks your input Ruud.
As far as I can recall , it was a name like Charles Henry Atkinson or very similar.
It gave all the old well remembered MN food>

Rgds

JC

R58484956
22nd November 2005, 14:17
We had to rough it on the QE, only had the same as the first class passengers.

Peter (Pat) Baker
22nd November 2005, 14:25
I remember curry & rice for breakfast in Harrison Line, mainly with Jackie Moore as Chief Steward. The 2/E, Wally Brinsdon (a Kiwi) used to have the curry & rice with his egg and bacon on top and use marmalade as chutney. Boy could he eat.
Peter Baker.

Succour
22nd November 2005, 15:49
What a great thread. The two that spring to mind on Bluey's was Nasi Goreng, and Kedgeree. On Elder Dempsters Kumba we were asked if we would like to try Palm Oil Chop. We all declined the offer after seeing the Ch cook come out of the poop mixing the chop with his hands and a lady of the night hanging round his neck. Strange ship that Kumba. Opposed piston Doxford and steam recip auxiliaries, including the turning gear. 110 volts DC, and the lights used to dim when we showed a movie. West African stewards and engine room hands, boy could they swing a hammer in the crankcase, Happy days. all the best lads Succour

ruud
22nd November 2005, 17:18
Ahoy,

I don't want to forget our "Iberian crew members",as they came in the Dutch MN in the early '50's, and I've served them a lot of:

Feijoada[black beans and pork stew]
--------------
Cozido's[different meat dish]
--------------
Bacalhau à Portuguesa[codfish fish dish]
--------------
Caldeirada à Fragateira[different fish dish]

And still make them nowadays, for friends. You just have to try it once!!!

paul0510
22nd November 2005, 17:37
Best feeders in BP were in my opinion the Indian crew ships. The tables (not just on these ships) were always properly laid, silver napkin rings etc. and for every meal starting with breakfast the Chief Steward had prepared a menu typed on the Company Menu card. Full English breakfast with juices, egg choice, hot cakes followed at midday by, you guessed it, a curry (Kopta, Madras, Dahl.....) with trimmings or/and English Fayre finishing off with dessert and cheeses. And if that wasn't enough an omelette for tea @ 17:00? No problem. To imagine I sacrificed all this for cereals and hard-boiled eggs, gristle with Sauerkraut and Rote Grütze followed at teatime by yes, black or grey bread and sliced sausage. German Merchant Marine Fayre A.D. 1978. Mind you, some of the Stewardesses weren't bad. ;-))

neil maclachlan
22nd November 2005, 17:38
Hi Folks,
When I sailed with Blue Star Lines the Food was fairly good when we had passengers aboard,but when in port it went downhill,nobody ate aboard. We used to have a salad called Russian Salad,no wonder Russia was such a happy country, During the voyage they would have on the menu a dish called colonial goose,it was always legs,we called it Blue Star centipede? They never gave you fresh milk but watered down condensed milk--yuk!
Cheers,
Neil Mac.

lakercapt
22nd November 2005, 17:55
The list that was displayed on board ships was a copy of the ships agreement (articles) and that showed the minimum (chief stewards thought it was maximum) food allowances with permitted substitutes. Commanly know as your wack.
Not many went to these extremes but I all depended on whither the chief steward had enough saved to buy his retirement pub

airds
22nd November 2005, 18:34
Anyone ever heard of the book I mentioned in my introduction and if so where
I can get hold of a copy ?.

JC


Here you are John - 2nd hand at £12.50 from www.abebooks.co.uk

The Nautical Cookery Book (http://snipurl.com/k51n) - for the Use of Stewards & Cooks of Cargo Vessels
C H Atkinson

but I see it/was (ISBN: 0851741916) a title from - Brown, Son & Ferguson (http://www.skipper.co.uk/) - the famous nautical publisher's - so maybe worth getting in touch with them in Glasgow ....

(red text is direct links)


b.rdgs


ps I'll expect an invite - Nasi Goreng (http://www.asianhomerecipe.com/recipecorner/indonesia/nasigoreng.php) with peanut sauce was always nice :-)

lofty
22nd November 2005, 18:46
What about Currie & Rice at breakfast that of course after around of eggs & bacon.
This was Harrisons [ two of fat one of lean Harrisons ],who said they were hungry.
Have had me hooked on currie ever since. (Thumb)
hi dave you forgot the griddle cakes and syrup my favourite cheers lofty

japottinger
22nd November 2005, 18:47
In Brocklebank we had a coasting chief who always came into the duty mess at lunch time, "Boy, let me see the menu" Chief-"Nothing I fancy, just send some rolls and butter to my cabin"
Behind his back we engineers and the mess boy were silently mimicing the same words as he had ordered the same every lunch time!
Mind you it was nothing for us growing boys(then!) to go through the whole menu, soup, curry(every day of course), main course, sweet, cheese and biscuits etc etc

We had a 2nd eng,. who ordered eggs at breakfast, "Mess boy- how you want your eggs sahib?"
2nd- "Not too soft, but not too hard, but just right"
Mess boy- " Acha sahib"
Needless to say he got them the same each day!

Tony Crompton
22nd November 2005, 18:52
"They" used to say in Brocklebanks that you got a Sunday Dinner every day ans a Christmas Dinner every Sunday.
-----------------------
Tony C

John Cassels
22nd November 2005, 19:58
Great to see all the input to this thread.
In Denholms it seemed (no matter what ship you were on) that the Sunday menu
main courses were roast chicken for lunch and steak & chips for dinner.
I retrospect , I think we had it good for those days. Still hoping to be able to find
out how to make devilled kidneys the way I remember them.
David, thanks info re the nautical cookery book - it's the first solid lead I've had in a long time.
Ruud ;next time your cooking on of your MN banquets , give me a call. I can't be too
far away from you.

rgds to all.

JC

Gulpers
22nd November 2005, 20:23
John,

You've gone posh. What's all this 'devilled kidneys on toast' nonsense? Didn't the 'top table' refer to this entrée as 'sh*t on a raft', like the rest of us? (Thumb)

Pat McCardle
22nd November 2005, 21:24
Alas! Some Cooks of old still try to follow the tradition? Fridays= Curry & Fish & chips. Sunday= seafood cocktail + Steak et al. One to remind you it was the weekend, so on the pi**, the other to remind you "Its Monday tomorrow-Turn too". These days its Scotch Pies, Beefburgers (Where's the beef) But Omelettes are still in there with Cheese & Spanish still the favourites!! S.O.S.+ Same Old Sh*T? (Thumb)

gdynia
22nd November 2005, 22:52
Sunday morning on the Stag Line had the biggest breakfast que as this was the only day Baked Beans were served - definetely a delicacy

R798780
22nd November 2005, 23:10
Then there was the Hamburg Steak Malabar. What the kids call a beefburger before that name was invented, with a fried egg on top. That name may be peculiar to Brocklebanks, but the hamburgers put most of todays offerings to shame.

Later in the day our brand new PRC Chinese cook took New Yorks finest frozen hamburgers and reconstituted them. Twice the size, four times as good.

Coney Island Quail, Scotch woodcock, Eggs Florentine, Golden Buck Rarebit, Welsh Rarebit; Never said no as apprentice.

Chris Field
23rd November 2005, 00:01
A great thread, gentlemen!
My most remembered meals on the City boats in the fifties (Colchester, Edinburgh and London) were the endless variations of curries (Bombay, Madras,Calcutta,Delhi etc etc, a totally new world for the young lad from post-war Brixton!

gdynia
23rd November 2005, 01:32
A great thread, gentlemen!
My most remembered meals on the City boats in the fifties (Colchester, Edinburgh and London) were the endless variations of curries (Bombay, Madras,Calcutta,Delhi etc etc, a totally new world for the young lad from post-war Brixton!


So why do we only call it Delhi belly when we get the runs

DMA
23rd November 2005, 03:37
With all this food about on the forum almost makes me want to get a can of Condensed Milk for a spot of tea.
What more could one ask for after a run ashore. (Pint)

Pilot mac
23rd November 2005, 13:00
The poor old catering department were often the 'whipping boy' if things wernt going too well aboard. It was a hard job especially when stores were running low homeward bound. Trying to turn out SOS (same old ****) on a daily basis was not a job I would relish.The humble potato would appear in many guises, boiled, roast, mashed(or creamed if you were P &O!), parsley,
stove, chipped, garfield, wafer, straw, croquette, lyonnaise, boulangere,
saute, I'm sure there are others?. Swede would also make a regular appearance homeward bound.

On one ship we had a particularly revolting cheese aboard which was served for ever on a daily basis, needless to say it was very unpopular. One day a diferent cheese appeared and was eaten and enjoyed by all. The next day we were back to the old revolting cheese. I asked the Chief Stewrd if there was any of the popular cheese left, he replied 'Oh yes plenty, the trouble is,
if I put it on the menu then everyone eats it!'

regards
Dave

Peter (Pat) Baker
23rd November 2005, 13:18
I also remember Palm Oil Chop (the chop stands for food) in Palm Line. It was served to we officers only on a sunday, in port. down the coast and was made with ingredients bought by the said officers and prepared by West African crew members (rather than the ships cook). It was preceded by a few gin & Tonics and was the most wonderful meal in the world. To cut the oil after the meal one always drank a neat gin.
A restaurant in Liverpool (the Bears Paw) used to provide this dish with four days notice and a minimum of 8 persons to serve.
This all took place in the 1950's. I often wonder how long it lasted.
Peter Baker.

rstimaru
23rd November 2005, 14:43
We used to get good food on the Accra in the early sixtys,I remember goig down to the seamans galley to beg the soup at smoko and if anybody sailed with E,d,s they will remember the palm stew that the kroo boy,s mamy,s used to make

KenLin39
23rd November 2005, 18:44
Hi Folks,
When I sailed with Blue Star Lines the Food was fairly good when we had passengers aboard,but when in port it went downhill,nobody ate aboard. We used to have a salad called Russian Salad,no wonder Russia was such a happy country, During the voyage they would have on the menu a dish called colonial goose,it was always legs,we called it Blue Star centipede? They never gave you fresh milk but watered down condensed milk--yuk!
Cheers,
Neil Mac.
Hi Neil, I may have missed something, what was Colonial Goose. Ken. (Ouch)

Polarum
23rd November 2005, 22:59
The other day, I overheard a programme on the BBC discussing cookery books for Christmas and they mentioned a book that was originally written for Chinese and foreign ships’ cooks on the Blue Funnel Line by the late Patience Gray. For those who hanker after ship's grub, it might be an ideal present this Christmas.

I was never on a bad feeder whilst on British ships, but often heard companies prefaced by the word 'hungry' - 'hungry hains' in particular.
Were these companies that bad?

billyboy
23rd November 2005, 23:41
stale bread toasted wid red lead (canned tomatoes) for breakfast
Cold pilchards with mash for lunch.
veg stew for dinner.

but on another coaster we had an old boy from Southampton who really knew how to do it. came as a bit of shock to waited on by him serving stuffed sheep hearts and other exotic fare. fresh fruit cake on the dog watch too. started putting weight on with this man.

Mac
24th November 2005, 04:09
Ken

Colonial Goose was an antipodean dish consisting of a boned out leg of mutton, the cavity that the bone occupied being filled with forcemeat.
The whole thing was then slowly roasted

The above info from a very old NZ cookbook.

fredkinghorn
24th November 2005, 11:02
Anyone remember " mock crab " ? --Grated cheddar cheese mixed with tomato sauce.
Seven Bell breakfast/dinner ? the " black pan " ?

memories, memories

trotterdotpom
24th November 2005, 17:46
There were good feeders and bad feeders, even on bad ones we were often doing better than folk ashore. Hard to moan about the food when you're in Somalia!

This thread has brought back happy memories of garfield potatoes (does that happen anywhere except on a ship?), Russian salad (yesterdays Macedoine of Vegetables with salad cream), etc. How come in Boston, the Boston Baked Beans have rum added, but they didn't aboard ship?

It brought to mind some of the great stuff, unheard of at home, which we were able to get ashore in foreign parts. Here's a ditty about that:


The Rolling Gourmet

As a boy my food was solid but boring –
Our Mam hadn’t heard of Nasi Goreng.
Meat ‘n’ two veg was our basic grub,
A packet of crisps, a treat from the pub.
Little did I know, when I went to sea,
The culinary delights awaiting me.

Bratwurst schmeckt gut and cost little brass,
Breakfast of Jarlsberg with a Norwegian lass!
Shasliks in Turkey, eagerly gobbled,
Resulted in tummy seriously nobbled!
Muchas tapas in Spain, devoured with grace,
Before Brits in hankies discovered the place.

Buckets of gumbo slurped in Jackson Square
Before Cajun nosh became “de rigueur”.
Gigantic beefsteaks in La Boca, B.A.,
Pero solo pescado on meatless Thursday.
African chillies on chicken wings made me smile
When wandering fingers made the girls jump a mile!

Bhandari’s curry from the galley’s backdoor –
My own backdoor screaming: “please, no not more!”
Newton’s Circus’ liver with ginger was Yum,
Peking Duck in China – Eeh by gum!
Hand-fed tempura prawns in Japan,
I’ll will never forget you Sumiko-san.


In those long ago days the Naked Chef wore a nappy,
The Two Fat ladies were still slim and happy.
The gourmet delights were fun while they lasted,
But look what’s left over – a great big fat bastard!
That sounds like I’m moaning and being a pain,
But you know that I'd willingly do it again!


Bon appetit

John T.

awateah2
24th November 2005, 20:00
In 1961 I was in the M.V. Aptity of F.T. Everard and Sons, a Tanker with a Coal Galley Range and Coke fired Central heating. very difficult when loading spirit at Fawley, hence Eggs boiled in the one electric Kettle kept locked away for such purposes. I think we were also charged £1. 10 shillings a week for our food although we were given an allowance of 3 shillings a day toward this cost, no fridge but a wire meshed meat locker on deck. only one fresh water tap, in the Galley and Salt water Showers, thinking back this was unbelievable for 1961. The Master was H.A.Kearns from Paisley ex British Tanker apprentice, The Mate was Jack Hadlow a long time Everard man and the Chief Engineer was a Mr 'Mad' Harris who insisted his breakfast was cooked even though he did not eat it.In the year I was aboard we must have had about 8 different cooks but I was young and fit and ever hungry, great memory of 'Corned Beef Hash' and Baked Beans after a cold day tank cleaning

Gulpers
25th November 2005, 12:29
John T, excellent, enjoyed The Rolling Gourmet very much! (Applause)

mcook
25th November 2005, 14:40
Reading the posts in this thread it seems to me that
there is a generally unanimous agreement that the
feeding standards were overall very good. I
whole heartedly agree with this, which makes the
odd exception stand out clear in one's memory.

I am sure that most Brock's old boys will recognise
one 'Second Hand' Rose as a Chief Steward. It was
from him that I heard the phrase "I'm not going to
buy anymore of that, everyone will just eat it" and
there was no joke involved here with him. His
attitude was better summed up one evening when
the Chief, trying to munch through something
immediately forgettable, leaned across the table
to the Chief Steward and said something like
"This (whatever it was) tastes like crap."
The reply was "Well, do what I do. Don't eat
it"

These days I can blame my heartburn as a legacy
of all those curries I had as a young man; nothing
to do with drinking red wine or anything like that!
(At least my wife believes me, I think!)

Good Eating

malcolm

R798780
25th November 2005, 14:49
Reading the posts in this thread it seems to me that
there is a generally unanimous agreement that the
feeding standards were overall very good. I
whole heartedly agree with this, which makes the
odd exception stand out clear in one's memory.

I am sure that most Brock's old boys will recognise
one 'Second Hand' Rose as a Chief Steward. It was
from him that I heard the phrase "I'm not going to
buy anymore of that, everyone will just eat it" and
there was no joke involved here with him. His
attitude was better summed up one evening when
the Chief, trying to munch through something
immediately forgettable, leaned across the table
to the Chief Steward and said something like
"This (whatever it was) tastes like crap."
The reply was "Well, do what I do. Don't eat
it"

These days I can blame my heartburn as a legacy
of all those curries I had as a young man; nothing
to do with drinking red wine or anything like that!
(At least my wife believes me, I think!)

Good Eating

malcolm


There were worse than Graham Rose. Fred thompson had similar responses; but didn't/wouldn't eat in the saloon. Then there was Dennis (the ogg) Oglevie. Seemed to have procured a permanent job coasting. Fred and Graham were super feeders by comparison. But then there was Les Flockhart who had a well earned reputation as the best feeder in Brocks. Sadly never managed to sail with him.

beejay
26th November 2005, 09:35
Hi Neil,
Vestys centipede chooks,always wonderd how the suppliers to Blue Star managed to breed chooks with so many legs.
regards Brian

R58484956
26th November 2005, 12:40
Chooks = chickens to the brits who are not familiar with antipodean words.

lakercapt
28th November 2005, 21:52
I don't think that anone has mentioned that old breakfast treat!
Bubble and squeek.
God awaful stuff using last evenings potatoes and cabbage.
Called bubble and squeek as that was the noise it made when the cook was doing it in a large frying pan

RCHARLTON
29th November 2005, 00:04
Just had some bubble and squeek last Friday morning as part of my traditional "Day after Thanksgiving breakfast". Great stuff!

Ray

Robinj
29th November 2005, 00:14
Reading through these threads all I can say being a sparks who sailed with various outfits the food was never bad, even when on an old tramp the C/E got the D/T's and tossed all the meat over the side and we ended up eating tinned sausages for the last week of the trip. That Chief cook was a genious.

terence
29th November 2005, 00:16
looks like u where all hard done bye xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx

tunatownshipwreck
29th November 2005, 01:02
looks like u where all hard done bye xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
It looks like I am not well acquainted with all forms of English from the mother country. What the heck did you just say?

neil maclachlan
29th November 2005, 17:08
Hi Ken(Lin)& Brian,
Blue Star was a good company and the food was'nt too bad(at times),Colonial Goose was chicken legs including the thigh,we all thought how did they manage to get so many bloody chicken legs,hence the Blue Star centipede as we called it. Brian say's Chooks,thats the Aussie word, we in Scotland as kids called them chookie hens,the Aussies must have cut it down to size? Anyway Guys,keep up the good work,it's great to be amongst you.
Neil Mac.

Pilot mac
29th November 2005, 18:15
what about 'puppy spew' sandwiches?

regards
Dave

gdynia
29th November 2005, 19:20
Whats happened to bacon and eggs. Our American crew give us for breakfast Grits, Hush Puppies and Corn Bread what a disaster

neil maclachlan
30th November 2005, 18:05
Hi Guys,
I sailed with Standard Vacuum and the food was streets ahead of anything we were served on Blue Star,we even had fresh milk for as long as it lasted and then it was cans of Carnation Milk. Our ships sailed under the British Flag but the company was owned by Standard Oil. On a Sunday we were give 2 beers each by the company, I think on American ships they were'nt allowed beer,but the company rule gave us free beers,we were also allowed to buy beer and spirits from the captains bond. The feeding was excellent but we still complained!
Neil Mac.

R58484956
30th November 2005, 18:19
On Union Castle cargo we had a sunday night treat, egg surprise, but after 11 months the surprise bit wore off, egg surprise= one upturned apricot with white custard.
Chief steward bought barracuda and tried to pass it off as herring, but the 12/4 had seen them in the frig room and after a few beers mentioned this to CS, we had free issue beer for a longtime afterwards.

Pat McCardle
30th November 2005, 19:16
Fear not Shipmates! Skinheads on a raft along with sh*t on a raft, cheeze beano's & Silver Dollars are still doing the rounds on North Sea supply boats......Aberdeen restaurants are the 'New' missions to seamen (EEK)

RCHARLTON
30th November 2005, 19:31
Whats happened to bacon and eggs. Our American crew give us for breakfast Grits, Hush Puppies and Corn Bread what a disaster

They must be from the Southern States. If you get a crew from North of the Mason Dixon Line (Approximately Baltimore) you'll get bacon and eggs. It may not be quite the same as good old English bacon and eggs (the bacon is a bit different) but it comes close.

Ray

RCHARLTON
30th November 2005, 19:34
It looks like I am not well acquainted with all forms of English from the mother country. What the heck did you just say?

As George Bernard Shaw once said "England and America are two countries divided by a common language". (*))

Ray

Jeff Egan
30th November 2005, 19:35
On the Masters rounds we inspected the cold room one Sunday morning and found a string of sausages from Hamburg trouble was the last time we had been to Hamburg was 7 months before.

Harry Nicholson
30th November 2005, 21:17
Hugh Shuttleworth wrote:
But then there was Les Flockhart who had a well earned reputation as the best feeder in Brocks. Sadly never managed to sail with him.
Hello Hugh,
The name Les Flockhart rings a bell, I think I sailed with him on the Mahanada in 57. was he a large fair haired chap from Dundee?
The man I sailed with specialised in Scottish meat loafs I recall; he was affable and generous and stocked up with fresh scottish salmon before we left Dundee. We would have it poached until we got to the Med when it would be served as grilled steaks, in the Red Sea he transformed what was left into the most glorious sequence of curries. Baskets of live guinea fowl came aboard in Calcutta and we had curry again, interspersed with curried bechti (a large fish from the Hughli) and then from the Sunderbunds came huge prawns which made a curry which was fit for emperors.... I'm vegetarian now but even so my mouth is watering at the memory. On other ships we sometimes were presented with curried sardines; now that was interesting and actually rather tasty.
I can see him now smoking his pipe and sitting in his cane chair.
He told me that his father had been killed in the war; as a little lad he was holding his Mother's hand on the pier at Dundee watching his fathers armed trawler putting to sea when it hit a german mine in the harbour entrance.....
regards
Harry Nicholson R/O

mick Wright
30th November 2005, 22:39
We had to rough it on the QE, only had the same as the first class passengers.
The only time we had passenger grub on this ship as a waiter we would order the best and hide it,after it had done a circuit round the dining room,under a tray of used crockery to escape the prying eyes of the chef, who checked all trays coming out of the dining room.
Even a cold dover sole is better than none


Mick Wright

mick Wright
30th November 2005, 22:40
What about shackles I think it was a stew,same as Scouse.


Mick Wright

tunatownshipwreck
30th November 2005, 23:02
As George Bernard Shaw once said "England and America are two countries divided by a common language". (*))

Ray
I may need a Berlitz guide.

Derek Roger
1st December 2005, 00:08
Hugh ;
I sailed with Les and he was a good feeder ! Not from Dundee though as I was living in Dundee at that time and would have remembered . Les was an "English " but a good lad nonetheless .

Brocklebanks crewed the Mahout from Newport News by sailing us all over to New York on the Queen Elizabeth . ( an error of judgement on the part of head office ; we had a ball ! ) I was 5th Eng at the time and the 3 rd mate was Alex Smith from St Monance in The Kingdom of Fife . He became a very good shipmate . He Andy Brett ( from Dundee ) and myself were all at the same Cabin Class table ; we had to wear our uniforms at meal times to impress the fare paying passengers !

First day at breakfast we were looking at the Menu and Alex Shouts out " Steward you've given me the wrong menu ; this is the luch menu ! Steward takes a look and says " No sir this is the breakfast Menu "
Alex says " Breakfast ??? Who ever heard of Oinion Spoup for Breakfast ???
Much hilarity ensued . Alex then said " keep your soup and bring me a Kipper "

The Old Man ; Chief : Mate and 2nd Eng . all were in first class ; the rest of us in Cabin except the Chippy and apprentices who travelled tourist . Talk about the British Class Distinction . ( I was OK with it when I became Chief ! )
Happy Days Derek

Robinj
1st December 2005, 00:22
We had to rough it on the QE, only had the same as the first class passengers.


I remember this stuck in a sideroom along with the dancers etc.

Jim Yates
1st December 2005, 12:00
Hi one and all
As an ex M.N Cook/chief Steward I have enjoyed reading your comments and it seems that each company had its own favourite dishes. but I remember most of them. I think I still have books and Recipes I have collected over the years.( stored in some old box not seen for years) one old favourite not mentioned is sweetbreads another devils on horseback. anyway thanks for the memories guys.

Harry Nicholson
1st December 2005, 12:40
Derek writes about class distinction which reminds me of the party held in Liverpool to see the new Mawana (1958) off on her maiden voyage. All the important people from Cunard Buildings gathered in the saloon for a sumptous evening (the catering was done by the Rembrandt Club). Only two ringers and above were invited so my cabin (right next to the saloon bar door) was full of one ringers and apprentices who decided to have our own agrieved party. We could see through the door into the saloon and were annoyed to see that while we were excluded the place was full of pretty young bints from the office typing pool whereas we were not good enough.
One of the Rembrandt caterers barmen noticed it all and said "I'll see you alright". He sneaked to us all the food we could eat and all the champagne cocktails we could stomach... I've still got a Rembrandt Club champagne glass.
I got close to joining the communist party.

R798780
1st December 2005, 13:20
Hello Hugh,
The name Les Flockhart rings a bell, in the Red Sea he transformed what was left into the most glorious sequence of curries. Baskets of live guinea fowl came aboard in Calcutta and we had curry again, interspersed with curried bechti (a large fish from the Hughli) and then from the Sunderbunds came huge prawns which made a curry which was fit for emperors.... Harry Nicholson R/O
Les produced what, for us in Brocklebanks, was the definitive list of curries. Regional and other names with the list of main ingredients. I saw one once, in the days before photocopiers so never got a proper copy, and long regretted that ommission.

Tony Crompton
1st December 2005, 13:21
A similar situation happened in New Orleans on "Makrana's" Maiden voyage.

We apprentices had to greet the "Guests" on the gangway and show them up to the party in the Officers "Lounge". Every time we passed the back door into the little bar the shore bartender passed us a "Slug" of Bourbon. Needless
to say the Mate was "Not amused" with us.
-----------------------
Tony C

Ron Stringer
1st December 2005, 17:15
On the "City of Lucknow" the food was always excellent, especially the curries prepared and served by the Goanese catering crew. My personal favourite was "dry mince curry with dhall", which I have never seen on any menu since I left the sea.

Ron Stringer

neil maclachlan
1st December 2005, 18:12
Hi Ron,
I was interested when you mentioned Dahll Curry, that was by far my favourite Indian dish. When I sailed with Standard Vacuum we used to switch watches so that everyone got some shoreside time when in port, tankers come in on one tide and go out the next. When I would be on the 8 to 12 watch i would eat in the duty mess where I could sample what our Indian crew was eating,I always tried their curry,boy was it hot--boat gurrum high! excuse my attempt at writing hindi?
Since coming ashore I taught my wife to make Dahll Curry,very successfull,infact a number of our friends asked for the recipe and rave about it.
Neil Mac.

paul0510
1st December 2005, 22:51
Dhal curry is not to be beaten...fried onion rings an' all...Neil, scan the recipe and put it on this site, NOW !!!!

R798780
1st December 2005, 23:44
Dhal curry is not to be beaten...fried onion rings an' all...Neil, scan the recipe and put it on this site, NOW !!!!
I'll second that request.

In Brocks and subsequently Moss tankers (majority Brocks Pursers) it was Dry mince curry with Dhall sauce, a combination hard to beat.

JET
2nd December 2005, 08:53
The worst feeder that I ever had the misfortune to sail on was the NZSC's Otaio, a cadet ship. We suspected something was not going to be right when the newly appointed 'Old Man' fronted up with his own retinue, including the Chief Steward.

The featured 'Centipede Chicken' arrived each Sunday, in fact it must have been two chickens with fifty legs apiece.
You knew where one body would finish up, the other would be a floater, if it finished up on your plate it was just like winning a raffle, a chook raffle.

Part way through the voyage the cadets (all 70 of them) complained about the quality and quantity of the food. A meeting was arranged with the Mate, the Chief Steward and the Chief Cook so that the cadets could present their list of complaints. Unfortunately the meeting didn't get very far before a copy of the Agreement was produced and they were told that they were receiving the correct food allowances. In fact, they were told that they were lucky to receive that, as cadets were not specifically mentioned on the list. All they got out of the meeting was 'food for thought'.

cheddarnibbles
2nd December 2005, 12:01
On the "City of Lucknow" the food was always excellent, especially the curries prepared and served by the Goanese catering crew. My personal favourite was "dry mince curry with dhall", which I have never seen on any menu since I left the sea.

Ron Stringer

My favourite also Ron........Usually served at Sunday lunch by Goanese chefs on Trident Tankers. I have not seen it in 45 years of shoreside searching, but I'll not stop looking. !!!

neil maclachlan
2nd December 2005, 22:17
Paul & Hugh,
This is my interpretation of what I remember and loved as Dhal Curry.
As you probably know Dhal is lentils?
Now My Recipe.
Chop and fry two medium onions in a saucepan,
Add 1 lb of lean ground beef and when browned add
2 cups of beef stock and 1 1/2 tablespoons of Silverwoods Medium
curry powder,simmer slowly for one hour.
Add 2 teaspoons of "Bisto" to the contents to thicken.Note Bisto should be
mixed with a little cold water before adding.
Take a can(or tin) of condensed lentil soup (or French Canadian Pea Soup)
heat in a separate saucepan .
Slice some onions and deep fry till crisp.
Cook as per instructions some long grained rice( to your taste.)
When all is ready serve as follows.
Place rice on plate,
Served curried mince over rice.
Lentils or pea soup over top and add fried onions.
add to this chutney of your choice and possibly a nice bottle of wine?
Enjoy!
This might not be to your memory of what I remember
but its damned good?
Neil Mac.
Bisto and Silverwoods products are obtainable in the UK we even have them
in Canada.

Ron Stringer
2nd December 2005, 22:53
Neil,

The dry mince curry served to me was always with the mince in the form of meat balls in a thick curry sauce. The dhall was served separately, added to the plate by the consumer. I'm drooling at the very thought.

Ron

Derek Roger
3rd December 2005, 02:48
Ah Harry ;
Sweetbreads What a Delight ! Dont know where one would find them now ?? I do hunt deer and nothing is wasted ( so I do get a we bit now and then )

Derek Roger
3rd December 2005, 02:54
I have had a lot of Spanicsh friends since I came to Canada ( In fact one was Best Man for me ) We had a wee dinner thing and I cooked Filet Steak and Chips ( with the Egg ) ; Jose ( My Pal ) said " Ah Devils On Horse Back ! A traditional Spanish dish " I was doubmfounded as I thought it was a Scots thing .
Still my favorite and with good "Filet " its hard to screw up .
Derek

Derek Roger
3rd December 2005, 02:56
Ron ;
Sorry to tell you the Dry Mince Curry was whatever was left over ; put through the mincer and Curried . I must say that I did like it however.

Derek Roger
3rd December 2005, 03:09
I sailed with Les only once and he was a great Chief /Steward Purser. He would about mid trip on The Ras To Jazz run ( Ras Tanura to Jedda ) produce a fine meal when we had a Walpot Movie Night . He would cook himself and we would all be fed Fish & Chips wrapped in Newspaper . ( Liverpool Echo )
It was a nice touch and we all appeciated it .
Derek

Derek Roger
3rd December 2005, 03:13
My first trip to sea ( Miapura ) Mike was 2nd Steward . When we had events at sea such as " Race Meetings " or Crossing the Line ; Mike would make all the officers a big "Pot of Scouse " Happy days .
Derek
Sailed with Mike later on the tankers . He was known as a good feeder !

Derek Roger
3rd December 2005, 03:21
On the first trip of one of the tankers doing the Ratanura to Jedda Run the bar had strict closing hours much to the diffidence of the watch keepers who could not get a " Coldie " after watch.
Les solved the problem by getting a screwdriver ; removing the bar door ; and throwing it over the side . Happyness reigned !
Les was later promoted to Supt. Catering with Brocklebank Cunard. Troops were all happy as feeding generally improved which made it first class ( It was never bad unless you sailed with Fred!!

Derek

cheddarnibbles
3rd December 2005, 14:05
Ron ;
Sorry to tell you the Dry Mince Curry was whatever was left over ; put through the mincer and Curried . I must say that I did like it however.
No problem, how else would you get DRY mince ????? I want to know what mixture of dry spices they rubbed into it to make it taste so good.
Neil's recipe for the dhall sauce was excellent....so we are half way there.

Cunarder
3rd December 2005, 21:51
The best Brocklebank curry would have to have been Jahlfreeji and Parathas - "Some mango chutney sahib?" - I seem to recall it was every Wednesday lunchtime. Ever since I've tried to reproduce it - without success - but I can still taste it 35 years later......

Alan Marsden

R798780
3rd December 2005, 23:30
The best Brocklebank curry would have to have been Jahlfreeji and Parathas - "Some mango chutney sahib?" - I seem to recall it was every Wednesday lunchtime. Ever since I've tried to reproduce it - without success - but I can still taste it 35 years later......

Alan Marsden
On Lucerna the chief cook would draw a jar of marmalade from the purser to make the jalfreeji - usually for Saturday "pub lunch", Bombay Goanese catering staff instead of the Bengali Brocklebank catering crews. The same purser declared that Jalfreezi was not an authentic indian dish. Then we went ashore in Kandla, a place definitely in India, and Jahlfreezi was on the menu. (But not that night, I know because I ordered it. Rats!!)

Morrisons supermarket do a very respectable Jalfreezi, a good curry, but it's not even close to the shipboard recipe and therefore a great disappointment first time I tried it.

Cunarder: Perhaps if you add marmalade you may get closer to your memories. Pigs fly as well!

beejay
4th December 2005, 08:47
On one vessel I sailed on rice pudding with Almond escence was a regular feature on the menu. After repeated requests to the chief steward complaining about the use of the escense nothing was done . So the two wise watchkeepers on the 12/4 decided to take matters into their own hands, by cutting a key to the store rooms. After several attempts sucsess at last. So venturing forth at 4 am the offending almond flavouring was located and despatched over the side. Nothing was ever said by the C/S or the cook about the missing goodies.
Our breakfast on the 12/4 was 2 miserable little rashers of bacon and one egg that you cooked in the duty mess. Fortunately for us the key that we cut also fitted the cool store, so from then on bacon and eggs had steak added to them, followed by canned peaches or other fruit. We were possibly the best fed 12/4 in the MN.
Brian.

trotterdotpom
4th December 2005, 14:53
On one vessel I sailed on rice pudding with Almond escence was a regular feature on the menu. After repeated requests to the chief steward complaining about the use of the escense nothing was done . So the two wise watchkeepers on the 12/4 decided to take matters into their own hands, by cutting a key to the store rooms. After several attempts sucsess at last. So venturing forth at 4 am the offending almond flavouring was located and despatched over the side. Nothing was ever said by the C/S or the cook about the missing goodies.

Brian.

Do you mean nutmeg? I remember lots of rice pudding being ruined by that. Rice pudding can handle a dollup of strawberry jam or a handful of sultanas, but never nutmeg! My sister and I would have locked our Mam in the coal house if she ever put that muck in the rice pudding!

J0ohn T.

ruud
4th December 2005, 15:23
Ahoy,

Almond[essence] isn't nutmeg, and is often used in rice puddings as well canella[cinnamon].

lakercapt
4th December 2005, 17:41
When we have curry as a side dish there is Dhal.
Make it with lentils,green and yellow split peas and differant types of peas brought in an Indian store. There are plenty of them in Brampton (Brambladesh)
All washed and soaked overnight, rinsed then slowly cooked in chicken stock. Comes out like a thick lentil soup and is yummy. I aslo add carraway seeds to enhance the flavour.
There are variations on this depending on which cook showed me what to do.

Gulpers
4th December 2005, 23:59
neil maclachlan and lakercapt,

If you guys keep this up, you are in danger of having 4,097 folk (current SN membership) salivating on your your doorsteps and demanding curries! Sounds delicious! (Thumb)

billyboy
5th December 2005, 00:15
heard a tale about a rather "Feminine" cook who locked the galley up at night. after 4 days of no cuppas at night the galley was broken into (not by me, honestly) coffee, sugar and conny was stolen and put in the engine room. the purpertrator then deffacated in the cooks apron which contained his knifes. He paid off at the weekend and as he went ashore a voice from the fo'csul called "who s*** in the cooks apron" he smiled and said "I dont know but hope you all enjoyed the beef stew you had"..... Moral is "DON'T UPSET THE SHIPS COOK" yuchhhhhh!!

Cunarder
5th December 2005, 07:06
Thanks, Hugh, I'll give it a try but I think it will be in vain once more. I don't think the Crusaders had this much trouble with finding the Holy Grail.....! The closest I've been is an Indonesian dry beef curry - Close, but not close enough....!

Cheers
Alan Marsden

beejay
5th December 2005, 09:08
Do you mean nutmeg? I remember lots of rice pudding being ruined by that. Rice pudding can handle a dollup of strawberry jam or a handful of sultanas, but never nutmeg! My sister and I would have locked our Mam in the coal house if she ever put that muck in the rice pudding!

J0ohn T.
It was definitely almond escence.
Brian

lofty
5th December 2005, 23:09
hi billyboy your story is actually true these are the true facts the year 1960 the ship was the mv factor t.j. harrisons the place georgetown BG the chief cook who shall be nameless always left his galley boots outside his cabin at night he discovered the s--t in his boots next morning he had a good idea who the culprits were as he had been having a bit of trouble with two particular deckhands he said no more about it until three or four weeks later we were queuing up in the saloon being payed off in liverpool the two deckhands were in front of me in the queue giggling and one said i wonder who s--t in the chief cooks boots loud enough for the chief cook who was standing behind me to hear the chief cook replied i dont know who done it but i do know who ate it in the soup by way of the galley lift to the mess room below this actually happened christmas and new year 1959/1960 when we were in georgetown who said harrisons were bad feeders cheerio for now lofty

tell
6th December 2005, 02:53
I have mentioned about the board of trade notice before, If the chief steward tried to give you short rations you could demand to have your rations weighed out , this was called your pound and pint.Terry

Cunarder
6th December 2005, 10:30
Aah - and who could resist the aroma of Somerset Egg in the mornings.....?

Peggy747
19th December 2005, 11:03
It was about 100 deg in the shade at Colon, a far off Sunday lunch time on the Tacoma Star, we were all done in after bouncing in and out of every nook and crannie between there and Curacoa, we were about to enter the canal just a bit later and we waited expectantly for the peggy to bring on the "Delights" , the soup looked awful (But it was HOT 1000deg) and the MAIN COURSE ---CREAMED TRIPE AND COWHEEL!!and needless to say it too was very very hot.and all were repulsed just by the sight of it and a "Kick" was suggested
A hastily convened "Delegation" was formed of ABs and Firemen and they sought the consideration of the Chief Stward, of course he said it was good fare, so they knocked on the Captains door (HE was from Blackpool)he sent the Chief Steward for a fork and then stood in front of us all on the boat deck and scoffed the lot, eeeeh steward thats luverly he said, nowt wrong with that lads -- steward, make sure I get plenty of that when I come in, go on lads go and eat your dinner.---It was nice duff though--HOT SAGO PUDDING (and you know what that looks like)
Happy Days???? Cheers Peter (Thumb)

Pat McCardle
19th December 2005, 13:52
I have had a lot of Spanicsh friends since I came to Canada ( In fact one was Best Man for me ) We had a wee dinner thing and I cooked Filet Steak and Chips ( with the Egg ) ; Jose ( My Pal ) said " Ah Devils On Horse Back ! A traditional Spanish dish " I was doubmfounded as I thought it was a Scots thing .
Still my favorite and with good "Filet " its hard to screw up .
Derek
Devils on horseback are prunes with smoked streaky bacon wrapped around them, held in place by a cocktail stick & roasted, as opposed to Angels on horseback which you use raw oysters instead of prunes, very British (Thumb)

edward
19th December 2005, 20:57
(K) (Thumb) i was working by on a harrison ship i think the author i was 2nd cook,we were in canada dock ,across from us was the forester with a west indian crew their cook had been taken off sick so my ch/ cook sent me over to help out when i got over there i was introduced to the gally (shock horor)right lads what do we feed you on,blackeyed peas & rice toped with a pigs trotter cooked with black peper and something else that was very hot did not taste to bad, stayed for a week,blackeyed peas & rice served with pork chops/braised steak,etc all done with the same sauce,left a happy crew behind.

jim barnes
20th December 2005, 14:07
Palm Line PEPPER CHOP now that made your eyes water? Real meat in it too?

jim barnes
20th December 2005, 14:21
heard a tale about a rather "Feminine" cook who locked the galley up at night. after 4 days of no cuppas at night the galley was broken into (not by me, honestly) coffee, sugar and conny was stolen and put in the engine room. the purpertrator then deffacated in the cooks apron which contained his knifes. He paid off at the weekend and as he went ashore a voice from the fo'csul called "who s*** in the cooks apron" he smiled and said "I dont know but hope you all enjoyed the beef stew you had"..... Moral is "DON'T UPSET THE SHIPS COOK" yuchhhhhh!!
Always remember the saying "who called the cook a C**T" reply Who called the C**T a cook"

Tom Morton
20th December 2005, 20:13
How well I remember 'curry' for breakfast when we had an Indian crew. However on that very ship (Denholm's Naess Favorita) I was on my first trip as 3rd Mate and found out with some surprise that the 'Butler" (Ch Steward) reported to me !! Breakfasts were very boring and the 12 to 4 guys were complaining about their sandwiches at night. Talked to the Butler and told him to get some variety in breakfasts and sandwiches---we talked about breakfast curry and it was well received----we talked about boiled eggs, poached eggs etc and egg and chips. Couple of days later , breakfast was served-----boiled egg in an eggcup sorrounded by chips !!!!!! Also talked about fresh fruit for the various watches, result of that was banana sandwiches----of course the sandwiches were made at 4pm and not unwrapped until probably 2 am----by which time they were black !!!!!
It took a while but paid off in the end.

edward
20th December 2005, 20:42
what about board of trade lime juice

Chief Engineer's Daughter
21st December 2005, 05:34
All this talk of food has made me hungry!

I have memories of eggs benedict, egg mayonnaise,eggs cooked allways for breakfast, duchess potatoes, curries, syrup pudding, pear belle helene, welsh rarebit and chips, lots of chips.

We had silver service and proper linen napkins, always left on the side table, in rings with your name on it.

On one ship we knew when the young steward was on duty cos breafast was served in the reek of burnt toast! On another the Chief Steward was known as Super Angus cos he everything was "super".

Oh lots and lots of memories, including taking over the galley and cooking and the poor galley boy sitting with a bucket of tatties taking out the eyes after they had been pealed in the machine everyday. UHT milk, powdered drinking chocolate that you just added water to, lemonade from USA and trying alsorts of different things when we went ashore.

It was all so long ago!

non descript
21st December 2005, 08:56
what about board of trade lime juice

Edward, I heard rumours that people have in desperation actually drunk the stuff, but I guess that was just a wild exaggeration; I think it was mainly used to clean the brass and also for scrubbing the wooden deck, as it acted as an excellent bleach.

edward
21st December 2005, 11:10
i rember we sailed from liverpool to s/ africa the bosun put i think it is called cloride (not spelt it right)in the fresh water tanks,he put to much in the water, taste,d terrible,had to cook with it could not get the smell out or taste out of the food, crew had to suffer for two weeks until we got to cape town to flush out the fresh water tanks,that reminds me we even try,d to covince the crew and officers that if you put board trade lime juice in their drink,s it would make it taste better yuy/ yuk.it turned out to be a good trip, except for the engine failure tell you about that later.

lakercapt
21st December 2005, 16:03
Board of Trade Lime Juice.
Brings back memoiries that stuff. Was 10% alchol and had to be keep in the bonded store.
Main purpose that it was still required to be on board was as an anti-scabotic measure. (Stop scurvy on ships hence British were known as "Limies).
When it was issued an entry had to be made in the ships official log book "anti scabotics issued) I saw that in shipmasters business not that I ever did it!
On a trip with raw sugar we found that mixing it with Four Bells Rum some raw sugar gave a great drink and even today a rum with a slice of lime on the rocks is my favourite potient potable.

Derek Roger
21st December 2005, 20:14
In Brocks by the time we reached the Meddy we were out of fresh milk and were then reduced to the powdered stuff which at best was bloody awful especially on cereal . Made in a mechanical cow !

If we were on a trip that went to the States after the Indian Run ; first thing on the menu on the first run ashore was a pint of fresh milk and Ice Cream .

The only thing worse than the powdered milk was the ice cream made from the stuff ( Galley crew would make it with the " Ice Cream machine " a thing which consumed a lot of ice ; physical effort and was worked with a crank handle )
Fortunatley Brock food was generally excellent and we always had lots of good cheese which offset the lack of fresh milk .

Derek

John Cassels
21st December 2005, 20:22
Made Kromeski a la russe this evening for dinner.

Wife not amused , can anyone put me up for a couple of nights?.

JC

Gulpers
21st December 2005, 20:24
JC,

I sense rectal insertion of Kromeski à la Russe, perhaps? (Jester)

JOHNKITTO
23rd December 2005, 15:48
As a Bank line apprentice, we "Enjoyed" Board of Trade fare E.g. one egg a day with two on Sunday. A favourite I remember was "Camel Egg" which was a piece of bread with the centre cut out and an egg fried in it. It was delicious with lashings of H.P. Sauce.
One thing I never came to terms with was Chips for breakfast.

I had been at sea 7 days, whilst sailing through the Red Sea the Steward was serving potatoes and I noticed a bead of sweat run down hid face onto his chin and into the Potatoes. From thereon it was either ignore such things or starve. Anyway 40 years later I am still here.

Derek Roger
23rd December 2005, 15:54
Fried berad with centre cut out with an egg I thought was Somerset Egg ??

trotterdotpom
23rd December 2005, 16:49
Fried berad with centre cut out with an egg I thought was Somerset Egg ??

As a lad in North Yorkshire, that was known as a 'devil egg'. Maybe because when you bit through crispy outer of the bread you got that devilishly delicious squirt of warm grease into your mouth - yum. Fortunately that was in the days before cholesterol. Anyone for dripping?

John T.

skymaster
28th December 2005, 16:22
Yes I have good memories of food at Brocklebanks especially on night duty in Calcutta and Colombo when we had run of the galley.

Mike Pikett

Redhead6
28th December 2005, 17:37
Just remember when I was with Shell in the 60's. Coming off the 4-8, breakfast time and couldn't get to the galley fast enough. The fried breakfast's were excellent, usually ate the first helping standing up and then relaxed a little for the second helping.

Regards

rstimaru
28th December 2005, 19:25
palm stew on the elder demster line it used to burn your thoat off (great stuff)

tell
30th December 2005, 01:46
As a Bank line apprentice, we "Enjoyed" Board of Trade fare E.g. one egg a day with two on Sunday. A favourite I remember was "Camel Egg" which was a piece of bread with the centre cut out and an egg fried in it. It was delicious with lashings of H.P. Sauce.
One thing I never came to terms with was Chips for breakfast.

I had been at sea 7 days, whilst sailing through the Red Sea the Steward was serving potatoes and I noticed a bead of sweat run down hid face onto his chin and into the Potatoes. From thereon it was either ignore such things or starve. Anyway 40 years later I am still here.
If my memory serves me well , it was one egg a week in my day according to BOT rules we didn't always get one though, Tell

Derek Roger
30th December 2005, 02:16
What time frame are you talking about Tell ?? I think in the 60s it was 4 eggs per week . Chief steward used to say that included eggs for baking ???
Most companies did better than the BOT minimum .
Derek

Peggy747
30th December 2005, 10:06
In the Tacoma Star, (The worst feeder in the world) a dish of two half cooked sausages surrounded by baked beans and a strip of burnt toast was known as "Train Crash", not a pretty sight but you had to eat it as there was nothing else! Peter (Thumb)

lakercapt
30th December 2005, 15:59
Yes most did feed better than the BOT allowance but on occassion when the stores were low you went on "your wack"

R651400
30th December 2005, 18:07
Fried berad with centre cut out with an egg I thought was Somerset Egg ??Must depend on who you sailed with Derek.
In Blue Flue it was Devonshire egg.
I remember it as tube shaped with the egg down the middle and I've never been able to work out how they did it..

Robinj
2nd January 2006, 21:50
Always knew TRAIN SMASH as tinned Tomatoes on toast. :confused:

tell
3rd January 2006, 01:10
What time frame are you talking about Tell ?? I think in the 60s it was 4 eggs per week . Chief steward used to say that included eggs for baking ???
Most companies did better than the BOT minimum .
Derek
er 1948 and later, one ship I was in didn't have a freezer, just an Ice box so when the ice run out we were on curried everything, we could only do 6 knots so we were at sea for very long stretches, was on her for 2 yrs. Tell

Peggy747
4th January 2006, 10:10
Always knew TRAIN SMASH as tinned Tomatoes on toast. :confused:
All the same Robin and none too tasty Cheers Peter (Thumb)

tell
4th January 2006, 16:16
All the same Robin and none too tasty Cheers Peter (Thumb)
Pass the train smash= tomato sauce Tell
(Cloud)

vix
5th January 2006, 00:01
Best feeders in BP were in my opinion the Indian crew ships. The tables (not just on these ships) were always properly laid, silver napkin rings etc. and for every meal starting with breakfast the Chief Steward had prepared a menu typed on the Company Menu card. Full English breakfast with juices, egg choice, hot cakes followed at midday by, you guessed it, a curry (Kopta, Madras, Dahl.....) with trimmings or/and English Fayre finishing off with dessert and cheeses. And if that wasn't enough an omelette for tea @ 17:00? No problem. To imagine I sacrificed all this for cereals and hard-boiled eggs, gristle with Sauerkraut and Rote Grütze followed at teatime by yes, black or grey bread and sliced sausage. German Merchant Marine Fayre A.D. 1978. Mind you, some of the Stewardesses weren't bad. ;-))

Hi Paul, I was on 6 BP, 7 if you include DBS from Suez. I found some of them to be excellent feeders others not so good with some YUCK! I have had curry for breakfast and, on Br Centaur, the curry got hotter and hotter as the trip progressed after 18 days I gave in, apparently the cook was just adding extra spices to the same mixture. One BP I was going to tuck into the soup, I was advised not too. Why? Because an 15 ton shackle had been thrown into the stock pot...to see if it was ever stirred? The shackle was still there when I tested the pot, next day!! There's a lot more to that story and that ship, but 'nuff for now. Vix

John Rogers
8th January 2006, 20:12
After reading the posts in regards to Good Feeders vs Bad Feeders did you know that back in the late 40 and 50s even the worst feeder was better than some of the rations your family was getting. When we would sign off we would be issued ration coupons so our families could feed us when we were ashore,these ration coupons were three times the allowance the poor civilian families were receiving. Rationing went on until 1953,even sweets were rationed,here listed are a few items.Sugar 8oz, Cheese 2oz, 1 egg, Butter 2oz, Bacon 4oz, Tea 2 oz, sweets or chocolate if you could find them, 2oz, and this was for a week. Count your blessings when you eat that big steak tonight.
John

mcgurggle
8th January 2006, 23:34
"Should old aquaintance be forgot
And never brought to mind,
They've f***ed the Chief Cook overboard,
Now he's 40 miles behind...!" (Ouch)

RIP Doc
Course' you all know why they called him DOC............?? (*))
McG

mcgurggle
8th January 2006, 23:54
Oh, & there was minced collops on toast, S**t on a blanket, nig**rs nob, chinese wedding cake...Oh my god..! Memories.. (EEK)
"Elder"........that was "mammaries" which was served with salad...oh & the "Collation of cold meats with salad" Yummm Yummm! How much of last weeks leftovers can you shift.? (egg)
But still.....I heard junior fifth Engineers complain about only getting one egg for breakfast on a "Head Boat", . Just how many eggs did they get for breakfast from 'mummy' BEFORE they went to sea ???
McG

Ian Harrod
9th January 2006, 00:15
Tasmanian Gravy = Tomato Sauce.

vix
9th January 2006, 05:28
I think the worst feeder I was on was Cape York - had a plate of minced meat and a boiled egg (with it's shell still on) when I cracked the shell my egg was rotten. Went to galley and they sent me to see the chief steward...he didn't eat in the wardroom...word was Skipper wouldn't let him...bearded him eating in his cabin...when I told him I'd been served a rotten egg he asked me...what do you expect me to do about it?? I was so mad...I stuck it right under his nose and asked him if he would appreciate it for tea? At least...I managed to put him off his tea.
On one BP tanker, we were being served 1/2 an orange each per week...everytime the C/S walked by the 12-4 would down tools and chant...vitamin C, vitamin C...didn't appear to work so we wrote a letter to BP in Moorgate...said we were getting half and orange per man, per week, per haps! Never received a reply...but the next time we were in Bombay the messroom was loaded with fresh fruit of every type imaginable.
But, the best feader I was ever on must be the Asia, a dirty old Cunard cargo ship; every Friday we would have a 7-course meal, this included soup, entree, main (fish & chips), pudding etc. the entree usually consisted of a pork hock each. One day Chief and Second cooks came down to the mess room and said...OK, what's wrong with the food then? We were stunned...nobody could possibly complain about what we were getting...and we said so...Chief said...Well, why hasn't anyone been up for seconds? LOL had a job to finish the firsts!
As this ship didn't carry any pasengers can anyone tell me why there was a big notice on our notice board that said...Crew are not allowed to fraternise with passengers?

skymaster
12th January 2006, 15:40
Neil,
Just cooked up your Dhal Curry!Wow!Not grandchildren,TV, Phones,Snow Storms etc could stop me being back on a Brocklebank Ship having lunch in some exotic port.Back to reality now!!!

Best regards

Mike

exsailor
18th January 2006, 12:38
Can't say I ever starved when shipping out of the U.K, despite eating the results from Cooks of various nationalities.
Best feeder though would be "Djatiluhur", operated by Manners, Hong Kong for Djakarta Lloyd. Capt, three Mates, Sparks, C/E and 2/E supplied by Manners, balance of crew including 2 Cooks, Baker, Galley Boy and 4 Stewards from D.L. We (officers) wrote next days menu at dinner over our coffee and free liquers.
Three course breakfast, 4 course lunch, 5 course dinner (with wine) plus biscuits and cake for afternoon tea and supper. All silver service. Even as lowly Third Mate, a Steward would arrive on the Bridge with silver tray, coffee pot and hot toast at morning tea time.
Bit of a step up after one of Manners bulkies (Pacific Saga), when the 75 year old Chief Steward had to cook after the Chinese catering dept all jumped ship in the US. On the fourth day steaming back to Japan and and being presented with boiled rice and boiled chicken at dinner for the fourth day in a row, I as Senior Cadet, took my plate (still full) and cutlery, opened the dining saloon port and threw the lot 'over the wall'. Much to the skippers consternation, four other officers followed. After being summoned by the 'Old Man' and our protest (and hunger) noted, Second Electrician (Indonesian) and myself (Kiwi) cooked for the balance of the voyage.
ex Sailor

tunatownshipwreck
18th January 2006, 19:18
Can't say I ever starved when shipping out of the U.K, despite eating the results from Cooks of various nationalities.
Best feeder though would be "Djatiluhur", operated by Manners, Hong Kong for Djakarta Lloyd. Capt, three Mates, Sparks, C/E and 2/E supplied by Manners, balance of crew including 2 Cooks, Baker, Galley Boy and 4 Stewards from D.L. We (officers) wrote next days menu at dinner over our coffee and free liquers.
Three course breakfast, 4 course lunch, 5 course dinner (with wine) plus biscuits and cake for afternoon tea and supper. All silver service. Even as lowly Third Mate, a Steward would arrive on the Bridge with silver tray, coffee pot and hot toast at morning tea time.
Bit of a step up after one of Manners bulkies (Pacific Saga), when the 75 year old Chief Steward had to cook after the Chinese catering dept all jumped ship in the US. On the fourth day steaming back to Japan and and being presented with boiled rice and boiled chicken at dinner for the fourth day in a row, I as Senior Cadet, took my plate (still full) and cutlery, opened the dining saloon port and threw the lot 'over the wall'. Much to the skippers consternation, four other officers followed. After being summoned by the 'Old Man' and our protest (and hunger) noted, Second Electrician (Indonesian) and myself (Kiwi) cooked for the balance of the voyage.
ex Sailor
Would this be the same "Pacific Saga" built in Japan in 1971, Liberia flagged? I boarded this ship once in the Columbia River in December 1971. I recall a number of times that HK crews jumped ship, to the point that if any HK crew member had never been to the US before, the company had to post a guard at the gangway.

Eric Parkin
19th January 2006, 11:23
Whilst with Harrison Line, they started Chartering foreign vessels for outward bound cargo's. I was sent over to Hamburg with a Shore Marine Superintendant to take delivery of m.v. Hasselburg. (German Officers and Portugese Crew)
After inspecting the vessel and agreeing that the vessel matched the cargo storage requirements, was chartered for £652.00 a day.
That night the said Marine Super and myself, I was the ship's Supercargo, decided we would sample the local alcoholic brews.
Next morning we were absolutely wrecked, went down for breakfast, after a fruit juice, the Portugese Steward placed a plate of boiled rice, with raw mince in the middle, and produced 2 raw eggs, which he cracked, and mixed up with the raw mince and then made gestures for us to eat.
Needless to say we could'nt eat it, I survived on cheese and coffee, until we had finished loading in London, where thankfully I left the ship.
I felt sorry for the Supercargo who sailed out on her.

trotterdotpom
19th January 2006, 12:27
Whilst with Harrison Line, they started Chartering foreign vessels for outward bound cargo's. I was sent over to Hamburg with a Shore Marine Superintendant to take delivery of m.v. Hasselburg. (German Officers and Portugese Crew)
After inspecting the vessel and agreeing that the vessel matched the cargo storage requirements, was chartered for £652.00 a day.
That night the said Marine Super and myself, I was the ship's Supercargo, decided we would sample the local alcoholic brews.
Next morning we were absolutely wrecked, went down for breakfast, after a fruit juice, the Portugese Steward placed a plate of boiled rice, with raw mince in the middle, and produced 2 raw eggs, which he cracked, and mixed up with the raw mince and then made gestures for us to eat.
Needless to say we could'nt eat it, I survived on cheese and coffee, until we had finished loading in London, where thankfully I left the ship.
I felt sorry for the Supercargo who sailed out on her.

Eric, I don't think your cosinero knew what he was doing - that sounds like the "rough guide to steak tartar", it's probably a good job you didn't eat it.

The real thing is raw minced steak (i.e. not a pile of pink fat from Tesco) with onion and spices, shaped into a patty with a hollow on top. A raw egg is dropped into the hollow. It is served chilled and it's delicious!

You'd have more chance of catching Bird Flu' on the Reeperbahn than you would have of getting Jacobs' Crackers Disease from Steak Tartar. Come to think of it, you'd have a pretty good chance of copping Bird Flu' on the Reeperbahn!

It was a regular breakfast dish with Oldendorff's. The people who whimped out could mix the whole thing up on their plate and give it back to the cook. He would fry it up and lo and behold, it was a hamburger. They don't know what they missed, "lecker,lecker!"

John T.

Eric Parkin
19th January 2006, 22:22
Must confess I've never had Steak Tartar, and have no intention in the future, but having a very queasy stomach from the night before did'nt help, I felt like heaving. In fact, heres an old term, " I was blowin for tugs " !.
I think that most seamen who served with Harrisons became addicted to Curry,I've been making it ever since.
The duffs served on Harrison vessels was proper rib sticker fare.

vix
20th January 2006, 05:51
Must confess I've never had Steak Tartar, and have no intention in the future, but having a very queasy stomach from the night before did'nt help, I felt like heaving. In fact, heres an old term, " I was blowin for tugs " !.
I think that most seamen who served with Harrisons became addicted to Curry,I've been making it ever since.
The duffs served on Harrison vessels was proper rib sticker fare.
I had steak tartar in Budapest...was very dubious at first...but loved it once I got started...would definately try it again...and again...and a...Vix

trotterdotpom
20th January 2006, 08:37
I had steak tartar in Budapest...was very dubious at first...but loved it once I got started...would definately try it again...and again...and a...Vix


Here, here, Vix, me too! Budapest is probably the best place to get it as it originates from that area. Attila the Hun and company would ride around with a chunk of meat under their saddles all day, then, after a hard days raping and pillaging, pull it out and eat it. The meat that is.

John T.

vix
21st January 2006, 05:51
Here, here, Vix, me too! Budapest is probably the best place to get it as it originates from that area. Attila the Hun and company would ride around with a chunk of meat under their saddles all day, then, after a hard days raping and pillaging, pull it out and eat it. The meat that is.

John T.
Hi Trotterdotpom...which...or should it be witch?...meat did they eat...remind me!!!
I also enjoyed the large glass of vodka I was served with my steak tartar...I drank half of it and poured the rest over the steak...we both felt much better!! Vix

pierhead jumper
21st January 2006, 20:07
Well,I,ve been reading some of these letters and had quite a laugh.But to get serious Ifound most of my old ships were so unremakable foodwise that the seaman ate solely to survive.Most Chief Stewards stuck religiously to the BOT.scale which has been previously mentioned.I can't recall it in entiriety but know it detailed the precise amount of curry powder allowed. As I said unremarkable but still remember two whichstood out.They must have been good to be remembered these years on.One was the Fanad Head,Heynes of Belfast and the other the Voco,Socony Vacuum Oil Co.
That's all for now folks. Pierhead Jumper.

Paedrig
21st January 2006, 22:08
Hi Neil,
Vestys centipede chooks,always wonderd how the suppliers to Blue Star managed to breed chooks with so many legs.
regards Brian
They bought them off P & O. (*))

fredkinghorn
21st January 2006, 23:07
I made one trip on heap of junk named funnily enough " Greathope " The steward was so fat he could'nt get into his bunk but slept in an armchair. It was rumoured that he did all the laundry himself during the night when he couldn't sleep. The cook was a guy named Dodsworth from Hull. His claim to fame was that he could sing like David Whitfield, also from Hull. The grub was pretty poor quality, but the cook did his best with it. Board of Trade rations was the norm. One trip was enough for me .

fred

" who's on first ?"

EXAB
17th February 2006, 18:54
I sailed with Esso in the early 50's and they were definitely the best feeders eggs any way you wanted for breakfast and as many as you could eat.I found the cooks very adept in giving you a varied menu.The worst feeder I was on was the KANA a Moss Hutchinson tramp the food was rotten and the cook was a C**t he couldn't boil water.the whole crew suffered from dysentry from one day out of London until we left Alexandria homeward bound we were sh*****g blood,believe me.

vix
17th February 2006, 19:10
I don't think that anone has mentioned that old breakfast treat!
Bubble and squeek.
God awaful stuff using last evenings potatoes and cabbage.
Called bubble and squeek as that was the noise it made when the cook was doing it in a large frying pan
Are you sure its not called bubble and squeek because of the noises coming after eating it? LOL Vix (K)

wa002f0328
17th February 2006, 19:16
Anyone remember Board of Trade LIME JUICE? good for cleaning brass, they were the days, oh, board of trade where was your brain.

alastairjs
17th February 2006, 19:27
Remember BoT Lime Juice very well. In addition to being very good with tarnished brass it was also indispensable for whitening teak decks and mixing with the cement wash for the fresh water tanks. It was drinkable, just, if you added about a desert spoon of it to a large glass of chilled water with sugar.

vix
17th February 2006, 19:28
what about board of trade lime juice
BoT Lime Juice...lovely grub...I used to take a large bottle of Rose's lime juice and mix the two together, as long as there was a little sugar it made a brilliant drink (especially with the likes of 'Bombay Gin'. I thing the rule of thumb was...BoT lime juice was issued 1 day either side of the tropics? Most C/S didn't like serving it up because of the run on sugar. (It was also a good substitute for vinegar!!) LOL those WERE the days!! (Night) Vix

calvin
17th February 2006, 20:10
Well shell used to be good feeders what about the steaks or sweetbreads currysor what about the tabnabs that had to be made for the old man afters his roundsmind you could not beat the fresh rolls and doorstep sandwiches the braised oxtail or cod portugesemy favourite though was when with w a souter and the arab firemen where having rammadan and offer of there lamb stew were a treat especially after a few tennents guinness and rums.

lakercapt
17th February 2006, 23:16
I commented earlier about BOT lime juice.
It had to be kept in the bond locker as it contained 10% alcohol.
Found out that mixing it with "Four Bells Rum" and a little sugar made an excellent portable potable.
Now I have to stick to Gosling Family Old Rum with a slice of lime and a couple of ice cubes. Wonderfull. (K)

Tony D
17th February 2006, 23:59
Was I the only person under the Red Duster who actually liked tinned sausages?,sort of square in cross section they were,nobody else seemed to like em so there were always plenty for me,I loved British Tanker bubble and squeek as well,recon I must be some kind of grub pervert.
(*))

Keltic Star
18th February 2006, 07:13
Some coastal company's paid the crew a victalling allowance rather than provide catering. This money was held by the Old Man and given to the cook to buy groceries in each port.

On Everards, Aquity,we caught "Ernie the Turk", our cook buying horse meat instead of beef in the market in Rotterdam. The Old Man's revenge was to sound abandon ship on the way down the Scheldt with Ernie the only one not told it was a practice. Ernie donned lifejacket and jumped overboard and we had to pick him up in the jolly boat. Don't know why, but he jumped ship on arrival in Antwerp.

On the Esso Brixham, we used to bunker the Mary and Lizzie on alternate weeks in Southampton. Our cook had relatives in the galley on both liners and both officers and crew ate like King's with enough money left over for decent wines on the tables.

Neil McInnes
18th February 2006, 08:43
Blue star had specially bred Chickens tha had mulipule with no Breast

vix
18th February 2006, 23:07
Blue star had specially bred Chickens tha had mulipule with no Breast
Is this a North of England chicken? (tha had mulipule) LOL Vix (K)

vix
18th February 2006, 23:12
Chooks = chickens to the brits who are not familiar with antipodean words.
I am sometimes wonder why people from Oz & NZ think that us ex-pats from UK don't know what a chook is/was??? I grew up in the west of England and always referred to chickens as chooks, especially bantams!! Some people even go to great lengths to explain 'nugget' (boot polish) and...SMOKO...now I ask you??!! LOL Vix (Night)

Keltic Star
19th February 2006, 06:07
Blue star had specially bred Chickens tha had mulipule with no Breast

On Prince Line. we called them fourteen legged seagulls

trotterdotpom
19th February 2006, 10:05
Was I the only person under the Red Duster who actually liked tinned sausages?,sort of square in cross section they were,nobody else seemed to like em so there were always plenty for me,I loved British Tanker bubble and squeek as well,recon I must be some kind of grub pervert.
(*))

Tony, were the sausages covered in tinned tomatoes? Delicious. I liked bubble and squeek so much, I make it myself now. On Australian ships the Seamen's Union banned 'bubble and squeek' because they would not eat re-hashed food. They got 'fried vegetables' instead - I never bothered asking but I could make an intelligent guess where the vegetables came from.

John T

trotterdotpom
19th February 2006, 10:07
I am sometimes wonder why people from Oz & NZ think that us ex-pats from UK don't know what a chook is/was??? I grew up in the west of England and always referred to chickens as chooks, especially bantams!! Some people even go to great lengths to explain 'nugget' (boot polish) and...SMOKO...now I ask you??!! LOL Vix (Night)

That's like the 'Aussie meat pies' that I was eating years before I ever came Downunder.

John T.

patrick oc
19th February 2006, 11:06
I sailed with Esso in the early 50's and they were definitely the best feeders eggs any way you wanted for breakfast and as many as you could eat.I found the cooks very adept in giving you a varied menu.The worst feeder I was on was the KANA a Moss Hutchinson tramp the food was rotten and the cook was a C**t he couldn't boil water.the whole crew suffered from dysentry from one day out of London until we left Alexandria homeward bound we were sh*****g blood,believe me.
i think we have thatcook now

Eric Walter
19th February 2006, 13:34
Yes I have good memories of food at Brocklebanks especially on night duty in Calcutta and Colombo when we had run of the galley.

Mike Pikett


Yes. Food on Brocks was always excllent. Often had the curry and the main course for lunch (as well as the soup and sweet). However in those days it was always sweated off. The curries tasted even better after adding the spices and other ingredients that were always available.

The night duty galley key was a wonderful arrangement unless you were the poor sod who was first in. The galley was always awash with jaspers at that time of night. It was worth it though for the 3 o clock fry up.

Remember breakfast took a little longer than it ought to because once milk was poured onto the cereal (especially weetabix) you had to allow a couple of minutes for all (hopefully) the weevils to surface before disposing of them on the saloon floor and commencing to eat.

Any Manchester Liners men know a Brian Raven, who joined as deck apprentice in 1964. I was in digs with him at Fleetwood for a year during our pre-sea.

Eric Walter

vix
20th February 2006, 08:35
i think we have thatcook now
I was on a BP tanker where ½ the crew went down with food poisoning...twice within 8 days! Years later I joined a BP tanker in Bombay...on boarding I asked who the cook was? I was told I wouldn't be seeing him for a while as he was laid low...with food poisoning! I asked if he was...a short fellow, mustache...smoked a pipe? "Yes, how do you know all that?" Same cook...who called the chef a ....? Who cares? LOL Vix (Night)

pete
20th February 2006, 22:45
Southern Fried Chicken with Onion Rings and of course CHIPS. I once ordered an egg omelet and after much discussion in the Pantry and the Galley I received a 2 egg omelete containing 2 scrambled eggs, great hilarity. On another voyage we convinced the C/S that Kippers and Custard was the thing to give the troops after a hard days graft. The OM was NOT a happy person.................pete

pete
20th February 2006, 22:50
Just remembersd that on one ship we looked at the Breakfast menu to find Bopple Squeeker. Great people the Indian and Bangladeshi's, they can speak my language pretty well but be b******d if I can speak their's..............pete

Robinj
20th February 2006, 23:22
Was I the only person under the Red Duster who actually liked tinned sausages?,sort of square in cross section they were,nobody else seemed to like em so there were always plenty for me,I loved British Tanker bubble and squeek as well,recon I must be some kind of grub pervert.
(*))
Tinned sausages. You wouldn't look at them again if you had to eat nothing else for a week after the Drunken C/E with DT's tossed all the meat overboard one night before he got stopped. Anyway you could think of we got. :@

sfmillsy
20th February 2006, 23:34
I well remember my first Sunday on the Border Reiver. I can't remeber ever having steak before. It was Steak, onion rings, fried egg, mushrooms, peas and of course french fries potatos..Chips.

I think I upset the Indian steward by finishing of the turin of chips so he had to go aft to the galley to get some more! His eyes nearly popped out of his head.

On one ship, the Simonburn I think, the Purser/ Chief Steward used exotic locations to name the kippers for breakfast...ie Newfoundland kippers, Tahitian kippers etc etc. On the last day before he paid of iIthink he had been on the bevvy so we just got 'kippers'. we all refused to eat them!

I reckon we did very well for grub, but then again perhaps I am just a gannet!

All the best

Steve Mills

BarryM
22nd February 2006, 17:27
I recall Nasi Goreng (with the obligatory two fried eggs and sambals) as served at the 'Madhouse' or Seamens Club outside the refinery gates in Curacao or veal cordon bleu at the Cellar Bar in Singapore, were meals that have never tasted the same elsewhere.

R58484956
22nd February 2006, 17:57
wELCOME BarryM to the site enjoy it and all it has to offer.

jim barnes
22nd February 2006, 18:49
I recall Nasi Goreng (with the obligatory two fried eggs and sambals) as served at the 'Madhouse' or Seamens Club outside the refinery gates in Curacao or veal cordon bleu at the Cellar Bar in Singapore, were meals that have never tasted the same elsewhere.
Cant agree more Barry used to look forward to a nasi goreng,, never had owt like it since,,, made my own many times since with the obligatory eggs(wife thinks iv lost it) can never get the same results though (Hippy)
Jim

calvin
22nd February 2006, 20:34
what about the exotic sounding soups creme du barry ..cauliflower soup potage breton...butter bean soup muligatawny and bron windsor or beef consomme ..oxo had better taste turkey and chicken al a king coronation chicken egg mayonaise boston bake beans and how many different ways to use and call potatoes or the goulash

Billy Brown
22nd February 2006, 21:09
On my 1st ship, Ellerman and Pappayanni 'Palmelian', The cook was from Nth Vietnam. We called him Harry. The galley range was coal fired, it was the deck boys job to get the coal the night before so the cook could leave the range on a low light. I got 3 hrs o/t for a 10 minute job, great.
Harry was a good cook and from his little stove would come all sorts of wonderful grub. At dinner we had 2 entrees, 1 was a european dish and the other was always curry, it was the first time I had seen green curry,It was fabulous.Anything was fabulous to a lad whose only experience of choice before was to take it or leave it! And only ever having 1 course.
Harry was a perpetual smoker.He would walk about the galley with the smallest end of a rollie jammed in his mouth with water streaming from his left eye because the smoke was going in it. Only God and Harry knew where the ash went.
I was Peggy on this ship and the deck crew lived aft and the galley was midships so I had to get the grub for the crowd and take it aft 5 at a time in a contraption called a kit. Those market boats were like corks in a bath and bounced everywhere, especially in the Bay Of Biscuits.
Sunday dinners every day and Christmas dinners on a Sunday.

Robinj
22nd February 2006, 23:26
AHH! Nasi Goreng and the one made with noodles. (Thumb)

Eric Parkin
24th February 2006, 00:44
I don't know if ' Edward ' might be able to help me, but on Harrison Line ships, If you had a Salad, ' Mexican Cole Slaw ' was on the menu. It was not a Creamy Slaw, but one dressed in oil, I loved it. Have tried to replicate it, since my family virtually live outside all Summer, Barbequing. But I have never been able to replicate it.
Also I sailed on a Norwegian Vessel, the mv Brimanger, on charter to Harrisons, the food was brilliant, they served cheeses that were 8 years, 10 years and 13 years old, which always had covers on them, when anyone had cheese and lifted the cover, the aroma would knock a fly off a bucket of you know what !
They also served a Goat cheese that was brown in colour, very very sweet, and was delicious. For years afterwards I would get it from Reeces in Liverpool, or a shop in Chester. It was served with thick Rye Brot.
Another dish served was Mutton that had been hung for a year and a day, this was sliced thinly and to me tasted musty and of dried blood, an aquired taste no doubt, perhaps Trotterdom might be of help here.
Look forward to replies.

Knut
25th February 2006, 22:22
Aboard AMERICA (Texaco,Norway) in the mid fifties the only fridge aft was located in the Officer`s pantry. The 4 crew messes were allowed to keep their margarine there. Jam, syrup etc. shared cupboards in the messes with millions of cockroaches. When the eggs got old and began to smell, the cook would serve pancakes nearly half an inch thick and raw in the middle. Raw coffee was bought by the bag in Brazil, mixed with peas and roasted in the galley. Of this one milktin full was given to the midnight - 0400 watch. The others has to do with what coffe was left over from supper. Of catchup we got one bottle a week for 15 men. To save money we would take on drinking water when we were off the Amazonas delta.
Discharging in Lagos there was on helluva racket going on all night just ashore. The locals were butchering cattle and next morning the mutilated carcasses were carried onboard in baskets and deposited in the freezer. A thousand Water Melons were taken on as well and for the next weeks tha fare was Lobscous, Fresh Meat with Onion Sauce and Water Melons of course.
I had 15 months of this and I believe the Captain and C/S retired as wealthy men.
Skol, Knut.

airlie bird
26th February 2006, 01:48
What about Currie & Rice at breakfast that of course after around of eggs & bacon.
This was Harrisons [ two of fat one of lean Harrisons ],who said they were hungry.
Have had me hooked on currie ever since. (Thumb)
what was wrong with curry for breakfast, used to love it after doing the 4 to 8 as mate, best feeder i was ever on was as an apprentice on the "Langleeclyde" all female catering staff , was there from 1951 to 1955 , carried 12 passengers round E Africa and S Africa, our cabin was right opposite the pantry , so got all the goodies after the passengers ate, have been fighting a bulging waistline ever since, worst one I was on was a theiving steward , mind you I lost 20 pounds weight that trip, 6 months! ! !

trotterdotpom
26th February 2006, 02:41
Another dish served was Mutton that had been hung for a year and a day, this was sliced thinly and to me tasted musty and of dried blood, an aquired taste no doubt, perhaps Trotterdom might be of help here.
Look forward to replies.[/QUOTE]

That well hung mutton must have come from a ram, Eric. Perhaps Knut can help with more information.

John T.

skymaster
26th February 2006, 20:36
Loved Kippers and Smoked Cod and Smoked haddock when available,I think they kept pretty well as on most brock ships I seem to remember having them.

Mike

Tony D
26th February 2006, 20:56
Mebee I was lucky but I was never sailed on a bad feeder,one thing I did note that because most cooks attended the same cookery schools for their tickets,the ships curry frinstance was very simlar no matter what ship,I don't mean it was bad ,it just had a unique taste,to me anyway.
Years after I left the sea I did a lot of time on the road,used to eat in transport cafes and such, ordered a chicken curry in one and when I took me plate back a chap dressed in checks was behind the counter,nice curry I said to him,when were you at sea? he looks at me, and says how the **** did you know I was at sea?
hee hee.
(*))

dom
27th February 2006, 00:50
Mebee I was lucky but I was never sailed on a bad feeder,one thing I did note that because most cooks attended the same cookery schools for their tickets,the ships curry frinstance was very simlar no matter what ship,I don't mean it was bad ,it just had a unique taste,to me anyway.
Years after I left the sea I did a lot of time on the road,used to eat in transport cafes and such, ordered a chicken curry in one and when I took me plate back a chap dressed in checks was behind the counter,nice curry I said to him,when were you at sea? he looks at me, and says how the **** did you know I was at sea?
hee hee.
(*))
never been on a bad feeder,dont know how lucky you are,but i surpose most/all ships to day are good feeders,one ship on the aussie coast ,tin salmon,sardines ice cream biscuits you name it it was in the mess.

Wee John
27th February 2006, 07:22
As a cadet on Denholms ore boats you had the starvation bonus for the chief steward, on one we fed for 3s/6d a day. We were in a strange way rather proud of our chief thief. Baby's boke on our sandwiches at night, and " Jugged Hare" every Friday, in 8 months I never saw any one order it. But lets be honest we never starved
Wee John

tell
28th February 2006, 02:18
The other day, I overheard a programme on the BBC discussing cookery books for Christmas and they mentioned a book that was originally written for Chinese and foreign ships’ cooks on the Blue Funnel Line by the late Patience Gray. For those who hanker after ship's grub, it might be an ideal present this Christmas.

I was never on a bad feeder whilst on British ships, but often heard companies prefaced by the word 'hungry' - 'hungry hains' in particular.
Were these companies that bad?
I was on one tramp steamer that had an ice box and a mean chief steward after a fortnight at sea we ate some wierd and wonderful concoctions, after the ice ran out it was nearly always currie, and breakfast was rice cakes and devilled kidney, the only fresh meat we got was weavils in the bread, consider yourselves lucky guys, we never even got the statuary one egg a week. Tell, bye the way we were at sea for six weeks or more at a stretch

BarryM
24th March 2006, 16:56
One Shell Tankers Master popularly known as B****** Brittain allegedly (might be lawyers reading this) instructed the Ch Steward to serve sausages cut in half lengthways "to stop them rolling off the plates". He called this a precaution; everyone else knew it as an ingenious ploy to cut sausage consumption by half.

KIWI
24th March 2006, 22:41
P&O like Cunard let us enjoy first class menus but the lunch time curries linger in the memory.On Stratheden when she came off Cunard charter was left a quantity of Escargot which duly appeared on a Aussie bound menu with very few takers.They duly reappeared on a lunch menu as chicken curry & were used up.I know this because the 2nd chef was a Kiwi & told me.Rank may have its priviledges but coming from the same place 12000 miles away certainly affected the diet. KIWI

hawkey01
25th March 2006, 13:40
BarryM, my goodness that name brings back memories. I sailed with said Capt. He hated Chinese food so we had 6 days of bad European and one good day of Chinese chow. Many other tales but must be careful!!!

Palm oil chop, well!! How about fish soup for Breakfast as served up on Greek flag tanker I was on called Argolis/6ZDC of NJ Goulandris. We had two free beers on Sunday as well.

Great feeder Sarpedon, Blue Funnel X Denbyshire. Full silver service. (Night)

RayJordandpo
25th March 2006, 17:48
Making my mouth water reading all those replies. Couldn't beat "the black pan" and a good fry up when coming off the 4-8 watch. I even enjoyed curry in a morning. I think on the whole we didn't fair badly although you did (still do) get the whingers.
Ray

RayJordandpo
25th March 2006, 18:39
On my 1st ship, Ellerman and Pappayanni 'Palmelian', The cook was from Nth Vietnam. We called him Harry. The galley range was coal fired, it was the deck boys job to get the coal the night before so the cook could leave the range on a low light. I got 3 hrs o/t for a 10 minute job, great.
Harry was a good cook and from his little stove would come all sorts of wonderful grub. At dinner we had 2 entrees, 1 was a european dish and the other was always curry, it was the first time I had seen green curry,It was fabulous.Anything was fabulous to a lad whose only experience of choice before was to take it or leave it! And only ever having 1 course.
Harry was a perpetual smoker.He would walk about the galley with the smallest end of a rollie jammed in his mouth with water streaming from his left eye because the smoke was going in it. Only God and Harry knew where the ash went.
I was Peggy on this ship and the deck crew lived aft and the galley was midships so I had to get the grub for the crowd and take it aft 5 at a time in a contraption called a kit. Those market boats were like corks in a bath and bounced everywhere, especially in the Bay Of Biscuits.
Sunday dinners every day and Christmas dinners on a Sunday. I was on the 'Anatolian' a very good feeder. I remember the AB's would lower the peggy down a vent to 'retrieve' a few cases of oranges. The crews cabins were full of them, everbody tried to hide them on Sunday cabin inspection. I think the old man knew what was going on but turned a blind eye to that one (no scurvy on those ships). One thing I do remember about those Meddy runs in the sixties. A lot of the old timers never bothered about going ashore much - unless we did Beirut, then all hands were down the gangway, it was a great run ashore in those days.
Ray

billmaca
26th March 2006, 00:22
The grub was ok on some of the older boats but getting it aft in kits in bad weather did'nt do it any good ,the black pan was the best grub on the Carithia but I think Esso tankers in the 60's were the best I can remember

hashcookie
1st July 2006, 19:44
this thread has made me laugh and laugh. Kromeskies a la ruse, how could i have forgotten them, then there was ''tea bags in tomato sc.'', herrings in tomato sc.,and if you sailed Federal, you may remember Bloaters on the breakfast menu. In fifteen years i cannot recall anyone ever having one, and they always ended up in the rosie. Tight 2'nd stwds., i remember the greasers mess requesting strawberry jam on their stores list, and getting greengage. greengage went over the wall and request repeated next day, and up comes another tin of greengage which was again 'given a passage'. This went on for a few days until the 2'nd stwd. got the message and the requested strawberry jam arrived

Tony D
1st July 2006, 23:05
Greengage Jam,buggah one remembers thats stuff,as you say the floor of the ogan must be littered with full tins of Greengage Jam.
Bro tells me a funny story re Jam, they have a Norweigien Bosun,he is sitting in the mess room looking quizicaly at the label on a jar of strawberry jam,"wos up bos"? they enquire.
"Boggah! Took me years to be able to pronouce Strawberry Jam as Strawberry jam and not Strawberry Yam, now they change the foking name to Strawberry Yelly"
(*))

Les Gibson
1st July 2006, 23:41
No mention yet of the dreaded Bank line. Board of trade rations, it was the old man who stocked the ship. 3 eggs per week, salad was beetroot and onions with salad cream on Sunday afternoon only. HP sauce on the same day as the eggs. In 18 months we never had fresh milk or lettuce,or tomato, or cucumber. Curry EVERYDAY for lunch. We reckoned that the only real fresh meat we ever saw was the Weevils in the cornflakes, and the watered powdered milk made them almost inedible. This in the early 60s!

pete
2nd July 2006, 08:08
Hello Les.........I joined Bank Line in '65 and never once had an experience like you describe. Two eggs for brekkie everyday as many sauces as you could wish for and fresh meat and veggies at all times. Mind you we still had Curry for lunch everyday (couple of Beers, plateful of curry = 2 hours kip before 4 to 8........Heaven).....cheers........pete

Keltic Star
2nd July 2006, 08:14
Remember once as cocky young Cadets, we demanded our ration of lime juice per ships articles. Captain and Chief Steward obliged, insisting we drank it in their presence. It sure wasn't Rose's and have not drank a lager & lime since.

Tony Breach
2nd July 2006, 13:07
Wow - some memories here. Anyone remember betroot & onion after the tomatoes & lettuce ran out two days after sailing? How about no breakfast eggs during December as Doc was going to bake a cake for christmas? I was a sailor on the BRISTOL QUEEN where the crew food was purported to be so bad that us deckies excercised our right per articles & fed ouselves by cooking on the permitted portion of the galley range. This system was already the norm when I joined so I had no option to try the ship's grub: we just kept a big stockpot going for a week, curried the remainder on the seventh day to kill any germs, washed out the pot & started again - no one was ever sick! I found first class food in Somalia where I once purchased 20 bags of live lobsters, about 400 of the beasts on the hoof for a shilling each while loading bananas at Chisimiao. Told the Filipino cook to boil & freeze them all - it was amazing to watch about 6 Filipinos versus 400 life-threatened lobsters in a small galley but we lived like lords for some time after.
Bristol City Line was OK, Bank Line not too good, Campbells we fed ouselves, Geest were oustanding. My many later years on foriegn flag ships depended on the crews but I found Filipinos, Greeks & Morrocans to be very good. Scandinavians eat very well.

billyboy
2nd July 2006, 13:47
yes Tony, campbells were not noted for crew grub. on the crested eagle (chartered by campbells for a summer season based at newhaven. one of the cooks we had was a 15 year old who only knew how to make soup for lunch and tinned tomatoes for brekie. we had several cooks that season. we even had an old retired welsh lady who was rather good though, she baked a lot and dished up some good grub bless her. when i transfered to the cross channel service i was surprised at the quality of our grub, excellent feeders them. as for south coast shipping, it depended on the cook. some were good and some were atrocious. the best i found was on the sand star, excelent grub once again. (still do a stockpot once in a while here mate. share it with our poor neighbours. they go mad over it...LOL)

john shaw
2nd July 2006, 15:20
I still do myself the odd "ham and cheese beano" for an evening snack.

At South Shields Marine and Tech college it was "sandwich spread" sandwiches EVERY evening for supper for us cadets.

I still long for the steamed puddings from my first trip-- a FANTASTIC 2nd Cook and Baker, who's name i'm ashamed to say I cannot recall, used to cook these 2 feet long containers, like an aluminium torpedo, full of delicious sponge pud.

Cooked beetroot with butter was a regular vegetable on the Bamburgh Castle.

The only thing that kept me going thru the inevitable seasickness when keeping an 8/12 evening watch in the stormy North Sea in 2000dwt chemical tankers (I never got used to "small ship" motion) was a mug of hot chocolate made with lashings of "connie milk"-- I bought a can the other week in my perambulations around my local LIDL store, but it tasted vile!

My last trips were with Korean crew-- the BEST was the cook's version of Bulgogi/bulkoki, more like a stir fry-- I still have his fantastic recipe and make it occasionally-- I ordered Bulgogi in a West End Korean restaurant, there subtitled "Korean BBQ", and it wasn't a patch on the shipboard stuff. But, I'd kill for some of the crew's kimchee to accompany it!

gus warner
3rd July 2006, 03:21
I was on the Alf Everard as a youngster in the early '50s and we had the old seamans ration books. we did our own cooking and I soon found out how to knock up a decent meal. When we went up the East coast w would be able to get beautiful fresh kippers and would toast them over the galley stove. I can still taste them. At Porthleven Iwould walk across the habour at low tide and get a bucket of pilchards off the trawlers for nix plus some "queenies" out of the nets (scallops) Happy days. Then I went deep sea on the Kana and just reading EXAB who also sailed on her I must have struck the same cook. This bloke stuffed up everything, but after that I must have got lucky because I always found most cooks were really good and came up with decent meals.
I have'nt seen anyone mention "tab-nabs" as yet. I always enjoyed a decent "tab-nab"

Tony D
3rd July 2006, 09:39
Used to like the tab nab fruit cake, twer about four foot square, Manchester tart,as well cut up into squares,yer can't seem to get good fruit cake or spice loaf as some used to call it ashore,lucky if you find one raisin every cubic foot.

NZSCOTTY
3rd July 2006, 10:15
Yes John we mostly remember the good feeders. But I also remember the bad feeders in Union Steam ship company. Cook usuallt started his morning in the galley with a beer and a fag!!

jock paul
3rd July 2006, 21:21
Most ships I was on were good feeders, but it depended a lot on the Old Man. One captain, a Norwegian, (some muttered that he was an Eskimo) insisted on boiled fish everyday for lunch. We used to dread it. There was only one table in the saloon and he would sit at the head wearing a flat cap and braces. In would come the fish. We would get the fish, nothing wrong with it, but he insisted on getting all the heads. He would sit there with a fork spearing the eyes and sucking them into his mouth! I still can't look a fish in the face, dead or alive.

lakercapt
4th July 2006, 02:13
Maybe one of your Ships Cook memebers would shre their recipe for "Duff" as I survived on that when sailing with Ropners. What won't fatten will fill was the saying.
Even had a bet with one crewmember that he could eat a whole duff.
I lost but he spent a lot of time later on the throne

Geoff Garrett
4th July 2006, 02:58
The delicacy I enjoyed most when I sailed as an apprentice was the bread, baked very other morning and the smell of it coming out of the galley was mouth watering (all this of course, assuming the Cook happened to be a good baker). The slices had some "heft", and always a wonderful crust. Best as toast with lashings of butter (out of a large can!) and washed down with a mug of scalding tea after an afternoon kip.

NINJA
4th July 2006, 21:28
On Gas Tankers it was a Sunday dinner everyday and a Xmas dinner every Sunday.

Certainally miss Kedgeree at Breakfast and as one contributor said Oxtail Jardinee followed by Brown Windsor soup the following day.

Also nowadays Lambs sweetbreads is not on the menu.

Ninja.

Paul J Burke
9th July 2006, 07:42
I ate well on a number of British ships as a kid with the requisite bottomless stomach. I started visiting ships at my small town port at the age of thirteen. I remember well chowing down on steak and chips, meat pies and some great puddings in the late 1960s and early 1970s on ships like the Pacific Stronghold, Pacific Northwest, Loch Loyal, Loch Ryan, Loch Gowan, Harpalyce, Graiggwerdd, Prometheus, Amalric, among many other UK ships with crews and cuisines mainly from India and Hong Kong. I always loved the much superior chocolates and toffees of Britain.
One thing I remember is a wall poster of what every man on board was entitled to in nutrition and meal allotments, I think it even got down to the minimum entitlement in salt. There was some colloquial term for the poster that I have long since forgotten. I really wish I had been able to get one of these posters for my collection, just as I would have loved the Indian Government's own issue of this chart. The whole thing was as big as a wide door, covered in text. The wall poster you refered to would have more than likely been the ships "Articles". A "classic quote" from Shipping Coys re food was "sufficient without waste"!!!

hashcookie
9th July 2006, 09:20
Maybe one of your Ships Cook memebers would shre their recipe for "Duff" as I survived on that when sailing with Ropners. What won't fatten will fill was the saying.
Even had a bet with one crewmember that he could eat a whole duff.
I lost but he spent a lot of time later on the throne

Greetings Lakercapt. this is the way i remember making my most successful duff, 'Golden Pudding' on the menu.You may want to adjust the proportioms accordingly! I 'creamed ' 3 eggs with 8oz of marg and4oz. of sugar, then added a pound of plain flour, with a teaspoon of baking powder. Then add slowly Lyle's Golden Syrup untill it is the consistancy of axel grease, clinging to the hand, but dropping off when inverted. It was technical stuff! Grease a pudding bowl with marge, drop in mix till bowl half full (or half empty), cover bowl with grease proof paper and secure with string . Steam for 2 hours, serve with custard or even more syrup. Fruit duffs could be heavy. When whole duffs were thrown over the side , they hit the water with a distinctive DUFF sound, hense the name. Good luck hash

Tony D
9th July 2006, 11:24
The only critisism I have of sea cooks was their inability to make good gravy,they all made it the same way,it was passable I suppose ,but nowt like me old mums gravy.
(*))
Ah someone else took the eat a whole duff bet as well, ones biggest mistake was lack of lubricant(not enough custard) and in in eating me dinner first.
(EEK)

Philip Jones
1st August 2006, 13:04
Cold baked beans rejoiced in the name Breton salad and Potage St.Germaine was pea soup with black bits in it(ham?) on Luxor in 1963,or was it lumen in 1961.

trotterdotpom
2nd August 2006, 10:46
I've just been reminded of "Roast Beef a la mode" - made from a cow which had been shot with a barrage of carrots.

John T.

non descript
2nd August 2006, 12:23
On Gas Tankers it was a Sunday dinner everyday and a Xmas dinner every Sunday.

Certainally miss Kedgeree at Breakfast and as one contributor said Oxtail Jardinee followed by Brown Windsor soup the following day.

Also nowadays Lambs sweetbreads is not on the menu.

Ninja.

Ninja,
Yes, spot on with that comment, although I have to confess, with the exception of the Joule, we were not able to enjoy the attentions of "Miss Kedgeree" at breakfast or indeed at any other times. Was she part of the crew? (*))

trotterdotpom
3rd August 2006, 12:41
Ninja,
Yes, spot on with that comment, although I have to confess, with the exception of the Joule, we were not able to enjoy the attentions of "Miss Kedgeree" at breakfast or indeed at any other times. Was she part of the crew? (*))

Miss Kedgeree may have been the Indian laundry lady who came aboard in Barbados - she could sure handle a 'front loader'. Very versatile.

John T.

john strange
5th August 2006, 08:25
I still have after more than fourty years a number of menus from some of the Castle line ships. I was showing them to a chef in the local R.S.L. vclub one day and half of the dishes he had never heard of, let alone know how to cook. Never heard of Brown Windsor soup. smoked eel, chicken chop suey, or applew pie a la mode.
On a NZSC trip to Oz we had a cook who could not, nor could he make bread. It always ended up like a telescope, all outside and a bloody wide open space in the middle.
How did we ever survive?

raybnz
18th August 2006, 06:35
In general I found the food good.. Always had plenty of it and a variety too.

My first ship was the Corinthic and she carried some 80 first class passengers. So as a engineer we ate the same as the passengers in out own mess. I did a trip as 3rd fridge engineer or Junior. While doing this I was given the keys to the ships stores to check the temperatures there. I learnt how to make ice cream and also the best cuts of beef. So our black pan breakfasts were always full of nice things. With a few cans of beer we even got the nigh****chman to cook it for us. I also got on well with the chef as I did odd jobs in the galley for him.

Tabnabs were nice and always full of powdered cream.

I also came across the breastless chickens that seemed to have a hundred legs.

For supper Shaw Savill would have a single cheese sandwich delivered to the cabin. By the time it came to eat it both corners of the bread were touching and it was as hard as steel.

But when I took the 2nd Freezers job out bound for Aussie I pilfered a box of Birds Eyes cod fingers. That got rid of the hunger one way and on the way back I scored a box of boneless beef. Great steaks. We did a trip up to the east coast of the US and part of the cargo consisted of crayfish tails. Now being a Kiwi this was good tucker so a box or two dissappeared into the brineroom.

The Indian cooks on the British Osprey were also good providers. The curries were good along with being able to pick one up from the crews galley at the end of 12 - 4 in the morning before turning in.

john strange
18th August 2006, 08:12
Remember taking a coaster from Tyneside to the Medway, just the one way trip. Ships stores on loading in Tyneside, six cases of 'Newcastle brown' and one loaf of bread. Skipper wanted to know what we intended to do with all that bread?
Recall a trip with N.Z.S.C to Oz. Going through the canal the cook had to provide a big pot of scouse to feed the boat boys we had on board to see us through the canal.
Second steward had arow with the cook the night before so after the boat boys had eaten he put a ham hock in the scouse and showed the boat boys. The cook spent the rest of the trip through the canal locked in the chain lockef for safe keeping.
But he did have one skill thta I have never been able to work out. He had the ability to make bread thta we called telescopes. It was all crust and no middle.
Tinned sausuages on tankers, no thanks.
Oh happy days
John

Tony D
19th August 2006, 12:07
We ran out of tea once and the Chief Steward bought some when we docked in the Americas, weird stuff it were, huge leaves and bloody mint flavoured,unsurpassed in its awfulness,a British Merchant Vessel with no tea was a sad place.
Chiefy got some stick.
Still,not as bad as running out of ciggies.
A British Merchant Vessel with no ciggies was a dangerous place.
(EEK)

K urgess
19th August 2006, 16:31
Danske Franske Dampskib Selskap (not that DFDS)
I was the officer's messboy (still am) so I got first pickings and I love Scandinavian open sandwiches (smorbrod/smorgassbord). Drew the line at raw egg on raw hamburger which is apparently a Danish delicacy but didn't really appeal. Dry ship so the only thing to drink was Aqua Velva.

Hungry Hogarth's
BOT allowances and no more. Bread that melted when you toasted it. First sight of American milk loaf what luxury (not)! Seven months of Heinz sandwich spread sandwiches in the bridge box every night. 6 cans of beer a week maximum and that meant everybody.

Lean & Hungy's
Good stuff but not a lot of it. Plenty to eat in Monte, BA and all those lovely little bars in Brasil.

Bankline
Curry, curry, curry, irish stew, curry. Bring your own tins of beans. The best curries were served down aft if you were lucky enough to be invited for a Pakistani or Indian holiday bash.

Please Send No Cowboys
Strange and wondrous things because of passengers. Just remember not to drink the finger bowl.

Port Line
Repeat of above but because I didn't have a monkey suit & cummerbund I used to eat seven bells dinner which meant good food that hadn't been standing for ages waiting for the passengers to appear.

Wilson's
The best fish and chips in the world and all the Hull Brewery Export you wanted!

CP Tankers
Good food, excellent prusser. Whisky club determined to try at least one different one every week courtesy of above purser. "Watney's bleedin' red barrel" on tap to misquote Bonzo Dog. Spanish crew and cook so some imagination not just chips, chips and more chips with steak or fish or steak or fish or chicken or fi......

Nile SS Co.
Much as PSNC & Portline but maybe a bit further down market.

Eat Sleep S**t & Overtime
Great grub. Wine from Portugal that I still like when I can get it. But do you really need to be reminded of the day of the week by what's on the menu?

Compass Line (Vesty charter for Blue Star)
Nice grub but in port too often in places with the best seafood restaurants (SA) or pub barbies (Oz) to remember much of it apart from CUB Draught at 6d a pint and Victoria Bitter. Fridge blokes who new just how to test the temperature of boxes of Beira prawns so that they would spoil if not eaten immediately.

Hadley's Sunshine Cruises
A Chief Steward who's two daughters appeared on Tennant's cans as pin-ups. He knew I liked baked beans so left catering tins of 'em in the midships pantry for evening snacks. Along with buckets full of deep fried chicken wings. Eat your heart out Colonel Saunders.

Watergate Shipping (Newcastle)
Good grub second trip but first trip the mash potato made our lass sick on a visit in Bordeaux. Strict bar hours and sparks wasn't a watchkeeper (!) so couldn't get a beer after last watch. Had a dining out club where we took turns to pay for meals ashore. One of those trips like where you enjoy the first movie but the sequel was rubbish.

Ellerman's City Liners
Only coasting so not enough time to form an opinion. Seemed good after previous but a bit old-fashioned (sweetbreads, oxtail, etc)

Texaco Tankships
Much the same as Eat SS & O/time. Even to the wine 'cos I joined both in Lisnave. I do remember eating a lot of lobster, crayfish and rainbow trout on this one.

Mobil Tankers
The best bread rolls ever by an Indian cook. Can't find 'em ashore and my efforts are appalling. Best after hours baine-marie ever just off the bar.

And that wraps up this culinary trip down memory lane. Time for a cuppa (egg)

Derek Roger
19th August 2006, 17:15
On Brocks MV Mahout we had a cook who made a brillant Curried Murgi ( Chicken ) I pestered him in vain for his curried chicken powder recipe ! It was his secret and he was not sharing with anyone . He did however make me a batch which he put in a coffeee jar.
All went well until we arrived in Heathrow when custmos took great interest in the bottle and its contents ! Reinforements were called and after about 10 minutes of examination ; smelling ; tasting by about 6 customs officers it was given the OK !
They also took great interest in my Guitar which I had unintentionally not delared having bought it from the 2nd mate therfore in my mind it was second hand ( although he had bought it new in Germany the same trip ) They looked inside it with torches and mirrors and finally declared it OK !
The guitar itself was therefore " imported without duty paid " and I considered myself very lucky.

john strange
21st August 2006, 08:10
All this talk of food brings back memories of my time on the 'Vindi"
How many of you can recall the special cocoa we were supposed to drink in order to keep our sexual uges in check. Or the bread and jam we had to endure as part of the evening meal, even the seagulls refused to eat it. Porrige that was more like wall paper paste, and who knows where the soup came from.

But we live to tell the tale
john

offcumdum sanddancer
8th September 2006, 12:48
Very surprised that there has been no thread discussing menus and recipes so far. I still try to recreate that favourite of Sunday lunch, the Dahl curry. (Then a little sleep for us dayworkers) It consisted of a bed of white boiled rice, a dollop of dahl, and topped off with a layer dry fried curried mince. Sprinkled over with fried onions. Am I correct? I like to think that my own creations are actually better than we were given, but I would very much like to compare my recipe with what was possibly taught at sea-school.

Are there any other recipes that are wanting to be done, possibly kromesky a la russe?, or that dish of beef? shot full of carrots, with an air gun, obviously.

Any catering supremmo's out there, or any one else with unrequited food desires?

Keith

Jeff Egan
8th September 2006, 13:31
Whey man, with a name like Sanddancer do you hail from Shields?

offcumdum sanddancer
8th September 2006, 13:46
Offcumdun sanddancer, please. Hail from Skipton, Yorkshire originally but came here as a cadet in 1965 and never managed to leave! I was stolen by a geordie lass, raised two little geordies (who have both settled in Yorkshire). I live between the college and the sea.

Offcumdun - Tyke, for one who come to live from foreign parts, eg, t'next village.
sanddancer - been here 40+ years, but still not a local yet.
why offcumdum and not offcumdun - finger trouble when registering

Keith

ps, I'm a friend of Alan Y Purvis, you should know him.

john shaw
8th September 2006, 14:33
There's a pretty comprehensive thread "Merchant Navy Fare" running to 9 pages/ 220+ entries, if you'd care to whet your appetite!!

offcumdum sanddancer
8th September 2006, 14:38
Hello John'

Thanks for that, but I cannot find that thread, well, not on my computer.

Keith

Waighty
8th September 2006, 14:41
Kromesky a la russe now there's a memory. What about Boolie Hash, Potage du Barry etc. Currys - Egg, Omlette, Malayan (add pineapple chunks), Singapore (add dessicated coconut). Omlette du M****illes (corned beef in it!). The good old culinary days.

john shaw
8th September 2006, 14:48
Keith

type "merchant navy fare" into "search forums" from the bar at the top of the page-- I guarantee that pear belle helene, roast beef a la mode etc etc will have you trippin' down memory lane with a grumbling stomach all day!! Regards

Jeff Egan
8th September 2006, 14:55
Mmmmm, Alan and I go back 42 years, those were the days my friend.

offcumdum sanddancer
8th September 2006, 17:02
Thanks John,

Not been here long.

Just found it and read all. Will have to post my versions of recipes, as not much on there (recipe-wise)

Strange that a large number of postings include Dahl curry, kromeskies, beef with the carrots, all of which I mentioned in my first post!

I will transfer activity there, thanks. BTW, I also loved the tinned sausages.

Keith

offcumdum sanddancer
8th September 2006, 17:06
Mmmmm, Alan and I go back 42 years, those were the days my friend.

We are due for a night out soon, few pints at the Dolly Peel and then down to Ocean road for the mandatory curry. Not that we aren't adventurous now and then, Alum house and an Italian or Greek for a change.

Keith

pentlandpirate
15th September 2006, 23:24
Curries were always popular. And it used up the scraps from the previous day. On one Indian crewed Denholm boat the Chief Steward came up with an innovative way of naming the curry of the day after a member of the crew. Proudly typed up on the daily menu card, I distinctly remember Bengari curry.............and later seeing him with a chipping hammer the same day still with all his fingers and toes.

Talking of meals what did other DSM members on the Team OBO's get as a Christmas gift? We got pewter napkin rings. The 2/o looked quite fetching with them converted into ear-rings!

ddraigmor
16th September 2006, 22:52
Aw God......!

Cook's own Kate and Sidney pies, Tiddy Oggies and jam flapjacks eaten on the hoof when working anchors........into the galley door in all the kit, gloves off, snaffle them while they were hot, grab a coffe and back to chain dragging......

Oh them days!

Jonty

jonog
2nd November 2006, 19:10
I remember all the old favourites. Do you think that they taught all the cooks the names (but not how to spell them), at college. I also remember that with Booker Line, if you went down the card (menu) and back up again, the purser would buy you a case of Tennents. Only saw it done once though by a northern Irish AB called Davy Harris. Big man, huge appetite. We had Guyanese crew on one trip I did, and everything was almost inedible. Lost a lot of weight though. But I remember the Chief saying at dinner one night, "It takes the human body 12 hours to convert food into sh*te, but that f****** cook manages it in half an hour!!!" Great days!!

Bridie
2nd November 2006, 21:33
I have even tried to get hold of a copy of the Merchant navy cookery book written by a chap called (I think) Atkinson, but still no success.

For a while I collected books with nautical themes (MN in particualr) and I have a copy of the said book!

"The Nautical Cookery Book for the use of Stewards & Cooks of Cargo Vessels"
by Chas. Henry Atkinson MCA
Silver Medalist 1925, Universal Food and Cookery Exhibition, London.
(Nautical Press 1928 - 12th Edition)

and Kromeskies are in there(Thumb)

http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/data/501/CookBook.jpg

slick
2nd November 2006, 21:46
All,
Well Hain's and a couple of others of that ilk were the pits to use modern argot, these are few of the remembered nicknames given to all sorts of nosh.
Tinned tomatoes aka Train/Tram Smash.
Cottage Pie aka Bungalow Duff or S--thouse on the Cliffs.
Curry and Rice was referred to by one Old Man of my acquaintance as DuckS--t and Hailstones.
Steak and Kidney Pie aka Snake and Pygmy pie.
Steak aka Wounded Cow
Sardines on Toast aka Sharks on a Raft.
Heinz beans aka Texas Strawberries.
Oxtail aka S--thouse Lids.
I am sure there a thousand others I await them eagerly.
Yours aye,
Slick

Bridie
3rd November 2006, 21:06
"The Nautical Cookery Book for the use of Stewards & Cooks of Cargo Vessels"
by Chas. Henry Atkinson MCA
Silver Medalist 1925, Universal Food and Cookery Exhibition, London.
(Nautical Press 1928 - 12th Edition)

Couple of recipies asked for:
Kromeskies (click) (http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/39041/cat/500/ppuser/9021)

Plum Duff (click) (http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/39042/cat/500/ppuser/9021)

Any other requests?(Scribe)

BarryM
4th November 2006, 09:08
Couple of recipies asked for:
Kromeskies (click) (http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/data/500/Kromeskies.jpg)

Plum Duff (click) (http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/data/500/PlumDuff.jpg)

Any other requests?(Scribe)

Bridie,

Click throughs do not appear to be working - but it could me my fault??

BarryM

Bridie
4th November 2006, 10:45
Couple of recipies asked for:
Kromeskies (click) (http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/39041/cat/500/ppuser/9021)

Plum Duff (click) (http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/39042/cat/500/ppuser/9021)

Any other requests?(Scribe)

Thanks for that Barry.(Thumb)
SN Team moved pictures as they were not in the proper place. Now link points to my gallery.
Hope this works now.

Bridie
4th November 2006, 10:56
I noticed that there were 2 recipies for Plum Duff with the "Cabin" version much better quality (ingredients anyway).
Remember there used to be:
Crew Tea and Cabin Tea (Crew tea was a few leaves and lots of twigs!!)
Crew Coffee and Cabin Coffee

Any other memories of differences between Mess Room and Saloon?

Some cooks I sailed with made sure the was no difference and were even biased towards the Mess Room(Thumb)

BarryM
4th November 2006, 11:01
Thanks for that Barry.(Thumb)
SN Team moved pictures as they were not in the proper place. Now link points to my gallery.
Hope this works now.

Bridie,

I never inquired too deeply what went into a kromeskie - with some cooks it was far better not to know - but what is panada?

Thanks,

BarryM

PS. I well remember the cook found rolling out meatballs on his sweaty belly. When complaints were made he put on a (grubby) vest and continued.(EEK)

Bridie
4th November 2006, 17:42
but what is panada?
Had to go searching the internet for that:

Panada (click) (http://www.answers.com/topic/panada)

but should have trusted the Nautical Cookery Book of course(Cloud)
Panada (http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/data/500/Panada.jpg)

Bridie
4th November 2006, 18:24
Some more requests;
Devilled Kidneys (http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/data/501/DevilKids.jpg) What about that next recipe!
Beef Rissoles (best I could do!) (http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/data/501/Rissoles.jpg)
Braised Beef (http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/data/501/Braising.jpg)

Taleso
6th November 2006, 14:13
Hi all Merchant Munchers,

They best ever night food and best hangover cure known to man was dry curry chicken. In a fit of nostalgia I did the business for lunch and I was just waiting for it to crisp up the skin when I found this thread our site. Lean towards the screen and breathe in the aroma of roasted spices…mmmmmmm (Eat) [=P] .

Merchant fare snippets.

The breakfast egg/bacon formulae.
One piece of bacon equals one egg. Two pieces of bacon meant no egg. Two eggs meant no bacon and that’s how it was calculated.

Mystery Chicken
To this day I do not know how a slice of bird can be carved from a chicken
and have it’s a**e positioned dead in the middle of the portion.

Somebody help me here, was it called curry captian?

Happy eating,
Taleso

Bridie
6th November 2006, 14:20
http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/data/501/SydneyStarMenu.jpg

Mike lawrence
6th November 2006, 17:50
Boston Baked Beans:
Haricot beans soaked overnight
Tinned tomatoes
Tomato puree
Belly pork
Molasses. Drain the beans mix in with tomatoes and tomato puree. Add molasses. Cut into small cubes the belly pork after removing rine fry until tender with thinly sliced onion and garlic. Add altogether in a roasting tin stir and allow to simmer on low heat in oven. Serve with crusty bread and a nice light ice cold beer.

John Cassels
6th November 2006, 19:55
Pete , just reading that menu takes one back to all those x-mases at sea.
Pity restaurants don't have menus like that.

Mike , great receipe , one to try out. Thanks.

JC

Mac
7th November 2006, 05:19
Taleso, the dish is known as "Country Captain", at it's simplest level the dish consists of chicken flavoured with chilli and turmeric.
The term "country" was used by the Raj to refer to anything of Indian, as opposed to British , origin.
From "The Raj at Table" by David Burton (Fabers 1994)

Taleso
7th November 2006, 08:52
Hi Mac,

Thanks for the info. I also use browned onion, cloves and cinnamon.

In the 19 sixties I was friendly with the chef from the Port View Restaurant then Port Swettenham (now Port Klang) through knowing his family back in the UK. He showed me how to do it Chinese/Malay style....cooking I mean.

Here we go again....Port View Restaurant.....chilli crab....honey soya pork chop.....[=P]..... spending the scrap money on big pi**up with all the lads dressed in their brand new tailored boiler suits also complements of the scrap fund.

Best regards,
Taleso