Great Lakes - This is Shenango!

kewl dude
5th November 2010, 15:39
Greg Hayden

kewl dude
5th November 2010, 16:06
March 9, 2006 I took this into Kinko's to get a price on scanning it. At the time Kinko's did not have a scanner that could handle 56 inch wide scans, but I was told that one was on the way. Regardless they gave me an estimate of $140 for the scans, 14 scans at $10 each.

First part of April the Kinko's manager called and said they were ready when I was. We set up an appointment for 2 PM April 19. From the start I told Kinko's that I would NOT let this out of my sight. That I MUST be present with this publication during every step of their scanning process.

We had agreed to save these as Tiff's, but when they first scanned the cover their computer processed and processed and processed and processed and .. we agreed to abort the process.

Then we decided to scan them as Gif's. Which worked much faster. The final fourteen scans are 5600 pixels wide by 2200 pixels high resulting in an average of 8 MB per scan. I was out of there at 4PM with these images burned to a CD.

Greg Hayden

kewl dude
5th November 2010, 16:31
I recall Ed Maney, Claude Peck but especially Pete Riley who was Shenango Fleet Superintendent based in Cleveland.

Pete was a "large man" who due to his bulk was unable to climb the ladder everyone else used to gain access to the ship. From the beginning of Great Lakes ships the access ladders used were of the type often used to paint a house, leaned against the rail at about a 45 degree angle.

Pete's belly prevented him from climbing the ladder. So the Cleveland ships chandler would bring Pete over on the gas engine launch they used to deliver food and supplies.

Coming to the off shore side of the ship and Pete would enter via the engine room side port that was called the gangway. All ships of Great Lakes design had these side port / gangways on both sides, on what was called the Fantail in the engine room.

They were two piece "dutch" doors allowing when underway for the bottom portion to be dogged closed but the upper part to be open for viewing the passing outside world and for natural ventilation.

Plywood 'wind jammers' were often rigged with a line leading forward from the outer edge to keep the wood from blowing astern.There was a lot of individuality in gangway wind jammers from ship to ship.

Greg Hayden

kewl dude
5th November 2010, 17:01
Greg Hayden

kewl dude
5th November 2010, 17:13
Greg Hayden

kewl dude
5th November 2010, 17:21
Greg Hayden

kewl dude
5th November 2010, 18:24
In the early 1990's when Geocities came along I was one of the first to climb on the wagon. Initially Geocities, which was a Virtual Village, my "address" was 1965 The Tropics street. As new people moved in we could visit with our next door neighbors over the fence and down the block. Initially everyone was given a free address and free 250 kb of disk space. Later enlarged to 1/2 a mb then one mb. Later two, then five mb.

Anyway among other things I put up was then the ONLY online History of the Snyder-Shenango businesses. I utilized information from This is Shenango! and a 1930 book named Freighters of Fortune by Norman Beasley. My Dad told me about this book, that he had seen on Shenango that Chuck Volk had. Chuck was C/E on Shenango when Dad was 3/E and 2/E. I have a LOT more Shenango pictures that I need to scan, especially those of crew. Somewhere here I have paper pictures of Chuck Volk but none on my machine right now.

It took me quite awhile to locate the book online but eventually I got in touch with Judith Herba the owner of Arnolds of Michigan in Marine City zip 48039. It took her quite a long time but eventually she found me the book in good used condition.

In its 310 pages Freighters of Fortune detailed the development of Great Lakes shipping from the get go until the late 1920's. I was surprised that Shenango was mentioned on only four pages plus a chart in the back stating that Shenango had 3 ships with a trip capacity of 34,400 tons of cargo. But Mr Beasley covered the attendant development of railroads and docks and locks and all the infrastructure without which the ships could not be so competitive

But in those four pages I gleaned much of the information about Shenango. Along about 1997 I got an email from William P Snyder VI -- the sixth. He told me that I had pictures up that the Snyder Family had NEVER seen and thanked me for my post.

Around 2000 Yahoo bought Geocities but everything continued free URL and server space as before. However in 2009 Yahoo announced that it was closing Geocities. Yahoo offered me "appropriate" disk space and a new Yahoo URL for a mere $40 a month -- $480 a year -- but I passed.

So everything I had up went away. Today if you key Shenango Furnace Company into Google you will find a lot of sites have varying degrees of information especially the "Trace your Roots" type sites.

Attached is a picture taken when the Shenango fleet numbered five ships. Left to right Schoonmaker, Snyder Jr, Shenango, Snyder, Wilpen. Taken in Buffalo one winter when all five were laid up rafted together anchored.

You notice that the first ships on the right did not have the bridge wings out to the ships sides. But all five had a passengers observation lounge right below the pilot house. Shenango was the kind of company where the young Snyder Family members went off to college but then began at the bottom of the ladder within the company experiencing first hand working within the company.

So by 1911 and 1912 when the Schooner and Snyder Jr came along the guys in the office listened to the guys on the ships and added those bridge wings. Just makes docking and locking lots easier and safer for the Captain and Mates.

Shenango was always a small company but everyone who faithfully worked for them was Snyder-Shenango "Family".

Greg Hayden

kewl dude
26th September 2012, 19:11
http://www.reocities.com/thetropics/1965/shenhist.htm

The Shenango Furnace Company

Greg Hayden

Elzi Volk
27th July 2014, 23:09
Anyway among other things I put up was then the ONLY online History of the Snyder-Shenango businesses. I utilized information from This is Shenango! and a 1930 book named Freighters of Fortune by Norman Beasley. My Dad told me about this book, that he had seen on Shenango that Chuck Volk had. Chuck was C/E on Shenango when Dad was 3/E and 2/E. I have a LOT more Shenango pictures that I need to scan, especially those of crew. Somewhere here I have paper pictures of Chuck Volk but none on my machine right now.
Mr. Hayden, I would be very interested..actually, ecstatic, if you might share with me any photographs you might have of Chuck Volk. I am his grand daughter. Charles John Volk is my father and the only child of Chuck Volk. Granpa Chuck passed away in 1963. His son, my father, passed away last summer.

I have only two photographs of my Grandfather; one with me on his lap when he was still in service on the Shenango, and another in his shipman's uniform. Other than that, I have left only stories from my Dad and his brass oil lantern that hung in his ship cabin.

If you have any remembrances or photos of my Grandfather, I would love to hear, read or see them. Including stories and photos of the ship that he loved. He still remains close to my heart after so many decades. Please feel free to contact me via private message. I will be happy to respond.

With kind regards,
Elzibeth (Elzi) Volk

ben27
28th July 2014, 00:35
good day kewl dude.5h nov,2010.23:39.re:great lakes-this is shanango.a very interesting post,he was a very astute business man.created a great industry for a man so young.thank you for posting,regards ben27

PLaMarre3
8th November 2014, 00:48
Thought you would enjoy this Chief! Done by my father for William P. Snyder III. I have a lithograph set aside for you....