Saybolt Book – 1954 -- Pocket – 3 inches wide by 5 inches high – Size

kewl dude
15th November 2010, 00:58
http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/showthread.php?t=6375&highlight=what+did+steam+engineers+do

I suspect some of you reading this will be surprised to hear that some who sell your ship fuel oil will try to cheat you? On the other hand, those of you who sailed ME will say to yourself “oh yeah!”

On board ship and later ashore I always believed in the Gold Standard.
I owned the Gold so I set the Standard.

Depending upon where you are loading fuel will help or hurt this transaction. From the ships point of view tied up at a refinery is the best place to be, since until the refinery folks and the ship folks agree, the ship is taking up dock space. Often with other ships anchored out waiting to dock in this space.

After the fuel oil is on board a meeting was held in the Master’s Quarters. The ship was represented by the Master, Chief Mate, Chief Engineer, First Assistant Engineer and Second Assistant Engineer. The seller had as many if not more people representing them.

Reading these last few posts about the volume of fuel oil. The seller and the buyer have to agree to the same amount.

Scenario: you are Master or Chief Engineer of a 16 knot, 16,000 ton ship that holds 24,000 barrels of 42 gallon per barrel fuel oil. You know that your ship will burn an average of one barrel per nautical mile in good weather. You have 6,000 barrels on board and are faced with a 12,000 nautical mile voyage. The company who owns this ship want you to load as much cargo as you can; limiting as much as possible your fuel and stores tonnage.

So you load 6,000 barrels + 10 - 25% just in case oil. 6,600 – 7,500 barrels at say $1.90 a barrel = $12,540 – $14,250. Then 2,000 miles before you reach your destination you run out of fuel oil.

Because someone on your ship was not paying attention? Because taking 6,600 barrels of fuel oil could take as long as 24 hours, someone sold you 2,000 plus barrels of seawater instead of fuel? As a Luzon bunker barge tried to pull on me in the middle of a dark and stormy night.

Ships of what I speak are the around the world fuel WW II built
AP – Transports General Class: C4-S-A1 Type
AH – Hospital Ships Haven Class: C4-S-B2 Type
AO – Fleet Oilers Suamico/Pecos Class: T2-SE-A1 Type

The T2’s carried 12,000 barrels in two fuel oil tanks aft each holding 6,000 barrels, one on either side of the engine room, plus an additional 12,000 barrels in two deep tanks forward. T2’s did not have settling tanks instead burning directly off the two aft fuel tanks.

The C4’s carried 24,000 barrels in double bottom tanks with two pathetically small settling tanks located immediately aft of the boilers forward of # 7 cargo hold. These small settlers required that each be refilled once each day and switched from one to the other twice daily at midnight and at noon. Ships with larger settlers typically switched only once daily at noon.

I scanned the black front and back cover of the Saybolt book even though I cannot make out any distinct printing. Holding the book at its edge I can make out what may have been printing on the front cover but no longer readable.

Greg Hayden

kewl dude
15th November 2010, 01:09
Greg Hayden

kewl dude
15th November 2010, 01:18
Greg Hayden

kewl dude
15th November 2010, 01:28
Greg Hayden

kewl dude
15th November 2010, 01:37
Greg Hayden

kewl dude
15th November 2010, 01:50
Greg Hayden

kewl dude
15th November 2010, 01:59
Greg Hayden

kewl dude
15th November 2010, 02:11
Greg Hayden




Saybolt Book Ends