Master's to be...

Alan Rawlinson
10th December 2010, 07:39
Mulling over those all too distant years on Bank Line ships, it occurred to me that I had sailed with at least 8 Officers who would go on to become Master. They were:

H Barbour - 2/0 Ernebank
J McCoy - 2/0 Maplebank
J Whiteside C/O Maplebank
B Carnie - C/O Westbank
J Lynch - 2/0 Inchanga
H Martin - 3/0 Southbank
J Farringdon - 2/0 Southbank
J Appleby - C/O Crestbank

Anyone have a similar list?

jimthehat
10th December 2010, 12:10
Mulling over those all too distant years on Bank Line ships, it occurred to me that I had sailed with at least 8 Officers who would go on to become Master. They were:

H Barbour - 2/0 Ernebank
J McCoy - 2/0 Maplebank
J Whiteside C/O Maplebank
B Carnie - C/O Westbank
J Lynch - 2/0 Inchanga
H Martin - 3/0 Southbank
J Farringdon - 2/0 Southbank
J Appleby - C/O Crestbank

Anyone have a similar list?

Only two...
Wilky Rutherford....C/o Clydebank
J R lynch c/o isipingo

jim

Alistair Macnab
10th December 2010, 16:06
Let me think......

I haven't many records left as a fire in my house removed earlier stuff
but here is my list from memory. Apologies to individuals if I've put them on the wrong ship! Apologies also for any omissions!

Jack Donald, Mate, "Fleetbank"
Bill Awcock, Second Mate, "Fleetbank";
John Appleby, Second Mate, "Laganbank";
Wilkie Rutherford, Mate, "Inchanga";
Alan Macgregor, Second Mate, "Inchanga"
Bill Langworthy, Apprentice, "Carronbank" *;
John Paul, Mate, "Roybank";
Dave Vincent, Second Mate, "Ernebank" *;
Spencer Lynch, Apprentice, "Carronbank" *.

These starred (*) also made it to Marine Superintendent as did the following shipmates who landed ashore in the Company in other positions:

Albert Scales, Third Mate, "Laganbank";
Brian Lucy, Second Mate, "Laganbank";
Alan Wright, Chief Engineer, "Roybank".
Stan Sweeney, 2nd. Engineer, "Carronbank".

Ah! These two year trips certainly separated the shipmates from the Board of Trade Acquaintances!

Andy Lavies
10th December 2010, 19:07
Could add that chap Alistair Macnab, acting 3/O in "Ettrickbank" and then 3/O in "Inchanga", another who ended up as a Super. Fancy giving up ships for a desk !
Andy

John Dryden
10th December 2010, 20:44
Could add that chap Alistair Macnab, acting 3/O in "Ettrickbank" and then 3/O in "Inchanga", another who ended up as a Super. Fancy giving up ships for a desk !
Andy

Knowing Alistair only from SN I would wager he often wished he was back on a ship and away from the desk!

Charlie Stitt
11th December 2010, 10:23
Two that I know off.
C Medlicott, Apprentice on the Inverbank 2. 1962/63
H Dillon, 3rd Mate on the Teakbank. 1965. ( first trip with Bank Line )
By the way Alan, your friend 2/0 J McCoy went on to become a top class Master and was a very good friend of mine on Forresbank 2 1965/66

boatlarnie
11th December 2010, 12:51
Mulling over those all too distant years on Bank Line ships, it occurred to me that I had sailed with at least 8 Officers who would go on to become Master. They were:

H Barbour - 2/0 Ernebank
J McCoy - 2/0 Maplebank
J Whiteside C/O Maplebank
B Carnie - C/O Westbank
J Lynch - 2/0 Inchanga
H Martin - 3/0 Southbank
J Farringdon - 2/0 Southbank
J Appleby - C/O Crestbank

Anyone have a similar list?

John Lowans was Apprentice with me on Cloverbank (1959), John Steel was Apprentice on Oakbank (1963/64); also on Oakbank Angus McBain was Ch. Officer and I think he became Master. Last but not least was C.B.Loads who was Mate on the Avonbank (1961).

Alan Rawlinson
11th December 2010, 18:47
Two that I know off.
C Medlicott, Apprentice on the Inverbank 2. 1962/63
H Dillon, 3rd Mate on the Teakbank. 1965. ( first trip with Bank Line )
By the way Alan, your friend 2/0 J McCoy went on to become a top class Master and was a very good friend of mine on Forresbank 2 1965/66

Interesting, isn't it, looking back on these shipmates...

J McCoy stands out in my memory as being a very ' serious ' sort of 2/0. He was hot on knots and splices and demonstrated some fancy ropework to us App's from time to time... ( Must have been when the bond was firmly shut!)

Alan Rawlinson
11th December 2010, 18:51
John Lowans was Apprentice with me on Cloverbank (1959), John Steel was Apprentice on Oakbank (1963/64); also on Oakbank Angus McBain was Ch. Officer and I think he became Master. Last but not least was C.B.Loads who was Mate on the Avonbank (1961).

I felt sure that Loads was already a Super in 1961 in the USA, or am I getting mixed up?

Alistair Macnab
11th December 2010, 19:43
The Loads boys were the sons of the Bank Line Marine Superintendent in Basrah. Brian Loads, the elder, was eventually promoted to Assistant Marine Superintendent in New Orleans in about 1966 but was hospitalized in 1968 and was retired in the following year when his illness proved incurable. I was his successor late in 1968.
Rodger Loads was the younger brother who was also in Bank Line. He went ashore before reaching Master and was in the insurance business in the UK. He often attends Bank Line Reunions but I notice he was not at the latest one this year.

John Campbell
11th December 2010, 19:56
Mulling over those all too distant years on Bank Line ships, it occurred to me that I had sailed with at least 8 Officers who would go on to become Master. They were:

H Barbour - 2/0 Ernebank
J McCoy - 2/0 Maplebank
J Whiteside C/O Maplebank
B Carnie - C/O Westbank
J Lynch - 2/0 Inchanga
H Martin - 3/0 Southbank
J Farringdon - 2/0 Southbank
J Appleby - C/O Crestbank

Anyone have a similar list?


T.D.Scott = C/O Eskbank
George Scott - C/O Fleetbank
Broadly - C/O Southbank
Kelly - Teakbank

Joe C
11th December 2010, 22:03
The Loads boys were the sons of the Bank Line Marine Superintendent in Basrah. Brian Loads, the elder, was eventually promoted to Assistant Marine Superintendent in New Orleans in about 1966 but was hospitalized in 1968 and was retired in the following year when his illness proved incurable. I was his successor late in 1968.
Rodger Loads was the younger brother who was also in Bank Line. He went ashore before reaching Master and was in the insurance business in the UK. He often attends Bank Line Reunions but I notice he was not at the latest one this year.

Sailed with Rodger Loads on the Moraybank 1954, I think.Good memories.He and Ron Creamer used to relieve the boredom of long sea trips by throwing lighted cigarettes across their cabin to each other and try to catch them in their mouths.Now why do I remember this!!

Alan Rawlinson
12th December 2010, 07:30
Mulling over those all too distant years on Bank Line ships, it occurred to me that I had sailed with at least 8 Officers who would go on to become Master. They were:

H Barbour - 2/0 Ernebank
J McCoy - 2/0 Maplebank
J Whiteside C/O Maplebank
B Carnie - C/O Westbank
J Lynch - 2/0 Inchanga
H Martin - 3/0 Southbank
J Farringdon - 2/0 Southbank
J Appleby - C/O Crestbank

Anyone have a similar list?


Oops!........ forgot 2 more, making a total of 10

A.E.Scales - Appn Crestbank
P J Elder - 3/0 Eastbank

jimthehat
12th December 2010, 17:43
The Loads boys were the sons of the Bank Line Marine Superintendent in Basrah. Brian Loads, the elder, was eventually promoted to Assistant Marine Superintendent in New Orleans in about 1966 but was hospitalized in 1968 and was retired in the following year when his illness proved incurable. I was his successor late in 1968.
Rodger Loads was the younger brother who was also in Bank Line. He went ashore before reaching Master and was in the insurance business in the UK. He often attends Bank Line Reunions but I notice he was not at the latest one this year.

Alistair,
interesting info.I did not know that bank line had a super in basrah,seems an odd place for bank line.
There was london,New York(when did the super move down to the gulf? seems a more logical place to be) Durban Calcutta, and Sydney,thats about the lot i can remember from my days.

jim

Alistair Macnab
12th December 2010, 18:19
Andrew Weir were major players in Iraq between the wars as an outgrowth of their relationships with the oil industry in the Western Hemisphere (USA, Mexico and Venezuela).

Weir had 'general stores' in all major oil towns up the Tigris and Euphrates valleys and they initiated an airline, Bank Line Airways to connect all their business locations with headquarters in Basrah where they had a company compound on the banks of the Shatt el Arab. I sailed with a Marconi Sahib who had once been a radio operator on Bank Line Airways. The main route was Basrah - Kirkuk - Mosul.

They acted as ships agents for other companies as well as Bank Line and ran a fleet of fast service boats to service ships in the Shatt. Presumably they were also involved with supporting British military interests during WWII. At one time, Bank Boats were heavily involved with carrying wheat from Australia to Iraq.

Eventually they were awarded the Iraqi dates concession to market the annual dates harvest.

All this came crashing down when there was a revolution in Iraq, I think in the late 1940s. Brian Loads told me such was the Weir influence in Iraq that the revolution was held off for 24 hours at Weir's request so that all the Bank Line expatriates could get safely out of the country!

Roger Loads can tell us all more about this interesting and largely unknown part of the Weir enterprises what I write comes from Rodger and his late brother, Brian.

jimthehat
12th December 2010, 19:19
Andrew Weir were major players in Iraq between the wars as an outgrowth of their relationships with the oil industry in the Western Hemisphere (USA, Mexico and Venezuela).

Weir had 'general stores' in all major oil towns up the Tigris and Euphrates valleys and they initiated an airline, Bank Line Airways to connect all their business locations with headquarters in Basrah where they had a company compound on the banks of the Shatt el Arab. I sailed with a Marconi Sahib who had once been a radio operator on Bank Line Airways. The main route was Basrah - Kirkuk - Mosul.

They acted as ships agents for other companies as well as Bank Line and ran a fleet of fast service boats to service ships in the Shatt. Presumably they were also involved with supporting British military interests during WWII. At one time, Bank Boats were heavily involved with carrying wheat from Australia to Iraq.

Eventually they were awarded the Iraqi dates concession to market the annual dates harvest.

All this came crashing down when there was a revolution in Iraq, I think in the late 1940s. Brian Loads told me such was the Weir influence in Iraq that the revolution was held off for 24 hours at Weir's request so that all the Bank Line expatriates could get safely out of the country!

Roger Loads can tell us all more about this interesting and largely unknown part of the Weir enterprises what I write comes from Rodger and his late brother, Brian.

Thankyou Alister,a part of bank line history that I had not come across.

jim

Alistair Macnab
12th December 2010, 19:23
In addition to the more recent ports of New York, Sydney, Hong Kong, Calcutta and Durban, Bank Line placed superintendents at other less well-known locations for various reasons. Here are a few of them:

West Africa:
Captain Andoe was sent out to Lagos, Nigeria in the early 1920s to support the French subsidiary, Venture Weir et Cie.

Arabian Gulf:
See separate thread of Weir's involvement with Iraq.

San Francisco:
Captain Gay was sent to California to manage the ship operations of Union Oil of California, at that time, a Weir major interest. As far as I can tell, this activity was at its height from about 1913 to 1936.

Singapore:
Mr Alan Wright, was sent to Singapore as Engineering Superintendent to oversee a series of drydockings there during the 1970s.

Rabaul, New Guinea:
Captain John Mackenzie was sent, first of all to Port Moresby then to Rabaul to superintend Bank Line operations in the Western Pacific. This was from the late 1960s to early in the 1980s. He was succeeded by Captain Alan Macgregor then by Captain Dave Vincent who can probably shed some more light on this matter.

Shanghai:
Bank Line (China) Ltd in Hong Kong was originally located in Shanghai where John Penn's father was located. John is known more nowadays for his connection as Director of the Hong Kong and Sydney offices of Bank Line but until the Glorious Revolution in the 1950s Bank Line had a very active office in China's main commercial city.

New Orleans:
To assist Captain Broadley in the New York office as U.S. Gulf calls were becoming more frequent and the liner services to Australia and New Zealand were developing away from neo-bulks into general cargo, a Marine Superintendent was appointed in New Orleans to look after the Gulf ports. The first appointment was Captain Brian Loads in about 1965-1966. He was followed by Captain Alistair Macnab in 1968 then by Captain Mike Ward in 1972

Houston:
With the gradual change over from New Orleans to Houston as the main loading port for Australasia, Captain John Shaw was assigned to Houston as Assistant Marine Superintendent in 1977. The Houston office became the USA office of the Bank and Savill Line also in 1977 when Captain Macnab moved from New York to Houston when the New York agency, Boyd Weir & Sewell became a controlled subsidiary of Bank Line in London along with United Baltic's rubber trading.

Weirs also had commercial interests in Rangoon (rice), Ocala Florida (real estate and phosphate) and Salisbury Rhodesia (building society).
All of the foregoing is yet an unwritten chapter in the Bank Line Story that is laid out in the Directory section of SN. It will be written when more detail in obtained.

Alan Rawlinson
12th December 2010, 20:14
The Loads boys were the sons of the Bank Line Marine Superintendent in Basrah. Brian Loads, the elder, was eventually promoted to Assistant Marine Superintendent in New Orleans in about 1966 but was hospitalized in 1968 and was retired in the following year when his illness proved incurable. I was his successor late in 1968.
Rodger Loads was the younger brother who was also in Bank Line. He went ashore before reaching Master and was in the insurance business in the UK. He often attends Bank Line Reunions but I notice he was not at the latest one this year.

Alistair, Please help...

I have vivid memories of loading oil in the Gulf ports through the night when we visited on the Southbank in 1961.

A Super came down from N.Y. ( I thought) and felt sure it was a Capt. Rodger Loads, but obviously not. Any clues??
( Maybe Rodger was seconded ashore when he was mate to assist due to short staffing)

He was a pleasant guy, who got stuck in himself with closing manhole lids and taking ullages etc. We sat in the old man's cabin with a beer poring over the capacity plans for the deeptanks....

The joys of visiting the Gulf Ports.

Alistair Macnab
13th December 2010, 04:31
Captain Andoe was Marine Superintendent in New York for many years and was eventually replaced by Captain Bob Broadley in the early 1960s. He was assisted by the Engineer Superintendent in NY, Joe Colahan who was replaced by Roddie McLeod in about 1970 but located in New Orleans.

Everyone, of course, got home leave from time to time, so there may have been others in the USA that I don't know. I do know that Captain Brian Rodgers did a relieving job one year before he went to the London office to understudy and eventually replace Captain David Gale as Chief Marine Superintendent.

Incidentally, Roddie McLeod was replaced in New Orleans by Jiggs Brauen in about 1975 when Roddie went to the London office to eventually become Chief Engineer Superintendent.

Alan Rawlinson
13th December 2010, 07:49
Captain Andoe was Marine Superintendent in New York for many years and was eventually replaced by Captain Bob Broadley in the early 1960s. He was assisted by the Engineer Superintendent in NY, Joe Colahan who was replaced by Roddie McLeod in about 1970 but located in New Orleans.

Everyone, of course, got home leave from time to time, so there may have been others in the USA that I don't know. I do know that Captain Brian Rodgers did a relieving job one year before he went to the London office to understudy and eventually replace Captain David Gale as Chief Marine Superintendent.

Incidentally, Roddie McLeod was replaced in New Orleans by Jiggs Brauen in about 1975 when Roddie went to the London office to eventually become Chief Engineer Superintendent.

Thanks for that..

Think it must have been Brian Rodgers then.

Alistair Macnab
18th December 2010, 17:18
In my addition to this thread on December 12th. I forgot to mention Mr. E B Oliver who was on the management staff in Shanghai at the time of the Communist Revolution. He was arested and held in jail for some time before being sent out of the country. This was probably the incident that closed down Bank Line's Shanghai office and its setting up in Hong Kong.
Mr. Oliver subsequently was employed in the London office in an executive capacity until his early retirement in the early 1970s.