Clarke Champan enclosed steam winches

Shipbuilder
18th December 2010, 14:43
I was not sure whether this should be in engineering, or here. Finally decided to put it here because it is more a question of what the controls are.

Some time ago, a number of you helped me with details of this type of winch. I have now laboriously drawn plan view and side views. I am not an engineer, neither am I a draughstman, so hope you aren't too critical of my drawing skills or lack of them.

I needed these drawings simply to illustrate the appropriate section of a ship model building manuscript that I am writing and just want to make sure I haven't made any major gaffs in the various bits and pieces.

What is the blue lever on the side view? Is it the brake?
What is the turquoise circle next to the engine control lever (red) in the side view.

Bob

joebuckham
18th December 2010, 15:39
I was not sure whether this should be in engineering, or here. Finally decided to put it here because it is more a question of what the controls are.

Some time ago, a number of you helped me with details of this type of winch. I have now laboriously drawn plan view and side views. I am not an engineer, neither am I a draughstman, so hope you aren't too critical of my drawing skills or lack of them.

I needed these drawings simply to illustrate the appropriate section of a ship model building manuscript that I am writing and just want to make sure I haven't made any major gaffs in the various bits and pieces.

What is the blue lever on the side view? Is it the brake?
What is the turquoise circle next to the engine control lever (red) in the side view.

Bob
hi bob
the blue lever is indeed the foot brake
the lever that you have labelled "speed control" is the central barrel disengagement lever, and had two positions full left or full right and pinned secure
turquoise circle has me completely baffled, but still cogitating


fear not, your drawings are most professional

Shipbuilder
18th December 2010, 15:57
Hi Joe,
Thanks, I thought it was the brake. I got the Speed Conrol listing from a photograph of one of these winches in The Theory & Prcatice of Seamaship by Danton. However, I will change it to Barrel Disengagement Lever. I was wondering why the speed would need to be changed anyway and maybe my photograph is labeled wrongly.

The turquoise circle is actually on the other side of the winch It appears to be a solid cylinder and the arm of it extends down the side of the winch to the edge of the drum where there is a large nut on it, like it is pivotted. It reminds me of a counter-balance weight on tank access hatches.

Bob

Shipbuilder
18th December 2010, 16:05
On reading more on the specificiation, I see it is two speed. 6 tons at 140 feet per minute or 3 tons at 280 feet per minute. Not that it matters as far as a model winch is concerned, but just wondered.
Bob

Shipbuilder
18th December 2010, 16:13
Here is the turquoise part enlarged. On closer inspection, it looks hollow.
Bob

joebuckham
18th December 2010, 16:42
Here is the turquoise part enlarged. On closer inspection, it looks hollow.
Bob

i think that it is part and parcel of the braking system , to apply a similar weight on the opposite side to the foot lever

Billieboy
18th December 2010, 16:42
Good drawings Bob, at least 7/10 it'll be 8/10 when you've done the corrections on the, "speed controller". The six and three ton speeds were the standard for all dry cargo ships from about 1930 to 1970.

Shipbuilder
18th December 2010, 16:54
Thanks,
Joe,
Thanks, that makes sense.
Done them already. Here you are:
Bob

Supergoods
18th December 2010, 16:54
If I remember correctly from 50 years ago the balance weight is on the reversing shaft to reduce the effort needed for the reversing lever.

joebuckham
18th December 2010, 17:13
i think that it is part and parcel of the braking system , to apply a similar weight on the opposite side to the foot lever

coming back to me slowly, i think there was a strap brake on either side, both controlled together by the foot lever and the the weighted lever

chadburn
22nd December 2010, 15:02
Thinking back the balance weight was there to "release/clear" the brake band from the brake drum to prevent it sticking on when heated up.

joebuckham
22nd December 2010, 15:18
If I remember correctly from 50 years ago the balance weight is on the reversing shaft to reduce the effort needed for the reversing lever.

that really rattled the grey cells, i seem to remember the weight moving when the lever was used. it makes a lot more sense than my last post (#10) and looking at its position, relative to the reversing lever, it is more likely that they were internally connected across the "back" of the winch.

HALLLINE
11th January 2011, 13:57
It is balance weight on the valve gear. Item 624 in the Clarke Chapman parts book.
Dave

Billieboy
11th January 2011, 16:03
Talking Clarke Chapman winches, has anyone changed the, "Bull-wheel", on a standard, (open), deck winch? It has a square hole, no keyway, and is held/clamped onto the shaft by four, or eight inch and a quarter BSW bolts, as well as eight one inch BSW bolts along the wheel halves. I only ever did one, after some dockie in Texas broke one just on the last lift.

HALLLINE
11th January 2011, 20:32
Changed plenty of crank pins, on both enclosed and open winches, mostly in the UK. The dockies didn't bother with the steam valve, just used the reversing lever for stop/up/down !!.