world war 2 help wanted

tonymorcom
20th December 2010, 15:45
Can anyone tell me whether or not time was served at college during the war to obtain 2nd mates and 1st mates certs. The reason I ask is that whilst researching my uncles wartime career he appeared to be signed on board ship at both times whilst he was actually passing his tickets. Now, were they registered to ships whilst actually at college or did they not actually go to college.

Also I am intrigued by the fact that he qualified for 5 chevrons. How did this work and how were they displayed?

As ever any help much appreciated. I am trying to collate all this info before his widow "shuffles off this mortal coil"

Tony

kwg
1st January 2011, 11:34
Merchant seamen were entitled to War Service Chevrons as indicated below from the Times of Aug 4th 1943:

OTHER DECORATIONS
The King has also approved an emblem to denote mentions in dispatches, and wound stripes and chevrons for war service. Production of these may take some months. The dispatches emblem is in bronze, of a new pattern in the form of an oak leaf, and is to be worn on the coat immediately after the medal ribbons. The wound stripes of gold braid and chevrons of red will be awarded not only in the armed forces but also in the Merchant Navy, Civil Air Transport, police, the National Fire Service, specified civil defence services, the Fire Guard, and by nurses in Government or local authority hospitals, or in recognized voluntary hospitals.

Particulars are given in a White Paper [Cmd. 6463, price 1d.] issued yesterday, and obtainable at the Stationery Office or through any bookseller.


The Times August 2nd 1944.

SERVICE CHEVRONS

Service men and women need no longer wear service and wound chevrons. When the chevrons were first issued some time ago the wearing of them was made compulsory. Many of the men and women of the services, however, regarded them as unnecesary. Now, under a new ruling, it is to be left to the discretion of the individual whether they are worn or not.

Service chevrons are printed in red on a blue-grey background for wear with blue-grey uniform, and on a khaki background for wear with tropical uniform. One chevron will be worn for each completed year of service in the present war. Service in the Navy, Army, Home Guard, Police, N.F.T.S, Merchant Navy, Civil Defence organisations and other services to which the scheme applies may be aggregated with Air Force service for the award of chevrons. Chevrons are to be worn on the right forearm, apex uppermost, and, like wound stripes may be worn with plain clothes after discharge or transfer to the reserve.

tonymorcom
1st January 2011, 13:01
Thanks KWG, that's as complete a description as I have come across.

Stephen J. Card
1st January 2011, 16:47
Can anyone tell me whether or not time was served at college during the war to obtain 2nd mates and 1st mates certs. The reason I ask is that whilst researching my uncles wartime career he appeared to be signed on board ship at both times whilst he was actually passing his tickets. Now, were they registered to ships whilst actually at college or did they not actually go to college.


Tony


Reading a few old biographies I believe the way to pass a ticket was to do self study then attend one of the sea school to brush up for orals. It certainly wasn't a requirement to attend a recognised course of any particular duration. Even as late as 1979 when I sat for Class 1 Master FG I did not do the full six months at GCNS, but opted to sit early after three months. It meant a lot of late nights at the books but I got it.

Stephen

tonymorcom
1st January 2011, 17:47
Reading a few old biographies I believe the way to pass a ticket was to do self study then attend one of the sea school to brush up for orals. It certainly wasn't a requirement to attend a recognised course of any particular duration. Even as late as 1979 when I sat for Class 1 Master FG I did not do the full six months at GCNS, but opted to sit early after three months. It meant a lot of late nights at the books but I got it.

Stephen

Thanks Stephen, that seems to clear up that little anomoly so finally I believe I have completed my research into what he did and where he went. It still seems incredible that you can track someone's career from 65+ years ago just using the internet. I probably know more about him during that 7 year period than his family ever did at that time. Regards Tony

eldersuk
2nd January 2011, 00:25
There was no neccesity to attend college for tickets, you could study in your own time and 'put your papers in' for the exam when you thought you were ready.

Most of the income of the colleges was from people who kidded themselves that they would study in their spare time at sea and turn up for the exam fully primed and ready to accept the congratulations of the examiner for being an engineering (or navigating) genius. I never, never, never met anyone who succeeded beyond the first time the bar opened (and I count myself among them) but I will now be deluged by posts from people for whom this method was successful, and I admire them beyond measure because I could never do it.

Derek