mv British Navigator

John_F
29th November 2005, 09:28
On 29th May, 1964, the British Navigator, 8520 dwt, was involved in a collision in the Thames Estuary. I remember seeing her limping in to Grain later that day. She was in ballast, I believe, & came in to Grain to complete gas freeing. She was regarded by the Company as a CTL & went straight to the scrapyard in Bruges.
Does anyone know the story of this collision, which other vessel was involved & who was to blame?

Patalavaca
27th December 2005, 11:38
Ahoy John,
this has me intrigued as I have never heard about this collison before so, I have just checked through " Marine News" for 1964 & found no reference to this incident.

Although Marine News is not necessarily authoritative, it is usually spot on with news and info.

Interestingly, there is a report of her being sold to Belgian 'breakers and arviving at Bruges on 22/06/1964.

I will ask a friend , a former BP Captain .. if he doesn't know then who will ?

Regards,
Patalavaca

John_F
27th December 2005, 16:27
Patalavaca,
Much appreciated - almost given up hope of further info. I know the date of the collision is correct as I wrote a letter home on the same day, after seeing her come into Grain. I was 3/0 on the Trust at the time & we were loading in Grain for the Baltic. My mother kept all my letters home which was a good follow on from the Journal that we had to keep as apprentices. Am in the process of transferring all the contents of my Journal & letters home to CD for my kids benefit (tho' they show scant interest at the moment!)
Kind regards,
John.

Patalavaca
23rd June 2006, 11:45
John,
sorry for the delay in responding - I did in fact ask Captain Stuart Le Fevre ( remember him ?) , now retired , if he had any knowledge of the incident and , alas , he didn't !

I tried !

Best wishes, Rick

John_F
23rd June 2006, 15:53
Rick,
Many thanks for trying anyway.
I certainly knew of Stuart Le Fevre when I was with BP but our paths never crossed. Does he live down in Devon? I think he took over from Ronald Marsh as Marine Super in charge of Navigating Apprentices but that was after I had left.
Thanks once again Rick.
Kind regards,
John.

rushie
24th June 2006, 12:29
Hi John,

Stuart lives in Honiton apparently and is keen to assist with my monstrous task of memories, anecdotes etc.

Whilst briefly on that subject....who was the BP Master who used to appear on the bridge at night wearing a "ladies" nightdress..? Used to scare the hell out of my old man whilst on watch..!!

Cheers,

Rushie

John_F
24th June 2006, 18:24
Rushie,

First I've heard of him (her). Any idea what era that was?
Whilst talking of night attire, I used to wear a 'longhi' whilst at sea in bed & still have it to this day (although my wife keeps threatening to throw it out). Several mates & engineers used to wear them during warm weather, as well as the Indian crew. You don't think that this has become confused with a nightie do you?
Kind regards,
John.

rushie
25th June 2006, 09:13
Hi John,

According to my mum it was definitely a ladies nightie.! Enough to make a grown man shake with fear..!

Rushie

gadgee
25th June 2006, 17:32
John
Yes - Captain P.Waller used to walk around on the bridge of the Kiwi in a longhi whilst I was on her!

John_F
25th June 2006, 20:57
John
Yes - Captain P.Waller used to walk around on the bridge of the Kiwi in a longhi whilst I was on her!Paul,
There you go - Captain Waller & I were a street ahead of David Beckham & his sari! I still do not own a pair of pyjamas to this day & if protocol requires me to look decent in the bedroom (in a hotel for example, when room service is expected) then I take my trusty longhi with me. I still get funny looks!
Kind regards,
John.

richardc
25th June 2006, 21:18
Paul,
I sailed with Capt Waller on the Merlin in '72, my last trip, and he must have given up the habit by then. Mind you we were coasting, UK - NW Europe all trip, so it would have been a bit cool around the dangly bits with just a longhi on. In fairness I didn't see much of him on the bridge, he gave everybody a bit of space, much appreciated I must admit.
I'm like John, don't possess a pair of pyjamas and don't see the need for a pair, lost the longhi years ago though so I use a large bath towel these days. Beckham and co are years behind in the fashion stakes!! I wonder how many other SN members also wore/still wear longhis or similar.
Regards,
Richard.

macjack
26th June 2006, 08:19
I wonder how many other SN members also wore/still wear longhis or similar.
Regards,
Richard.[/QUOTE]
Richard,
Yup, started wearing "Lunghi" Lungi / Dhoti
Traditional men's clothing in India consists solely of a lungi or dhoti. A lungi is a short length of material worn around the thighs like a sarong, while a dhoti is simply a longer lungi with an extra piece of material drawn up between the legs. in final year of apprenticeship (u/c 3/o) on Indian crew ship (BP) had three in fact, really comfortable, especially up the Gulf and around their country of origin. Also slept on deck, on a wooden contraption that had a sort of canvas hammock arrangement did have correct name cannot for the life of me recall - anyone?
Mac.

gadgee
26th June 2006, 21:14
Richard
Sailed with Capt Waller on the Kiwi in 1969 - the warmer parts of our trip were Mombasa, Port Sudan, Aden,Sattahip(Thailand), BMashur, Djibouti, Assab, Massawa so a longhi was appreciated there!! I also possessed one in my BP days but got rid of it long ago.


QUOTE=richardc]Paul,
I sailed with Capt Waller on the Merlin in '72, my last trip, and he must have given up the habit by then. Mind you we were coasting, UK - NW Europe all trip, so it would have been a bit cool around the dangly bits with just a longhi on. Richard.[/QUOTE]

Graham Wallace
30th June 2006, 05:37
I wonder how many other SN members also wore/still wear longhis or similar.
Regards,
Richard.
Richard,
Yup, started wearing "Lunghi" Lungi / Dhoti
Traditional men's clothing in India consists solely of a lungi or dhoti. A lungi is a short length of material worn around the thighs like a sarong, while a dhoti is simply a longer lungi with an extra piece of material drawn up between the legs. in final year of apprenticeship (u/c 3/o) on Indian crew ship (BP) had three in fact, really comfortable, especially up the Gulf and around their country of origin. Also slept on deck, on a wooden contraption that had a sort of canvas hammock arrangement did have correct name cannot for the life of me recall - anyone?
Mac.[/QUOTE]

Mac
I remember the longi's, very comfortable. However despised the flip flops , to this day cannot abide them
Graham

R651400
4th July 2006, 11:29
Also slept on deck, on a wooden contraption that had a sort of canvas hammock arrangement did have correct name cannot for the life of me recall - anyone?

Could it be charpoy?
On the Far East run slept in Malay/Indonesian style sarong also very cool and comfortable. Still tie my bathtowel in the way I was shown with a sarong.
Malcolm

Pilot mac
4th July 2006, 14:14
Lunghi? Doti? Sarong? you are all so cosmopilitan! Whats wrong with the 'Brockelbank Kilt'

regards
Dave

Mick farmer
3rd August 2006, 13:52
Hi John,

Stuart lives in Honiton apparently and is keen to assist with my monstrous task of memories, anecdotes etc.

Whilst briefly on that subject....who was the BP Master who used to appear on the bridge at night wearing a "ladies" nightdress..? Used to scare the hell out of my old man whilst on watch..!!

Cheers,

Rushie

Rushie

I think it was Capt Cartwright he also painted his toenails your dad and me

could hardly contain ourselves when first confronted by this

Cheers

Mick

ps good to hear about Stuart Lefevres whereabouts

pete
3rd August 2006, 17:55
Having swallowed the anchor in '86 I still wear my Longhi during really hot spells,(like recently) Very comfortable, plenty of "Air Flow" and not easy for other people to pull off?????...............pete

rushie
3rd August 2006, 21:27
Must have been a sight to behold on watch in the middle of the night....!!

Can you recall which ship / ships you were on with my dad at all.?

Cheers Mick,

Rushie

John Tremelling
3rd August 2006, 22:20
I still wear a Sarong when relaxing in the house, or in this weather in the garden, when required to look decent. Used to get odd looks from the postie or my near neighbours in my little Welsh village. Often wear a kilt when required to look more formal as well, never could abide itchy sweaty bits!!!! Not yet tried ladies nighties though.

John T

Mick farmer
4th August 2006, 16:03
Must have been a sight to behold on watch in the middle of the night....!!

Can you recall which ship / ships you were on with my dad at all.?

Cheers Mick,

Rushie


I was on the British Ardour with your dad I left it to get married

Cheers

Mick

ronald pearson
22nd June 2008, 18:46
Just found ships nostalgia; I had a happy time on the Br. Navigator in the late 50s. We were on the Norwegian coast filling up bunker depots for trawlers ( we had a fleet those days ). I have had my wife up to the North Cape recently on a cruise ( Black Watch ) to show how beautiful it was . P.S. Do not go in Jan...

kevin1506
24th June 2008, 22:10
hi was with bp from 1974 to 79 from deck boy to gp1

kevin from hull

red devil
23rd December 2008, 15:48
Capt. S.A.N. Le Ferve signed my Indentures in 1969!

arfabuck
24th December 2008, 21:37
Bought my first lungi in Bombay for 10 rupees on the Flag - 1965. There were two 'agents' vying with each other for the sale, similar names and until recently could remember both. Now forgotten.
A red checkered affair that the cook finally consigned to the fire when the gonads started to show through and her mother refused to visit again until I got rid of said item of clothing.
NOT a happy day in our marriage!
Art

John_F
24th December 2008, 21:50
Hi Art,
Could these have been Ganoomal or Gerimal? I still have the odd item of clothing from one or the other, both of whom used to tout for business on BP Tankers?
Kind regards,
John.

Hamish Mackintosh
24th December 2008, 22:11
Still waiting to find out about the collision?

eriskay
24th December 2008, 23:12
Stuart Le Fevre was Chief Officer, under Captain R. L. Friendship, on my first ship in 1964 - British Power. Remember them as great characters and fine seamen.

Angus Mac Kinnon

John_F
25th December 2008, 00:05
Still waiting to find out about the collision?
Hamish,
Yes - very much so but it can wait till after Christmas! Have a good one!
Kind regards,
John.

arfabuck
25th December 2008, 01:22
Hi Art,
Could these have been Ganoomal or Gerimal? I still have the odd item of clothing from one or the other, both of whom used to tout for business on BP Tankers?
Kind regards,
John.
Spot on! Wish I had a memory like yours aye.

Art

richardc
27th December 2008, 19:00
Angus,
Seems like we may have sailed together on the Power. I joined her at Grain in October 64 as a first trip N/App and left May 65 at drydock on the Tyne for repairs.
Good bunch on board from what I remember, shame about the Gulf - Aden trips really.
Regards,
Richard.

Hamish Mackintosh
28th December 2008, 00:07
Hamish,
Yes - very much so but it can wait till after Christmas! Have a good one!
Kind regards,
John.

Thank You John!
And to you "lang may yer lum Reek""

eriskay
29th December 2008, 00:39
Hi, Richard :

That's right, I joined on 20th October 1964 as first-trip J/E according to my 'Book', and she came back to the Tyne on 4th May 1965. I rejoined her after drydock (on 14th May 1965) and finally signed off at Wilhelmshaven on 19th September 1965. After Captain Friendship, it was Captain Mitchenson, if I recall correctly.

Agree the Gulf - Aden 'milk runs' were not something to look forward to. I have particularly bad memories of Aden, as I lost a good friend whilst we were alongside the discharge berth at Aden, the ship's Bosun, who hailed from Braes, Isle of Skye, a fellow-Hebridean. He was found alongside, between the Jetty and the ship's side, drowned. Had been on his last trip prior to retirement. This occurred when I was serving for a second time on the 'Power', by this time as 4/E, on 12th March 1967.

Took me quite some time to get over that experience, not a day to be forgotten.

Left the 'Power' in Newcastle, 18th April 1967 and was just to do one more stint, by now as 3/E, on the 'Industry', from July - November 1967, after which I was invalided out pending results of medical checks. As they would not accept me back on the marine payroll until I had 100% medical clearance, which was proving a bit of a problem, I took what I thought was a temporary shoreside job and am still in it today - 40 years later !

Enjoyed my time at sea, thought BPTC were an excellent company, would not have missed it for anything !

Incidentally, my outstanding memory of Captain Friendship and XC/O Stuart Le Fevre was their passion, and competitiveness, for table-tennis matches in the midship area between the P & S alleyway doors! I have to say they were very accomplished players too, they never lost too many, Stuart with his flamboyant cravat and Captain Friendship with his "go on, just dare, just dare beat me ...." look! Good fun and happy days.

Angus Mac Kinnon

gadgee
30th December 2008, 21:01
Sailed with Ronnie Friendship on British Argosy Feb to June 1968 when he was Commodore and I was third trip Deck Cadet. I can still picture him now - small stature, a gentleman and always polite.

Minto
30th December 2008, 22:38
Please bear with me! I was a BP company man (eventually) & want to know how you include the funnel on your sign.

richardc
2nd January 2009, 19:41
Hi Angus,
I remember the table tennis matches, fortunately I wasn't very good so was never in any danger of winning. I seem to remember we had to attend a sunday morning weighing session on the butchers scales to make sure we all kept trim. As the N/Apps daily work was holystoning there was no chance of getting fat. From what I remember the senior N/App had a bowel problem and was always being given 'black draught' by Ronnie in an attempt to make him move. It never worked and I think he eventually ended up having a 'flush out' at the hospital in Aden!
Did you leave at the annual drydock on the Tyne in Feb 65 and rejoin at the next visit in May 65? We broke adrift from the buoys in Port Said while attempting to moor up in a gale in April 65 on the way back to the Gulf from Milazzo and damaged the prop or rudder or both. When we got into the Red Sea we stopped and the Mate went over the side to have a look, not too successfully I seem to remember. We loaded in the Gulf, discharged at Grain and went back to Palmers for repairs, where I left.
The Power was a good ship then with a good bunch on board. I got on very well with Ronnie Friendship as he originally came from Torquay I think and I was from Exeter, just up the road!
Didn't we used to spend a fair few evenings singing Irish songs in the 4th Engineers cabin?
Regards,
Richard.

eriskay
2nd January 2009, 21:01
Hallo, again, Richard :

Yes - the Sunday morning weigh-ins was Captain Friendship's idea, with veiled threats that all and sundry should participate, even though he personally would be the main beneficiary from any dietary procedures!

When coming off the 12:4 in the early hours, we used to visit the midships pantry to get a sannie or two that had been left out for us for consumption before crashing. On a couple of occasions when calling the watch around 03:30 hours I caught Captain Friendship raiding OUR pantry ... ! Whilst he looked guilty and abashed, he was not too abashed to warn me that this nocturnal weakness of his should not become public knowledge, as he was supposed to be slimming, and that if the word did get out, he would know from where it had originated!

Always recall an incident up at the swimming pool one day where he appeared suddenly from nowhere. I was the only other one up there at the time and was over near the E.R. Skylights, which were 'screwed open'. Looking down below on to the top of the turbine and gearing casings, he became wistful and said something along the lines "Young man, don't you think it is simply incredible how mankind has evolved to a point where he can create and manufacture something like that steam plant below us, capable of driving a 42,000 DWT vessel through the sea at 16 knots, sophisticated turbines whirring round at goodness knows how many RPM, huge gearwheels meshing perfectly - isn't man's ingenuity and the achievements of our engineering brethern just breathtaking? "

Naturally, being one of that lowly breed, I agreed wholeheartedly. In fact perhaps too wholeheartedly, as he followed this up with " Now then, this converstaion never took place, one word from you and I shall deny everything, and you shall find yourself in a little bit of bother, do you follow me?" All delivered with that impish grin of his, of course.

"Yes, Sir!" I replied. He might have been a wee fellah but he was the boss and I was certainly not going to use this interesting little exchange in the ever-present 'oil and water' conflicts that arose from time to time! Okay, call me a poltroon!

Another fine memory of the man was at the time we were in drydock on the Tyne, 1965, my Father's ship was somewhere else on the East coast, and I asked Captain Friendship for permission to have my Father on board for the evening and a night, as we never saw much of each other being both away at sea. He agreed right away, and than when he learned my old man was also a Master Mariner he couldn't do enough to make his visit and stay most enjoyable. In fact he insisted that he have the Owner's room that night, lap of luxury! Aye, you deckies stick together ... !

In answer to your question - no, I was signed off 11 February 1965, signed back on 26 February 1965, signed off 4 May 1965, signed back on 14 May 1965, then finally discharged 19 September 1965 at Wilhelmshaven.

One of my ships, but I didn't think it was the 'Power', more likely the 'Justice', broke her moorings at Port Said in a whole gale, even the 3 or 4 tugs couldn't hold her, and if I recall correctly the 2nd Mate, who I think was Irish and was located aft tending the last wire that was still holding, had his leg badly damaged - if not actually removed - when the wire broke and he had to be put ashore for urgent medical attention. As I say, I thought that was on the 'Justice' (Captain Pugh) in 1966, but now I'm wondering if in fact it was the 'Power' as you have described a similar incident in the same location?

Was the 4/E in question a ginger-haired lad from Clayton-le-Moor, or somewhere that sounded like that, in the County Durham area? If so, I was his J/E and many a time he came down the worse for wear which meant I had to 'learn the ropes' even faster than normal as he was in no fit state much of the time. I lost him once and all I found was his clogs laid out neatly on the plates, near the turbo-feed pumps. I eventually found him fast asleep in a pile of cotton waste up in the steering flat - sans footwear, of course !

They say we Scots are hard to understand at times, but that lad's accent and grammar were something else, but I liked him, and hope life has been kind to him.

Regards / Angus

eriskay
3rd January 2009, 20:37
Another memory of the 'Power', although I cannot be sure of dates now, was the time we were doing a run from the Gulf down to Santos and called in at Durban for bunkers. After taking bunkers, we were warming through at around 05:00 hrs, ready for going on Standby to resume our passage, I was the 4:8 J/E along with the big 3/E (Londoner) and had just started doing my rounds, leaving the Third up on the manoeuvring platform warming through every five minutes, when I heard this almighty thump.

The reverberation through the hull structure, emanating from the aft end, was as though something had run into our stern. Having only just recently started warming through, I wondered if something might have found its way under our stern and got thumped by the propeller. Agreed with the Third to shoot up top and have a gander over the stern. Nothing there, all clear. Went down below again via aft hatch and down to the stern gland area. Shock .. horror .... aft plummer block top half wedged between where it should be and the ship's side, the cast iron crack right across with bolts still in place. Shot off to tell the Third, who made his way down to see it for himself then instructed me to go back up topside and put the Chief on the shake and tell him what had happened.

Notwithstanding my natural deference to my superior, but well aware of the stentorian demeanour of that Chief, I suggested it might be better if the bad news came from the senior officer of the watch. He declined this proposal on the grounds the SOOTW was not allowed to leave the E.R. during watchkeeping hours. (Likely story, I thought, but off I went and duly put the Chief - O'Donnell, I think - on the shake)

Cut a long story short, we were 'stuck' in Durban (yippee!)for about five days whilst the aft plummer block was removed and, with no small amount of bother, taken ashore to be metalocked and brought back / reinstated. The repaired bearing was still there when I left the ship, many months and thousands of sea miles later, good job well done.

Apparently the cause was the sliding lubricator mechanism, at low RPM such as when warming through, did not lubricate the top half of the shaft and bearing adequately, causing a dry friction that allowed the bearing/shaft to 'seize' and the cast iron housing became the weak point and just sheared in two. I heard much later that a similar thing had happened on another '42' down in Australia, but Head Office had not issued any alert or precautionary warning to other marine staff of that incident, so for a while we throught we had created some sort of precedent.

From then, however, at least on the 'Power', we adopted the habit of pouring oil physically over the journal, through the lubicator cover plate, on all plummer blocks, during warming through period. The excess L.O. would be drained off periodically and poured back in to the bearing again, ad nauseum, until such time as we were under way when we could be sure the design lubrication system functional and reliable. Naturally this chore became a J/E task !

Minto
3rd January 2009, 22:21
This is to ERISKAY. Just read your memories & it triggered my memory of joining British Argosy when . Friendship took over from Charlie Colborn as commodore of the fleet. Just checked discharge book 24/11/67 Angle Bay.

Minto

richardc
6th January 2009, 19:27
Angus,
The Power was definitely blown off the mooring buoys in Port Said, which is why we ended up back at Palmers on the Tyne for repairs. The 2nd Mate was Irish, name of Cecil Briggs, tall chap and very friendly from what I remember. I don't remember him damaging his leg in the incident and I was on the poop with him at the time. It was quite a performance, especially when the ropes started parting. It was surprising that the Port Said mooring crew weren't injured as they were on the buoys attaching the ropes and the ship was being blown downwind and the buoys kept sinking in the gusts.
I think you're right about the 4th being ginger haired, but I can't remember where he came from. The 3rd was Sandy Toft? who did a mean rendition of Mac the knife I seem to remember.
Regards,
Richard.

Pat Kennedy
6th January 2009, 20:03
Isnt it very strange that nobody has any memory of this collision which caused a ship to be 'written off'?
I posted a similar query a while back concerning an incident in the sixties when the Anchor Line Circassia ploughed into the Blue Funnel Jason alongside in the Clyde, putting her in drydock for six weeks.
Nobody remembered anything about it! You begin to doubt your own memories.
Regards,
Pat

John_F
7th January 2009, 16:02
"The 3rd was Sandy Toft? who did a mean rendition of Mac the knife I seem to remember.
Regards,
Richard."

Hi Richard,
Did you mean Sandy Tosh? I sailed with Sandy on the Glory when he was a first trip Eng. App. I heard recently that he rose to Chief but not sure whether he stayed with BP. There is a photo in the SN gallery:
http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/showphoto.php?photo=2269
Sandy is sitting on the extreme left.
Kind regards,
John.

richardc
8th January 2009, 19:26
Hi John,
Yes you are right it was indeed Sandy Tosh, a nice chap from what I remember and good on the guitar.
Regards,
Richard.

Graham Wallace
9th January 2009, 21:47
Alexander Duncan Tosh 1956 E/A, obtained Chief's Steam ticket 1965. I have no record of his later BP ships. I have never come across him but have a 1989 address in Oz.

By the way John great photo of the Glory Apprentices, any chance of a copy.
I have come across JS Thompson( another 1956 intake) he became BP C/E 1969. That was fast!

Graham Wallace
Graham Wallace

JohnBP
9th January 2009, 22:48
Never worn them, afraid of being approached....

RAF
24th January 2009, 16:20
Just joined the forum so a late comment re British Navigator.

At the time of the collision I was a first trip Deck apprentice onboard.
The Master was Capt. A Mcmillan Ch/Off D.C.Dalton we werer returning to the Isle of Grain from one of our regular trips to Copenhagen.
From my journal I record that we were to undergo a steelwork inspection instead of going to drydock. The tank bulkheads and deck plating were in quite a wasted state even though the ship was only 11 years old.

The ship was approaching the Nore anchorage in thick fog when we were in collision with a small coastal tankerthe "Pass of Melfort" which was going astern to drop her anchor on the edge of the channel. The bow of the Pass of Melfort contacted the "Navigator" just ford of the midships accomodation on the port side, splitting the shear strake an setting back 26 frames down the port side.
The collision happend about 0400 - 0500 hrs, eventhough my cabin was on the port side being a tired 17 yearold I slept right through the whole affair !

We spent about three weeks on the buoys off Sheerness and then the ship was towed away by Belgium ship breakers. there was a good chance that she would has been scraped in any case.

RAF

John_F
24th January 2009, 19:49
Just joined the forum so a late comment re British Navigator.

At the time of the collision I was a first trip Deck apprentice onboard.
The Master was Capt. A Mcmillan Ch/Off D.C.Dalton we werer returning to the Isle of Grain from one of our regular trips to Copenhagen.
From my journal I record that we were to undergo a steelwork inspection instead of going to drydock. The tank bulkheads and deck plating were in quite a wasted state even though the ship was only 11 years old.

The ship was approaching the Nore anchorage in thick fog when we were in collision with a small coastal tankerthe "Pass of Melfort" which was going astern to drop her anchor on the edge of the channel. The bow of the Pass of Melfort contacted the "Navigator" just ford of the midships accomodation on the port side, splitting the shear strake an setting back 26 frames down the port side.
The collision happend about 0400 - 0500 hrs, eventhough my cabin was on the port side being a tired 17 yearold I slept right through the whole affair !

We spent about three weeks on the buoys off Sheerness and then the ship was towed away by Belgium ship breakers. there was a good chance that she would has been scraped in any case.

RAF
RAF,
Welcome to the site.
At last - I was beginning to think that I had dreamed the whole episode. Many thanks for bringing this thread to a succesful conclusion.
I'm not surprised that you didn't wake up when the collision occurred. As a first trip apprentice at 17 & thrown in at the deep end coasting on the Navigator, you must have felt pretty n-ck-r-d!
Was blame ever apportioned to either party?
Many thanks once again for the information.
Kind regards,
John.

Patalavaca
24th January 2009, 20:07
Welcome to the site RAF, a very big thank you for resolving the mystery and adding first hand detail to the ship's history.
( I was beginning to think that John F. had lost his marbles and imagined the entire event ....(EEK) )
AS the collision took place in 1964, it was the 1961 built 'Pass of Melfort' that was involved. This vessel has not been reported as broken up and may still be trading somewhere. Here she is :-
http://www.photoship.co.uk/JAlbum%20Ships/Old%20Ships%20P/slides/Pass%20of%20Melfort-01.html
Regards, Rick

RAF
25th January 2009, 12:36
John,

Cannot remember who was to blame though I was pretty innocent of these matters in my formative years.

Rgds

RAF

John_F
25th January 2009, 18:28
RAF,
Doesn't really matter now, does it?
Many, many thanks though for your information (& for proving to Rick that I hadn't lost my marbles after all!!)
Kind regards,
John.