cook book

chrisor
25th December 2010, 20:36
hi every body,in the late 60s i took my 2nd cook and bakers ticket i also had to buy a cook book to do the course.it has been so long now that i have lost my book but would like to get another. but, cant even remember the name of it.if anyone can remember it it would be most appreciated..thank you

len mazza
26th December 2010, 03:36
The one I had to buy at Ensign St.School was/is Practical Cookery by
Ceserani and Kinton,first names,Victor and Ronald,respectively.Published by
Edward Arnold,an excellent book,I still use it,it sits in my kitchen within arms length,hope that is of some help.

chrisor
26th December 2010, 15:07
thanks len.lent mine to a woman who then said i didnt hence the word "lost".but has always been the best cook book i have ever had

muldonaich
26th December 2010, 18:52
was it the nautical cookery bookfor the use of stewards and cooks on cargo vessels by ch atkinson price then 4/6 god knows what you would pay for one nowbrgds kev.

calvin
26th December 2010, 19:01
theres a firm called clarksons do fots of old ships and loads books they may have the one you looking for

Monket
26th December 2010, 19:03
http://stores.ebay.co.uk/Goldstone-Books/_i.html?_nkw=practical+cookery&submit=Search&_sid=68762990

ALAN TYLER
27th December 2010, 12:29
Sadly also lent my Cesarini & Kinton and never got it back!!!

Nick Balls
27th December 2010, 13:47
Published by Edward Arnolds , you might still get this book pretty easily as it was widely used in many colleges. We have a copy in our kitchen originally from the local tech.
In fact http://www.amazon.co.uk/Practical-Cookery-Victor-Ceserani/dp/0713118539 Highly recommended

Bridie
27th December 2010, 20:30
Is this the one ;)
Nautical Cookery Book - 1928 (http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/data/501/CookBook.jpg)

Burned Toast
28th December 2010, 10:48
Is this the one ;)
Nautical Cookery Book - 1928 (http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/data/501/CookBook.jpg)

That's the one(Applause) Must dig mine out also got the C/K book.

Ray

Nick Balls
28th December 2010, 11:05
Brilliant! I would love to have a copy of that!

chrisor
28th December 2010, 19:17
dont think that was the one i had, the only thing i really remember is that without its cover it was a green hardback {couldnt get get less helpful if i tried could i }

Pat Kennedy
28th December 2010, 19:27
And does this nautical cookery book have full instructions on the production of those rubber fried eggs we used to get on every ship I was ever on.
Pat(Jester)

Billieboy
28th December 2010, 19:28
In 1962 the Cook's ticket book in Cardiff was Pellaprat. I was lucky(?) to find a Dutch translation in 1970, I learned to cook and to read Dutch whilst using it. I gave it to my son last year.

Bridie
28th December 2010, 19:55
And does this nautical cookery book have full instructions on the production of those rubber fried eggs we used to get on every ship I was ever on.
Pat(Jester)
or the so called "salad" left out for the watches during the night.
Corned dog, pickled beetroot and onions on an enamel tray, usually placed in the hottest part of the crew messroom.

Pat Kennedy
28th December 2010, 20:30
or the so called "salad" left out for the watches during the night.
Corned dog, pickled beetroot and onions on an enamel tray, usually placed in the hottest part of the crew messroom.

Bridie,
On some ships, that was the only sustenance that was edible.
On one ship, we lived on cheese on toast, and visits to the nearest chippie when in port.
Regards,
Pat(Thumb)

John Callon
28th December 2010, 20:57
The cook book you are referring to is Practical Cookery by Ceserani and Kinton with contributions by Professor David Foskett. I bought mine from Amazon 3 years ago and it was 10th edition, cost just over GBP20.00 - ISBN 0-340--81147-1 and is published by Hodder Arnold. Have to say it is nothing like the copy I had in the 60's when I took the Chief Cooks ticket in Liverpool but nevertheless would recommend the newer version to anybody.

len mazza
28th December 2010, 22:29
Just taken the plastic and paper covers from my C@K book,first time
since purchase in 1963,and sure enough the hardback cover is green,
Live and learn.!.

len mazza
28th December 2010, 23:00
I told a schoolmate of my who was in the RN what was put out for
supper on a 'Joe Shell job and he couldn't believe it,we were eating
five star according to him.It must have been cronic feeding in the RN.back in the day!.

Burned Toast
29th December 2010, 10:41
Brilliant! I would love to have a copy of that!

Brown & Ferguson were the stockists for the nautical Cookery Book, if the no longer keep them may be worth while emailing the marine college that do the ships cooks course, to see if they have any for sale.

Ray

Burned Toast
29th December 2010, 10:43
or the so called "salad" left out for the watches during the night.
Corned dog, pickled beetroot and onions on an enamel tray, usually placed in the hottest part of the crew messroom.

Naa Spam or pilchards shame(Applause)(Applause)

jg grant
31st December 2010, 07:10
Hi I lost my C&K while attending Castlehill catering college Edinburgh. Turns out someone in my class put it in the oven and the next class found it burnt. I have Saulniers repertoire known as the bible but forty something years later I found a C&K edition in the hospice shop North shore Auckland. For me it's one of the best. No fancy pictures or poncy dishes just good workable recipes. I found it the day after I retired! Regards and I hope Santa was good to you all and the new year will be good for you too. Sorry to hear of the weather in UK< it's all cold beer and bikinis here. Ronnie

spongebob
31st December 2010, 08:37
or the so called "salad" left out for the watches during the night.
Corned dog, pickled beetroot and onions on an enamel tray, usually placed in the hottest part of the crew messroom.


Bridie, on our little banana boat trading between NZ and the Pacific
Islands the menu listed "salad in season" whenever there was little flare in the fare and then it was usually coarse looking beetroot and large onion rings.
There was no excuse for it as good salad vegetables were cheap and in ample supply in the Islands so I chose to mark the menus by striking out the ambiguous description and writing in the description of the unappetizing facts,
Chief Steward complained to the Old Man and Bob got a bollocking because the menus were sent into head office at the end of each voyage. I can still see that rough fodder after fifty plus years.

Bob

Butters
1st January 2011, 02:50
Hi Bob ,
I remember the good old 'salad in season', and recall beetroot and onion rings, tomato and onion rings , sliced cucumber & tomato & the speciality on the 'WAIMEA', al la Tammie - Sliced cucumber & tomato with tinned peas - juice and all .

The cook book people are asking about is available from Amazon - 1928 copy a little expensive but the 1960 reprint abot thirty four pound.

Rgds.
Lindsay

alan ward
15th October 2011, 09:47
In 1962 the Cook's ticket book in Cardiff was Pellaprat. I was lucky(?) to find a Dutch translation in 1970, I learned to cook and to read Dutch whilst using it. I gave it to my son last year.

snap,my boys got mine as well,also my old granton and a couple of sabatiers I bought in Marseilles 1974 why don`t they buy their bloody own?

Pat McCardle
15th October 2011, 10:44
Is this the one ;)
Nautical Cookery Book - 1928 (http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/data/501/CookBook.jpg)

Just add salt!!

Mike Evans
2nd December 2011, 13:10
The instigator of this could not be the Pat McCardle of the Sig Ragne ?(Denholms)1974. if it is Pat hope you got your book it was because of you I got mine and went on till 1989 on a great variety of ships.
Despite all the wry comments from old hands Thre are some great cooks i owe a lot to. Benny Sommoza, Pat old Stan on the RFA Resoursce to name a few. Cheers to you all

Forbes1922
14th December 2011, 17:38
hi every body,in the late 60s i took my 2nd cook and bakers ticket i also had to buy a cook book to do the course.it has been so long now that i have lost my book but would like to get another. but, cant even remember the name of it.if anyone can remember it it would be most appreciated..thank you

Hi
Ceseranni and Kinton Practical Cookery was the initial book used
in the early 60,s. I used a 1 st edition 9for my 2nd cook/Bakers) on a course in Swansea College 1963 it was used to check out recipes. The book was to be used as a basis for City and Guilds.
nb I was on the cover of the 4th edition!!
I think they are up to 11 editions now.W,H Smith used to have them
Forbes

guinnessmick
14th December 2011, 20:34
dont some people like to moan even after all these years i once heard a quote saying people in the mn live like kings sunday dinner every day and xmas dinner on a sunday and its true i often wonder how many of those moaners got three meals a day and a supper nomatter what it consisted of

Burned Toast
15th December 2011, 11:03
dont some people like to moan even after all these years i once heard a quote saying people in the mn live like kings sunday dinner every day and xmas dinner on a sunday and its true i often wonder how many of those moaners got three meals a day and a supper nomatter what it consisted of

Made me sleep better when they had their moan(Gleam)(Bounce)

Ray

OllieUK
17th July 2012, 08:13
Ceseranni and Kinton Practical Cookery
This book is available for .40p on amazon 17/7/2012

jg grant
17th July 2012, 08:59
There's a couple of things I'd like to say here. There's no mention of the financial constraints put on the galley perhaps because of company policy or perhaps because of skipper/ chief steward arrangements in foreign ports. Availability comes into it also. Then you have the galloping gourmets who go to sea from the shipyards and sea school , and deck officers are not immune either. Most, I would guess, at least in my era, never saw bacon and eggs on the same plate once a week never mind once a day.. Suddenly they are culinary experts and there conversation usually starts with,'on my last ship'. I could also mention that I have sailed with dodgy, deck hands, mates and engineers/firemen and assorted rogues and numpties in all departments. That's life! Wouldn't have missed it for anything. Ronnie ex cotton mill where I ate crisp butties every day for two years at lunch time except we didn't call it lunch. Don't know what it was called but on a good day it came with Heinz sandwich spread.Regards to you all.

ALAN TYLER
18th July 2012, 12:43
Ceseranni and Kinton Practical Cookery
This book is available for .40p on amazon 17/7/2012

My copy had a green cover in the 60s, don,t know what edition that was. Unfortunately it was "borrowed" by a 2nd Cook and never returned!!!

Forbes1922
18th July 2012, 14:16
I and and a few others used the 1st edition to test out recipes etc at Swansea College in late 1962. I actually ended up on the photo cover of the 4th Edition with a fellow Cook, Tony Groombridge.Photo was taken in the kitchens of the Llandarcy Oil Refinery Jan 1963

kevjacko
18th July 2012, 19:08
still got mine will try and upload a photo.

muldonaich
18th July 2012, 20:27
There's a couple of things I'd like to say here. There's no mention of the financial constraints put on the galley perhaps because of company policy or perhaps because of skipper/ chief steward arrangements in foreign ports. Availability comes into it also. Then you have the galloping gourmets who go to sea from the shipyards and sea school , and deck officers are not immune either. Most, I would guess, at least in my era, never saw bacon and eggs on the same plate once a week never mind once a day.. Suddenly they are culinary experts and there conversation usually starts with,'on my last ship'. I could also mention that I have sailed with dodgy, deck hands, mates and engineers/firemen and assorted rogues and numpties in all departments. That's life! Wouldn't have missed it for anything. Ronnie ex cotton mill where I ate crisp butties every day for two years at lunch time except we didn't call it lunch. Don't know what it was called but on a good day it came with Heinz sandwich spread.Regards to you all.

could not agree with you more jg kev.

Mick Spear
19th December 2012, 06:29
And does this nautical cookery book have full instructions on the production of those rubber fried eggs we used to get on every ship I was ever on.
Pat(Jester)

Surely not in Blue Flu Pat?
Mick S

vicday
4th January 2013, 04:01
Hi Billieboy, I did my 2nd Cook and Bakers Cert Part One in the kitchen above the Poll office in Cardiff Docks in 1969, but as I was just qualified as a Chef I already owned a Sabatier collection which you could buy for 5 Pounds then and I also had a Granton Steak knife, my books were the Ceserani and Kinton Practical Cookery and Professional and Practical Cookery by Cracknell and Hauffman 2nd Edition, I was amused when I was told I had to sit the Board of Trade Cert as I was qualified but I must admit I learned some new stuff and made a few friends there, I also now hold my Chief and Ships Cook cert and the Higher cert of Nautical Cookery, great times and many an hour spent in The Ship Inn after school was out.

kevjacko
7th January 2013, 21:41
There's a couple of things I'd like to say here. There's no mention of the financial constraints put on the galley perhaps because of company policy or perhaps because of skipper/ chief steward arrangements in foreign ports. Availability comes into it also. Then you have the galloping gourmets who go to sea from the shipyards and sea school , and deck officers are not immune either. Most, I would guess, at least in my era, never saw bacon and eggs on the same plate once a week never mind once a day.. Suddenly they are culinary experts and there conversation usually starts with,'on my last ship'. I could also mention that I have sailed with dodgy, deck hands, mates and engineers/firemen and assorted rogues and numpties in all departments. That's life! Wouldn't have missed it for anything. Ronnie ex cotton mill where I ate crisp butties every day for two years at lunch time except we didn't call it lunch. Don't know what it was called but on a good day it came with Heinz sandwich spread.Regards to you all.

Spot on there jg unlike other departments the Galley staff were on show to all 3 times a day, every day, regardless of conditions. No place to hide if you got it wrong.

vicday
10th January 2013, 04:57
You're right of course Kevjacko, no ship was perfect, and every ship had it's galley basher, whether it was because they expected more or they were just troublemakers I don't know, but I do know I had more than one confrontation ashore because they couldn't keep their mouth shut, however generally the crews were real men and could solve their problems without using their fists. I will however relate a story which I have told many times to illustrate the point you made and it started out on the when I was working by on the Ocean Transport prior to sailing on her. A third engineer came to the galley door with a slightly rusted and otherwisw filthy empty beans tin, he said "cookie can you put some soup in this for me" I said "hang on and I'll find you a pint mug" He said "no don't bother this'll do I'm not that fussy" so I filled his rusty and oily filthy tin . gave him some fresh bread which he broke with his oily hands and walked away happy as a pig in sh##t. When we sailed and were about a week out the officers steward came into the galley swearing and cursing about an officer who wanted him to completely change the tablecloth and reset all the cutlery which was set for eight persons, when I asked why, he said "because I spilled a tiny drop of tomato soup on the cloth", I went to the servery hatch to see who it was and lo and behold it was the same third engineer who came to the galley with the rusty tin.
The finale to this story is one that maybe I shouldn't repeat as it goes against my professional standards, but I couldn't help thinking of the justice of it, three days later I put Mulligatawny soup on the menu, and our third engineer had two bowls of it, what he didn't know was the soup contained plate powder, tasteless in the soup but it kept him on the toilet for two days, the steward was an old hand and he was not to be messed with. The chief Steward thought he had a stomach bug and confined him to his cabin and fed him only on Broths.

Vic.

Burned Toast
10th January 2013, 12:40
You're right of course Kevjacko, no ship was perfect, and every ship had it's galley basher, whether it was because they expected more or they were just troublemakers I don't know, but I do know I had more than one confrontation ashore because they couldn't keep their mouth shut, however generally the crews were real men and could solve their problems without using their fists. I will however relate a story which I have told many times to illustrate the point you made and it started out on the when I was working by on the Ocean Transport prior to sailing on her. A third engineer came to the galley door with a slightly rusted and otherwisw filthy empty beans tin, he said "cookie can you put some soup in this for me" I said "hang on and I'll find you a pint mug" He said "no don't bother this'll do I'm not that fussy" so I filled his rusty and oily filthy tin . gave him some fresh bread which he broke with his oily hands and walked away happy as a pig in sh##t. When we sailed and were about a week out the officers steward came into the galley swearing and cursing about an officer who wanted him to completely change the tablecloth and reset all the cutlery which was set for eight persons, when I asked why, he said "because I spilled a tiny drop of tomato soup on the cloth", I went to the servery hatch to see who it was and lo and behold it was the same third engineer who came to the galley with the rusty tin.
The finale to this story is one that maybe I shouldn't repeat as it goes against my professional standards, but I couldn't help thinking of the justice of it, three days later I put Mulligatawny soup on the menu, and our third engineer had two bowls of it, what he didn't know was the soup contained plate powder, tasteless in the soup but it kept him on the toilet for two days, the steward was an old hand and he was not to be messed with. The chief Steward thought he had a stomach bug and confined him to his cabin and fed him only on Broths.

Vic.

Nice one, and not the first(Gleam)(Eat)(Applause)

Ray