Ship Scrapping List

SAL
4th January 2011, 20:14
I have set up a blog which you may find interesting
called The Ship Scrapping List at:-

http://merseyshipping.blogspot.com

I try and keep up with shipping heading for Alang, China, Bangladesh and Pakistan

Please have a look and see what you think.

Thats another Story
4th January 2011, 20:21
very good Sal thank you for compiling it.john

SAL
4th January 2011, 20:25
very good Sal thank you for compiling it.john

Thank you John

John Callon
4th January 2011, 20:43
Most interesting site Sal, look forward to reading more.Well done.
John

doncontrols
4th January 2011, 22:24
Well done for compiling it, but I dread seeing one of my old ships in there. Its a bit like looking at the hatches, matches and despatches page at home lol!!
Cheers, Don

KEITH SEVILLE
5th January 2011, 07:09
I find it a very interesting source of information.
Keep up the good work.

Best Regards
Keith

R58484956
5th January 2011, 12:18
Sal, a very interesting and informative site, keep up the good work.

BillH
5th January 2011, 13:28
I have set up a blog which you may find interesting
called The Ship Scrapping List at:-

http://merseyshipping.blogspot.com

I try and keep up with shipping heading for Alang, China, Bangladesh and Pakistan

Please have a look and see what you think.
Sal,

Congratulations on the basics.

As an experienced researcher and established author, I would offer a suggestion to give your work more validity.

Currently it is a list, not that you claim anything else and gives no acknowledgement as to your sources.

If you want it to become a research tool then you really need to list your sources as you would find in a printed or digital reference book so that anyone utilising it can expand their search.

That for example would permit someone like myself to source reference your site which in turn would reference your base source back to its root.

Just a thought but a good start nevertheless.

Regards
Bill

captain61
5th January 2011, 14:46
Well done on the research sal... Its a bit like the book of the dead

Stephen

chadburn
5th January 2011, 15:41
Appreciate the work you have put into the compilation SAL, it certainly struck me that barring for a handful most were built after I had retired. Certainly do not build them like they use to when you think that Companies like Brock's hung on to their pre War tonnage well into the 1950's, that's if they survived the U-Boat's.

SAL
5th January 2011, 15:49
Sal,

Congratulations on the basics.

As an experienced researcher and established author, I would offer a suggestion to give your work more validity.

Currently it is a list, not that you claim anything else and gives no acknowledgement as to your sources.

If you want it to become a research tool then you really need to list your sources as you would find in a printed or digital reference book so that anyone utilising it can expand their search.

That for example would permit someone like myself to source reference your site which in turn would reference your base source back to its root.

Just a thought but a good start nevertheless.


Regards
Bill


Thank you all for your comments, very kind of you.

To answer bill, yes it's just a list at the moment, it didn't set out to be a complete reference site.

I found google can do that better than I can and quicker :)

The information sourced is available widely on the web, the only bit which I do is cross reference the vessel across a number of sources to gain the IMO number, that takes the time.

It is not very often you get the vessel name with the IMO number, the name might not be correct, the type of vessel stated might not be correct the tonnage might not be right, so a lot to do per entry.

It's only in it's early stages, who knows what might happen.

Cheers

The Onanist
22nd May 2011, 10:17
It would be helpful if you could include the lightweight and $ per ton cif as this gives an indication of the financial state of the of the shipping industry! This is usually included on the websites of the big demo brokers (Braemar, Clarkson etc.)

SAL
22nd May 2011, 18:25
It would be helpful if you could include the lightweight and $ per ton cif as this gives an indication of the financial state of the of the shipping industry! This is usually included on the websites of the big demo brokers (Braemar, Clarkson etc.)


If I have the ldt then I will put it on as I have mentioned on the blog, it is not always the case that I have that information.

As regards the $ per ton, time restricts me in carrying out further detail information on the vessel.

Thanks

viking
23rd May 2011, 20:42
very informative

kasco
13th September 2011, 12:38
Sal
GREAT!
Thanks for your hard work.

Kasco

Mrslinarcos
8th November 2011, 00:47
Excellent work indeed. Will DISCOVERY SUN be heading to Alang or to a different location?

Mrslinarcos
14th January 2012, 22:59
So where did DISCOVEY SUN end up?? Last I had seen her on AIS/Vessel Tracker, she was off Colombo, Sri Lanka and that was it...that was in November last year. Anyone have any idea where she went?

Jacktar1
15th January 2012, 02:09
Discovery Sun ended up in Alang some time ago

Mrslinarcos
15th January 2012, 13:36
Interesting, I sent an email to Peter Knego and they said they hadn't seen her.

ixion
28th January 2013, 10:16
I wondered what and where are the active scrapyards left in the UK now both small and large and the capacities perhaps in terms of length of ship and level of activity ?

jmcg
28th January 2013, 14:10
Has any S/N one ever taken a ship to her final graveyard in Alang?

What are the protocols?

Is there a special delivery crew from her last port of discharge or from date of sale?.

Is she stripped of all the essentials at the anchorage at Bhavagnar prior to her final run to Alang anchorage?

Indian crew for the last thrust to the beach?

How long after beaching is crew released and how etc.?

I am fascinated by the sheer volume of breaking at Alang.

The AIS port tab will show vessels currently awaiting the final run up to the beach.

Only ever took one to the breakers - Roonagh Head to Castellon , Spain where we 'tied up' alongside.

Many thanks in advance.

BW

J(Gleam)(Gleam)

A.D.FROST
28th January 2013, 14:25
In the 70's when the CALEDONIA STAR was due to be scrapped.The lads flog everthing that was not fasten down incl. spares.Then the company change their mind and ended up doing one more trip so the lads had to sign back on so no one could find out what was missing.

Malky Glaister
30th January 2013, 08:33
Alang and other such breakers.

I have for some time wondered just how the really heavy bits of ship,usually at the stern, ie shafting are brought ashore.

I have seen the videos of twenty or so chaps carrying large plates ashore and have wondered how many dozens to carry or perhaps roll a VLCC's tail shaft ashore.

Any one know?

regards

Malky

jmcg
30th January 2013, 15:31
Malky

Yes I have seen an ILO presentation where it clearly showed how the heavy parts are recovered.


On the beach can be found windlasses and winches (ancient ) with huge coils of wire and ropes "bent" on. These are run out to the piece to be recovered and then it is hauled ashore to face the gas axe.

The "driver" of the windlass /winch sits under a makeshift cover of sorts.

Fascinating !

I still have it (the presentation on disc) somewhere. If I find it I will PM you should you wish to view.

BW

J(Gleam)(Gleam)