Svanen

Jan Hendrik
3rd December 2005, 01:06
Berthed at circular quay in Sydney.

Three masted barquentine built in Denmark 1922

For all particulars: http://www.svanen.com.au/

Derek Roger
3rd December 2005, 13:22
The present Svanen is a twin hulled Heavy lift vessel . Put up the 2000 ton sections of the Confederation Bridge between New Brunswick and PEI. Also built the bridge between Denmark and Sweden .

gdynia
3rd December 2005, 13:53
The present Svanen is a twin hulled Heavy lift vessel . Put up the 2000 ton sections of the Confederation Bridge between New Brunswick and PEI. Also built the bridge between Denmark and Sweden .
Derek
Picture of her on shipspotting.com classified as a floating Sheerlegs

Bob S
3rd December 2005, 16:59
Is this the same vessel? Seen at Southampton during the Cutty Sark Tall Ships parade of sail on the 25th August 1982 as OUR SVANEN. Also built in 1922 as the Baltic trader SVANEN, re-rigged as a barquentine in 1978 and at the time of the sighting, flew the Canadian flag.

ruud
3rd December 2005, 17:33
Ahoy Robert,

Here a link, to find out yourself, just type the name "SVANEN" in the search-engine, and then into the display there are several "SVANEN's", included the "OUR SVANEN", and you will get answer to your question;

http://www.tallship-fan.de/index_e.htm

Jan Hendrik
3rd December 2005, 22:30
The Svanen was re-rigged to a barquentine in the 70's indeed. She was originally built as a schooner type.
There have been several vessels with same name, even a Norwegian, but this one is Danish.

Further the new heavy lift "Svanen" where Derek talks about has recently been recommissioned for the offshore wind turbine market.
It is an odd looking barge and had earlier been used to build the Oresund bridge between Denmark and Sweden.
I am doing regular presentations about this topic and will now include this vessel, it is same idea as with the "Resolution" , ex "Mayflower Resolution" which vessel was actually specifically built for that industry -- for "Resolution" refer to pictures in the Gallary and under Special Purpose vessels, for those who are interested.

Attached photo of the heavy lift Svanen (reference; Roadtraffic Authority) placing the last section of this bridge.
Jan

Derek Roger
4th December 2005, 00:45
Jan ;
The Chief Engineer on Svanen for both bridges in Canada and Denmark / Sweden was a John Docherty ( From Sunderland ) ( Now living in Canada ) and is a personal friend . Also Chief for the early wind turbine installations .

I did the work on the vessel to prepare her for the trans Atlantic voyage from Georgetown PEI to Denmark on the" Mighty Serpent " The work included adding a lot of bottom stiffening ; sea fastening steel work ; and some Aft pedestal support steel for the blocking arrangement on the vessel for the deck cargo voyage to Europe . I have a pic or two somewhere which I will post when I find them . Also was involved with the rigging / sea fastening which was quite complex ; the blocks had to be stowed with no load on the wires for the voyage .

She is not really a barge but two ship hulls connected with a transverse aft end keeping them separated and a structure between the hulls at the keel level to tie it all together .

Regards Derek

Jan Hendrik
4th December 2005, 01:33
Interesting Derek, quite and expertised and versatile business with lots of complications no doubt.

Bob S
4th December 2005, 15:59
Thanks Ruud, very interesting.

Jan, is it the Oresund bridge that you do presentations about? I worked in Malmo during May 1999 and saw the SVANEN, amoung others vessels, working on the bridge. I've got some photos "tucked away" somewhere of the partially completed bridge including Smit's GIANT 4 with a cargo of bridge sections, quite possibly the one being carried by SVANEN in the above photo being as it looked like the only part missing when I saw it. Will see if I can find them and post.

Jan Hendrik
4th December 2005, 22:33
Robert, sorry my mail was not too clear, I do presentations on wind turbines and not bridges.
This as a hobby and although I am not an expert in this field at all, then the topic is quite controversial and I always end up with lively discussions.
Since turbines are placed offshore as well, then you come across those specific vessels/structures aiding this industry.
Jan

Sister Eleff
28th June 2007, 01:13
Is this the same vessel? Seen at Southampton during the Cutty Sark Tall Ships parade of sail on the 25th August 1982 as OUR SVANEN. Also built in 1922 as the Baltic trader SVANEN, re-rigged as a barquentine in 1978 and at the time of the sighting, flew the Canadian flag.

'Our Svanen' arrived in Australian waters with The First Fleet Re-Enactment in 1988. She sailed in company with other vessels, following the route that Capt Arthur Phillips RN took in 1787-1788. Following the Bicentenial celebrations of 1988 she was put up for sale. I believe she had spent time in Canada but was registered in Britain at the time. She was bought by ASTA (Australian Sail Training Assoc) to replace the 'Barquentine New Endevour', as a sail training vessel. Unfortunately this group went into receivership and the ship was sold again in 1990, to a charter group. The owner took great pride in her, although I hear on the grapevine that she has been recently sold again.

She was originally 'Svanen' then at some point before she came to Australia the 'Our' was added to distinguish her from another vessel of the same name. I believe she has reverted to 'Svanen' again.

More info and great photographs of her can be found, along with the other ships that did the re-enactment, in a book called 'SAILING HOME, A Pictorial Record of The First Fleet Re-Enactment Voyage' by David Iggulden with photographs by Malcolm Clarke. Published by Angus & Robertson 1988 ISBN 0-207-15965-3.

stein
28th June 2007, 21:17
Here's our Svanen: http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/42452/si/svanen
If one with that name was seen near the Øresund bridge, it might have been this one. But she never carried any square sails. (For those not fluent in any Scandinavian language, the name means "The Swan", and is indeed a common name on sailing ships, as well as excursion boats and the like). Regards, Stein.