HMS St Margaret

Norman Trewren
5th December 2005, 23:39
Does anyone have a photograph of the St Margaret? My old man sailed in her towards the end of the war.
Many thanks
Norman Trewren

fred henderson
6th December 2005, 00:54
Does anyone have a photograph of the St Margaret? My old man sailed in her towards the end of the war.
Many thanks
Norman Trewren

Norman, do you know what sort of ship St Margaret was?

Fred

Norman Trewren
6th December 2005, 01:09
Hi Fred
I believe she was a cable layer. Don't know much about her at all. I only know that Dad finished the war in her in the middle east.

norman
(Cloud)

fred henderson
6th December 2005, 18:56
Hi Norman

You are correct, she was a Cable Layer. By the way her name has an "S" on the end. She was one of four cable vessels built by Swan Hunter. She was launched in October 1943. The other ships in the class were Bullfinch (1940), Bullfrog (1944) and Bullhead (1944). I have no idea why she has the odd name out.
They were 1,524 grt, 252 feet oa, twin screw with steam reciprocating engines giving a speed of 12 knots. During the war they carried 1 x 4 inch and 2 x 20 mm guns.
Bullfrog and Bullhead were transferred to Cable & Wireless in 1947. The other two remained in RN service until the 1970s.

I cannot find a pic of St Margarets, but I have tracked down a photo of Bullhead.

Fred

Ron Stringer
6th December 2005, 20:19
Fred,

A wild guess. The cross channel telephone cable came ashore at St Margarets Bay, just north of Dover. Perhaps, as a cable layer, they named her for the English end of the cable.

Ron

Norman Trewren
6th December 2005, 22:50
Many thanks for your research and your time, Fred.
Norman

(Thumb)

ruud
7th December 2005, 00:59
Ahoy,

Could it be this one?

http://www.navyphotos.co.uk/st_margarets%20fspt.htm

Norman Trewren
7th December 2005, 15:18
Brilliant, Ruud - I wonder when that was taken. Many thanks.
Norman

(Applause)

ruud
7th December 2005, 16:27
Ahoy Norman,

Well you could ask and get that answer from the webmaster of this site;

http://www.navyphotos.co.uk/index.htm

Landour
8th December 2005, 17:10
Paying off in Devonport in either 1982 or 83. In her RMAS colour scheme

Norman Trewren
8th December 2005, 21:54
Thanks Landour

Stevo
21st December 2005, 23:21
St Margarets was sold to Pounds of Portsmouth and lay alongside the motorway into the city for several years. In the early 90s St Margarets left Portsmouth under tow with the former tank landing craft/admiralty trials ship Whimbrel bound for Italy and rumours of a conversion to a sailing vessel? Not much is known after that, but apparently the Whimbrel foundered at some point during the tow.

Bannedus
6th January 2006, 18:47
Cable layer. Seen here in her RMAS colours

R736476
7th January 2006, 09:04
If you search in Gallery/ Royal Navy you will also find a pic of St Margarets posted by brixhamrfc on 27 November 2005.
Regards
alex

Rory Bhoy
22nd March 2006, 00:26
When I was in the RN I was loan drafted to her for a couple of months in 1978, and what a couple of months it was. Great laugh, brilliant crew. (Thumb)

Rory Bhoy
28th September 2006, 20:43
Does anyone have a photograph of the St Margaret? My old man sailed in her towards the end of the war.
Many thanks
Norman Trewren

I was secunded to the RMAS St Margarets back in the late 70's when I was in the Royal Navy. I've got a pic of her.

Peter4447
28th September 2006, 22:32
I have a feeling that the St Margerets came into Harwich sometime in the late 50's. I think at that time she was painted white with a buff funnel - can anyone confirm this livery please?

Peter4447(Thumb)

R736476
29th September 2006, 08:51
St Margarets and Bullfinch were run by the Admiralty Cable Ships Service, based I believe at Turnchapel, Plymouth.
Regards,
Alex

shipartist
20th October 2006, 11:35
How did these ships lay cable,through the bow tackle/winch/pulley, whatever you call it, (what do you call it?) and then engines astern, or what, and for what purpose?

alex page
21st October 2006, 03:09
in the early 60's the bullfinch and the st margrets had MN crews and I believe they were involved in laying cables to track submarines . They used to spend a lot of time creeping around the west coast of Scotland ,perhaps they were just on a pub crawl .
Alex

Noddy-Billing
4th January 2008, 15:10
How did these ships lay cable,through the bow tackle/winch/pulley, whatever you call it, (what do you call it?) and then engines astern, or what, and for what purpose?

The St.Margarets was built more for repairing cable than for laying original cable, so only required bow sheeves. Originally Royal navy manned, she became part of the Admiralty Cable Service sometime after the end of WW2. At that time she was painted all white with a buff funnel ( if I remember correctly). When the Royal Maritime Auxiliary Service (RMAS) was founded in about 1978 she assumed the standard RMAS colour scheme of black hull ( with a white line above the gunwhale) and buff upperworks and funnel. She did take part in the laying of the SOLUS chain in Northern Waters, which was a system of detecting submarines coming down from Russia through the Denmark Strait. She was replaced ( sometime in the 1980's) by RMAS Newton. Hope this helps in filling in some blanks>

Lancastrian
5th January 2008, 10:29
Very much so, but just to complete the picture, this is from R736476 in another thread.
The RMAS took shape over the last 30 years, initially by the amalgamation into the Port Auxiliary Services of various separate areas of waterborne activity formerly managed by Captains of Dockyards, Senior Victualling , Armament Supply and Naval Stores Officers. This was later followed by the amalgamation in 1975 of the then separate Services comprising Ocean Tugs, Admiralty Cable Ships and certain trials vessels into the RMAS.

Ian rice
8th June 2010, 01:14
Know as the Maggie, a good ship to have served on back in the eighties, a crew of 64, before we took the boffins on.Found memories, of good mates and times past.

paulatsea
10th June 2010, 22:13
Know as the Maggie, a good ship to have served on back in the eighties, a crew of 64, before we took the boffins on.Found memories, of good mates and times past.

Hi Ian

I wonder if you served with my uncle who was the chief stoker on the Maggie ?

His name was Ron Taylor