Cory's Coastal Tankers

Frank Holleran
7th December 2005, 06:23
Anyone got a photograph of the PASS OF MELFORT one of the fleet of Pass tankers that was on the UK and Continent coast. I think a couple of the others where the Pass of Kildrummy and the Pass of Glenclunie (dont know if the spelling is correct) Did time as Donkeyman on her in 1967...Thanks Frank

Bob S
7th December 2005, 18:22
Hi Frank

There's a photo of PASS OF MELFORT (if you ignore the tug alongside) in this forum, just put PASS OF MELFORT in the "search forum" dropdown menu above.

Frank Holleran
7th December 2005, 19:33
Thanks Bob.....
Pity about the tug...Fond memories of this little lady...a big eye opener from the deep sea vessels...you could eat a three course dinner of the engine room plates,it was that clean and polished and painted...like being in a sub in heavy weather..most of her was under water....if any one has any unobstructed pics, would be nice. Thanks again Bob.
Frank

ruud
7th December 2005, 19:46
Ahoy,

Could it be this one?
Credits must be given to Dave Morrison cq. G.A.Osbon

Bruce Carson
7th December 2005, 20:21
Hello ruud:
I think that was a previous ship of the same name built in 1926 by the Blythswood Shipbuilding Co. Glasgow.

Bruce C.

Tony Crompton
7th December 2005, 20:46
Is this the one you want? Remember her well and all the Morrisons who sailed in her.
--------------------
TonyC

Frank Holleran
8th December 2005, 01:24
I'm afraid the steam job was a bit before my time Rudd, thanks for the post.....however you got the one Tony...Little Johnie Morrison the skipper from Lewis, knee high to a grasshopper..a good guy, had a dram or two with him..bit of a nightmare when he and Angus and Donald the deck boy got together, and the Gaelic started to flow..even the Bosun Callum couldn't understand a word they where saying...Belfast Ch/engineer..Glasgow 2nd engineer / Gordie 3rd engineer and myself Yorkie Donkeyman, down below..a good ship and crowd..Little Johnie would take her out in all weathers, like a bloody submarine, the only thing visible would have been the housing and the funnel...good times, Thanks for the post Tony.
Frank

sandman
8th December 2005, 10:30
Hi Frank
I sailed in the old pass of Glenogle,but then she was converted to a sand dredger.She still had her old pump room and pumps when i was aboard,but we had them removed in the early 80's,when we had the 3 paxman gennies removed and replaced with 2 listers.The old girl finally went to the Breakers in 2003 at the grand old age of 40. (Fly)

Frank Holleran
8th December 2005, 19:03
Great little work horses'...loved my time on the MELFORT (one and only coaster)...but the call to go back deep sea got to me, and the fact that I couldn't save any bloody money on a coastal job,ha/ha!!!!...going up to the skips cabin every Fri afternoon and getting a pay packet,.... constant runs ashore, no trouble to get a case of Tennants and a bottle of Ski on request.... A job and a half keeping the pump room bailed out during heavy weather...looked like a swimming pool sometimes from the top of the ladder....
Frank (Thumb)

Nairda59
17th December 2005, 22:23
I'm still looking for a Pass of Balmaha picture of the same era Ruud, built 1942 scrapped 1967
Any help would be appreciated

ruud
17th February 2006, 14:56
Ahoy,

I haven't forgot you, but still looking for her.But hard to find a piccie

Damsel
BRT:784
Len:193
Beam:31
B'LDR:39
Comp:1942
Coastal Tanker.
1942 MOWT managed by C.Rowbotham.
1946 MOWT managed by Anglo Saxon Petroleum Co.
1947 PASS OF BALMAHA, Bulk Oil SS Co, London.
1967 Scrapped Dalmuir

ruud
17th February 2006, 15:03
Anyone got a photograph of the PASS OF MELFORT one of the fleet of Pass tankers that was on the UK and Continent coast. I think a couple of the others where the Pass of Kildrummy and the Pass of Glenclunie (dont know if the spelling is correct) Did time as Donkeyman on her in 1967...Thanks Frank
Ahoy Frank,
I think this is the Pass of Glenclunie you're looking for?

jim barnes
17th February 2006, 15:10
Hi Frank

There's a photo of PASS OF MELFORT (if you ignore the tug alongside) in this forum, just put PASS OF MELFORT in the "search forum" dropdown menu above. looks like tug is holding her above water

paul rennison
10th March 2006, 20:07
Ahoy all, just scrolling through and caught this thread, I posted a question in "Other companies" regarding Pass of Glenclunie, thanks for the pic Ruud, I was on her as Catering boy in mid 60's she was then in Cory's colours, joined her at Saltend in my home port of Hull, she used to carry some dodgy stuff around, Methanol, ethanol, Acids etc, just prior to my joining her a couple of crew had died of asphxiation in the pump room on passage up the Firth of Forth to Grangemouth. The old man (whose name escapes me for the minute)
Was famous for a daring rescue in the Irish sea in the early fifties when one of the Heysham-Belfast ferries (Princess Elizabeth I think) sank with great loss of life in horrible weather. At the time my Dad was stationed in Belfast & we lived there most of the time,& we were due to sail that night but missed the train from Hull spooky eh?. Anyway she was a great little ship & we went to some interesting out of the way places, up the Sheldt, Flushing, Shellhaven,Fawley,Isle of Grain etc. one trip in Europort, I missed her sailing as I was told by the mate "sailing at two" and thought he meant 2am, at 6pm she was well gone, I went to Hook of Holland and spoke to one of the shoreside stewards there & got a ride over to Harwich, rang my dad who was a tanker driver for DCL and he said I should go to BXL at Manningtree, got a cab down there, and a lift to DCL at Saltend and was on the Jetty as she came upriver. the mates face was a picture!! The old man said my initiative was good but he still docked me a days pay. Does anyone remember sailing in her in the mid 60's?? or the story of that storm??
Cheers lads
rennop (Thumb)

Ron Stringer
10th March 2006, 20:56
Paul,

You will find the outline facts about the ferry disaster on http://news.bbc.co.uk/onthisday/hi/dates/stories/january/31/newsid_2505000/2505913.stm but if you go on to www.google.com and type in Princess Victoria ferry disaster there is much more information available.

Ron

Frank Holleran
12th March 2006, 01:53
Ahoy Frank,
I think this is the Pass of Glenclunie you're looking for?

Rudd...Thats the one ..but different colours from the Cory days.

Jimmy...Dont know what the story was with the tug.... Remember one time in Middlesborough, I was taking the movements and the Chief Engineer was on the controls..bridge rang down, full astern, and the bugger jumped full ahead..bosun on the wheel, and he had the forsight to swing her hard 'a' starboard...but we still caught the wharf with a good bang..the boys told me later the shore linesmen were legging it everywhere...so not a surprise to see her with a tug..still a bloody good vessel and crew.

Paul..Got to see some of the crew from the Glenclunie in Grangemouth a couple of times, if memory serves my right..she had a few of the Island boys on her (Lewis/Harris) same as the Melfort..that would have been around 66/67..that was a few drams and pints of heavy ago.
Regards
Frank

vic pitcher
13th March 2006, 09:53
Ruud

Great picture of the "Glenclunie" under Panocean colours.
It looks like Dordrecht to me?
I was OM of "Glenclunie" from Dec 77 to Jan 81 in tandem with Capt. "Nockie" Morrison doing 6 weeks on and 6 weeks off.

C/E's were the never to be forgotten "Tommy Griff" and Tom Crowe.
Tom Griffiths was an amazing character. He went through the war with Athel Line and Eagle Oil without any torpedoings.
He retired to Rhayader and sadly died nearly 10 years ago. A host of old "Pass Boat" men gave him a rousing send-off. I did an "obit" on him for "Sea Breezes"
Tom Crowe was a likeable rogue (from Easterhouse). He also is no longer with us.
Paul
You are referring to the loss of the Stranraer-Larne ferry "Princess Victoria" in January 1953. One of the rescuing ships was "Pass of Drumochter" built as "Empire Bute" in 1944 under the command of Captain James Kelly of Larne. They managed to take the PV's No. 6 boat in tow and the survivors were taken off by the Donaghadee lifeboat. Tommy Griffiths was a great pal of Captain Kelly, who passed on some 15 years ago.
"Glenclunie" was a nice ship to handle, although astern movements were weak. It was a delight to swing to the flood at Billingham Oil Jetty and berth port side to.

paul rennison
13th March 2006, 10:32
Ahoy Vic, yes it was Capt Kelly who I served under on the Glenclunie, he was a firm but fair man, when he found I used to work on the fish dock in Hull he was always asking me to deep fry his fish, the C/E may have been the Tom Griffith you mentioned as I recall he liked a drop of malt, when we would go to the continent & draw a bond he made sure there was a few bottles in the store. Do you have a picture of her in Cory colours?
Cheers Vic,
Paul

Tony Crompton
13th March 2006, 10:36
A regular Master in "Pass of Glenclunie" I remember was Johnson, cannot recall his christian name. Affectionately known on the East Coast as the "Geordie Arab".

Cannot recall particularly poor stern power on this ship but like all Pilots I was always aware of the possibilitry that a Pass Boat would not go astern!!. Happened to me on both the Dalveen and Melfort.
-------------------------
Tony C

vic pitcher
13th March 2006, 14:23
Tony

Can't recall a "Johnson"
Perhaps you are thinking of George Holmstrom, formerly of South Shields. although the
appellation "Geordie Arab" rings no bells. George, before retirement was Master of the
chlorine carrier "Northern Star." He recently celebrated his 70th birthday at the "Sea Hotel" S.S. which was attended by a healthy ex-Pass contingent, other well remembered Masters of the "Glenclunie" are Dave Greer, the late Duncan McKinnon, and Charlie Grant (now a pilot at Workington). Davey Greer was Master of the "Dalveen" for a long time.Another one was John Collister (BOAC-"berth on arrival Collister") who became a Forth pilot, sadly, no longer with us.
"Glenclunie" was sold to West African interests as a bunkering vessel around 81-82.
A regular Mate, Richard Pigula was offered large quantities of USD to go down to W.Africa with her to show the new guys how to survive in the pumproom. I was in the "Drumochter" in Rotterdam Botlek berthed close to her prior her departure festooned with Yokohama fenders and we went on board to see Richard who told me that the new guys where extremely apprehensive about the coming deep-sea voyage.
Unhappily, Richard contracted a virulent form of malaria on the coast and died, perhaps he didn't keep up with the tartan tablets.
Tom Griff the Chief of the "Glenclunie" had a disconcerting trick of giving vigorous "dead slows" simultanously remarking to old "Paddy" the Donkeyman, "..that'll keep the ****** on his toes." It did!
Davey Greer was Master of the "Dalveen" for a long time

Tony Crompton
13th March 2006, 15:10
I have checked my records and was on Pass of Glenclunie last in 1970 and other Pass boats in 1972, apart from Pass of Brander in 1979. I think they stopped running to the Tees regularly after that or else it was coincidence that I never went on one. Remember well the Morrisons and Duncan McKinnon. Remember also Capt. Templeton from Northern Ireland in the Cordene and Cordale. (Were't they renamed as Pass Boats later )
------------------------------
Tony C

vic pitcher
13th March 2006, 17:35
Tony

Pass Boats ran regularly into the Tees until the demise of Nedlloyd-Panocean in 1983.
Yes, there was also Tommy Templeton (TT).
The Cordene and Cordale became "Pass of Chisholm" and "Pass of Cairnwell" running frequently Tees-Coleraine and Tees-Maydown with acrylonitrile.
We used, in bad weather, Kyleakin, Loch Alsh, Kylerhea Sound of Sleat, Sound of Mull and Sound of Islay, if we could get the tides right. Authorities got very twitchy about us transiting the Kyles with nasties so we had to give Skye a wide berth.
When the Bann bar was not possible, we would anchor in the Foyle, but after the Ra's
sinking of the "Nellie M" I took to using Loch Indaal off Port Charlotte in the "Chisholm",
it was just a short hop over to Portstewart.

Frank Holleran
19th March 2006, 05:04
A couple of years after leaving the Pass of Melfort...was an a Shaw Savill job.. we where loading for Aus and NZ in Liverpool...woke up one morning to find the Melfort tied along side us...she was transfering a cargo of Liquid Tallow into our double bottom tanks...went on board her and the same old ship mates still there..took them up to the Caradock that night and introduced them to Betty and a few of the girls (also that f......g stupid parrot)..Next day came up from the steering gear and was walking back along the deck to accommodation..there was little Johnie Morrison (Melfort skipper) talking to our Skipper/First Mate/Chief Eng and Sec Eng...when he spotted me..stopped talking to that lot and crossed the deck to shake hands with me and have a good 5 minute chat...leaving the other lot waiting...invited me back on board for a dram and a Tennants at lunch time..great guy and skipper...
Regards
Frank

vic pitcher
19th March 2006, 12:19
Frank

Johnny Morrison is alive and reasonably well, retired in Carnoustie.
I learned shiphandling at his feet!

"Ach, Vic, you've got to think about the forces acting on your ship"

bert thompson
19th March 2006, 17:02
Did builders trials on the Pass of Glencunnie from Sunderland. The weather was terrible that we headed for the Tyne. Was delighted that the "Arkas" auto pilot could cope with the conditions. One of the Morrison brothers was Second Mate. Can't remember if we did a second trial. Saw her many times over the years.

Frank Holleran
20th March 2006, 04:53
Frank

Johnny Morrison is alive and reasonably well, retired in Carnoustie.
I learned shiphandling at his feet!

"Ach, Vic, you've got to think about the forces acting on your ship"
Good to hear he's still going...great wee guy.
Brought a smile to my face at the words "Ach, Vic...seems 'Ach' was his favourite word..Ollie was my nickname, and many a time he would say, with that smirk on his face "Ach Ollie, now dont be going drinking to much whisky now" always followed with a wee chuckle..Happy days.
Regards
Frank

Nairda59
8th April 2006, 21:55
I sailed on Pass of Balmaha doing the Saltend to Grangemouth and then Shell haven with petrol, methanol and Isopropanol in the early 60's.(BC= Before Cory)
It was amazing how popular I was in the petrol rationing days.
It was equally amazing just how much petrol there was in an old steam ram pump (At least 10 jerry cans worth)
Captain, whos name I forget, was a nervous man with a grim face and no smile.
My uncle Donald Stewart was Mate.
C/E was from Leicester cant remember his name
Happy days.


PS RUUD I now have the picture I badly wanted but thanks for your efforts

John Edward Tomlinson
12th April 2006, 22:28
Just been looking through the forum on Cory ships. Brought back some happy memories. Does anyone know what happened to the Corsea? I sailed in her in 57 and haven't been able to discover her final fate.

Much obliged.

John.

spartan
13th April 2006, 20:33
Hi John.Is this the CORSEA you are after
Built by Hall Russell 1957, 3373 GRT.
Renamed
Kappa Progress 72
Astro Venture 74
Breznzett 75
Panagia 76
Tsimentias 77
Broken up Bombay Feb 89
Cheers
Spartan

John Edward Tomlinson
20th April 2006, 00:30
Hi Spartan, many thanks for the info on the Corsea. The best ship I ever sailed in.

Best wishes, John.

Frank Holleran
20th April 2006, 02:40
Hi John...type, solent,then,waters, all one word, then (gap) uk, into a google search, and it will fetch up a site, on the site go to, Gallery of 2500 old ships, hit the C button, then hit the #18 and it will fetch up gallery of ships, the Corsea is in the bottom right hand corner, tried pasting the URL into this forum but it would not accept it...good luck.
Regards
Frank

John Edward Tomlinson
21st April 2006, 23:52
Hi Frank, thanks for the information about the photo of the Corsea on [url]http://www.solen****ers.co.uk/
What a great website.

There must be a reason why it can't be posted on the forum.

I wonder if any other members know why?

Thanks again.

Best wishes, John.

ruud
22nd April 2006, 06:11
Ahoy John,

It's all about the word t w a t that's missing in solen****ers, and that is vulgar language, same with m a r s e i l l e, it will only be showing with m****ille, for reason that a r s e is in it.Hope this will help you why it can't be posted.

Frank Holleran
22nd April 2006, 06:45
Thanks for explanation Rudd.
Regards
Frank

mcgurggle
22nd April 2006, 06:46
You should try SC U N THORPE.
(*))
McG

John Edward Tomlinson
22nd April 2006, 22:32
Thanks Rudd. I suppose if we think long enough about it, we could come up with a long list of unacceptable names and words!

All the best, John.

Larry Dev
2nd February 2008, 23:10
That is a name from yesteryear Frank, I wonder what happened to Betty, did she retire Or was she made redundant by the passing years.

Frank Holleran
6th February 2008, 23:25
I think I would go for the, made redundant by passing years....the parrot probably met a less graceful demise.(Fly)
Regards
Frank

sailorpritch
27th May 2008, 21:21
Ruud

Great picture of the "Glenclunie" under Panocean colours.
It looks like Dordrecht to me?
I was OM of "Glenclunie" from Dec 77 to Jan 81 in tandem with Capt. "Nockie" Morrison doing 6 weeks on and 6 weeks off.

C/E's were the never to be forgotten "Tommy Griff" and Tom Crowe.
Tom Griffiths was an amazing character. He went through the war with Athel Line and Eagle Oil without any torpedoings.
He retired to Rhayader and sadly died nearly 10 years ago. A host of old "Pass Boat" men gave him a rousing send-off. I did an "obit" on him for "Sea Breezes"
Tom Crowe was a likeable rogue (from Easterhouse). He also is no longer with us.
Paul
You are referring to the loss of the Stranraer-Larne ferry "Princess Victoria" in January 1953. One of the rescuing ships was "Pass of Drumochter" built as "Empire Bute" in 1944 under the command of Captain James Kelly of Larne. They managed to take the PV's No. 6 boat in tow and the survivors were taken off by the Donaghadee lifeboat. Tommy Griffiths was a great pal of Captain Kelly, who passed on some 15 years ago.
"Glenclunie" was a nice ship to handle, although astern movements were weak. It was a delight to swing to the flood at Billingham Oil Jetty and berth port side to.

cheers vic .I took over from griff as c/e from 82/84 untill she was sold , do you know what happened to her after the nigerians owned her

john pritchard

ray bloomfield
27th May 2008, 22:56
After the Nigerians had her surely she was only fit for scrap, saw one of the old bovril boats steaming along of Lagos a few years ago doing about six knots and belching out clouds of black smoke, just look around the anchorage near Bonny and it was obvious how they treat thier ships!

vic pitcher
28th May 2008, 09:33
cheers vic .I took over from griff as c/e from 82/84 untill she was sold , do you know what happened to her after the nigerians owned her

john pritchard

Hi John

I saw you last at East Lewis Quay when you were working for Gordon Dewar and I was with Stolts.

There was a small picture of the "Glenclunie" in "Sea Breezes" some years ago
of her in Nigeria. I doubt that her Polar Nohab will have survived the West African treatment.
I went aboard her in Rotterdam when she was about to depart for W.Africa, complete with Yokohama fenders. Richard Pigula was the Mate for the trip down having been enveigled by a suitcase full of Dollar bills. Poor Richard didn't survive the venture, succumbing to a virulent strain of Malaria on his return to the UK; he should have kept taking the tartan tablets.

Are you still living Ormskirk way?

Vic

monty
28th May 2008, 18:27
Lookimg back through the posts I came accross the "Geordie Arab" That was definately Captain Johnson from South Shields and although I'm not certain I think he was called Ron. I sailed with him on either the Corburn or the Corchester. He was a tall fellow almost bald and very brown. Hence the Geordie Arab name. I think I knew George Holmstrom also. The person I'm thinking of was a tall well built guy. It was around 1973 when I left and George and another lad were considering going to Bantry Bay in Ireland where Corys had won a contract to supply the tugs at a new refinery being built. Peter Ross engineer.

vic pitcher
29th May 2008, 09:00
Lookimg back through the posts I came accross the "Geordie Arab" That was definately Captain Johnson from South Shields and although I'm not certain I think he was called Ron. I sailed with him on either the Corburn or the Corchester. He was a tall fellow almost bald and very brown. Hence the Geordie Arab name. I think I knew George Holmstrom also. The person I'm thinking of was a tall well built guy. It was around 1973 when I left and George and another lad were considering going to Bantry Bay in Ireland where Corys had won a contract to supply the tugs at a new refinery being built. Peter Ross engineer.

Monty

You're right about George Holmstrom-very tall and blond. He has told me about the Bantry Bay tugs.
George is now retired in S.Shields, moved back there recently from Thropton.
He celebrated his 70th 2 years ago with a grand do in the Sea Hotel.

Colin Edwards
12th January 2010, 12:44
I have happy memories serving as 2nd Mate and Acting 1st Mate on the following ... 'Pass of Dalveen' winter 1960, 'Pass of Dumochter' summer 1961 and 'Pass of Melfort' winter and summer '62. Great experience and well worth failing the ticket to get this 'sea time' in between finishing Shell apprenticeship and returning deep sea with Esso. Swallowed the anchor in 1965 now retired living in Margate and watching ships anchored in Margate Roads. Anyone know who built these ships and when ... or what became of them? Internet searches seem to relate to older wartime vessels [ex 'Empire' fleet] of same names?

BillH
12th January 2010, 15:14
I have happy memories serving as 2nd Mate and Acting 1st Mate on the following ... 'Pass of Dalveen' winter 1960, 'Pass of Dumochter' summer 1961 and 'Pass of Melfort' winter and summer '62. Great experience and well worth failing the ticket to get this 'sea time' in between finishing Shell apprenticeship and returning deep sea with Esso. Swallowed the anchor in 1965 now retired living in Margate and watching ships anchored in Margate Roads. Anyone know who built these ships and when ... or what became of them? Internet searches seem to relate to older wartime vessels [ex 'Empire' fleet] of same names?
This may help but 2 of the histories are incomplete

PASS OF DRUMOCHTER (1) (1958 - 1962)
O.N. 169424. 813g. 334n. 193.0 x 30.7 x 13.8 feet.
T.3-cyl. (15", 25" & 41" x 30") engine made by Aitchison, Blair Ltd., Clydebank. 750 IHP
19.10.1944: Launched as EMPIRE BUTE, by A. & J. Inglis Ltd., Glasgow, (Yard No.1286P), for the Ministry of War Transport, (Coastal Tankers Ltd., managers).
22.12.1944: Completed.
1945: Anglo-Saxon Petroleum Company Ltd., appointed as managers.
11.4.1946: Owners restyled as the Ministry of Transport.
1946: Sold to Societe Algerriene de Navigation Pour L'Afrique du Nord, (Ch. Schiaffino and Compagnie, managers), Algeria, and renamed MILIANA.
1948: Sold to Scotto, Ambrosino Pugliese Fils et Compagnie, Algeria, and renamed RIVOLI.
1952: Sold to Bulk Oil Steam Ship Company Ltd., (J. W. Cook & Company Ltd., managers), London, and renamed PASS OF DRUMOCHTER.
1962: Sold to Lugari and Filippi, Italy, and renamed SANTA GUILIA.
1970: Sold to Chimigas S. p. A., Italy.
1971: Sold to "Ciane Anapo" Compania di Nav. e Bunkeraggi S. p. A., Italy.
1971: Sold to Fratelli Novella, Genoa.
1971: Demolished by Ditta Lotti at La Spezia.


PASS OF DALVEEN (1958 - 1972)
O.N. 300799. 965g. 397n. 1,169d. 65.99 x 9.61 x 4.350 metres.
5-cyl. 2 S.C.S.A. (340 x 570mm) oil engine manufactured by Nydqvist & Holm AB, Trollhattan. 1,050 BHP. 11.5 kts. Ice class 3.
20.8.1958: Launched by Rolandwerft G.m.b.H., Bremen (Yard No.871), for the Bulk Oil Steam Ship Company Ltd., London.
26.11.1958: Completed.
1965: Owners restyled as Cory Maritime Ltd.
1972: Sold to Ibru Sea Foods Inc.Ltd., Nigeria, and renamed AGBARHA OTOR.
1981: Sold to Volta Trading & Finance Company S. A., Panama, and renamed BARBARA VII.


PASS OF MELFORT (1961 - 1972)
O.N. 302655. 937g. 406n. 1,250d. 65.66 x 10.24 x 4.293 metres
4-cyl. 2 S.C.S.A. (340 x 570mm) oil engine manufactured by Nydqvist & Holm AB, Trollhattan. 1,050 BHP. 11.5 kts. Ice class 3.
20.12.1960: Launched by Blyth Dry Docks & Ship Building Company Ltd., Blyth, (Yard No.379), for the Bulk Oil Steam Ship Company Ltd., London.
10.5.1961: Completed.
1965: Owners restyled as Cory Maritime Ltd.
1972: Sold to Mare Nuovo S. p. A., Italy, and renamed MARE GLACIALE.
1975: Sold to Necom Marittima S. p. A., Italy, and renamed NECOM.
19 : Sold to Vetor S. r. l., Italy.

judd1992
18th January 2010, 16:15
Sailed on the Pass of Glenclunie and Dirriemore in the early 80's, with Vic and all the Morrisons, Had a great time and learnt plenty.
Was trying to remember the name of the C/E on the Dirriemore who always wore a flat hat.

molle42
29th December 2013, 01:25
Tony

Can't recall a "Johnson"
Perhaps you are thinking of George Holmstrom, formerly of South Shields. although the
appellation "Geordie Arab" rings no bells. George, before retirement was Master of the
chlorine carrier "Northern Star." He recently celebrated his 70th birthday at the "Sea Hotel" S.S. which was attended by a healthy ex-Pass contingent, other well remembered Masters of the "Glenclunie" are Dave Greer, the late Duncan McKinnon, and Charlie Grant (now a pilot at Workington). Davey Greer was Master of the "Dalveen" for a long time.Another one was John Collister (BOAC-"berth on arrival Collister") who became a Forth pilot, sadly, no longer with us.
"Glenclunie" was sold to West African interests as a bunkering vessel around 81-82.
A regular Mate, Richard Pigula was offered large quantities of USD to go down to W.Africa with her to show the new guys how to survive in the pumproom. I was in the "Drumochter" in Rotterdam Botlek berthed close to her prior her departure festooned with Yokohama fenders and we went on board to see Richard who told me that the new guys where extremely apprehensive about the coming deep-sea voyage.
Unhappily, Richard contracted a virulent form of malaria on the coast and died, perhaps he didn't keep up with the tartan tablets.
Tom Griff the Chief of the "Glenclunie" had a disconcerting trick of giving vigorous "dead slows" simultanously remarking to old "Paddy" the Donkeyman, "..that'll keep the ****** on his toes." It did!
Davey Greer was Master of the "Dalveen" for a long time
I sailed with Capt. Davey Greer on the Pass of Dalveen in 1970 as acting third mate

molle42
29th December 2013, 02:06
I was acting 3 mate on the Pass of Dalveen in 1970 and Davey Greer Master.
I went back deep sea after that and ended up as Master in the Norwegian Merchant Navy. Dropped my ancher after 42 years at sea and now living in Croydon