Titanic Engineer's Memorial

howardws
27th March 2011, 21:05
For years I lived in or near Southampton and to my shame I didn't have a close look at the Titanic Engineer's Memorial. I've just returned from a weekend of revisiting my lost youth and had a close look. The Engineer on the left appears to be operating the reversing lever on a recip steam engine but I have no idea what Engineer on the right is doing. Can anyone tell me please?

I have to say that I was somewhat moved by the memorial.

http://www.maritimequest.com/misc_pages/monuments_memorials/titanic_engineer_memorial.htm

billyboy
28th March 2011, 00:42
Answering a telegraph order and operating a throttle valve by the looks of it

lazyjohn
28th March 2011, 10:40
I wonder if its a manual watertight door control?

Mind you it seems to be set on a pedistal with hydraulic pipe at the base. Perhaps its a depiction of a ships wheel?

I doubt if the artist was a nautical man.

Mind you, it doesn't matter to me, its the rememberance that counts.

howardws
28th March 2011, 10:41
Thanks billyboy, I think that you may be right. I was thrown by the fact that the wheel appears to drive a vertical shaft that disappears into what looks like a closed tank. It's also 42 years since I last answered a telegraph that wasn't built into a control room consol!

Blackal
29th March 2011, 06:49
I started to ask when it was built - as a lot of Southampton was leveled during 39-45, but had a google and see that it has stood since 1914.

As you say - it is an impressive memorial.

Al

Bob_F
31st March 2011, 07:23
Is the wheel not the flywheel of the reversing engine? and he is closing cylinder drains. The main stop valve would be on his right.
Bob F.

chadburn
31st March 2011, 13:50
Had a look at this a couple of time's to try and make it out, however, after giving my glasses a good clean I suspect Bob F is right. The pipe appear's to lead to the reversing engine cylinder which is next to his left lower leg. As for his right hand I would suspect it is answering the Chadburn.(*))

Basil
31st March 2011, 14:30
Isn't there also one in Liverpool?

howardws
1st April 2011, 07:55
Thank's Gents. So, if Titanic's engines were reversed by reversing engines what is the Engineer on the left doing?

lazyjohn
1st April 2011, 10:09
Hello all, maybe not the ideal place for this question, I don't want to stray too far off topic.

I'm puzzled by the term 'reversing engine', what's that please?

All my steam time was with turbines, so I understand the need for an 'astern' turbine.

I though Titanic was steam recip' so just valve change required for astern running, roughly comparable to a diesel engine reversing.

Was the valve gear so heavy to move it needed power assistance?

R58484956
1st April 2011, 10:19
Titanic was recrip engines.

vickentallen
1st April 2011, 11:18
Reversing engine, moved over the Stevenson link for the reverse ecentric to come into play, heavy bit of machinery to operate by hand

lazyjohn
1st April 2011, 11:23
Reversing engine, moved over the Stevenson link for the reverse ecentric to come into play, heavy bit of machinery to operate by hand

Many thanks for the info.

chadburn
1st April 2011, 12:29
The Engineer on the left I think is on the Throttle. Judging by his concentration he is balancing the HP crank just after TDC.

Long gone
1st April 2011, 19:55
The Engineer on the left I think is on the Throttle. Judging by his concentration he is balancing the HP crank just after TDC.

So that the engine will restart? I have often wondered what would happen in a TE engine with the h.p piston stopped at the wrong crank positions.

I know that on the Smith-Johnson 3-cylinder compound locomotives, there was a reducing valve which admitted steam to the l.p. cylinders at starting; was there a similar arrangement on marine TE engines?

chadburn
1st April 2011, 22:47
The name of the game was to stop the engine with the HPcrank balanced at TDC and the Stephenson reversing links in the mid-position ready to either go Ahead or Astern (depending on what the vessel was doing), other than that it was using the Impulse Valves to give it a shove.

Billieboy
2nd April 2011, 10:32
So that the engine will restart? I have often wondered what would happen in a TE engine with the h.p piston stopped at the wrong crank positions.

At Cardiff Docks, the impounding pumps were single direction TE engines. If, while testing the engine after a repair or part replacement, it stopped in the wrong position, then it was the apprentices job to Bar the engine to the correct position, using a nine foot steel pinch bar fitted into a fulcrum of two thich steel plates and using the square pinching holes in the flywheel, if one was lucky it was only a short job. Then, when the engine driver came on shift one may be allowed to start the engine, and learn how to oil the eccentrics and the slippers.

Graham Wallace
2nd April 2011, 15:56
Titanic was recrip engines.

The Titanic had a Parsons type exhaust steam turbine using steam from main engines at 9 psi and powered the central prop with no reversing function.
the rotor blades were 18' to25.5' in length and the rotor casing 14 feet in length. total weight rotor and casing 420 tons

Manganese bronze prop 16.5 feet diameter, service rpm 165

A massive installation

Graham

Peter Short
5th April 2011, 14:16
The Titanic had a Parsons type exhaust steam turbine using steam from main engines at 9 psi

Graham,
For those like me not used to this type of machinery - it might be worth noting that steam entered the Titanic's exhaust turbine at around 10 lb absolute pressure, as one writer (John Guthrie) says "a mystery to the non-technical mind.....already a healthy vacuum to most people". About 18,000 SHP developed.

Graham Wallace
5th April 2011, 16:45
Graham,
For those like me not used to this type of machinery - it might be worth noting that steam entered the Titanic's exhaust turbine at around 10 lb absolute pressure, as one writer (John Guthrie) says "a mystery to the non-technical mind.....already a healthy vacuum to most people". About 18,000 SHP developed.

I did actually struggle with that figure when I partially quoted it.

Full Quote,"The exhaust steam turbine engine used to drive the central propeller was of the Parsons type and was designed to take the exhaust steam from the main engines at a pressure of about 9psi which was then expanded down to about 1lb absolute via a steam condensing plant. This condensing plant was designed to maintain a vacuum pressure of 2ft 4.5in on a barometer pressure of 30in". The turbine itself was designed to operate with a circulating water temperature of around 55-60 degrees F. Unquote. Author Tom McCluskie.

Reading back to the main engines, their spec was 215 psi to an exhaust pressure of 9 lb absolute!

I have a Steam ticket from 1962(ouch, 49 years ago), never sailed triple expansion though have vague memories of wonderful MOT oral questions.

Graham

Tmac1720
5th April 2011, 18:54
The correct section of quote should be " exhaust steam from the main engines at a pressure of 9 lbs absolute which was then expanded down to 1 llb absolute"

Unfortunately what I actually wrote didn't always make it to the final print past the proof reader. (Cloud)

Billieboy
6th April 2011, 14:11
Unfortunately what I actually wrote didn't always make it to the final print past the proof reader. (Cloud)

Don't panic Tmac, it happens to lots of Engineers!

Tmac1720
6th April 2011, 14:26
Don't panic Tmac, it happens to lots of Engineers!

Thanks for those kind words mate, but sometimes I wonder why anybody bothers to write anything when what you spend time over gets "edited" by somebody who doesn't know a valve from a pump. (Smoke)

Graham Wallace
6th April 2011, 16:24
The correct section of quote should be " exhaust steam from the main engines at a pressure of 9 lbs absolute which was then expanded down to 1 llb absolute"

Unfortunately what I actually wrote didn't always make it to the final print past the proof reader. (Cloud)

Tmac,
Thanks for a very interesting book. I was given my copy from the Director of the Marine Museum in Kingston Ontario when my volunteering ended and I moved West

Graham

Tmac1720
6th April 2011, 16:39
No problem Graham and I hope you enjoyed it errors and all... (LOL)

As we used to say in Harland and Bluff... "It wasn't me wot done it, I only held the drawing" (LOL)

septiclecky
13th September 2011, 18:56
Isn't there also one in Liverpool?

Correct near the PierHead by where the Isle of Man Steam Packet ferries berth.

Cutsplice
13th September 2011, 22:27
Has the monument any indication on it to relate the monument to the Titanic, as the one in Liverpool has no indication as White Star did not want any reference to the vessel. The monument is situated a stones throw from the ex White Star HQ in the bottom of James St, now vacant and in need of refurbishment.

davidrwarwick
14th September 2011, 09:06
The monument in Liverpool is called The Engineers Monument and was originally conceived as a monument to the Engineers lost on the Titanic, however during its construction it was altered to honour Engine Room casualties of WW1 and bears the inscription:-

IN HONOUR OF ALL HEROES OF THE MARINE ENGINE ROOM
THIS MEMORIAL WAS ERECTED BY INTERNATIONAL SUBSCRIPTION MCMXVI.

http://www.liverpoolworldheritage.com/visitingthewhs/areas/pierhead/memorialtoengineroomheroes.asp.

Dave

rickles23
7th November 2011, 06:34
Hi,
With the Titanic's engines, how long would it take to go from full ahead to full astern?
Regards

Duncan112
7th November 2011, 18:16
Some information here,

http://www.encyclopedia-titanica.org/discus/messages/5919/135459.html?1234206120

As with any internet forum though some must be taken with a few lorry loads of salt!!

rickles23
9th November 2011, 05:16
Thank you Ducan112,
So it seems that the Canadians were right, no time to reverse engines.
In the copy of the American Enquiry none of the Officers mentioned the Telegraph orders.
Regards

rodfair
22nd April 2012, 20:16
I believe the Engineer on the right is looking at the clock! "Ten more minutes and I'm out of here!"
We know that not to be the case!