Ship Captain's medical guide and the medical locker

Alan Rawlinson
29th March 2011, 17:00
Who remembers the daily routine as second mate, opening the medical locker ( after the morning sights) and more often than not sticking a needle into a few bum cheeks? Penicillin usually, although did have occasion once to administer morphine into the vein at the inside of the elbow joint.

Was telling the Grandkids the other day when attending their abrasions but don't think they believed me!

Then there was that lovely sickly sweet cough linctus in a 5 gallon jar. The Indian crew were addicted to it, and it quickly ran out....

Happy days...

R396040
29th March 2011, 20:01
Yes still consult my old copy and remember years I did it aboard various ships. On my first Brocks ship Matra in late sixties remember the Master (Hicks) suddenly taking an interest as I was getting a long line up of Indian crew each day.. I told him they were all coughing a lot. I had like with British crews given each small medicine bottle each full of cough linctus which is morphine based. He told me feed them literally one teaspoon each....... The queues soon stopped/
My latest diagnosis for my grandson of possible chicken pox was found to be incorrect and called a virus.Mind you my certificate is almost
fifty years old.
Stuart

Andy Lavies
29th March 2011, 20:28
No volunteers for "Black Draught", then, also in very large bottles. Kaolin et morph for tummies. Opium tincture for pain relief. Friars Balsam as an inhalent or could be used for sticking wounds where stiching was inappropriate. Dreadnaughts as thick as bike inner tubes and those re-usable BOT hypodermic needles!! Do present day ships still carry such things?
Andy

Windsor
29th March 2011, 20:36
I remember treating a young EDH for constipation, gradually working up from vegetable laxative pills to ever more copious doses of "black draught", without success! Until day four! I knew I'd succeeded when he crippled down the afterdeck towards the dispensary, trying to walk from the knees down, and his first words were,"Got anything for piles?"

simomatra
29th March 2011, 22:20
I remember a second mate, no names, who used to get the Indians to put out their tongue and he then place an Alka Seltzer tablet and told them to swallow it. he never got many to come back. That stopped the malingerers

John Farrell
29th March 2011, 22:24
I heard a variation on that one. A Second Mate in EDs used to treat all ailments by selotaping an asprin to the forehead.

jimthehat
29th March 2011, 23:32
Who remembers the daily routine as second mate, opening the medical locker ( after the morning sights) and more often than not sticking a needle into a few bum cheeks? Penicillin usually, although did have occasion once to administer morphine into the vein at the inside of the elbow joint.

Was telling the Grandkids the other day when attending their abrasions but don't think they believed me!

Then there was that lovely sickly sweet cough linctus in a 5 gallon jar. The Indian crew were addicted to it, and it quickly ran out....

Happy days...
I certainly remember the injections,on th Forresbank down in OZ we had a raft of indian going up to the docs every day with myself in tow ,the dock got fed up trating people who were not sick and advised me to give injections of vit C.Mentioned this to the old man and he ordered a few gross of the vials so i was a very busy lad at 0930 each morning and the crew loved it.

jim

IBlenkinsopp
30th March 2011, 08:06
Good Morning,

Still use the photos in the SCMG for Health & Social Care, when covering STI, with students, does the trick!

Eddie

Alan Rawlinson
30th March 2011, 08:09
I remember a second mate, no names, who used to get the Indians to put out their tongue and he then place an Alka Seltzer tablet and told them to swallow it. he never got many to come back. That stopped the malingerers

Wasn't going to mention it, but you've got me going now!

Can recall Jimmy Scobbie, 2/0 of the IRISBANK ( the older one) asking to see the palms of the Indian crew members lining up for treatment, and he would playfully spit in the middle of their hand. It was meant as a joke, and they usually saw the funny side, until one day someone took offence. That was the end of that game.

What about the medical guide with the glorious technicolour pic of a sick todger! Always seem to leave a lasting impression on the readers!

NoR
30th March 2011, 09:54
My copy is a 1952 edition. It has the burial service at the back; presumably for when you've worked your way through the book and the patient hasn't recovered.

I remember being given a bottle of cough linctus when 3/o on Black Ranger. I was feeling pretty rough, and swallowed the whole bottle fairly quickly, gave me a nice spaced out feeling and I could hear music. 2nd mate gave me bollocking and no more linctus.

Duncan112
30th March 2011, 10:20
Current version of the Guide available (FREE!!) at

http://www.dft.gov.uk/mca/mcga07-home/workingatsea/mcga-medicalcertandadvice/mcga-dqs_st_shs_ships_capt_medical_guide.htm

Sadly the photographs to threaten first trippers with are long gone

trotterdotpom
30th March 2011, 10:34
Current version of the Guide available (FREE!!) at

http://www.dft.gov.uk/mca/mcga07-home/workingatsea/mcga-medicalcertandadvice/mcga-dqs_st_shs_ships_capt_medical_guide.htm

Sadly the photographs to threaten first trippers with are long gone

Lack of shore leave and fear of the Grim Reaper have probably renedered those photos redundant.

John T.

Nick Balls
30th March 2011, 10:48
Alan
the last 'Advance medical Aid course' I did we had the specialist down from the local hospital's STD clinic. The nurse taking the course was great and had various college admin staff attend that part of the course. The young chap giving the talk said at the end 'And now for the 'piece de resistance' followed by the slide show................... Only the MN boys remained in the room..........the rest fled screaming!

Burned Toast
30th March 2011, 12:54
Used to buy a few packets of smarties, for those who wanted to see the doctor and get a day off, worked a treat with the somali crew.

Gareth Jones
30th March 2011, 15:19
Current version of the Guide available (FREE!!) at

http://www.dft.gov.uk/mca/mcga07-home/workingatsea/mcga-medicalcertandadvice/mcga-dqs_st_shs_ships_capt_medical_guide.htm

Sadly the photographs to threaten first trippers with are long gone

Just had a quick read through the bits on diseases.

Pulmonary Anthrax and Rabies still frighten me !

JoeQ
8th April 2011, 10:32
I certainly remember the injections,on th Forresbank down in OZ we had a raft of indian going up to the docs every day with myself in tow ,the dock got fed up trating people who were not sick and advised me to give injections of vit C.Mentioned this to the old man and he ordered a few gross of the vials so i was a very busy lad at 0930 each morning and the crew loved it.

jim

I sent a bunch of the Indian crew of the Laganbank ashore to see the doc in Maracibo, they all came back with a bag full of syringes and vit C injections. They all came to see me the next morning for their injections but none lasted more than 2 days before making a miraculous recovery

Waighty
8th April 2011, 11:25
Who remembers the daily routine as second mate, opening the medical locker ( after the morning sights) and more often than not sticking a needle into a few bum cheeks? Penicillin usually, although did have occasion once to administer morphine into the vein at the inside of the elbow joint.

Was telling the Grandkids the other day when attending their abrasions but don't think they believed me!

Then there was that lovely sickly sweet cough linctus in a 5 gallon jar. The Indian crew were addicted to it, and it quickly ran out....

Happy days...

When I was on AVONBANK (1970) the Chinese chippy was very addicted to the cough linctus - I had to restock the supply completely before I realised what he was up to. The Mate (Jeff Mann) had to order the chippy to stop drinking the stuff! Cold turkey for a while.

I loved administering the sulphur drugs particularly the sulphudimidine which if memory serves was the one that had to be chewed with water. It tasted foul but it certainly worked as no one ever came back for more.

Stories about 2nd Mates using Smarties as tablets abounded, I wonder how true they were?

Alan Rawlinson
8th April 2011, 11:40
When I was on AVONBANK (1970) the Chinese chippy was very addicted to the cough linctus - I had to restock the supply completely before I realised what he was up to. The Mate (Jeff Mann) had to order the chippy to stop drinking the stuff! Cold turkey for a while.

I loved administering the sulphur drugs particularly the sulphudimidine which if memory serves was the one that had to be chewed with water. It tasted foul but it certainly worked as no one ever came back for more.

Stories about 2nd Mates using Smarties as tablets abounded, I wonder how true they were?

Took an Indian from the E.R., to the doctor's in Birkenhead when on the Ernebank as Apprentice in 1953. The doctor took one look at him and sent me back with a note saying he was close to pegging out, and couldn't return with me. He had severe Diabetis. (spelling?) Was a bit of a shock as he had looked a bit thin but not at death's door. Can recall the name all these years later - it was Tabarak Ali. Anyway, a couple of years later we tied up alongside another Bank Line ship, and there was Tabarak Ali right as rain and with a big grin!

Re the sulphur tablets ( bunger uppers) wasn't the dose around 16 tablets a time?

woodend
8th April 2011, 13:22
I remember the First Aid Courses well with a 'supposed' doctor complete with soup stained tie doing the exam at the end. One of the other E.D. members on the course with me was asked the question: It is winter in Halifax, Nova Scotia and you are out with your girl friend and she collapses, what would you do?
Back came the quick reply: Take advantage of her before she ices over!
He passed.

Julian Calvin
8th April 2011, 13:32
Certainly was true on one Elders ship I was on. Chief Steward on the Freetown (Terry ?) used to separate the colours. The West African crew new exactly which colour was for what ailment and would correct him if they thought he had it wrong.

Gareth Jones
8th April 2011, 13:44
Certainly was true on one Elders ship I was on. Chief Steward on the Freetown (Terry ?) used to separate the colours. The West African crew new exactly which colour was for what ailment and would correct him if they thought he had it wrong.

(Applause)(Applause)(Applause)

I love that - superb !!

Joe C
9th April 2011, 17:13
Took an Indian from the E.R., to the doctor's in Birkenhead when on the Ernebank as Apprentice in 1953. The doctor took one look at him and sent me back with a note saying he was close to pegging out, and couldn't return with me. He had severe Diabetis. (spelling?) Was a bit of a shock as he had looked a bit thin but not at death's door. Can recall the name all these years later - it was Tabarak Ali. Anyway, a couple of years later we tied up alongside another Bank Line ship, and there was Tabarak Ali right as rain and with a big grin!

Re the sulphur tablets ( bunger uppers) wasn't the dose around 16 tablets a time?

Remember the sulpha-thingy tablets very well.Taking the bl**dy things,not dispensing them.Chittagong I think but we won't bother with the details!!

IRW
10th April 2011, 01:46
Re Smarties.
Afraid I used them as 2/0 on those I considered on the make the realy potent ones were the v.dark red,yellow stomache blue muscular etc but had to remember which ones were which or were soon corrected. Who said a Lascars bum was like an orange re injections must have had some real softies.

johnb42
4th May 2011, 23:02
The section of the book that I still remember vividly, was the one on back ache. Today's pc brigade would have had a ball with it.
The immediate assumption seemed to be that anyone presenting with back ache was malingering. To confirm this, it was suggested that firstly the "patient's" temperature be taken. During this operation it was suggested that the thermometer case was dropped to see if the "patient" bent to retrieve it. If he did it was back to work. If he didn't, but was still suspected of swinging the lead then he was to be confined to the ship's hospital, put on a slop diet with no tobacco and no visits from shipmates. This it was said would soon return the recalcitrant to work.
Those were the days.

Alan Rawlinson
5th May 2011, 07:12
The section of the book that I still remember vividly, was the one on back ache. Today's pc brigade would have had a ball with it.
The immediate assumption seemed to be that anyone presenting with back ache was malingering. To confirm this, it was suggested that firstly the "patient's" temperature be taken. During this operation it was suggested that the thermometer case was dropped to see if the "patient" bent to retrieve it. If he did it was back to work. If he didn't, but was still suspected of swinging the lead then he was to be confined to the ship's hospital, put on a slop diet with no tobacco and no visits from shipmates. This it was said would soon return the recalcitrant to work.
Those were the days.

I remember the coloured photo pages best....

The one of a chopper with a lurid chancre on it must have frustrated thousands of nights ashore.

tom roberts
5th May 2011, 10:29
A ship I was on one of the a.bs. copped a dose of a lass in the Cottage pub on the dock road Liverpool the chief steward gave him the peniciilin jabs he was allergic to it near killed him put him ashore in Las Palmas never heard of him again or what happend to him,frightened me think what training did these chief stewards ever get.

trotterdotpom
5th May 2011, 11:43
What year was he in Las Palmas?

Worrried, Tunbridge Wells.

jimthehat
5th May 2011, 13:43
A ship I was on one of the a.bs. copped a dose of a lass in the Cottage pub on the dock road Liverpool the chief steward gave him the peniciilin jabs he was allergic to it near killed him put him ashore in Las Palmas never heard of him again or what happend to him,frightened me think what training did these chief stewards ever get.
I would hazard a guess and say thay probably did the same courses as we second mates,ie first aid at sea cert,AND ship captains medical certificate.

jim(@)

China hand
5th May 2011, 18:36
I sailed with a Master who had to be jabbed every day. He hated the Mate, didn't trust the 2nd Mate, 3rd Mate couldn't read until he had 5 whiskies. I was No.1 'prentice. Got a lot of needle experience that trip.

trotterdotpom
6th May 2011, 00:05
I sailed with a Master who had to be jabbed every day. He hated the Mate, didn't trust the 2nd Mate, 3rd Mate couldn't read until he had 5 whiskies. I was No.1 'prentice. Got a lot of needle experience that trip.

I suppose ar*e pricking is better than ar*e licking.

John T.