Houlders Ore Carriers

Robinj
11th December 2005, 22:14
Oregis, Orelia, Oremina, Orepton, Oreridian & Oreosa. Sailed on four of these, b-----s in bad weather rolled like hell especially with a belly of Iron ore.

non descript
11th December 2005, 22:29
Only sailed on the one - OREGIS - 1966/67. Going round North Cape and having the Captain turn the radar off during a blizzard (for no logical reason other than he had the key and was in charge) was "interesting".

John Cassels
12th December 2005, 07:55
Probably saw you in Santa Portalbot as sailed on most of the Denholm ore boats
in the 60's. Ah the joys of Margam Wharf.

JC

jim barnes
12th December 2005, 09:47
sailed on the DUKESGARTH (ore carrier/ tramper) early 70s cant remember the company?

DCMARINE
12th December 2005, 10:33
Life history of All the B.I.S.C. ore carriers (The Iron Ladies) is given in Records 23, 24, & 25 0f Ships in Focus. Makes interesting reading.
Donald

Fairfield
12th December 2005, 13:37
DUKESGARTH, MONKSGARTH, QUEENSGARTH, KNIGHTSGARTH (?) all belonged to Cory. Regulars on the Clyde with ore and even after they went to Greeks as DAPO ships.
Pic of QUEENSGARTH in Ore Carriers Forum.

Baltic Wal
12th December 2005, 18:17
BISCO Submarines when on the Sept Isles run, only bridge and aft accomodation above water.
On the Rievaulx did 3 trips Glasgow Sept Isles, 20 hours in Glasgow then 1Hr 50 minutes loading at Sept Isles. Followed by a trip to Port Elizabeth, 2 weeks loading by hand. least we got a run ashore.

Robinj
13th December 2005, 19:49
Only sailed on the one - OREGIS - 1966/67. Going round North Cape and having the Captain turn the radar off during a blizzard (for no logical reason other than he had the key and was in charge) was "interesting".

Maybe the same old man who only appeared after his first bottle of gin.

Robinj
13th December 2005, 19:53
Probably saw you in Santa Portalbot as sailed on most of the Denholm ore boats
in the 60's. Ah the joys of Margam Wharf.

JC

Memories are fond of Port Talbot (well the local pubs and one crumy nightclub who's name alludes me).

non descript
13th December 2005, 22:58
BISCO Submarines when on the Sept Isles run, only bridge and aft accomodation above water.
On the Rievaulx did 3 trips Glasgow Sept Isles, 20 hours in Glasgow then 1Hr 50 minutes loading at Sept Isles. Followed by a trip to Port Elizabeth, 2 weeks loading by hand. least we got a run ashore.

Yes Baltic Wal, that's absolutely correct - the Seven Islands loading in 60 minutes was a thing to remember - amazing stuff. You needed a trip to Vitoria or Port Elizabeth after that one.

As for the Port Talbot Pub... maybe "Walnut Tree" or something similar, but the night club, that name is a distant memory that escapes me too.

peter lewis
13th December 2005, 23:52
i think the name of the night club in port talbot was the carlton

non descript
14th December 2005, 00:02
Well done Peter, it was indeed The Carlton Club. It was run by Bryn Thomas and apparently the first night club licence in the country to be granted outside London. Specialised in Folk Music and I remember a "Peter, Paul & Mary" act playing there regularly. All I can remember was fancying Mary - which was just as well really given the alternatives....

Tom Morton
14th December 2005, 00:31
All this talk about 'Port Talbot' brings back great memories from 30 + years ago. The 'Walnut' rings a loud bell, memories of some good Chinese Resturants, Margam Abbey steelworks and most importantly 'my first love'. (*))
Those were certainly the days!
Does anyone remember a S Wales bosun by the name of Dennis Ahearn who served on sveral of the PT ore carriers

greatharwood
14th December 2005, 01:01
Life history of All the B.I.S.C. ore carriers (The Iron Ladies) is given in Records 23, 24, & 25 0f Ships in Focus. Makes interesting reading.
Donald

Where can I find Ships in Focus? I did one trip on the Iron Horse.Talk of Sept Isles and rolling has brought back memories which for 30 odd years had been lost in the deep subconscious. For good reason....

John Cassels
14th December 2005, 08:10
Ah , what memories indeed.

The walnut is well remembered, also the Grand hotel which was nearest to Margam
and once you had crossed the railway lines served as a first stop and then the
last stop at the end of the evening.
There was also the "Lamb and flag"commonly known as the lamb and tit and a couple
of dubious watering holes on the way down to the "beach".

Remember all the laybys just inside the locks which after the neaps used to be well occupied.

Still got some photos of Santa Portalbot in the hey days which I can post if
anyone interested. (Don't all rush to your keyboards).

JC

peter lewis
14th December 2005, 10:57
you lucky people you just visited port talbot think of us old salts who live there so much smoke from the steel works even the birds cough and the grand is still there

DCMARINE
14th December 2005, 12:24
"Ships in Focus" can be ordered from J. & M. Clarkson in Preston. Give them a ring on 01772 612855.
Regards,
Donald

Baltic Wal
14th December 2005, 18:28
Website www.shipsinfocus.co.uk

Roddy MacSween
14th December 2005, 19:31
Crinan, Naess Trader, Sir Andrew Duncan, Ormsary in the 60's!! Happy memories of a memorable era.

Port Talbot - Red House!
Narvick
Seven Islands - Who could forget Sept Iles?
Pepel
Monrovia
Workington - Lovely memories - Cannot remeber the favourite drinking den!
Newport
Sagunto
Alicante - before the arrival of toursists, when a 'Cubalibre' cost pennies!!
Etc, etc.

John Cassells, I remember very well aand have fond memories of the old cacet vessel 'Crinan' - Well mostly fond, with the exception of one sadistic Instructor who will remain nameless!!

First Trip Cadets

Hamish Mackay
Syd Catto
Derek Wickins
John Jackson
Sam Brown
John Cassels
Frank Brown
Gavin Brownlie
John Gatherer
Stewart Cameron
Rodney Holroyd
Hamish MacKay

How am I doing? I have missed one!! Does anyone know what happened to my old pal Syd Catto

Regards

Roddy MacSween

Robinj
14th December 2005, 22:49
The Grand Hotel and the Walnut tree are the two I best remember especially when they erupted at closing time, still can't remember the nightclub only getting rooked playing roulette.

Was it the Commercial Hotel near the station in Workington I know the beer was Robert Peel, and as we got on well with the barmaid we pretended to be residents and got a lock in.

Razor
15th December 2005, 00:12
Was it the Commercial Hotel near the station in Workington I know the beer was Robert Peel, and as we got on well with the barmaid we pretended to be residents and got a lock in.


Afraid the Commercial is just a derelict building at the moment. Did you never use the Coastguard or the Steam Packet? they were the closest two pubs to the dock, the former was open 24/7, but unfortunatly was closed down a few years ago when a brawl occurred between two Scandiwegian crews. The barmaid tried to control things by brandishing a gun, which someone had given her years earlier and she had believed was a replica ('onest yer honer) the gun when off, blowing a neat hole in the ceiling and upsetting the local constabulary. With the result that the barmaid got a job serving porridge for a wee while and the pub was closed down and is now a private house. Shame!!
The Steam Packet is still going strong, but has been renamed by the locals as the Fag Packet due to the clientels preference for "uphill gardening"

John Peel for the beer, Robert was the guy that started the aforemention constabulary.

The ore days at Workington are finished, the steel works are being shut down, the coal trade has finished completely as well, virtually the only seaborne traffic now is tankers. The local council are at present considering closing the docks and turning the place into yet another marina.
Such is life!!

Cheers Razor

John Cassels
15th December 2005, 12:19
Roddy old pal,

Think you mead Sid(Sandy) CATHRO,

cass

John Cassels
15th December 2005, 19:15
Roddy.me again,

How could you miss Kirkeness. Don't you remember our 4th trip on the Crinan ?.
Still got photos of you with the whole crowd on the poop , in fact have lots of
them - on our very first ship.

The "sadistic" instructor.......... I got to know quite well afterwards. Maybe he
mellowed with age !!!!!.

Cass

Robinj
15th December 2005, 23:00
Thanks Razor I thought I had got it wrong still pickled from the stuff. We always seemed to go to the commercial as we got the lock ins.

david smith
16th December 2005, 08:31
I know I got chucked out of a pub in Costa del Workington for explaining to the Landlord our cargo - Australian coal transhipped from Rotterdam. Spent the rest of the night at the Coastguard.

Frank P
16th December 2005, 10:58
When I was on the M/S Arabella one of her regular loading ports was Nouadhibu in Mauritania West Africa. If you wanted a drink there you had to travel in to the next country Spanish Sahara, I think it was about 20-30 minutes by car.

Frank

trotterdotpom
16th December 2005, 11:45
When I was on the M/S Arabella one of her regular loading ports was Nouadhibu in Mauritania West Africa. If you wanted a drink there you had to travel in to the next country Spanish Sahara, I think it was about 20-30 minutes by car.

Frank

Most people don't realize that the word "pisspot" is actually derived from the word "passport".

For ore carrier afficionados with fond memories of Monrovia and Lower Buchanan: today, 16th December in 1821, Lt Robert Stockton and Dr Eli Ayers, a naval surgeon and member of the American Colonizing Society, induced a local African king to sell territory for a colony which later became the Republic of Liberia.

Coincidentally, on the same day 48 years prior to that event, the Boston Tea Party took place - American anti-colonialists chucked 300 chests of tea overboard from a British ship in Boston.

Information from "www.seawaves.com" - free "This Day in History" - check it out and keep up with the nautical past.

Sadly, particularly for any of our descendents who live there, Liberia has been a bit of a disaster area for quite a few years now. Bring back President Tubman - I've probably still got a tee shirt with his picture on.

John T.

Bob Davies
16th December 2005, 13:50
The Oregis was my first ship - joined her in Irlam dock just before Christmas 1966.
I was junior R/O to Pete Benney.Stayed on her for 3 months before joining the Cunarders (Carinthia then the Caronia)Some good memories!!!
Bob

non descript
16th December 2005, 14:38
Bob, there is more than an equal chance that I was on OREGIS at that time, as I joined her in Workington towards the end of 1966 and remember being in Irlam quite soon after joining her and several times after that. Oh the joy or taking 4 hours to sail up to Manchester just to turn the ship round and then pass the berth we had vacated earlier, but now heading the opposite direction some 8 hours later.

Roddy MacSween
6th January 2006, 20:20
Memories are fond of Port Talbot (well the local pubs and one crumy nightclub who's name alludes me).
Red House and the Talbot?

wa002f0328
6th January 2006, 21:26
WHAT ABOUT MABEL WARWICK, WAS she not a little orecow????

vix
6th January 2006, 22:41
This brings back memories: I was 'sent' to Falmouth...to join the Stancloud...when I got there I was met at the station...2 blokes said, "You for the Stancloud?" Yep..."Would you prefer to join the Pennyworth...going to Vittoria? Would I??!! I met up with the Stancloud 18 months later...in Bandar Mashur...still the same crowd...they came onto a BP...looking for a decent feed!! 'nuff said? Vix

non descript
7th January 2006, 09:00
WHAT ABOUT MABEL WARWICK, WAS she not a little orecow????

She was a lovely ship and a lovely name too.

Bob Davies
7th January 2006, 09:36
Hi Tonga. The Oregis was my first ship.Irlam to Narvik with Pete Benney as Chief R/O.Got a picture of him somewhere.Joined on 28.12.66 and paid off 31.3.67.I remember it was a good trip with a good introduction/training from Pete.I believe you are on Anglesey - so am I (in Llanfairpwllgwyn-etc)Call in to Topaz.Regards.Bob

non descript
7th January 2006, 16:11
Hi Tonga. The Oregis was my first ship.Irlam to Narvik with Pete Benney as Chief R/O.Got a picture of him somewhere.Joined on 28.12.66 and paid off 31.3.67.I remember it was a good trip with a good introduction/training from Pete.I believe you are on Anglesey - so am I (in Llanfairpwllgwyn-etc)Call in to Topaz.Regards.Bob

Hello Bob,

As I did a voyage from Irlam to Narvik in January 1967 it seems very likely we were on board together, The Master was Captain Oddy I think?

I'm not sure why you come to the conclusion that I'm on Angelsey? Whilst Islands are definitely my forte, they tend to be Tongan rather than British.

Kind regards
Tonga

Bob Davies
7th January 2006, 16:18
Hi Tonga,
Oh dear - open mouth insert both feet.
Bob (egg)

PS I must have looked at someon else`s profile.Sorry

non descript
7th January 2006, 18:14
Hi Bob,

No worries, I do that most of the time (and worse)

Kind regards
Tonga

norsea
7th January 2006, 21:31
Hi to all ex Houlder Ore Carrier personnel.I sailed in all six ore carriers as well as
Mabel Warwick. First as Apprentice in Oregis in1956 under Capt Denis Parkin (later
Personnel Supt) and finally 1st Mate in Mabel Warwick in `68. Served all my career with Houlders including 5 years in the North Sea. Oregis was converted to a Diving Support Vessel in 74 and renamed Coupler 1, reverting back to Oregis in 76.She carried a full saturation diving team and had a Saturation chamber, Diving Bell and Wet Bell on board.Ship`s personnel were renamed Barge Master, Ass1t Bargemasters,
Roughnecks and Roustabouts as per Oil Rig rating. I was forced to retire on health grounds in 78 so no doubt Oregis is long gone.Incidentally Mabel Warwick had a sister ship Joya McCance.
Regards
Norsea

jordiboy
7th January 2006, 22:01
I did three trips on Oreosa 1961/62, Pepel Narvik and Monrovia, excellent cabins and food.

non descript
8th January 2006, 13:23
Pepel was interesting because it involved sailing up river and made a change from the usual ocean ore terminal. There was also the chance of monkeys being bought and brought onboard.

Baltic Wal
8th January 2006, 14:24
Trouble with pepel was that you needed to move ship to load another hold. Not much to do at a conveyorbelt sticking out of the jungle, only thing to do at Pepel was flame throw the insects.

Another exciting port was Wabana where you tied up on an exposed berth under a cliff and the ore came by conveyor belt from the mine to the top of the cliff.

Best place was Vitiria where it was just a rowboat into town.

non descript
8th January 2006, 16:08
Another exciting port was Wabana where you tied up on an exposed berth under a cliff and the ore came by conveyor belt from the mine to the top of the cliff.
.

Was that were the man with a large hammer took a swipe at the bigger lumps as the passed along the conveyor belt, in order to smash them and thereby avoid the huge drop on to the tank top with a 15kilo ore lump?

Baltic Wal
8th January 2006, 17:20
Thats right, it was a long drop from the top of the cliff and played havoc with the wooden sheathing we had, that and the grabs at General Terminus

non descript
8th January 2006, 17:25
Thanks Baltic Wal.

calumthomson
24th February 2006, 19:22
Re JC to Roddy Macsween,
With age I sure did John as we all had to, but no offence. We did get to know each other better in Antwerp and were always glad you were there.
Good to hear you always,
Calum

vic pitcher
1st March 2006, 16:09
Vallum Shipping Co. (Common Bros, BISCO, Jardine & Mathieson)


"Iron Age"
"Iron Ore"
"Iron Barque"
"Iron Horse"
"Iron Crown"

Hindustan Steam Shipping Co.
"Afghanistan"
"Daghestan"

"Iron Horse" happiest ship I've ever been in (2nd Mate 1963-4)

O.M. the redoubtable "T2" Taylor, a pint sized holy terror.
Purser/Ch.Stwd Bill Allaway
2/E Albert Le Blond- later a formidable Tyne and Wearside entrepreneur.

"Horse" and "Age" had Chinese crew, remainder were Brits.
Fovourite discharge ports for partying, Birkenhead (Bidston Dock)
Middlesbrough (Cargo Fleet)

Jeff Egan
1st March 2006, 16:25
Afghanistan had Chinese crew when I sailed in her in 1968

DerekC
25th March 2006, 16:53
Hello Bob,

As I did a voyage from Irlam to Narvik in January 1967 it seems very likely we were on board together, The Master was Captain Oddy I think?

I'm not sure why you come to the conclusion that I'm on Angelsey? Whilst Islands are definitely my forte, they tend to be Tongan rather than British.

Kind regards
Tonga
HI Tonga,

I have just joined the forum and enjoyinfg all the comments about the 'ore' boats, what pigs they were...! My first trip to see was in the OREMINA, Houlder Brothers, and it was nearly my last! Up to Narvik in ballast from Dagenham into the teeth of the big hurricane of 1970, anyone remember that? I can take a joke as well as the next man but that trip as an introduction was pushing it a bit. I note you sailed with Captain Oddy, I met him on the 'Mabel Warwick', or was it the 'OROTAVA', I am just away to dig out my discharge books to check. But for now I like the forum, I look forward to some good yarns.

regards
Derek

DerekC
28th March 2006, 19:02
Hi everyone,

I am trying to build a journal of my days on the ore ships of Houlder Brothers. Found a couple of nice pictures already on this excellent forum, but would like to know if anyone has any more they would like to share. I lost all my own shots years ago and have nothing to show my kids. Maybe, there are some salty dogs out there who knew me and took some piccies. I'd especially like to hear from them. To help focus in, here is a brief list of my trips...

OREMINA - 10/71 till early 72 - Houlder Brothers (my first trip Dagenham/Narvik, paid off in Falmouth)

Mabel Warwick - Aug 72 till Jan 73 - Capt Oddy.

OROTAVA - Nov 74 till Jan 75 - Capt Lewis

Sir Alexander Glen (bare boat charter OBO) - Sep 75 till Feb 76 - Capt Leach

Any piccies at all would be a great help. Hope to chat soon.

DerekC
(Thumb)

non descript
30th March 2006, 21:09
Orotava enjoyed a succession of name changes: (1968) Orotava, (1969) Orotava bridge, 1974) Orotava, (1979) Ripon Grange. - At least she ended her time with a proper name (*))

NINJA
10th May 2006, 20:19
Went to Vittoria on the OROTAVA BRIDGE, problems with loading such a big vessel for that port meant we had nearly a week in Vittoria, we then went to Tubarao to top off. After Sept Isles Vittoria was heaven.

NINJA
10th May 2006, 20:28
Razor,

You forgot to mention the Ancient Mariner better known as the "Honky TonK" in your list of Workington night life, now burnt down.

A traffic into the docks now is Gypsum from Italy. Which is then transported to Britsh Plaster Board works at Kirby Thore.

ruud
29th June 2006, 04:24
Hi everyone,

I am trying to build a journal of my days on the ore ships of Houlder Brothers. Found a couple of nice pictures already on this excellent forum, but would like to know if anyone has any more they would like to share. I lost all my own shots years ago and have nothing to show my kids. Maybe, there are some salty dogs out there who knew me and took some piccies. I'd especially like to hear from them. To help focus in, here is a brief list of my trips...

OREMINA - 10/71 till early 72 - Houlder Brothers (my first trip Dagenham/Narvik, paid off in Falmouth)

Mabel Warwick - Aug 72 till Jan 73 - Capt Oddy.

OROTAVA - Nov 74 till Jan 75 - Capt Lewis

Sir Alexander Glen (bare boat charter OBO) - Sep 75 till Feb 76 - Capt Leach

Any piccies at all would be a great help. Hope to chat soon.

DerekC
(Thumb)
Ahoy Derek,
Found your Sir Alexander Glen in the "old shoebox" piccie must be taken in the mid/end '70's early '80's in the Rotterdam area, possible the Nieuwe Waterweg[New Waterway].

Nova Scotian
19th August 2006, 23:12
I am seeking information on one of Houlders ore carriers, the MV Orepton. This was my first trip to sea. I joined her in Workington, in April 1964, and payed-off in Irlam seven months later.

If anyone has some pictures of her, that I can use, they would be really appreciated. I am also seeking information on her particulars, and on her history after she left the Houlder fold. Finally, am I correct in assuming the Master at the time was a Captain Bully?

Many thanks.

Nova Scotian

john shaw
19th August 2006, 23:44
Nova Scotian

if you visit www.photoship.co.uk, enter the gallery, you will find numerous files -- enter those for the letter "O" and there is a pic of Orepton in there.

Nova Scotian
20th August 2006, 02:29
Nova Scotian

if you visit www.photoship.co.uk, enter the gallery, you will find numerous files -- enter those for the letter "O" and there is a pic of Orepton in there.
Thanks John.

non descript
20th August 2006, 08:25
John

Orepton was built 1955, sold in 1971 and re-named Orepton Star, sold in 1973 re-named Maritihi and broken up in 1974.

Regards
Mark

Les Gibson
20th August 2006, 10:58
My first trip to sea as 'Lecky was on Afghanistan (Chinese crew) Feb. 1962. Spent 4 months rocking and rolling back and forth to Sept. Isle with one trip to Monrovia! Then joined Iron crown(European crew) June 1962 until Feb, 1963. Better runs Vittoria etc. but still rolled all over the shop, even when tied up.

Nova Scotian
20th August 2006, 12:21
John

Orepton was built 1955, sold in 1971 and re-named Orepton Star, sold in 1973 re-named Maritihi and broken up in 1974.

Regards
Mark
Hi Tonga:

Thanks for the history on Orepton. Although I sailed under Captain Oddy, I believe he relieved a Captain Bully. Does that name ring a bell with you?

non descript
20th August 2006, 13:36
Nova Scotian,

Captain Oddy was a very decent chap. He was Master of the Oregis when I was on her in 1966-67 - the other name you mention does not ring any bells at this stage, it is quite a curious name to have as a Ship's Master.

I was very lucky to sail with the latter; that way I was able to appreciate Captain Oddy's gentlemanly behaviour as well as his ability as a seaman.

Kind regards
Tonga

Razor
20th August 2006, 15:49
[QUOTE=NINJA]Razor,

You forgot to mention the Ancient Mariner better known as the "Honky TonK" in your list of Workington night life, now burnt down.

Very remiss of me!!!!
My first visit there was like a re union!!! Most of the Lassies there, had been in my class at the local school, as had their husbands, which made for a few interesting experiences!!! Lol.

NINJA
20th August 2006, 16:26
Hello Razor,

Nowhere left for a reunioun now, even the Coastguard is a private house along with rhe Sailors Return and all the lassies have definitely retired.

Cheers

Ninja.

Trader
20th August 2006, 21:02
I am seeking information on one of Houlders ore carriers, the MV Orepton. This was my first trip to sea. I joined her in Workington, in April 1964, and payed-off in Irlam seven months later.

If anyone has some pictures of her, that I can use, they would be really appreciated. I am also seeking information on her particulars, and on her history after she left the Houlder fold. Finally, am I correct in assuming the Master at the time was a Captain Bully?

Many thanks.

Nova Scotian

Hi Nova Scotian,

I have put a couple of photos of the "Orepton" in the thumbnails in this post taken in the Ship Canal, I don't even know when I took them, probably early 60's and before 1964. They are not very good but it shows you the old steam tugs on the canal in those days.

I did a trip on the "Orelia" in 1958. Joined her in Irlam did the trip to Pepel and paid off in Dagenham. One trip was enough. Nice ship, single berths(not usual in those days) food not too bad, Captain was a gentleman from Hartlepool, the Mate was a p--t. He logged me for smoking on the lookout on the monkey island on the way down to Pepel. He came up to the island to tell me to come down on to the bridge wing under the awning as a tropical storm was approaching(I suppose that you have to give him credit for that). He saw me putting my dog end into the sand bucket and told me in no uncertain terms that smoking was not allowed on the lookout.

I had to laugh( not in his face of course) as the sand bucket was full of dog ends. I suppose that I was the only one to get caught. The funnel was belching out sparks, it wasn't as if I was a fire hazard. Bye the way I haven't smoked for 42 years, not on account of that incident though.

All the best........Trader.

non descript
20th August 2006, 21:10
Trader, if my memory serves me well the first 8 hours of the voyage from Irlam to Pepel was taken up with going up the canal to Manchester in order to turn round, and 8 hours later one passed the berth again, but this time heading towards the sea. (*))
Kind regards
Tonga

Trader
20th August 2006, 22:22
Trader, if my memory serves me well the first 8 hours of the voyage from Irlam to Pepel was taken up with going up the canal to Manchester in order to turn round, and 8 hours later one passed the berth again, but this time heading towards the sea. (*))
Kind regards
Tonga

Quite right TONGA. There was a turning basin just below Irlam locks near to Irlam steelworks and the iron ore berth. It was only big enough to turn the small colliers (3,000tons) which came to Partington(next door to the steelworks) after they had loaded coal. Any thing bigger such as the iron ore boats had to go up to Manchester to turn around passing through Irlam, Barton and Mode Wheel locks swinging in Salford docks and then negotiate the same locks again on the outward passage and passing the iron ore berth from which you had started about 6 hours later depending on traffic.

It wasn't too bad if the weather was decent but if it was raining it was no picnic as you were on standby most of the time tying up in the locks, making tugs fast etc.

Regards Trader.

non descript
20th August 2006, 22:46
Quite right TONGA. There was a turning basin just below Irlam locks near to Irlam steelworks and the iron ore berth. It was only big enough to turn the small colliers (3,000tons) which came to Partington(next door to the steelworks) after they had loaded coal. Any thing bigger such as the iron ore boats had to go up to Manchester to turn around passing through Irlam, Barton and Mode Wheel locks swinging in Salford docks and then negotiate the same locks again on the outward passage and passing the iron ore berth from which you had started about 6 hours later depending on traffic.

It wasn't too bad if the weather was decent but if it was raining it was no picnic as you were on standby most of the time tying up in the locks, making tugs fast etc.

Regards Trader.

Trader,
Come on, don't exaggerate... " but if it was raining it " - are you suggesting that there really are days when it does not rain in Manchester....

(*))

Kind regards
Tonga

Trader
20th August 2006, 23:02
Tonga,

As a Mancunian I resent your last remark.It has been known for the sun to shine sometimes in Manchester. LOL.

Trader

non descript
20th August 2006, 23:14
Trader/Mark

I apologise - I was getting confused with Pepel.

:D

Nova Scotian
21st August 2006, 14:34
Hi Nova Scotian,

I have put a couple of photos of the "Orepton" in the thumbnails in this post taken in the Ship Canal, I don't even know when I took them, probably early 60's and before 1964. They are not very good but it shows you the old steam tugs on the canal in those days.

I did a trip on the "Orelia" in 1958. Joined her in Irlam did the trip to Pepel and paid off in Dagenham. One trip was enough. Nice ship, single berths(not usual in those days) food not too bad, Captain was a gentleman from Hartlepool, the Mate was a p--t. He logged me for smoking on the lookout on the monkey island on the way down to Pepel. He came up to the island to tell me to come down on to the bridge wing under the awning as a tropical storm was approaching(I suppose that you have to give him credit for that). He saw me putting my dog end into the sand bucket and told me in no uncertain terms that smoking was not allowed on the lookout.

I had to laugh( not in his face of course) as the sand bucket was full of dog ends. I suppose that I was the only one to get caught. The funnel was belching out sparks, it wasn't as if I was a fire hazard. Bye the way I haven't smoked for 42 years, not on account of that incident though.

All the best........Trader.
Hi Trader:

Thanks for the pictures...it brought back a few memories. I guess ore carriers didn't appeal to everyone, but Houlders liked to put a lot of their first-trippers on them whether they were mates, engineers or ROs. Uncomplicated ships that came home every couple of weeks.

Cheers

leo hannan
21st August 2006, 20:55
Nova Scotian,

Captain Oddy was a very decent chap. He was Master of the Oregis when I was on her in 1966-67 - the other name you mention does not ring any bells at this stage, it is quite a curious name to have as a Ship's Master, and reminds me (for some reason that I cannot imagine) of Captain TAG Head of the Royston Grange. (*))

I was very lucky to sail with the latter before I sailed with the former; that way I was able to appreciate Captain Oddy's gentlemanly behaviour as well as his ability as a seaman.

Kind regards
Tonga
Hi Mark.
You're spot on with Capt. Oddy. I remember when I first met him on the "Oremina" I knocked on his cabin door and heard "ccccooommme in" and I thought to myself "Oh God" wait till he hears me open my mouth. I stuttered worse than he did, we both burst out laughing and we seemed to get along like a house on fire. As you say a nice bloke.
Regards
Leo (*))

non descript
24th August 2006, 21:44
Leo,
I had forgotten that aspect of Captain Oddy’s lifestyle; I remember him more as having the patience of a saint, as he tried to teach me to play darts, being a gentleman he explained that it was just the roll of the ship that caused my arrows to miss their target. (Smoke)
Regards
Mark

Robinj
24th August 2006, 23:27
Hi Nova Scotian, I sailed as R/O on the Orepton in the 1960's, but also sailed on Three others so not to sure when. Remember them all with fond and memories.

norsea
27th August 2006, 18:07
What a shame you gentlemen cannot remember Norman Oddy as a true gentleman as First Mate on board Condesa in 59 when I completed my Apprenticeship. Capt. Head, a stickler for dicipline but also competely fair. If TAG Head came on the bridge at 0200 and you were not out on the wing he had to know why.Radar was for Capt`s use only. Happy Days!!!!

leo hannan
28th August 2006, 20:59
What a shame you gentlemen cannot remember Norman Oddy as a true gentleman as First Mate on board Condesa in 59 when I completed my Apprenticeship. Capt. Head, a stickler for dicipline but also competely fair. If TAG Head came on the bridge at 0200 and you were not out on the wing he had to know why.Radar was for Capt`s use only. Happy Days!!!!
Hi Norsea.
I would certainly agree with you about Norman Oddy, one of the old school. Can't say the same for how I found TAG Head, worked by with him on Westbury and sailed with him on Royston Grange 67', rather an obnoxious sort of bloke. Was he involved in turning over a tug somewhere down Southern Argentina? From what I gather he was taken ashore by the authorities but someone from BA office drove down and got him out of the country( or is this another Houlder legend)
Regards
Leo (*))

non descript
6th September 2006, 12:13
Dave Edge has kindly posted and excellent shot of Oreosa here:

http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/showphoto.php?photo=34199

duquesa
6th September 2006, 15:19
Great memories reading all these tales of the ore boats. Did time on several from 1957, later to include both Mabel Warwick and Joya McCance.
I thought I remembered all the Masters but must confess, "Bully" rings no bells. Could it have been Boothby? He later commanded and unfortunately died with his whole ships crew on the Royston Grange. Tommy Head was a law onto himself but, although extremely strict, he was a very fine seaman. I had happy times with him on the Langton Grange. He later took over the Hardwicke Grange and there, finished his seagoing career.

non descript
6th September 2006, 21:19
Captain George Boothby was a perfect gentleman and tragically lost his life, together with the entire crew, in May 1972 when catastrophe overtook the Royston Grange. He was an excellent seaman and one of the best Masters to serve in the Houlders fleet. I don't remember him serving on the Ore Carriers, but I could be wrong.

trotterdotpom
7th September 2006, 00:37
Captain George Boothby was a perfect gentleman and tragically lost his life, together with the entire crew, in May 1972 when catastrophe overtook the Royston Grange. He was an excellent seaman and one of the best Masters to serve in the Houlders fleet. I don't remember him serving on the Ore Carriers, but I could be wrong.

I sailed with Captain Boothby on "Mabel Warwick" in about 1969.

John T.

non descript
7th September 2006, 10:21
Thank you John T., I am grateful for your guidance. (Applause) On that basis I would go as far as to say you had the excellent combination of a Good Ship and a Good Master.

trotterdotpom
7th September 2006, 13:17
Thank you John T., I am grateful for your guidance. (Applause) On that basis I would go as far as to say you had the excellent combination of a Good Ship and a Good Master.

Very true, Tonga.

John T.

duquesa
27th October 2006, 09:01
Incidentally you ex Houlder guys, wrong thread I know but, any of you ever sail on the Ore boats with Capt.Paddy Slevin? I was shipmates with him when he was Ch.Off. on the Imperial Transport under Capts. Valentine & Wells. What a character.

Lefty
2nd December 2006, 01:40
I've 'wasted' the whole evening reading this thread. Great stuff! Was 2/O on the 'O' carriers for seven years between 64 and 71/2 plus Queensbury with Tag Head. My first ship in Houlders was the Joya McCance from Glasgow to Port Ettienne, later called Noadibou with Backhouse and family. When I told my parents I was to join her my mother asked what sort of ship. I replied 'an ore carrier'. She exclaimed ' A WHAT?'
Anyway up I want to get my oar in for Dixie Dean. He was the greatest guy I have ever sailed under. What a gentleman! Tag Head was naff compaired to him! Pay-off sheets for every man jack over 10 possible pay-off dates, and then another ten days for good measure, as if there wasn't enough to do !!!
Paddy Slevin was a great guy too, but then having come from Bank Line, Houlders was an absolute dream world!!!! Home every six months on the dot! Wow!!! Learning to play darts on an ore carrier does funny things to your shore side attempts! 30 degree rolls are not condusive to good play!
Hear from you all again I've no doubt!
Howard

non descript
2nd December 2006, 08:06
Yes Howard, the Ore Carriers were great ships and a joy the sail on. There is a wealth of stories in various threads about many of the Masters you mentioned and indeed, Paddy Slevin was unique; in passing you may see that TAG Head just passed away and his widow gets some comfort from reading the threads of times past.

NINJA
3rd December 2006, 19:29
Not that it was a place you would spend long time alongside, but did anyone ever spend longer than 24 hours tied up at Seven Islands, I was there on the OROTAVA and it was only 24 hours. (Once got 5 days in Vittoria but that was a different kettle of fish).

Regards

Ninja.

non descript
3rd December 2006, 19:41
I do remember taking 10 days to get to Seven Islands on Oregis and 90 minutes to load.....

john shaw
3rd December 2006, 20:14
90 minutes to load Mark? How on earth did you get rid of all the ballast that quickly?

I think the quickest we did on "Irish Wasa"(ex Sheaf Wear,16000dwt) after a 10 day crossing was about 6 hours at Port Cartier-- we had to keep stopping the loading to deballast, despite putting her in a trim about 15 feet by the stern.

The over-riding recollection I have of ore-carriers on BISCO charters was the battle to deballast fast enough!!-- the stripping was the slow bit.

non descript
3rd December 2006, 20:45
John
You are absolutely correct and it was frankly a disgrace (to the load line rules) as we ended up having to stop the loading to catch up with the de-ballasting. So my 90 minutes was not so much poetic licence, as running time.
Kind regards
Mark

duquesa
3rd December 2006, 22:42
All true though! Suffered a run of Seven Islands trips on Oreosa,Mabel Warwick & Joya McCance. Strange, cold,unwelcoming, rectum of the world. Maybe the 90 mins was a blessing in disguise. 9/10 days there and back sometimes almost submerged. Great ships though - no regrets.

non descript
3rd December 2006, 22:57
John

Looking back at my post, read in the wrong light it might seem a bit off-hand; that was not my intention...

You are wholly correct in your observations, I trying to make the point that there was an element of poetic licence about my comment, and the 90 minutes referred, not to time from start to finish, but the accumulated hours required to put the ore into the holds.

I would say that 6 hour alongside was more like it, but certainly putting 9,000MT of iron-ore into the Oregis could have been done in an obscenely quick time and the only thing stopping her being turned round with actually mooring, was the ballast system.

Kind regards
Mark

Lefty
3rd December 2006, 23:51
I can remember going to Sept Isles in fog,discharging ballast before going alongside, hearing a farting noise(cargo being loaded), moving off the berth, closing hatches and being told paperwork would catch up with us by post! Thence to Irlam for a 12 hr turnaround and back again for another lot!!!
HL H

Nova Scotian
3rd December 2006, 23:54
My first trip to sea was on the Orepton...Workington to Seven Islands and then back to Port Talbot. Bad weather on both trips across the Atlantic with a very short turn-around in Seven Islands. Iceberg watches in the Belle Isle Strait. Not what I thought I had signed on for! However, things turned around for the next few trips when we loaded in Melilla and other Med ports.

De-ballasting was always a problem on those ships. Once, while at anchor off Takoradi, we had started the process when the pilot boarded earlier than expected. The anchor was weighed and we headed in with a number of the tanks slack. On approaching the breakwaters we encountered a slight cross swell and started to roll quite excessively due to free surface effect. It was quite an alarming two minutes with everyone hanging on for dear life all over the ship.

A practical lesson in stability for all on board!

Lefty
3rd December 2006, 23:54
Oh yes, and I think I was the only one to get ashore. 2/O always did the draft on arrival and dept if my brain serves me right !!!

NINJA
4th December 2006, 17:48
Hello Nova Scotian,

I suppose you went from one extreme to the other on your first trip to sea as regards a run ashore, Workington versus Seven Island, Hudson Bay Trading post versus the Honkey Tonk.

No contest.

Regards

Ninja.

non descript
4th December 2006, 18:18
The Joya McCance became the ST. Margaret and continued the BISCO charter, my first ship in 1968 Middlesboro to Monrovia with Paddy Slevin. She was also my first ship as 2nd Mate in 1973. She would roll on wet grass. Remember leaving Glasgow New Years Eve '73 for Seven Islands and loading in 35 minutes, good news it was -40!!


Looking back I found this one - I reckon the 35 minutes would definitely be a record.

ps. In case anyone is wondering, I have just moved all the recent general comments to the main Houlders Ore Carriers Thread, in keeping with scheme of things and the fact they were about several of the Ore Boats and I will copy this one across to provide some continuity.

Robinj
4th December 2006, 22:13
Fortunately never did the Seven Isles trip.Worst was some place in the Red Sea. Also managed 5 days in Vittoria anchored mid-river until we eventually got alongside. Then to the Teenage Club!!!

non descript
4th December 2006, 22:22
Robin, I suspect the port in the Red Sea was Abu Zenima... a most interesting place where the conveyor belt was overseen by a man with a large sledge hammer ,whose sole task was the smash the big bits of ore before they dropped into the hold. He often missed.....
(POP)

Robinj
4th December 2006, 22:28
Tonga,Thanks it could well be, but I don't remember it at all.

non descript
4th December 2006, 22:29
Tonga,Thanks it could well be, but I don't remember it at all.

If all your clothes were completly ruined by the red dust, it was the place (Thumb)

Robinj
4th December 2006, 22:33
If all your clothes were completly ruined by the red dust, it was the place (Thumb)

Yes your right reminded me of Trinidad from loading Bauxite same thing happened.

Roger Wincer
19th December 2006, 08:46
Oregis, Orelia, Oremina, Orepton, Oreridian & Oreosa. Sailed on four of these, b-----s in bad weather rolled like hell especially with a belly of Iron ore.

Oreosa=My first ship! 2nd Radio for 7 months from Dec 1965.Including the 1966 seaman's strike. First trip Port Talbot to Monrovia and back. Port Talbot on any night of the week an interesting experience. I really enjoyed it and put on nearly 2 stones in weight, so the food must have been good. Two trips to Murmansk and also Narvik, Oxelosund and Almeria.

NINJA
23rd December 2006, 18:15
To all Houlders Ore Carrier old crew members.

There is still a lot of interest in the old ore carriers. Have posted a photo of the Orepton in Workington.

Regards

Ninja.

Robinj
27th December 2006, 23:21
Ninja, Many thanks for the photo brought back a few memories.

BA204259
1st January 2007, 11:53
Further to a couple of posts in this thread (going back to last August, particularly Nova Scotian and duquesa), concerning a Captain Bully.

I sailed as a very (very) green first trip R/O on the Oremina. As my first ship it is just a little bit special. I joined her in Barrow on 24 April 1960 and paid off in Port Talbot a couple of months later having done three trips - to Bone (Algeria), Wabana (Newfoundland) and Kirkenes (up the Syd Varanger Fjord in Norway).

I can confirm that the Master was Captain Bully - and it is his name on my Discharge Book. From his signature I am not sure if it was Bully or Bulley.

I remember him (through the mists of time) as a very pleasant sort of man - although how he put up with first trip idiots like me I'll never know....although we were all first trippers once!!

non descript
21st January 2007, 22:31
Roger Wincer kindly has added a nice nostalgic image of Oredian here:

http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/48383/cat/510

calvin
22nd January 2007, 18:40
sailed on the oregis as coupler 1ran aground in tyne on black middens the refitted and sail to ekofist field

paulw
14th March 2007, 10:22
hello everyone,
just discovered this excellent site.
anybody remember my dad mike waterton?
the next time he visits i'll log on for him and he can take part in the forum.
regards
paul

shippix
20th June 2007, 06:26
Have been reading this interesting thread.
I am surprised the Sheaf Wear ? has not been mentioned.
I was on board her back in about '62. Didn't go anywhere on her, she was moored in the River Fal in Cornwall England.
Would anyone have a pic of her please ? Would be much appreciated

Best wishes
Shippix

non descript
20th June 2007, 07:53
Have been reading this interesting thread.
I am surprised the Sheaf Wear ? has not been mentioned.
I was on board her back in about '62. Didn't go anywhere on her, she was moored in the River Fal in Cornwall England.
Would anyone have a pic of her please ? Would be much appreciated

Best wishes
Shippix

Hi Shippix,
Part of that may be due to confusion. I checked back to read your earlier posting and the minor confusion maybe started there, Sheaf Wear was not owned or managed by Houlders although as an ore-carrier owned by Sheaf Steamship Co, England (and was I think managed by Souters) she spent a lot of time on charter to BISCO and hence traded the same routes as the Houlders Ore Carriers.
Regards
Mark

non descript
20th June 2007, 07:57
Shippix

I just did a search under her next name =Irish Wasa= and have found her shown here (http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/30502/si/irish%20wasa/what/allfields)

shippix
20th June 2007, 08:32
Tonga
Thanks so much for your time and info, of course it was souters ! Memory going !! Great to see a pic of the old girl again

Best wishes
Shippix aka Peter

jd0459
25th June 2007, 23:10
To Roddy&robinj
Another One At That Time Was The Ancant Marriner <honky Tonk>thats Were The Shore Bosuns Were

Jd

jd0459
21st July 2007, 12:57
In july 1973 i had just payed of the RUDBY in birkinhead and was out with the lads in workington, we were in the honky tonk <anchent mariner> and i was invited back on board a ore boat i am shure it was one of houlders it had a crews bar on her.
The mate came in as she was about to sail,and i left the ship,i will always remember it as it was blowing a gale that night and felt sorry for the crew, as i know what the solway can be like, she was bound for mamansk.
John

jgazzard
22nd September 2007, 02:47
Capt Oddy was mate on the Oreosa in about 63/64 when I was there.
Capt Alan Bulley was master of the Oredian during my first trip as third mate ion 60. Have no idea what happened to him after that.

Regards John

non descript
22nd September 2007, 10:21
Captain Norman Oddy was a very decent man; kind and a good ship's master and this point that was not lost on Houlders who promoted him to Captain at a relatively young age.

Quite why his parents sought fit to burden him the the initial "N" was always a mystery. (EEK)

Raz Jones
16th November 2007, 18:34
I remember Denis Ahearne well from here in Port Talbot sailed with him a few times he must have died in the 70s if I remember rightly

Raz Jones
16th November 2007, 18:53
All this talk about 'Port Talbot' brings back great memories from 30 + years ago. The 'Walnut' rings a loud bell, memories of some good Chinese Resturants, Margam Abbey steelworks and most importantly 'my first love'. (*))
Those were certainly the days!
Does anyone remember a S Wales bosun by the name of Dennis Ahearn who served on sveral of the PT ore carriers

I remember Denis Ahearne well from sailing in the ore carriers and here in Port Talbot he passed on in the 70's I believe

Raz Jones
20th November 2007, 17:29
Thank you John T., I am grateful for your guidance. (Applause) On that basis I would go as far as to say you had the excellent combination of a Good Ship and a Good Master.

I sailed with Captain Boothby in Orelia August 1955 until January 1956 as you say a true Gentleman
Regards Ray

Raz Jones
22nd November 2007, 19:09
I sailed in the following ships of Houlder's Ore Carriers
Orelia 55/56 Captain Boothby
Orelia again 59/60 Captain D M Smith
Oredian October 60 /December 60 Captain D J Barkley
Oregis October 64 / December 64 Captain V J Owen
Oremina July 66 / August 66 Captain J Mulligan
Oremina again December 66 / March 67 Captain D S Leach
Orepton April 67 / June 67 Captain K Walker
Oreosa never actually sailed in her but based aboard whilst maintaining her and the other sisters during the lay - up of ore carriers at Port Talbot in 1966
Regards to All
Ray Jones

non descript
23rd November 2007, 07:54
Ray,
That is impressive - to have sailed on 5 out of the 6, and worked aboard the 6th is quite special; my tally is a very minor three; Oregis, St Margaret and Mabel Warwick
(Thumb)
Mark

BRIAN HERDMAN
12th December 2007, 14:02
sailed on MV ORATAVA great ship greater crew one exception being xxxxx. TUBARAO great place SAN SABASTION even better,

NINJA
13th December 2007, 09:45
Yes when I was on the OROTAVA it was a good ship, we went to Vittoria for iron ore and got grounded under the loading gantry so we had an extra couple of days there, a great place, then down the river to Tubarao to top off.

non descript
13th December 2007, 13:41
Brian Herdman has said that during his time on the OROTAVA in 1975, the ship received a comondation from the USA Coast Guard for picking up a sailor in distress off Baltimore - he asks if anyone can tell him the name of the hurricane that caused this incident, and furthermore can anyone tell him what happend to the citation? He says the Master's name was Captain Tyler.

ChrisCampbell
19th December 2007, 19:03
Hi everyone,

I am trying to build a journal of my days on the ore ships of Houlder Brothers. Found a couple of nice pictures already on this excellent forum, but would like to know if anyone has any more they would like to share. I lost all my own shots years ago and have nothing to show my kids. Maybe, there are some salty dogs out there who knew me and took some piccies. I'd especially like to hear from them. To help focus in, here is a brief list of my trips...

OREMINA - 10/71 till early 72 - Houlder Brothers (my first trip Dagenham/Narvik, paid off in Falmouth)

Mabel Warwick - Aug 72 till Jan 73 - Capt Oddy.

OROTAVA - Nov 74 till Jan 75 - Capt Lewis

Sir Alexander Glen (bare boat charter OBO) - Sep 75 till Feb 76 - Capt Leach

Any piccies at all would be a great help. Hope to chat soon.

DerekC
(Thumb)

Sure I sail with you on the Glen

Regards Chris

non descript
19th December 2007, 19:29
Chris,
The names you mention are 100 A1 and in theory you maybe also know The General ? A very decent soul who taught me more than I care to admit.
Kind regards
Mark

gyca
7th August 2008, 12:08
Brian Herdman has said that during his time on the OROTAVA in 1975, the ship received a comondation from the USA Coast Guard for picking up a sailor in distress off Baltimore - he asks if anyone can tell him the name of the hurricane that caused this incident, and furthermore can anyone tell him what happend to the citation? He says the Master's name was Captain Tyler.
See my response under orotava thread

Nova Scotian
23rd September 2008, 21:19
I recently obtained a copy of the OLB for the MV “Orepton” for the period 18th Jan – 7th July, 1964. I’m not sure whether I am in the correct category but here it is:

The List of Crew identified the following:

Master Alan Bulley
1/0 John Morgan, Gerald Evens
2/0 Terry Noddle, Jeremy Lees, Gerald Evens
3/0 William Nicol
Nav Apps James King, Peter Dunford, Cavan O’Callaghan
R/O Brian Harrison, Robert Balkwell (JRO)
C/E Anthony Ryan, John Thompson, Cyril Flynn
2/E James Gray, John Thompson
3/E Brian Lee, John Todd
4/E John Todd, Kenneth Quinn
5/E Donald Marsland, Thomas Burns
Elect William Brown, Kenneth Tait
C.Stwd Raymond Harwood, James Taylor
Bosun Dennis Ahern, James Mallon, Kendal Wilkinson
Carpenter William Jennes, Albert Lindsay
C.Cook Jacob Smith, Kenneth Kitchen

Deck Crew Loreto Pace, John Portelli, Michael Sacco, Henry Brown,
William Kennedy, Liam Collins, Daniel Price, Oliver Santry,
David Rees, Donald Smith, Arthur Blackley, David Conway,
Frank Murphy, Anthony Mamo, Francis McCann,
Carl Mc Cartney, Peter Fitzpatrick,
William Cordner

Cat Dept Peter Doherty, Mansel Williams,
Edward Pattinsen,Terrence Westerman, Fred Clark,
Jeffrey Green, David Sutherland, Christopher Lloyd,
Anthony Jones, Terrence Devereaux,
Anthony Manning, David Runciman, Harry Squirrel,
David Walker, Paul Esbensen, Anthony Robinson

Eng Crew Peter Fitzpatrick, Roy Beddow, Gerald Karme, John Barry
illiamm Tyacke, Cyril Pine, Raymond Andrew,

Super’y Robert Lees, Jean Lees.


Ports In Order Middlesbrough, Narvik, Port Talbot, Port Elizabeth,
Freeetown, Workington, Seven Islands, Port Talbot,
Melilla, Immingham, Bone, Barrow, Narvik, Irlam, Oxelosund,
Barrow.

Cheers Nova Scotian

non descript
23rd September 2008, 23:13
Nova Scotian,
Well done - a brilliant bit of work (Applause)

Mick quinn
25th September 2008, 20:45
Thought I had made an entry on this site but cannot find it now so will repeat for those interested.

I joined the Oregis in Caen, France on 27 June 1971 and stayed on her until we took her to lay-up in Falmouth on 17 September 1971. During that time we took a few cargoes into Caen but spent most of our time between Murmansk and Workington on the BISCO run. Great bunch of lads aboard but ship rolled on wet grass and was not sorry to finally leave her.

She was my first Houlders boat though so I have to thank her for many years of service with Houlders, the best shipping company I sailed with especially when I signed up to the PER. Couldn't believe my luck, paid whether I was on board or not, great life. Houlders even picked up the tab at Anchor House in London when I was temporarily financially embarassed. Great company, great crews and a sorely mised vocation.
Mick Quinn

CLIVE R786860
11th November 2008, 16:05
Signed on in Workington which was handy as i live just down the road in Whitehaven.It must have been about 1970,captain Oddy was in command remember the cadet had to rake all the lads out of the Coastguard sailed for Belfast to load bunkers then up to Murmansk for Port Talbot.The Grand Hotel was our favorite watering hole,discharged our cargo then sailed for Kirkenes for another load back to PT.Cant remember where i paid off,cant find my Discharge Book.Found a clipping from our local paper a few months ago with a picture of the Ravensworth stating that she was the last ore carrier to use Workington put that in a safe place now i cant find that!Sailed on here twice joining her in Barrow in Furness.

non descript
11th November 2008, 16:32
I had the honour to serve under Captain Oddy; a very decent man - quite why his parents chose to christen him Norman, is anyone's guess... very unkind (EEK) - maybe they did not see the connection until they filled in his initial in his Birth Certificate?

Bob73
29th November 2008, 18:25
Hi Nova Scotian,

I have put a couple of photos of the "Orepton" in the thumbnails in this post taken in the Ship Canal, I don't even know when I took them, probably early 60's and before 1964. They are not very good but it shows you the old steam tugs on the canal in those days.

I did a trip on the "Orelia" in 1958. Joined her in Irlam did the trip to Pepel and paid off in Dagenham. One trip was enough. Nice ship, single berths(not usual in those days) food not too bad, Captain was a gentleman from Hartlepool, the Mate was a p--t. He logged me for smoking on the lookout on the monkey island on the way down to Pepel. He came up to the island to tell me to come down on to the bridge wing under the awning as a tropical storm was approaching(I suppose that you have to give him credit for that). He saw me putting my dog end into the sand bucket and told me in no uncertain terms that smoking was not allowed on the lookout.

I had to laugh( not in his face of course) as the sand bucket was full of dog ends. I suppose that I was the only one to get caught. The funnel was belching out sparks, it wasn't as if I was a fire hazard. Bye the way I haven't smoked for 42 years, not on account of that incident though.

All the best........Trader.


I remember the Orelia well, it was my first ship sailed from Port Talbot to Mellila around 1964, I was fresh out of radio college. I did 6 months on her until being sent to RMS Sylvania (Liverpool - New York bus route) When I was on Orelia she sailed to Mellila, Sept Isles, Narvik, Bone, Kirkeness I finally left her at Irlam on the Manchester ship canal still rolling 12 Hours after entering the canal. I think she would roll on wet grass!

Jim Brady
30th November 2008, 21:09
I sailed on the Oregis in 1958 under captain Neil, Waterloo, Liverpool one
gentleman and his wife a lady who always came down every trip when we
were in Port Talbot. I believe he was a focs'le head skipper I can believe
that because he had never forgotten his roots and was a most fair man.
Ports Seven Islands, Bone,Vittoria,Monrovia and Poti.
Somebody mentioned being hours at Seven Islands I recall in 1958 taking
about 45 minutes to load. AS we were coming alongside the conveyor belts
were loading,with a man on deck with a walkie talkie directing operations.
the Oregis loading 8000 ton,I also went there on the Pennyworth 10,000tn
90 minutes to load.

This was 1958 maybe health and safety altered this,all this talk about
ballast etc which I know nothing about I was only a steward but I went
there at least 4 times and the quickness of the loading was always a topic of conversation. !.

non descript
30th November 2008, 21:22
Hi Jim,

Yes, it was back at # 85 and # 89 and it is good to see that my memory is not totally lost. Certainly for a relatively small ship, the loading speeds at Seven Islands were very scary..

By the way, I thought the story within your first post was very sad and I offer you my sympathies – It is good that you found a decent Ship and a decent Master to offset the frankly abusive and disgraceful start you endured. Bullying is neither clever nor productive, and is the preserve of small men with small minds; thankfully they have no place on board a ship.
(Thumb)
Mark

DavidSv
20th December 2008, 14:49
Hi Tonga

It probably was Oddy. He signed my Dis. Bk. in June 67 when I did a three week trip in Oregis. I don't know why it was just three weeks, because I worked my way around all six of the 'Ore....' boats (except Oredian) without a break between Jan 65 and June 68. I sailed with Oddy again from Jan to June 68 in Oremina. I was with Houlders for over six years, as EDH or QM, between 63 and 69.

Regards David Svensen

David Menzies
7th January 2009, 13:44
Hello. I sailed on the Oregis & Oremina. I saw the Oregis later as a support ship near North Shields.
dave Menzies.

David Williams
13th January 2009, 19:51
Hi ALL.
Only sailed on the one ore boat,the ORELIA
in 1957.Port Talbot,Bone,Port Talbot,Narvik,
Irlam,and then the same all over again,Does
anyone recall the pub in Irlam nicknamed the
"Stinking Stocking",between trips it was done
up and nicknamed the" Scented Nylon "dont
remember what it was actualy named.

Dave Williams(R583900)

David Menzies
14th January 2009, 17:17
I have found the Houlder Orecarrier thread very intersting. I saw two from the past Captain Oddy a real gentleman & Paddy Slevin, who was chief Officer on the Newbury in 1959, the Master was Captain Taylor.

David Menzies
14th January 2009, 17:19
I have read the Houlder Ore carrier thread with interst. It was interesting to see names crop up like Captain Oddy.
Also, Paddy Slevin who was C/O on the Newbury, Captain Taylor was master.
David Menzies.

marinero
14th January 2009, 17:37
I have found the Houlder Orecarrier thread very intersting. I saw two from the past Captain Oddy a real gentleman & Paddy Slevin, who was chief Officer on the Newbury in 1959, the Master was Captain Taylor.

Hi David.
Would that have been Captain Jim Taylor, a small guy with glasses, If so I sailed with him on the "Bidford Priory" and the "Joya McCance"(tanker)
Regards
Leo (Thumb)

Bill Davies
14th January 2009, 19:09
sailed on the Oregis in 1958 under captain Neil, Waterloo, Liverpool one
gentleman and his wife a lady who always came down every trip when we
were in Port Talbot. I believe he was a focs'le head skipper I can believe that because he had never forgotten his roots and was a most fair man.!.

First time I have ever heard it put that way.

Bombersman
15th January 2009, 09:41
Would that have been Captain Jim Taylor, a small guy with glasses, If so I sailed with him on the "Bidford Priory"...
We both did Leo :-) I sailed with him several times.

When some of the meat boats were laid up in the Tyne, we got some of their booze which Jim Taylor distributed via a few parties. We were drinking stuff we had never heard of, which made a change from the old Barclays.

Kind regards

Bob W

marinero
15th January 2009, 13:21
Would that have been Captain Jim Taylor, a small guy with glasses, If so I sailed with him on the "Bidford Priory"...
We both did Leo :-) I sailed with him several times.

When some of the meat boats were laid up in the Tyne, we got some of their booze which Jim Taylor distributed via a few parties. We were drinking stuff we had never heard of, which made a change from the old Barclays.

Kind regards

Bob W

Hi Bob.
Happy New Year to you and family.
"Big Jim" as we called him was a decent guy who liked a sherbet or two. I remember one trip on the "Joya" we were discharging at an SBM at Siracha in Thailand when during the evening meal I went midships to get something from the Captain's cabin and looking through a window to the foc'sle I saw a load of natives loading drums of paint over the side. I raised the alarm and Capt. Jim came storming from aft with reinforcements. Later the Bosun collared me and told me I had spoilt his little earner for a run ashore with the lads. It took me a long time to live that one down. Oh happy days.
Regards
Leo (Thumb)

Bombersman
15th January 2009, 15:44
Hi Bob.
Happy New Year to you and family.

New year greetings to you and yours also Leo.

I wonder if you remember a Scottish junior (it was over forty years ago) on that trip when we both sailed with "Big Jim". He was just as drunk after one can as most would be after a few but stayed in that condition. His tap was stopped, but "Big Jim" in his kindness took pity on him at one of the above mentioned parties and said "Go on Bob just give him one can" This had the invetitable consequences and unfortunately he was my junior at the time.

Best wishes

Bob W

marinero
16th January 2009, 12:29
"I wonder if you remember a Scottish junior (it was over forty years ago)"

Hi Bob.
as you say 40 years ago and my memory is not so good as it was. I remember some people Bob but we met so many it gets rather difficult.
Weather here freezing at the minute, we have to have the log burner on, looking forward to the summer again. Hope to be driving back to the UK in April when the weather picks up.
Regards
Leo (Thumb)

Bombersman
16th January 2009, 15:05
Leo said: -
Weather here freezing at the minute, we have to have the log burner on, looking forward to the summer again.

It's a bit chilly up here in the North East of England but a slight improvement on last weeks cold weather. Getting back to Ore carriers, in keeping with this board, it is no where near as cold as it was at Severn Islands when I was there on the "Oregis" during my only trip on a motor ship.

I was only on the "Oregis" for a short while, but a well known old face in the shape of Paddy Slevin, the captain who was leaving, was there to greet me. The C/E was a man called Pugh who seemed a very pleasant bloke. The 2/E was a Mr (John?)Brown who I had met earlier in the Persian Gulf when I was out scrounging Igema fluid for Mike Mitchell.

As mentioned earlier on this board, the turn around on ore carriers at Severn Islands took my breath away. Tankers generally turned round pretty quickly in about a day, but the turn round on the "Oregis" was something else. As I recall we almost turned around on my watch, the 12-4, in the afternoon. At least I wasn't starting, stopping and controlling the speed of cargo pumps.

I quite enjoyed my trip on the "Oregis" which was devoid of the high temperatures that we endured on tankers in the Red Sea and Persian Gulf. She was not as well appointed accomodation-wise as the Brandon and Bidford, but comfortable enough.(*))

Kind regards

Bob W.

Bombersman
16th January 2009, 15:12
I was not to see the "Oregis" again until years later when she went aground on the Black middens when I took my young son down to see her.

I had been ashore for a few years then as plant engineer at British gas, engineering research station at Killingworth.

Bob W.

MARINEJOCKY
16th January 2009, 15:22
Hi Leo, Its a bit chilly in Fort Lauderdale as well, not expected to reach 80 today and getting down to a freezing 57 tonight.

Talking of weather & ore carriers reminds me of going with Bill Robson (not my uncle as some think, but a family friend) over to Workington to visit an ore carrier. My memory is of a wide open space between where we parked his car and getting to the ship with a gale blowing waves over the sea wall. That was cold.

My nexty memory of an ore carrier was in Glasgow. Mr. Ling, the cadet training officer would get word to us cadets that one of the ore boats was coming into Terminal One which I believe was in the city center basically and he expected us to go for a visit. We went on board as young, not even wet behind the ears cadets and enjoy being shown around. What really peaked our interest was when in the chart room we looked at the ships position in the Clyde, its transit up the river and its position at the dock and then a dotted line from the gangway down to the cross river ferry and another dotted line down to Marys Bar. When we asked why that was marked we were told we would find out soon enough. That obviously got us to thinking we should make a point of finding out what happened there and for the next few months I enjoyed numerous lessons that would stand me in good stead around the world.

Does any body out there know that the VD clinics in Aberdeen, Glasgow and Newcastle were all on "Black Street", not that I ever needed them.

I thought my life would be spent on those ore carriers but unfortunately they were being phased out along with alot of the characters I later learnt about.

I did go down to Shields to see the Oregis on the Black Middens and that was a sorry sight.

Bombersman
16th January 2009, 15:33
MARINEJOCKEY said: -
Hi Leo, Its a bit chilly in Fort Lauderdale as well, not expected to reach 80 today and getting down to a freezing 57 tonight.

It's around 5 deg C here and hovering around freezing at night. Any improvement in this and I will be off to the Lake Distrct for some bracing fell walking, staying at a hotel in Low Lorton which I like to think of as having some distant family connections, as it has my my family name.

Warmest good wishes

Bob W.

MARINEJOCKY
16th January 2009, 18:20
MARINEJOCKEY said: -
Hi Leo, Its a bit chilly in Fort Lauderdale as well, not expected to reach 80 today and getting down to a freezing 57 tonight.

It's around 5 deg C here and hovering around freezing at night. Any improvement in this and I will be off to the Lake Distrct for some bracing fell walking, staying at a hotel in Low Lorton which I like to think of as having some distant family connections, as it has my my family name.

Warmest good wishes

Bob W.

Went for a swim as the pool is 90 but did not go in as the air is definately freezing at 69 degree's. I can not remember Wark being this cold or am I just forgetting things in my older years.

I used to go to Whitely Bay and it was much hotter than this and who can forget the near tropical days on the beach with the large pit dumps on the beach at, I think, Seaton Sluice or the fun running up and down the dunes at Bamburgh in near desert conditions.

You have no idea of the conditions we have to put up with here and to think we had it bad on the gas ships in my case and the ore carriers in your's.

NINJA
16th January 2009, 20:04
Hello Bombersman

If you are going to the W________F in Low Lorton this weekend its pouring down and blowing a gale so bring your Waterproofs.

Regards

Ninja,

Bombersman
17th January 2009, 07:44
Thanks Ninja. I only pop across when the forecast is good and preferably midweek when most folk are working.(Wave)

A good guess at the location, but incorrect. the hotel I stay at is dated 1530.

Kind regards

Bob

Robinj
18th January 2009, 14:32
Hello. I sailed on the Oregis & Oremina. I saw the Oregis later as a support ship near North Shields.
dave Menzies.

Hi David, When were you on the Oregis I was R/O on her oct/65 to Mar/66 and I remember one trip to Vittoria. Regards Robin

clonguish
24th January 2009, 21:16
My first trip to see as an Eng. App. the Edenmore joined in Port Talbot 29/07/72 only to get court in the Dock strike that year and we had a few weeks on the Iron Berth, and a great start to my sea going career. Remember her dearly as she was a Doxford LBD ( Long Bore Diaphamic ) meaning she had an external driven scavaging pump on the side driven by a piston so ur ear drums were effected by presure diff in the ER, remember a C/E called Craig who I believe was killed later in a fire? also a C/O Nobby Clarke form Aberdeen who looked after me as wee loon from Aberdeen myself. met him after he retired working in personell for Houlder Ofshore, we both paid off in Singapore late 72. Our runs were Seven Isles, Narvick and freetown, narvick was always to South Shields. In another post i saw Paddy Slevin mentioned indeed I sailed with Paddy on the Bidford Priory a few years later, also years later was Staying in Ireland in Laois in a small Hotel got into conversation with the owner of the establishment and Paddy Slevin had passed on but no one arround actually believed he was a skipper thought his sister made up that story when she sent him to "dry out" cause when he came home he was sober for the first week, untill he left and "went away to sea"

non descript
24th January 2009, 21:32
.... In another post i saw Paddy Slevin mentioned indeed I sailed with Paddy on the Bidford Priory a few years later, also years later was Staying in Ireland in Laois in a small Hotel got into conversation with the owner of the establishment and Paddy Slevin had passed on but no one arround actually believed he was a skipper thought his sister made up that story when she sent him to "dry out" cause when he came home he was sober for the first week, untill he left and "went away to sea"


Paddy Slevin was a very kind and decent man. He was also amazing, in that he never touched a drop once on board, and was never without, once back home under the care and control of his sister. (Thumb)

norsea
23rd February 2009, 22:29
I had the pleasure of sailing with Capt.Liam (Paddy)Slevin in "Mabel Warwick" from 6.2.68 to 9.8.68 as First Mate. My wife accompanied me on one trip to Murmansk and Paddy`s sister joined us for a brief stay in Middlesborough. We both left in Glasgow and travelled togther to Belfast and from there Paddy travelled home to Omagh. Sadly that was the last time we met. One of my fondest memories is of Paddy on the bridge with his omnipresent pint mug of tea, hot or cold, it was always there.
Happy days.

non descript
23rd February 2009, 22:45
I had the pleasure of sailing with Capt.Liam (Paddy)Slevin in "Mabel Warwick" from 6.2.68 to 9.8.68 as First Mate. My wife accompanied me on one trip to Murmansk and Paddy`s sister joined us for a brief stay in Middlesborough. We both left in Glasgow and travelled togther to Belfast and from there Paddy travelled home to Omagh. Sadly that was the last time we met. One of my fondest memories is of Paddy on the bridge with his omnipresent pint mug of tea, hot or cold, it was always there.
Happy days.

As it all sounded all too close datewise to my own times, I checked my Certificates of Discharge and it shows me as being on St Margaret 12-07-68 joined (Middlesbrough) and paid off in Immingham 29 November 1968 and signed by L F Slevin.. To confuse matters further, it goes on to record 11-07-70 until 19-10-70 on Mabel Warwick (paid off in Glasgow) and again L F Slevin… Does that ring any bells and do I need to start apologising for being unduly useless? (Jester)

David Williams
24th February 2009, 13:33
Hi Robinj.
Did just the one trip on the Orelia,
back in 1957,cant say that she was
a "bad" one,I seem to remember having
a good time on her.

Dave Williams(R583900)

norsea
24th February 2009, 22:33
Tonga, thanks for your reply..The only assumption I can come up with is that Capt. Slevin may have relieved another Master on St. Margaret between July and November `68 so he would have signed your Discharge Book on signing off. Does that sound feasible??
Regards
Angus D.

Robinj
26th February 2009, 11:37
Hi Robinj.
Did just the one trip on the Orelia,
back in 1957,cant say that she was
a "bad" one,I seem to remember having
a good time on her.

Dave Williams(R583900)

Hi Dave, Sailed on three of these ore carriers and had a great time on each with some smashing guys.

non descript
2nd April 2009, 18:28
Tonga, thanks for your reply..The only assumption I can come up with is that Capt. Slevin may have relieved another Master on St. Margaret between July and November `68 so he would have signed your Discharge Book on signing off. Does that sound feasible??
Regards
Angus D.

Hi Angus, Sorry I missed yours until now. - I guess all thing were possible in 1968 (Jester)

As for "One of my fondest memories is of Paddy on the bridge with his omnipresent pint mug of tea, hot or cold, it was always there."... Yes, that is exacty how I remember him, a real gentleman. (Thumb)
Regards
Mark

David Menzies
18th April 2009, 20:15
I was interstedin the comments on Paddy Slevin.
He was mate of the Newbury in 1960 with Captain Taylor.
Dave Menzies

chadders
20th April 2009, 17:06
Hi Angus, Sorry I missed yours until now. - I guess all thing were possible in 1968 (Jester)

As for "One of my fondest memories is of Paddy on the bridge with his omnipresent pint mug of tea, hot or cold, it was always there."... Yes, that is exacty how I remember him, a real gentleman. (Thumb)
Regards
Mark

Hi,

Maybe I can add to the confusion here! The St. Margaret was my first ship I joined in October 1968 (8th) in Middlesborough, Tonga will remember he was the senior apprentice. Between October '68 and April '69 the St. Margaret had 5 Masters Paddy Slevin, Frank Richards, Vic Owen, Jimmy? Taylor and Norman Oddy does that help? I doubt it

non descript
20th April 2009, 19:36
Hi,

Maybe I can add to the confusion here! The St. Margaret was my first ship I joined in October 1968 (8th) in Middlesborough, Tonga will remember he was the senior apprentice. Between October '68 and April '69 the St. Margaret had 5 Masters Paddy Slevin, Frank Richards, Vic Owen, Jimmy? Taylor and Norman Oddy does that help? I doubt it

Chadders,
Thanks for that and maybe I should apologise for what was a particularly strange pork-pie hat that I used to wear; if I remember it correctly the hat was most definitely not a product of Locks of St James's Street and was a very odd orange colour. (Jester) – It and its owner featured in a series of photographs designed to encourage the youth of the day to visit 53 Leadenhall Street and sign up; and I rather think you also appeared in some of those recruitment pictures as well?
(Thumb)
Mark

jimtar17
20th April 2009, 21:59
Hi
I sailed on two Houlder ships in 1961 , the Oreidian and Oregis, both sailed out of Barrow , and came back to Port Talbot. I remember them to be happy times and good ships to work on.
Happy memories from Jim Parker AB

norsea
30th April 2009, 21:23
Sad to see Oregis on her last voyage under tow of the tug Wellington in a Shipping magazine published August 2008, minus her Haaglund and Liebherr cranes and pipe handling davits.
I first sailed in Oregis from 2-9-56 to 14-4-57 as Apprentice under Capt.D.A.Parkin and also in the North Sea as Ass`t Bargemaster between 1974 and `78. By coincidence Capt Parkin was then in the Superintendents Department.
Regards
Angus Davidson

ALAN TYLER
24th May 2009, 21:18
Sad to see Oregis on her last voyage under tow of the tug Wellington in a Shipping magazine published August 2008, minus her Haaglund and Liebherr cranes and pipe handling davits.
I first sailed in Oregis from 2-9-56 to 14-4-57 as Apprentice under Capt.D.A.Parkin and also in the North Sea as Ass`t Bargemaster between 1974 and `78. By coincidence Capt Parkin was then in the Superintendents Department.
Regards
Angus Davidson
Hi Angus, You wouldn,t happen to have a copy of the picture of the Oregis under tow. If you do I would appreciate a copy to add to my collection. She was a sterling vessel, with many happy memories for me.
Regards Alan.

ALAN TYLER
10th October 2009, 11:24
Is there anyone out there who sailed on all six Orelia, Oregis, Oreosa, Oredian, Oremena and Orepton. I only managed Oreosa and Oregis. It would be a real achievement to have been on them all.

Robinj
11th October 2009, 12:39
Is there anyone out there who sailed on all six Orelia, Oregis, Oreosa, Oredian, Oremena and Orepton. I only managed Oreosa and Oregis. It would be a real achievement to have been on them all.

I only managed three, but I was a sparkes.

David Williams
3rd February 2010, 20:59
I sailed in the following ships of Houlder's Ore Carriers
Orelia 55/56 Captain Boothby
Orelia again 59/60 Captain D M Smith
Oredian October 60 /December 60 Captain D J Barkley
Oregis October 64 / December 64 Captain V J Owen
Oremina July 66 / August 66 Captain J Mulligan
Oremina again December 66 / March 67 Captain D S Leach
Orepton April 67 / June 67 Captain K Walker
Oreosa never actually sailed in her but based aboard whilst maintaining her and the other sisters during the lay - up of ore carriers at Port Talbot in 1966
Regards to All
Ray Jones

Hi Raz.
Just missed sailing with you.
I did the one trip on the Orelia
10/5/57 - 2/9/57.

Dave Williams(R583900)

David Williams
3rd February 2010, 21:12
Sure I sail with you on the Glen

Regards Chris

Hi Chris.
I dont know if this information is of
any use to you,dont know if you have
seen these.But if you click onto SS STEAMSHIPS,
you will find three photos of the OREMINA two
photos of the MABEL WARWICK,two photo,s of the
SIR ALEXANDER GLEN,but I couldnt find a ship called
the OROTOVA.All these can be downloaded.

Dave Williams(R583900)

norsea
13th February 2010, 22:05
Hi Angus, You wouldn,t happen to have a copy of the picture of the Oregis under tow. If you do I would appreciate a copy to add to my collection. She was a sterling vessel, with many happy memories for me.
Regards Alan.

Apologies for the delayed reply Alan. I`m sorry I have already passed the relevant magazine to a friend.
Regarads
Angus D.

ALAN TYLER
14th February 2010, 12:16
Apologies for the delayed reply Alan. I`m sorry I have already passed the relevant magazine to a friend.
Regarads
Angus D.

Hi Angus, No problem, no doubt if I keep rooting around one will turn up. Hope lifes being kind to you. All the Best Alan.

nimpoes
3rd March 2010, 18:23
enjoyed my time on the houlder ore ships going to vitoria in brazil and several times to that freezing cold place seven islands up in quebec but besides the cold I do remember the cod we caught in their hundreds with a piece of rope and a hook no bait. mind that was over 50 years ago(Jester) (Jester) (Jester)

David Menzies
3rd April 2010, 12:20
I sailed on the Oregis & Oremina. Yes they rolled but the cabins were good & with the bunks & settees at right angles to each other that mare kipping much easier.
I am re visiting Narvik in June on the Braemar as part of a trip to the North Cape.
A few years ago I re visited Port Talbot. How the place had changed with all the Turkish shops.
Dave Menzies.

David Williams
3rd April 2010, 12:29
I sailed in the following ships of Houlder's Ore Carriers
Orelia 55/56 Captain Boothby
Orelia again 59/60 Captain D M Smith
Oredian October 60 /December 60 Captain D J Barkley
Oregis October 64 / December 64 Captain V J Owen
Oremina July 66 / August 66 Captain J Mulligan
Oremina again December 66 / March 67 Captain D S Leach
Orepton April 67 / June 67 Captain K Walker
Oreosa never actually sailed in her but based aboard whilst maintaining her and the other sisters during the lay - up of ore carriers at Port Talbot in 1966
Regards to All
Ray Jones

Hi Ray.
Just missed you on the Orelia,was on her in 1957,
Port Talbot,Bone,Irlam and Narvik run.

Dave Williams(R583900)

David Williams
3rd April 2010, 12:47
Hi Everybody.
I am looking for photo's of the Orelia.
I have a few,but am trying to enlarge
my collection,I will be most grateful if
anybody can help me and will reimburse
all expences.

Dave Williams(R583900)

brinew
14th September 2010, 19:36
Captain Boothby did sail as master on the oreidian ,he origianlly joined the ship as passengerafterpaying of one ship with perforated ear drums when we arrived back in Port Talbot the Captain paid of and Captain Boothby took command i will give more detail when i find my discharge book Found my discharge book,Captain Boothby was master of the Oredian from 23rd Feb 1957 to8th of Sept 57
he was A TRUE GENTLEMAN,,i was assistant Steward at that time and a good crowd mostly from Port Talbot.

d.mccarthy
20th November 2010, 11:45
did anyone sail on the sagamore or the edenmore .

d.mccarthy
20th November 2010, 20:34
(Pint)(Pint)(Pint)did anyone sail on the sagamore

where is sandy mac cloud

tonymorcom
21st November 2010, 00:25
did anyone sail on the sagamore or the edenmore .

yep I sailed on her as deck cadet in 1974 for a few months ~ see my gallery for some info about the cat.

EddieC
22nd November 2010, 20:20
Sailed on Sagamore between September 1971 and Feb 72. Joined her as a first trip deck Cadet in Newport and went up to Murmansk. Then Monrovia, Nouadhibou and Seven Isles. The Old man was Capt Coyle for most of the time, and the Mate was Kevin Campbell. I ran into Capt Coyle again when he joined the Orotava Bridge in Hamburg, late 72, I think.

duquesa
22nd November 2010, 22:05
Slipped off thread again.