New Littoral Warships

NickNZ
9th April 2011, 10:03
So teh Americans are doing what the Brits are supposed to be best at... Indecision. Which of the new littoral warships will prevail, or will it be bothy. The latest I read (and we are 3 months behind here in Godzone) is that 55 ships are required. Who will/has won ?

Davesdream
17th April 2011, 16:50
I do know if there is a winner or should be, or even conveyed as such.


http://www.uscg.mil/History/img/Bertholf0014.jpg

http://www.navsource.org/archives/15/150201.htm

http://www.navsource.org/archives/15/150202.htm

Here are 3 different idea's on this theme, each one has different weapons,senors and so on required for there primary mission in these ships. The first link is the US Coast Guards design and does play a part in this mission. The second and third links are as one can see totally different in design as part the ship builders concept, moreover what part in these mission area's the ship should be assigned to.

So each country in this global community we live in has there own concept of what the requirements are for said country.

So NO i do not see it as a winner or loser in this.

Regards
Dave

Dickyboy
17th April 2011, 19:02
Can anyone give me some sort of background about what this is about.
What a Littoral Warship is would be a good start. :o

Davesdream
17th April 2011, 23:52
Here is a backround.

http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/library/report/1993/MFJ.htm

It is lengthy, but it gives the reader a good idea on the origins of this type of naval warfare.

Regards
Dave

Mike S
18th April 2011, 02:08
The stabalised trimaran design is based on a design from Austal Shipping here in Henderson Western Australia. The first of this design was built for Fred Olsen and is in use as an inter island ferry in the Canary Islands. The whole design and proof of concept is from Austal however in the US ships have to be built by US Companies and so the tie up with GD.
The latest I heard was that the Austal GD design has won out and they are building the first batch in the US now. I can vouch for the fact that thay are quick...........the first one fair flew down Gage Roads on the way out for sea trials off Rottnest Island. It was the fastest thing of that size I have seen.......and it is big. It has a strange long name however if you look up Fred Olsen/Canary Islands in Google it will be there somewhere. I went on board while she was building.........biggest Aluminium vessel I have ever seen.

Mike S
18th April 2011, 02:18
http://www.fredolsen.es/en-US/ferry%20in%20canary%20islands/fleet%20of%20ships.aspx

Benchijigua Express is the name of the vessel, built in 2005

Dickyboy
18th April 2011, 06:10
Here is a backround.

http://www.globalsecurity.org/military/library/report/1993/MFJ.htm

It is lengthy, but it gives the reader a good idea on the origins of this type of naval warfare.

Regards
Dave
Many thanks for the link Dave.
It makes very interesting reading.
Seems to me that in todays world, where there aren't massive Blue Water fleets to face each other, that the answer is to do it as it was usually done pre WW1. Up close and personal, with more of the Send a Gunboat type actions.
It seems to me to be the way to go.

NickNZ
18th April 2011, 09:47
Didn't the Royal Navy discover during the Falklands War that aluminium is not a good idea in a warship?

chadburn
18th April 2011, 12:48
Indeed they did Nick, along with Nylon-Terylene No8's. The MOD cost cutter's should have hung their head's in shame over that one.

Mike S
18th April 2011, 13:23
Yes indeed Nick they did.
I have like you a big problem with that and it will be interesting to see where they go. I am not sure if the naval version is aluminium..... I just know that the original of that design was.

davierh
18th April 2011, 17:31
Americans have already built the two prototypes it looks like they are going with both designs at present as they on 29 Dec 2010 ordered a further 10 of each, of 55 required.
Ten each type USS Freedom(LCS1) Lockheed Martin design
Ten each type USS Independence (LCS2) General Dynamics design.
2010-2 ordered
2011-2 ordered
2012-4 ordered
2013-4 ordered
2014-4 ordered
2015-4 ordered
Big vessels as far as littoral goes "Freedom" class 115.3 mts long
17.5 mtrs beam 40 knots+Normal Hull.
"Independence" class 127.6 mts long 31.6 mtrs beam due to trimaran hull.
Both carry helicopters both around 3000 tons displacement both carry various armaments.

Klaatu83
30th April 2011, 15:49
Didn't the Royal Navy discover during the Falklands War that aluminium is not a good idea in a warship?

One would have thought that the U.S. Navy should have learned the same lesson back in 1975, when the guided missile cruiser USS Belknap collided with the aircraft carrier USS John F. Kennedy. In the ensuing fire the entire aluminum superstructure of the Belknap was melted down to the level of the hull, which was made out of steel. The cruiser was subsequently rebuilt at great expense, presumably so the Navy wouldn't have to admit that a major warship had become a total loss. However, one would think that anybody who saw pictures of what was left of the Belknap after the fire, would have drawn the obvious conclusion about the non-viability of aluminum as a suitable material for warship construction.

NickNZ
1st May 2011, 07:35
I have just lookewde at photos of the USS Belknap post fire, on Google Images, and am stunned!
That anyone should allow a warship to be built using aluminium, ranks with trans0Channel ferries being designed with non-closing doors.
Aluminium superstructures must surely be covered under SOLAS?