Sailing East from London in 1949

IAN M
21st April 2011, 02:53
Had my four foreign voyages on the Glengarry in mind when I wrote this.

SAILING EAST FROM LONDON IN 1949

Bowling along through the Biscay
Then onwards through the Med
Three days to Gibraltar
And five more to Port Said

Slowly though the Suez
On a clear and starry night
The Red Sea lies before us
And we’re now dressed in white

With bunkers filled at Aden
It’s into the monsoon
The sky so heavily laden
No sights obtained at noon

Discharge commences at Penang
After twenty-two days at sea
Natives work both day and night
And so, of course, do we

Next stop is Port Swettenham
Then on to Singapore
Discharging briefly halting
When rain begins to pour

Steaming through South China Sea
Heading for Hong Kong
A typhoon makes the passage rough
But nothing much goes wrong

Northwards now to China
To Formosa and Shanghai
But as the Civil War is close
We're relieved to say 'goodbye'

Outward yet, still farther east
To the ‘Land of the Rising Sun’
But while last cargo swings ashore
Loading is begun
And spirits rise as we turn west for London

By Ian M. Malcolm

Dickyboy
21st April 2011, 06:31
A great poem Ian, and what an adventure for a young man just after the war. To see the world that had so recently been blowing itself to bits, and now at peace. The world was much bigger in those days wasn't it.

IAN M
22nd April 2011, 01:18
Dicky

Thanks for your kind comment. Had adventures during the war too, but postwar sailing was the halcyon days of the MN. The Glens were fine ships and the Glengarry was perhaps the finest of them. I could have stayed in her, but wanted to see Australia before I left the sea. Holts granted my request and I visited Australia on the Deucalion which was the old Glenogle, an original Glen acquired by Holts in 1935. A much slower ship, but more time for fun and we mixed more with the passengers.

Regards

Ian

Tom Inglis
30th April 2011, 11:18
Dicky

Thanks for your kind comment. Had adventures during the war too, but postwar sailing was the halcyon days of the MN. The Glens were fine ships and the Glengarry was perhaps the finest of them. I could have stayed in her, but wanted to see Australia before I left the sea. Holts granted my request and I visited Australia on the Deucalion which was the old Glenogle, an original Glen acquired by Holts in 1935. A much slower ship, but more time for fun and we mixed more with the passengers.

Regards

Ian

Hello Ian,
as an old Blue Funnel /Glen Line man myself your peom brought back many memories and I would like to share it with other Blue Funnel / Ocean chronies in our news letter which is circulated monthly. Please therefore could you agree for me to pass it on to Editor of Ocean Nestorian Newsletter ? and with your permission I will also quote from your profile in SN to give everyone the link. You may well know some of the characters and if you are not already a member you would qualify for membership of Oean Nestorian Association.
Regards
Tom Inglis

Tai Pan
12th May 2011, 10:26
Nice one Ian. did 3 years ( 1957) as 1st R/O on Glangarry, definitly the best of the Glens. Had my four foreign voyages on the Glengarry in mind when I wrote this.

SAILING EAST FROM LONDON IN 1949

Bowling along through the Biscay
Then onwards through the Med
Three days to Gibraltar
And five more to Port Said

Slowly though the Suez
On a clear and starry night
The Red Sea lies before us
And we’re now dressed in white

With bunkers filled at Aden
It’s into the monsoon
The sky so heavily laden
No sights obtained at noon

Discharge commences at Penang
After twenty-two days at sea
Natives work both day and night
And so, of course, do we

Next stop is Port Swettenham
Then on to Singapore
Discharging briefly halting
When rain begins to pour

Steaming through South China Sea
Heading for Hong Kong
A typhoon makes the passage rough
But nothing much goes wrong

Northwards now to China
To Formosa and Shanghai
But as the Civil War is close
We're relieved to say 'goodbye'

Outward yet, still farther east
To the ‘Land of the Rising Sun’
But while last cargo swings ashore
Loading is begun
And spirits rise as we turn west for London

By Ian M. Malcolm