Best Duty Tug Day Ever

Waighty
6th May 2011, 17:16
This of course depends on your definition of 'best'.

Best for a peaceful and job free day was one Summer Sunday in 1985 at Rosyth. Came in for 0800 start to find all the jobs on the movement sheet cancelled or postponed. Spent the day walking around the dockyard/naval base with walkie talkie. Found all sorts of things I didn't know existed or knew nothing about. Great day, topped off by Freddie Williamson's superb fish and chips!

Best for money! Yet another Sunday. Nothing on the movement sheet after 0900 but by 0815 the work piled up. Active from 0830 to 1900 - double time magic with guarantee 8 hours afterwards. Barges up and down to Crombie and HMS Liverpool on buoy in river. Couple of MCMVs, sullage and fuel barge to a/s HMSs. A good day although the mate, Ernie Parrot, who was nearing retirement at the time had been looking forward to a nice quiet day. He said he'd never do a Sunday with me again!

OLD STRAWBERRY
6th May 2011, 17:33
Been there Mike. Always a pain in the butt when one had to do some work whilst on Duty watch.

Waighty
7th May 2011, 16:51
Been there Mike. Always a pain in the butt when one had to do some work whilst on Duty watch.

Further to duty tug, when I was Asst HM at Grangemouth on a Sunday you never knew what was going to happen until you got there so I usually staggered in with a huge pile of Sunday papers - sometimes you read the lot at a leisurely pace and at other times you took them home unread!

You'll have to let me know how you insert the RMAS flag into your name line. It looks good.

senior pilot
7th May 2011, 17:13
This of course depends on your definition of 'best'.

Best for a peaceful and job free day was one Summer Sunday in 1985 at Rosyth. Came in for 0800 start to find all the jobs on the movement sheet cancelled or postponed. Spent the day walking around the dockyard/naval base with walkie talkie. Found all sorts of things I didn't know existed or knew nothing about. Great day, topped off by Freddie Williamson's superb fish and chips!

Best for money! Yet another Sunday. Nothing on the movement sheet after 0900 but by 0815 the work piled up. Active from 0830 to 1900 - double time magic with guarantee 8 hours afterwards. Barges up and down to Crombie and HMS Liverpool on buoy in river. Couple of MCMVs, sullage and fuel barge to a/s HMSs. A good day although the mate, Ernie Parrot, who was nearing retirement at the time had been looking forward to a nice quiet day. He said he'd never do a Sunday with me again!
as you said a nice quite sunday and great dinners from freddie all so george pearson another good cook. worst time searching the forth for six ,seven hours for a woman who jumped from the road bridge.

Waighty
7th May 2011, 17:40
as you said a nice quite sunday and great dinners from freddie all so george pearson another good cook. worst time searching the forth for six ,seven hours for a woman who jumped from the road bridge.

That would be the worst job of all I think. Don't remember George Pearson though. You'll know Angus Cameron, Willie Thornton, Barry Kinch, John Campbell and many others besides; of course you might be one of the guys I've named!

Best regards, Mike Waight.

senior pilot
7th May 2011, 17:52
That would be the worst job of all I think. Don't remember George Pearson though. You'll know Angus Cameron, Willie Thornton, Barry Kinch, John Campbell and many others besides; of course you might be one of the guys I've named!

Best regards, Mike Waight.

not one named i know all the rest though except john campbell i left when it was still pas in 75 alex

Waighty
10th May 2011, 18:17
not one named i know all the rest though except john campbell i left when it was still pas in 75 alex

You must have had a varied and interesting career with PAS. I absolutely loved the style and character of the work both in and out of harbour, although the seagoing side interested me most particularly the mooring vessels. Great people and very professional to boot. Very good memories indeed. Mike

senior pilot
10th May 2011, 23:48
started in portsmouth 1962 as a cabin boy on the tug samson then moved to the ammo boats ,spent the next three years on the kinterbury doing the med trips i left portsmouth for my home town of rosyth and worked on various ships handmaid, flintlock ,enfield daisy , accord,director ,cairn allso took charged of the fleet tenders on duty nights as liberty boats for r f a tankers moored in the river,two things made me leave first was the fire on the advice in the indian ocean when we had to abandon the ship, the second was being rammed and allmost rolled over by the devonshire so i did not want to try my luck any further . but there was big changes coming with the rmas .

mil511mariner
30th May 2011, 15:38
SP
I recall being told the story of the Cairn being rolled, when she was moved to Kyle and converted to do target work - I believe the chief engineer was on the plates when it happened and still made it out in one piece as did the rest of the crew. Miraculous when you read of the number of recent tug capsizes where a lot of the crew did not make it. I also worked with Pete Smallridge and Curly Morrison in Devonport who were on the Advice tow from Singapore another amusing story, after the event ! I believe the tow was the Alsation.

shoot999
30th May 2011, 16:39
SP
I recall being told the story of the Cairn being rolled, when she was moved to Kyle and converted to do target work - I believe the chief engineer was on the plates when it happened and still made it out in one piece as did the rest of the crew. Miraculous when you read of the number of recent tug capsizes where a lot of the crew did not make it. I also worked with Pete Smallridge and Curly Morrison in Devonport who were on the Advice tow from Singapore another amusing story, after the event ! I believe the tow was the Alsation.

Wasn't it after the Cairn incident that the funnels were raked in? Or was that just another PAS story?

senior pilot
30th May 2011, 21:34
the tug that was towed back from singapore was the spanial ,the cairn was pushed over to 90 degrees i ended up standing on the hull for a few seconds untill the skipper a jimmy mair managed to right her by putting both engines full ahead and one propeller struck the bow and sprung us clear the gearbox was ripped apart with gogs flying every where the propellor was pulled out by at least two feet the cook was quick to grab the od as he went over the side he grabed the lads long hair. as for the funnels being angled this had allready been done with some of them when built, but it was then carried out on the ones that still had straight funnels.