Maersk Supply Service and offshore Pay?

noworries182
7th May 2011, 14:55
Hi people, i'm soon to be starting a job with Maersk Supply Services and I was just wondering how much i would be looking at earning per year compared to other companies, as i have had other offers. Its my first trip as a Deck Officer.

Thanks

the brit
8th May 2011, 00:19
didn't you ask when you applied or surely they would have said the annual salary plus perks etc.

Blackal
8th May 2011, 14:34
It will be in your Terms & Conditions.

How much are the others offering?

Al

Burned Toast
8th May 2011, 19:57
Ask the other companies:- what 2/M and C/Mate get
Gulf Offshore
Sealion
Vector
Farstad
Subsea
Tidewater

Ray (Smoke)

Jan Hendrik
9th May 2011, 06:54
Don't understand why you want to get this sort of information through this forum.
Didn't you get a suggested contract with all the conditions?

You would never start a job without knowing the working conditions and pay. The latter as I can judge seems to be more important to you than anything else.
Anyway good luck.
Cheers
Jan

dowling
12th May 2011, 09:01
Hi Noworries,as a few of the others have stated you should have asked about wages first,then again it may depend on whether you'll be on a Flatback or Anchor Kranker,though i think Maersk have done the same as Farstad,nae bonus if your on one or the other.2nd Mates and Mates with Farstad are on roughly 33 grand a year upwards.No many Brits left with Maersk as they had a big clearout a few years back,mostly my side of work(Ratings) but if yer upstairs ye might be alright for a while!

Blackal
12th May 2011, 09:05
Without actually being in the AHTS/PSV business - I wouldn't worry over much about any slight differences in pay. (easy for me to say) - and concentrate more on gaining experience. Get some years under your belt, and look for opportunities from there?

Al :)

david freeman
15th May 2011, 17:20
Hi people, i'm soon to be starting a job with Maersk Supply Services and I was just wondering how much i would be looking at earning per year compared to other companies, as i have had other offers. Its my first trip as a Deck Officer.

Thanks

You took the job.Mearsk are a large shipping company, Are you engaged by a manning or management company? If you are are you tied to Maersk or your employment company. Maersk have a large and varied fleet of vessels sailing under many flags, I am sure some one in Mearsk will put you right as to the terms and conditions you can expect in the various Maersk Fleets. Watch out for the contract and the article dates, if they do not coincide you may get a peirhead jump you do not want and return out of contract on minimum conditions, with a seatime voyage you did not expect. Money is not everything? as I am sure others have said.

Doughnut
24th June 2011, 04:22
Did you end up taking the job with MSS? If so, what boat you on? I only ask since I'm 2/M with them.

I'm surprised they didn't give any indication on your salary, pay scale and seniority scale were one of the first things I asked for when I had the prospect of getting a job with them.

Blackal
24th June 2011, 04:36
Doughnut - I suspect that there will be nothing more from Noworries182 on this subject. As with other seemingly 'strange' queries - the motives are usually not as they purport to be.

Al :)

noworries182
24th June 2011, 10:10
Hi guys, I'm back!!!! as always with site, i didn't get much helpful feedback which is all I really wanted, not just patronising comments!

I did get the job with MSS yes, it was more of a promotion than anything as I finished my cadetship. Regardless of the pay I was going to take the job, due to the difficulties of finding your first job as a newly qualified officer with experience only on container ships, as i'm sure your all aware. The experience and opportunity of working in the offshore industry was more attractive.

However, I was only interested in some general information about other companies purely out of interest! and was wondering what the difference in pay would of been if i would have took the interview for Sealion offshore and maybe just start up a general conversation to discuss some terms and conditions of contracts as its my first contract as an officer.

Thanks anyway for taking the time to reply.

Blackal
24th June 2011, 20:52
Obscure question, no elaboration or response for over 6 weeks.............

Maybe it reads okay to you?

Al

Don Matheson
24th June 2011, 21:45
No Worries:- Wee bit concerned about your long awaited response arriving with your statement that you didnt get much help. "Helpfull feedback" was what you wanted but instead got "patronising comments", Rubbish!!!
You posted a rather ambignous question, without giving anything away such as your position with Maersk and I think, what you expected from the company and just what you could give them.
Quite a few people responded but you didnt have the courtesy to respond to allow them to help so I dont think you can return and announce your arrival as If you were returning home from the Zulu Wars and have wonderful things to tell.
You have just finished as a cadet and this was your first job as an "officer". I think that if your attitude on a supply boat was as santimonious as your effort on here it could also be your last trip as an "officer".
Many members on here have served and are serving on "supply boats" and know that a second mate is a rather hardworking dogsbody with a lot to learn.

Don
Former C/E on "Supply Boats", AHTS, Platform Supply

Burned Toast
25th June 2011, 12:38
No Worries:- Wee bit concerned about your long awaited response arriving with your statement that you didnt get much help. "Helpfull feedback" was what you wanted but instead got "patronising comments", Rubbish!!!
You posted a rather ambignous question, without giving anything away such as your position with Maersk and I think, what you expected from the company and just what you could give them.
Quite a few people responded but you didnt have the courtesy to respond to allow them to help so I dont think you can return and announce your arrival as If you were returning home from the Zulu Wars and have wonderful things to tell.
You have just finished as a cadet and this was your first job as an "officer". I think that if your attitude on a supply boat was as santimonious as your effort on here it could also be your last trip as an "officer".
Many members on here have served and are serving on "supply boats" and know that a second mate is a rather hardworking dogsbody with a lot to learn.

Don
Former C/E on "Supply Boats", AHTS, Platform Supply

Too true Don, and a junior 2/mate I would imagine with them carrying two 2/mates.(egg)(egg):sweat:

Ray (twenty years offshore supply and crankers)

Satanic Mechanic
25th June 2011, 13:09
I think you will find that the rates of pay and conditions across companies in any given trade pretty much even out.

When you meet (and you will)the guy who claiming he gets /$1000 a day + pension and a daily free shag - because he is a 'specialised LNG FPSO DP' operator - He's Lying

noworries182
25th June 2011, 13:59
I agree Don, some of the replies were helpful and I appreciate them, but I have posted other questions on this website before which were met with similarly unhelpful and once again, patronising feedback. After some of the initial comments from this post such as:

"You would never start a job without knowing the working conditions and pay" and,

"Don't understand why you want to get this sort of information through this forum."

Along with previous replies from other posts, you may better understand my reluctance to check the replies. I was also selected for supply vessels based on my performance throughout my cadetship and due to getting a 1st in my degree, someone somewhere must think I’m suited to supply vessels.

In case my appreciation wasn’t evident in my first reply, I’ll say again. Thank you to everyone who replied with helpful comments.

Satanic Mechanic
25th June 2011, 15:26
due to getting a 1st in my degree,

A freakin what in a what (EEK)

Blackal
26th June 2011, 05:46
Along with previous replies from other posts, you may better understand my reluctance to check the replies.

You don't do yourself many favours.............

Al

DCMARINE
27th June 2011, 12:12
I agree Don, some of the replies were helpful and I appreciate them, but I have posted other questions on this website before which were met with similarly unhelpful and once again, patronising feedback. After some of the initial comments from this post such as:

"You would never start a job without knowing the working conditions and pay" and,

"Don't understand why you want to get this sort of information through this forum."

Along with previous replies from other posts, you may better understand my reluctance to check the replies. I was also selected for supply vessels based on my performance throughout my cadetship and due to getting a 1st in my degree, someone somewhere must think I’m suited to supply vessels.

In case my appreciation wasn’t evident in my first reply, I’ll say again. Thank you to everyone who replied with helpful comments.
Life on Supply vessels and anchor-handlers nowadays is a lot easier than when I started over 30 years ago but it is still hard graft and 1st trippers have to be "carried" until they get to grips with the job - if they are willing to learn. Having a 1st in a degree means absolutely NOTHING on the back-end of a supply boat with decks awash whether handling anchors, or containers floating around. My advice is to Look, Learn, and take advice from those with you who have been in the job a long time, no matter who they are. You are part of a team and you will make life easier for yourself if you stop waving your Degree about as if you are better than those without otherwise your time on supply vessels will be short-lived.
Donald Campbell

Don Matheson
27th June 2011, 15:00
Well said Donald, I just hope it does him some good. I believe from my own experience that a snapped wire coming up the deck has no intrest in degrees, but is just intrested in killing or maiming anyone it can.

Don

DCMARINE
28th June 2011, 11:37
Well said Donald, I just hope it does him some good. I believe from my own experience that a snapped wire coming up the deck has no intrest in degrees, but is just intrested in killing or maiming anyone it can.

Don
Been there, done that, and got the T-shirt. That's why I've been ashore for 30 years.
Donald

Don Matheson
28th June 2011, 12:49
Donald I do hope the wire I mentioned didnt get you and if it did I can only say how sorry I am.
Have my own experience when a wire parted and took a seamans head clean off. Fortunately for me I was on leave at the time but felt very bad about it for years. Always thinking if I had been driving the winch, perhaps just perhaps, it would not have happened. Sad thing was that he had gone into the water from the roller previously, seaman had thrown the lassoo then waved to me to heave up and we pulled him back on deck. Walked past me soaking wet, said thanks Don went and had a beer then shower then fresh gear then back on deck. Really liked him and to have that happen to him with a wire upset me a lot.
These are the sort of things that unless you have seen it for yourself you just cant believe. These are also the things you have to listen to those around you to learn.

Don

RayJordandpo
28th June 2011, 13:29
May I quote Terry Gay, a larger than life, well known supply boat mate and ex tugman. (sadly no longer with us)

The mate of a tug we were on asked to borrow Terry's deck knife to cut some rope. Terry refused and told him in no uncertain terms to use his own knife. The mates reply - "I stopped carrying deck knives when I passed my 1st mates certificate" Terry's reply - "Well then cut it with your f.....g mates ticket then"

Don Matheson
28th June 2011, 22:16
Sounds like your mate Terry had it just about right for a tug or supply boat Ray.

Don+

Burned Toast
29th June 2011, 09:43
May I quote Terry Gay, a larger than life, well known supply boat mate and ex tugman. (sadly no longer with us)

The mate of a tug we were on asked to borrow Terry's deck knife to cut some rope. Terry refused and told him in no uncertain terms to use his own knife. The mates reply - "I stopped carrying deck knives when I passed my 1st mates certificate" Terry's reply - "Well then cut it with your f.....g mates ticket then"

Sailed with Terry in Toisa, Good seaman and shipmate.

Ray

Doughnut
4th July 2011, 05:28
Life on Supply vessels and anchor-handlers nowadays is a lot easier than when I started over 30 years ago but it is still hard graft and 1st trippers have to be "carried" until they get to grips with the job - if they are willing to learn. Having a 1st in a degree means absolutely NOTHING on the back-end of a supply boat with decks awash whether handling anchors, or containers floating around. My advice is to Look, Learn, and take advice from those with you who have been in the job a long time, no matter who they are. You are part of a team and you will make life easier for yourself if you stop waving your Degree about as if you are better than those without otherwise your time on supply vessels will be short-lived.
Donald Campbell

Sound advice.

It seems I went down a similar route as no worries with regards to doing a degree. When I qualified Maersk weren't giving jobs to many cadets at all, the few that were getting jobs were degree students. Seems like a strange criteria to me considering I'd only ever been on box boats but there was no way I was turning down the chance of getting into this side of the industry.

I was prepped to a certain extent by friends and family who have/had worked on Anchor Handlers so I knew it was a completely different ball game. From the moment I stepped onto my first AHTS I felt like a glorified cadet, my degree meant diddly squat and I had a lot to learn (and still do). The Mate and the Old Man gave similar advice as you have given, the jist of it being look, listen and learn, and to get involved as part of the team. Take the initiative though, if you don't show much of an interest then why should they bother?

No worries, I hope you enjoy the change of scenery, it certainly beats spending two weeks steaming across the Pacific to a container terminal that looks just like the last one you've been to.