Ss British Swift

Indra Sinha
15th December 2005, 20:35
A warm greeting to all in these forums from a newcomer.

I am a novelist researching a story set on a tanker in the sixties. The ship in the story is modelled on BRITISH SWIFT, a BP tanker built on Clydeside in 1959. In late 1967, her master was M.S.McClymont, who left her dry docked in February 1968 to get married. Afterwards he lived in Devon.

My interest in BRITISH SWIFT comes from having acquired some of her papers in an auction. From them I learned of such processes as "hot butterworthing", which must hardly be known outside the merchant marine.

They also contain references to various crew members such as M.H.Davies, AB, who would today be 70 years old, and H.G. Scragg, 2nd Steward, and W.H.S. Kirkby who had lost his National Insurance Card. Others mentioned include K. Pearson, EDH, J. Reid, Assistant Steward, N.J. McClean, AB, D. Izzat, FG and Mohammed Khosravipour, Navigating Cadet.

I wonder what became of P. Cox, Deck Boy, who left the vessel to go home, taking all his belongings with him, without submitting an application to take leave. In his report to the B.P. Tanker Co in Moor Lane, EC2, the master stresses that "he must have been under the impression that, having been signed off, he was free to leave." He goes on to say, "I will now leave this matter in your hands but, in view of his services on board the vessel and the good opinion held by the Chief Officer and myself of him, I would, with very great respect, suggest that this occasion is a case for explanation rather than disciplinary action."

What a decent master McClymont was.

These are events of almost forty years ago, but I would love to hear from anyone who knows more about this ship, her master or crew.

gadgee
15th December 2005, 20:43
Hello Indra
Welcome to this site. I am sure you may be able to find help. Strangely enough I was a Deck Apprentice and then Third Officer with BP Tankers in the mid to late sixties and served on similar vessels to the British Swift - I was on British Kiwi and British Kestrel and remember "hot butterworthing". Regretfully I know of no one whom you mention but others here may!
Good luck!

non descript
15th December 2005, 21:07
A warm welcome to you Indra, I hope you have a happy time on the good ship SN. Bon Voyage

paul0510
16th December 2005, 00:20
Hi Indra,

'hot butterworthing', a means of cleaning oil tanks, usually at sea after discharging, comprising of the piece of equipment shown below which was connected to a rather cumbersome hot water hose and a long rope and lowered in stages,depending on tank depth, through the removable 'Butterworth plate' set into the deck plating. The rope was used to hold the equipment at the various levels and also to avoid strain on the hose. To those involved, a sod of a job, heaving the heavy brass Butterworth and water-filled hose up from the depths!!. This task could on occasions last for days. The water/oil mix that resulted in the tank bottom was pumped into the 'slop tank' which was usually the aftermost centre cargo tank. After being allowed to settle, the water at the bottom of the slop tank was pumped overboard via the stern pipe under the strict eye, naturally(!) of the Officer, or in most cases Apprentice in charge.
That was tank-cleaning 30-40 years ago like on the 'Swift'. BP had so many ships at that time 100+ it was difficult or nigh impossible to keep track of ratings or officers so the names unfortunately mean nothing to me either.
Good luck with your research.

thunderd
16th December 2005, 01:17
Indra welcome to the site, as you can see we have here the most knowledgable and helpful people on the planet, I hope you enjoy the rest of the site and find the information you are researching....good luck with the novel, make sure you let us know when it's available.

Fairfield
16th December 2005, 11:25
BRITISH SWIFT was one of the BIRD Class of medium sized tankers built for BP in the 1950s by various yards. She came from Scotts' at Greenock in 1959:

11174grt/ 15400dwt

525ft x 69ft x 29ft draft. Diesel powered- Doxford engine.

Renamed NOAH VI in 1977. Don/t have anything of her after that.
There is a pic of mine in the BP Tankers Forum. Not too good I/m afraid. I/ve posted a trials shot I have of her in the Gallery.

John_F
16th December 2005, 11:53
Indra,
Some more details of the British Swift.
She was built by Scotts Shipbuilding & Engineering Co. Ltd. of Port Glasgow & completed on 24.10.1959. After 16 years service with BP she was sold on 21.11.1975 to Noah Shipping of Tehran & renamed Noah VI. On 19.5.1982 she was in collision with a vessel named Cast Gull in the Persian Gulf. She put into Bahrein & was reported to be still there in 1989 & that was the last to be heard of her but I expect someone on this site will know what her ultimate fate was.
Like Paul Jarvis, I too sailed on 2 of her sisters - British Gannet & British Trust - & very nice little vessels they were too. They were all motor vessels as opposed to steam ships, hence the prefix "mv."
I have attached a photo of her.
Photo & details from Norman Middlemiss - The British Tankers

R58484956
16th December 2005, 17:18
WElcome Indra to the site where most of us have seagoing experience and as you can already see, ask a question and the answer is there in a flash.

janbonde
16th December 2005, 22:07
Cannot remember for sure but you could not buy the butterworth system it was all on leasing deal [it was originally a british patent but he went to the states so I was told,anyone please verify] with the companys, then gunclean systems came along that was just as heavy a chore with the crew having to move a big hoist frame around the decks to hoist and change the heads

John_F
16th December 2005, 23:51
Janbonde,
In between the Butterworth & the gunclean system, there were the Victor Pyrate machines. These were very similar to Butterworths but had an additional arm (3 instead of the Butterworth's 2). In BP at least, the supertankers tended to use the Victor Pyrate machines whereas the smaller ones stuck to Butterworths. At that time (50s & early 60s), there was no such thing as a slop tank & all the sludge was just pumped directly over the side. On the supertankers, tank cleaning would start as soon as the discharge port was left behind & oil trails could clearly be seen in the Western Approaches. Try doing that today.
Regards,
John F

janbonde
17th December 2005, 20:07
John-F I know it was common practice of that sort of thing in the early 50`s also the sludge the tank cleaning crew shovelled out went straight over the side, then I went over to Norwegian and Panamanian flag and came back to tankers in the early 70`s was in the 250,000t with Esso International the other thing which was part of Butterworth were the hull scrubbing units with divers,we used call at Tenerife on the voyage and spend 24 hrs at anchor just outside the port and get the bottom cleaned.made a difference to bunker usage and knots,as in all these large companys 1 cent in the $ saved was a lot of money

Tony Maskell
12th March 2006, 05:17
Indra
I sailed with Captain McClymont on his first command, the British Gunner back in 1966, I was Chief Officer, and he was one of four 1st command Captains that I sailed with as Chief Officer.
My memories after 40 years of him have not changed and they do not particularly coincide with yours
Tony Maskell

Coastie
12th March 2006, 05:34
Good Morning Indra.
Welcome to Ships Nostalgia. I hope you get the information you are searching for. Whilst you're on here though, I think you'll find lots of other interesting topics to keep you amused and informed.

vix
12th March 2006, 05:43
I wonder what became of P. Cox, Deck Boy, who left the vessel to go home, taking all his belongings with him, without submitting an application to take leave. In his report to the B.P. Tanker Co in Moor Lane, EC2, the master stresses that "he must have been under the impression that, having been signed off, he was free to leave." He goes on to say, "I will now leave this matter in your hands but, in view of his services on board the vessel and the good opinion held by the Chief Officer and myself of him, I would, with very great respect, suggest that this occasion is a case for explanation rather than disciplinary action."
Hi Indra, welcome to the site. Hope you get all of the info you're looking for?
I don't understand this quote, though? If he had 'Paid-off' then he was entitled to leave. Why was there talk of disciplinary action and why did he have to apply to 'take leave'? Maybe things had changed in 1967? Some of the other old hands might be able to enlighten me? Vix

KenLin39
13th March 2006, 22:14
A warm greeting to all in these forums from a newcomer.

I am a novelist researching a story set on a tanker in the sixties. The ship in the story is modelled on BRITISH SWIFT, a BP tanker built on Clydeside in 1959. In late 1967, her master was M.S.McClymont, who left her dry docked in February 1968 to get married. Afterwards he lived in Devon.

My interest in BRITISH SWIFT comes from having acquired some of her papers in an auction. From them I learned of such processes as "hot butterworthing", which must hardly be known outside the merchant marine.

They also contain references to various crew members such as M.H.Davies, AB, who would today be 70 years old, and H.G. Scragg, 2nd Steward, and W.H.S. Kirkby who had lost his National Insurance Card. Others mentioned include K. Pearson, EDH, J. Reid, Assistant Steward, N.J. McClean, AB, D. Izzat, FG and Mohammed Khosravipour, Navigating Cadet.

I wonder what became of P. Cox, Deck Boy, who left the vessel to go home, taking all his belongings with him, without submitting an application to take leave. In his report to the B.P. Tanker Co in Moor Lane, EC2, the master stresses that "he must have been under the impression that, having been signed off, he was free to leave." He goes on to say, "I will now leave this matter in your hands but, in view of his services on board the vessel and the good opinion held by the Chief Officer and myself of him, I would, with very great respect, suggest that this occasion is a case for explanation rather than disciplinary action."

What a decent master McClymont was.

These are events of almost forty years ago, but I would love to hear from anyone who knows more about this ship, her master or crew.

Hi Indra. Welcome. I've never heard of anyone once having signed off to be expected to stay for any reason (except the cook) but not a deck boy? . Once I had signed off and had my discharge book I was gone. I served on several BP tankers mid 50s to early 60s and between Little Aden and the Gulf cleaned tanks loads of times, then it was get down there wearing the obligatory tank boots and not much else shovelling shale or scale into 10 gallon drums which were hoisted up by block and tackle and dumped overside, always ended up singing and whistling quite a bit, but the large glass of Tate and Lyles rum (Caroni 90) made some amends. I believe there was an explosion on one ship, I think it was the Bulldog, owing to the earth strip not being tightened. Ken.

Charlie_Wood
17th March 2006, 01:07
Indra
I sailed with Captain McClymont on his first command, the British Gunner back in 1966, I was Chief Officer, and he was one of four 1st command Captains that I sailed with as Chief Officer.
My memories after 40 years of him have not changed and they do not particularly coincide with yours
Tony Maskell

A very diplomatic first post Tony, welcome.

heglig john
6th April 2006, 17:55
hi well i joined the british gull in govan in the sixties,,stood by her during building and sailed with her for 7 month on the aussie coast,,there was a greenock crew ,but they gave so many problems that i beleive after i left in dry dock they were relaced with a indian crew ,,she was a opposed piston b/w and gave us no problems during the trip ,,heglig john

dom
6th April 2006, 18:11
I wonder what became of P. Cox, Deck Boy, who left the vessel to go home, taking all his belongings with him, without submitting an application to take leave. In his report to the B.P. Tanker Co in Moor Lane, EC2, the master stresses that "he must have been under the impression that, having been signed off, he was free to leave." He goes on to say, "I will now leave this matter in your hands but, in view of his services on board the vessel and the good opinion held by the Chief Officer and myself of him, I would, with very great respect, suggest that this occasion is a case for explanation rather than disciplinary action."
Hi Indra, welcome to the site. Hope you get all of the info you're looking for?
I don't understand this quote, though? If he had 'Paid-off' then he was entitled to leave. Why was there talk of disciplinary action and why did he have to apply to 'take leave'? Maybe things had changed in 1967? Some of the other old hands might be able to enlighten me? Vixmust agree with vix,unless you sign off and resign you can leave right away,some time on board you signed off at one table,signed on at another

maryam79
28th December 2006, 18:21
My father his name was mohammad khosravipour

baschris
17th April 2008, 01:13
A warm greeting to all in these forums from a newcomer.

I am a novelist researching a story set on a tanker in the sixties. The ship in the story is modelled on BRITISH SWIFT, a BP tanker built on Clydeside in 1959. In late 1967, her master was M.S.McClymont, who left her dry docked in February 1968 to get married. Afterwards he lived in Devon.

My interest in BRITISH SWIFT comes from having acquired some of her papers in an auction. From them I learned of such processes as "hot butterworthing", which must hardly be known outside the merchant marine.

They also contain references to various crew members such as M.H.Davies, AB, who would today be 70 years old, and H.G. Scragg, 2nd Steward, and W.H.S. Kirkby who had lost his National Insurance Card. Others mentioned include K. Pearson, EDH, J. Reid, Assistant Steward, N.J. McClean, AB, D. Izzat, FG and Mohammed Khosravipour, Navigating Cadet.

I wonder what became of P. Cox, Deck Boy, who left the vessel to go home, taking all his belongings with him, without submitting an application to take leave. In his report to the B.P. Tanker Co in Moor Lane, EC2, the master stresses that "he must have been under the impression that, having been signed off, he was free to leave." He goes on to say, "I will now leave this matter in your hands but, in view of his services on board the vessel and the good opinion held by the Chief Officer and myself of him, I would, with very great respect, suggest that this occasion is a case for explanation rather than disciplinary action."

What a decent master McClymont was.

These are events of almost forty years ago, but I would love to hear from anyone who knows more about this ship, her master or crew.

hello indra,
my name is BAZ MUMFORD,I SAILED ON THE BRITISH SWIFT INTO THE PERSIAN GULF FOR A 6 WEEK CRUISE.THE MOST MODERN SHIP I HAD EVER BEEN ON IN THOSE DAYS.SINGLE CABINS UNHEARD OF THEN,AIR CONDITIONING AND LOVELY GRUB.I SAILED IN HER MARCH 62".DONT KNOW ALL THEM POSH NAMES BUT WE JUST CALLED IT CLEANING THE TANKS,AND WE GOT A LOVELY TOT OF 4 BELLS RUM.DONT SUPPOSE MY NAME IS MENTIONED IN YOUR PAPERS.
ALL THE BEST
BAZ MUMFORD

JohnBP
17th April 2008, 02:44
Indra, I was on the British Curlew for 7 months, what a great ship, cant help with the Br. Swift, but thanks for the question it has sparked lots of chat which I like.

JohnBP

albert.s.i
17th April 2008, 10:56
welcome indra, i dont know much about the swift but i think the butterworth sytem was explained i was pumpman in 40s and 50s with bt and they were hard work and i put all the sludge over the stern i think it became taboo in the early 50s when tanks i think esso had one at wallsend to pump all the sludge usually from 10 centre into the shore tank the last time i used it was on the seaf royal 1957 albert .s.i

derekhore
17th April 2008, 21:18
Wasn't the 'sludge' allowed to settle out....then the water decanted off through the pump room sea valves until an oily trail was seen astern?
The rest was then pumped ashore.

In Wallems we had Toftejorg tank cleaning machines...very similar to the Butterworth's...but fixed in each tank.

A cadet's nightmare was tankcleaning...heaving up those hot, black rubber hoses every couple of hours after 30 mins at 10', 30 mins at 20' then 40' mins at a bottom wash.
And how hot did the pump room get with all that hot water passing through the pipelines!!

Hamish Mackintosh
19th April 2008, 23:08
Was not the "Butterworth" gear invented by a BTC second engineer by the name of Butterworth ?Or was that just an "old wifes tail"

d.r.wing
28th May 2008, 20:16
Hi Indra, I sailed on the Swift as electrician 20/2/61 to 26/7/61 Hull, then foreign,then Falmouth for drydocking this was the second half of her maiden voyage, I believe that the whole crew with the exception of the Master and C/Eng. were changed at Hull,why? I know not.I think the Master was called Minchinson,I remember the Chief Eng.was called Brown. I got into trouble with him at Falmouth for reporting several faults that were not on his list but that I had asked to be part of the repairs.
I remember there was an auxcilliary boiler that worked off the exhaust from the main engine and one 8 to 12 night watch a flange blew much loud hissing and steam, the forth eng. grabbed a spanner and disappeared into said steam came back to the controls red faced but triumphant. the overhead engine room crane had a flexible cable that was badly placed so that it was always in danger of catching on the crane track, which it finally did and I had to make a temporary joint to continue work on the engine, this was one of the missed items on the repair list. I also remember that the labelling on some of the main circuit breakers were swapped between engine room and bridge this was discovered when the generator engine went faulty as we approached Port Said at night, Bridge deck in panic first prioity was navigation lights standby Genny fired up proceed to put load on a bit at a time bridge deck first only to discover that accomodation and bridge labels were swapped. Ah Well such was life in those days. Best of luck with your book.

DAVELECKIE
28th May 2008, 21:01
In the 1970's a well known saying circulated the fleet. DRIFT WITH THE SWIFT.
As it says the Swift was not the most reliable Bird class vessel and the name was well earned in this period.

Dave

Andy Wilkins
6th July 2008, 20:41
I was on the Swift for 4 months in late 73, early 74 as my first trip as a Nav Off Cadet. There were some memorable times; a stonking storm on New Years Eve when we anchored off the Nore but dragging in the general direction of Holland, I seem to remember some of the walkway was carried away. We also hit the jetty at the Isle of Grain as we were turning to go alongside and, finally, in keeping with the above comment, I was cast adrift with the Chief Engineer (a chap called Taylor I think) when one sunday, after lunch, it was decided that we needed to do a bit of repair work (using something called DEVCON I believe)on the hull. I was elected to go with the Chief in one of the lifeboats and yes, as soon as we were in the water and cast off the engine in the lifeboat spluttered to a halt and defied the Chief's efforts to get it going again for about 30 mins, as we slowly, but surely, drifted away from the ship! Happy days. The skipper was a very large Welshman called Lewis. Anyone else on this forum on her at that time?

John Hunter
20th July 2008, 18:44
Hi All,
with regard the deck boy...........could it be he signed off but was supposed to sign back on again straight away! I remember signing off on a couple of occasions and looking at the desk to sign back on again and thinking should I just do a runner!!!! Not a good idea as a cadet!

Just a thought

John

Solongago
10th September 2008, 02:26
Hi Indra,

'hot butterworthing', a means of cleaning oil tanks, usually at sea after discharging, comprising of the piece of equipment shown below which was connected to a rather cumbersome hot water hose and a long rope and lowered in stages,depending on tank depth, through the removable 'Butterworth plate' set into the deck plating. The rope was used to hold the equipment at the various levels and also to avoid strain on the hose. To those involved, a sod of a job, heaving the heavy brass Butterworth and water-filled hose up from the depths!!. This task could on occasions last for days. The water/oil mix that resulted in the tank bottom was pumped into the 'slop tank' which was usually the aftermost centre cargo tank. After being allowed to settle, the water at the bottom of the slop tank was pumped overboard via the stern pipe under the strict eye, naturally(!) of the Officer, or in most cases Apprentice in charge.
That was tank-cleaning 30-40 years ago like on the 'Swift'. BP had so many ships at that time 100+ it was difficult or nigh impossible to keep track of ratings or officers so the names unfortunately mean nothing to me either.
Good luck with your research.
Don't quite know how this reply system works but an interesting aside. I recall that in '68 when on the British Robin and arriving at Bombay (as it was then) where we had to close the bond, any available cans of 'brew' were slid into the Butterworth hoses and as one was required a long broom handle was utilised to push it out. It was an Indian crew ship and the trust system seemed to work.
Robin was a great ship with an excellent Goanese cook who made buns for smokoe. KP

billyboy
10th September 2008, 05:06
Anyone remember the Galley boy "Bob Taylor" (also known as Robert or Bobski) seem to recall he had an accident and cut his foot rather badly and needed shore treatment. He lives out here now. was chatting with him a couple of months ago.

Brill39e
13th March 2009, 18:41
I sailed on this ship in 1967 as a fireman/greaser for two voyages--the first a cruise round the Med., the second eastward via the cape to the Gulf and then on to the coast of India and East Pakistan with a cargo of (I think) parrafin. --a memorable voyage for a young lad at the time. Unfortunately I can't remember any of the names of my shipmates.The ship broke down in the Bay of Biscay and I can remember using that engine room crane to help lift out a damaged (lower) piston and assisting the engineers in tightening and slackening the huge 'big end' nuts to adjust the bearing in the crankcase--I really felt like one of the 'workers' with that big hammer in my hands! Less edifying was cleaning out the scavenge spaces in some red hot port in India, or going down into the fresh water tanks to clean out oil contamination--- I had intended to go to the Marine School at Leith to become a junior engineer--an opption available at the time for engine room ratings' but I got married instead and although my seagoing career was relatively short I wouldn't have missed it for the world!

trucker
13th March 2009, 20:47
Hi Indra,

'hot butterworthing', a means of cleaning oil tanks, usually at sea after discharging, comprising of the piece of equipment shown below which was connected to a rather cumbersome hot water hose and a long rope and lowered in stages,depending on tank depth, through the removable 'Butterworth plate' set into the deck plating. The rope was used to hold the equipment at the various levels and also to avoid strain on the hose. To those involved, a sod of a job, heaving the heavy brass Butterworth and water-filled hose up from the depths!!. This task could on occasions last for days. The water/oil mix that resulted in the tank bottom was pumped into the 'slop tank' which was usually the aftermost centre cargo tank. After being allowed to settle, the water at the bottom of the slop tank was pumped overboard via the stern pipe under the strict eye, naturally(!) of the Officer, or in most cases Apprentice in charge.
That was tank-cleaning 30-40 years ago like on the 'Swift'. BP had so many ships at that time 100+ it was difficult or nigh impossible to keep track of ratings or officers so the names unfortunately mean nothing to me either.
Good luck with your research.

certainly was a sod of a job.but the tank cleaning rum ,at the end .was well worth it.plus the overtime.

trucker
13th March 2009, 20:58
Hi All,
with regard the deck boy...........could it be he signed off but was supposed to sign back on again straight away! I remember signing off on a couple of occasions and looking at the desk to sign back on again and thinking should I just do a runner!!!! Not a good idea as a cadet!

Just a thought

John

probably changing articles.didn,t get your dis. book though.well not if the company could help it.

Vital Sparks
18th March 2009, 13:15
In the 70s, shipping companies started the practice of keeping ships articles open for a year. If you were on a ship when this happened, it was necessary to sign off the old articles and then sign onto the new articles. This at least was the practice for the ships officers. I sailed with a few masters who insisted that the crew signed onto the new articles before signing off the old because they didn't trust the lads not to decide to go home.

barnsey
21st March 2009, 05:49
Indra
I sailed with Captain McClymont on his first command, the British Gunner back in 1966, I was Chief Officer, and he was one of four 1st command Captains that I sailed with as Chief Officer.
My memories after 40 years of him have not changed and they do not particularly coincide with yours
Tony Maskell

..... and I sailed with Mr. McClymont who was mate of the British Power in 1961. Starting out from the Isle of Grain with the Pilot aboard we were on the focstle with him and the Bosun trying to break the anchor shackle which we had failed to break when going on the bouys. He resorted to setting fire to a drip tray full of kerosene to heat it up !!! I thought this somewhat dangerous in a non-gas free ship even though we had a head wind!!!

We 4 Navigating Apprentices did ALL of the tank washing that trip, IoG to Mina without ANY help from the crew who were a Bolshy lot. We were put on the Mina - Aden crude oil run, three trips and did all the tank washing for them too. Then thank goodness LEFO. As many of you will know the 42's had 4 tanks across so we were pretty well knackered.

A trifle unfair to flog us out to avoid confrontation with the crew. The two pumpmen were great thank goodness. The next Mate for the same run again was a completely different kettle of fish who we thought the world of... C.F.Williams.

trucker
21st March 2009, 20:04
havn,t been on a tanker,where the deck crew didn,t do the tank cleaning /diving.usually the cadets helped.but mainly there to get the lay out of the pumproom ,eductor .ballast systems,etc.most a.bs were made up tank cleaning for the extra cash.[overtime].

barnsey
21st March 2009, 22:04
Precisely Trucker,

This however was one where the mate used us to avoid confrontation with the crew.

Love your Avtur .....the only beer that had me flat on my back after two bottles .... mind I also had a few Rums !!

trucker
21st March 2009, 22:07
must have been a right a--e hole of a crew.bosun must have been as bad.can,t beat a bottle of journey into space.

barnsey
21st March 2009, 22:38
I cannot remember much about the crew ... mind, they were not much in evidence as I said.

We four were not really happy with the Mate using us that way and we got no favours from him for the effort we put in.

Happy enough otherwise.

I have been stripping some Varnish off doors .... could have done with some of that BROWN stuff ... reckon it would work a treat. Its a wonder that mob over in Brussels havn't banned it yet ... they seem to have you Poms under the thumb in every other way!!!!

trucker
21st March 2009, 22:45
I cannot remember much about the crew ... mind, they were not much in evidence as I said.

We four were not really happy with the Mate using us that way and we got no favours from him for the effort we put in.

Happy enough otherwise.

I have been stripping some Varnish off doors .... could have done with some of that BROWN stuff ... reckon it would work a treat. Its a wonder that mob over in Brussels havn't banned it yet ... they seem to have you Poms under the thumb in every other way!!!!

give them time.

macca57
21st March 2009, 22:50
British Swift was built by Scotts' Shipbuilding & Engineering Co., Greenock not Port Glasgow.

bazzaboy1
5th July 2009, 07:10
I sailed on the swift in 64 and my recolection of Mr claymont was he was not a man of his word i had a bit trouble in Hamburg and he promised me everything would be ok got back to England and he gave me a bad discharge bazzaboy1

John McAuslin
5th July 2009, 11:38
I sailed on Btitish Swift in 1972, deck apprentice. She was carrying heavy fuel oil then, coasting round UK. Then got a 'deep sea' run from Teesport to Sandwich Masechusets, then Venezuela, back to Hamburg, then coasting in the Medi during summer/autumn. Tank cleaning was long and arduous, as was the checking of heating coils and the inevitable twice daily temperature checks on the cargo when loaded. Best part was bhandary chapattis at 5 in the morning down aft. Great ship, great trip even though the mate, Hywell Philips made life difficult for all the nav/apps.

barnsey
5th July 2009, 11:49
I sailed on Btitish Swift in 1972, deck apprentice. She was carrying heavy fuel oil then, coasting round UK. ...... Great ship, great trip even though the mate, Hywell Philips made life difficult for all the nav/apps.

What were the dates you were aboard John, I was second Mate on her

from Oct 1972 - March 1973. P.Burleigh was Master and H Philips was the Master/Extra Mate, J.Evans was the Mate, Bob Langton and Mike Magill the second mates, Ken Freeman and Peter Edwards were 3rd mates.

David Barnes

John McAuslin
12th July 2009, 08:26
Barnsey,
Joined in Teesport, Aug 72. Left her in Liverpool Oct/Nov? 72. P. Burleigh, Hywel Philips and Bob Langton, I remember. She was about to start coasting UK/NW Europe again, and myself and other cadets were transferred to allow their cabins to be used by the joining "extra" mate and "extra" second mate. I went straight from Liverpool by train to Isle of Grain and joined the British Seafarer, that same day, in time to sail before midnight to Shellhaven and Purfleet on the Thames. British Seafarer was without doubt, my most enjoyable trip at sea, even although it was coasting up the Baltic thru the winter.

Regards,

John McAuslin

Dickyboy
12th July 2009, 09:35
Hi Indra, Welcome aboard.
With reference to tank cleaning. I was never on the British Swift, or any of that class. (Commonly known as "Birdie Boats", due the them all, with the exception of British Trust, being named after birds, I wonder why the different name for her?)
The tankers I was on had epoxy coated tanks, so no, or very little scale to dig out. The tank bottoms often had to be mopped out though, at the bottom, around the suctions,Tto remove any traces of water. That was on the product carriers. The VLCCs I was on used to save the slops in the center middle tank, known as the "Settling tank" Once "Settled Out" the water was drained off from underneath the oil and discharged to sea. The oil was then saved and the next cargo loaded on top of it. This was known as "Load on Top" and several thousand tons of perfectly good crude oil was saved in this way.
Tank Cleaning was a hard job, and could take several days. It was usually done at the first opportunity, which often meant in bad weather.
The Butterworth Hoses, nozzles, saddles, sand bags, to keep the saddles in place, and the hauling up and lowering down of hoses all bring back good memories for me. Hard work, tireing, dirty and smelly work it was but it got the crew working together, and gave us something to complain about. :o

The Sailorman
19th September 2013, 16:40
I sailed on the British Swift 1965 joined Swansea to Grangemouth then Isle of Grain then Stockholm paid off Newcastle. A very clean ship & a good feeder

retfordmackem
20th September 2013, 17:08
I sailed on Btitish Swift in 1972, deck apprentice. She was carrying heavy fuel oil then, coasting round UK. Then got a 'deep sea' run from Teesport to Sandwich Masechusets, then Venezuela, back to Hamburg, then coasting in the Medi during summer/autumn. Tank cleaning was long and arduous, as was the checking of heating coils and the inevitable twice daily temperature checks on the cargo when loaded. Best part was bhandary chapattis at 5 in the morning down aft. Great ship, great trip even though the mate, Hywell Philips made life difficult for all the nav/apps..
John-if you still about. I was on the Swift ,joined at Malmo 10/6/72 and left 6/Nov 1972 in I.O.G . I was on with my Missus and I think the captain Burleighs wife was on board . I remember going to Sandwich .Where my wife and I went ashore and got up to Boston with Bob a junior engineer .We actually went to see the premier of the godfather at a cinema. When getting to Venezuela my missus could not go ashore because she did not have a long skirt to go ashore. Armed guards on gangway if I remember. Was there a deck cadet called Howard on board who had an incident in Hamburg where he pooled his money with another deck cadet (This may have been you)for a lady of the night and could not rise to the occasion . He got some stick over that.
I hope to god you read this pal as memory of you is slowly coming back.
I remember the ship as a very happy ship . I am going to see if Graham Wallace can get me a crew list for the time .

retfordmackem
20th September 2013, 17:51
Barnsey,
Joined in Teesport, Aug 72. Left her in Liverpool Oct/Nov? 72. P. Burleigh, Hywel Philips and Bob Langton, I remember. She was about to start coasting UK/NW Europe again, and myself and other cadets were transferred to allow their cabins to be used by the joining "extra" mate and "extra" second mate. I went straight from Liverpool by train to Isle of Grain and joined the British Seafarer, that same day, in time to sail before midnight to Shellhaven and Purfleet on the Thames. British Seafarer was without doubt, my most enjoyable trip at sea, even although it was coasting up the Baltic thru the winter.

Regards,

John McAuslinHOPEFULLY YOU ARE STILL ON THE SITE .
John I was on the Swift when you joined and left . I was on board with my wife and joined at Malmo 10/6/72 and left in I.O.G 6/11 72. Liverpool date was 20/10/72 when you left .I can remember the one trip across the pond to Sandwich and Venezuela. My wife with junior engineer Bob went up to Boston while in Sandwich and went to a multi plex cinema to see Godfather 1 .Wot an experience 6 cinemas in one.
Then when we went to Venezuela and we could not go ashore as the wife did not have suitable clothing ,all minis and would not wear a boiler suit.I think the captains wife was on board as well.
When we went to Hamburg ,if my memory serves me right there was another deck cadet called Howard . And him and another cadet ,possibly you-pooled there money to visit a lady of the night. Unfortunately he could not rise to the occasion. He got some stick over that and every time on deck ,the shout was "no hard feelings Howard " Do you recall this?

retfordmackem
20th September 2013, 18:17
What were the dates you were aboard John, I was second Mate on her

from Oct 1972 - March 1973. P.Burleigh was Master and H Philips was the Master/Extra Mate, J.Evans was the Mate, Bob Langton and Mike Magill the second mates, Ken Freeman and Peter Edwards were 3rd mates.

David Barnes.Dear Barnsey if you joined Oct 72 then John left in Liverpool ,date 20/10/72 according to my Discharge book. I was on board though as Lecky,my wife was with me
until 6/11/72 . Left at I.O.G so we must have had a couple of weeks on board with you.

retfordmackem
20th September 2013, 18:20
What were the dates you were aboard John, I was second Mate on her

from Oct 1972 - March 1973. P.Burleigh was Master and H Philips was the Master/Extra Mate, J.Evans was the Mate, Bob Langton and Mike Magill the second mates, Ken Freeman and Peter Edwards were 3rd mates.

David Barnes
David Barnes[/QUOTE].Dear Barnsey if you joined Oct 72 then John left in Liverpool ,date 20/10/72 according to my Discharge book. I was on board though as Lecky,my wife was with me
until 6/11/72 . Left at I.O.G so we must have had a couple of weeks on board with you.

retfordmackem
20th September 2013, 18:46
Barnsey,
Joined in Teesport, Aug 72. Left her in Liverpool Oct/Nov? 72. P. Burleigh, Hywel Philips and Bob Langton, I remember. She was about to start coasting UK/NW Europe again, and myself and other cadets were transferred to allow their cabins to be used by the joining "extra" mate and "extra" second mate. I went straight from Liverpool by train to Isle of Grain and joined the British Seafarer, that same day, in time to sail before midnight to Shellhaven and Purfleet on the Thames. British Seafarer was without doubt, my most enjoyable trip at sea, even although it was coasting up the Baltic thru the winter.

Regards,

John McAuslin
John-if you still about. I was on the Swift ,joined at Malmo 10/6/72 and left 6/Nov 1972 in I.O.G . I was on with my Missus and I think the captain Burleighs wife was on board . I remember going to Sandwich .Where my wife and I went ashore and got up to Boston with Bob a junior engineer .We actually went to see the premier of the godfather at a cinema. When getting to Venezuela my missus could not go ashore because she did not have a long skirt to go ashore. Armed guards on gangway if I remember. Was there a deck cadet called Howard on board who had an incident in Hamburg where he pooled his money with another deck cadet (This may have been you)for a lady of the night and could not rise to the occasion . He got some stick over that.
I hope to god you read this pal as memory of you is slowly coming back.
I remember the ship as a very happy ship . I am going to see if Graham Wallace can get me a crew list for the time .

retfordmackem
28th September 2013, 20:49
John-if you still about. I was on the Swift ,joined at Malmo 10/6/72 and left 6/Nov 1972 in I.O.G . I was on with my Missus and I think the captain Burleighs wife was on board . I remember going to Sandwich .Where my wife and I went ashore and got up to Boston with Bob a junior engineer .We actually went to see the premier of the godfather at a cinema. When getting to Venezuela my missus could not go ashore because she did not have a long skirt to go ashore. Armed guards on gangway if I remember. Was there a deck cadet called Howard on board who had an incident in Hamburg where he pooled his money with another deck cadet (This may have been you)for a lady of the night and could not rise to the occasion . He got some stick over that.
I hope to god you read this pal as memory of you is slowly coming back.You would have left in liverpool on 20.0ct
I remember the ship as a very happy ship . I am going to see if Graham Wallace can get me a crew list for the time .........

Batley Bill
28th September 2013, 23:08
The penny has only just dropped that I sailed with 'Barnsey' a couple of times (the Reliance and extra 2/0 possibly on the Kestrel). David, you persuaded me that the best way to deal with an especially nasty cold that I had was to drink hot whiskey toddies whilst listening to your Strauss Waltz records (or was it Gilbert and Sullivan?). I felt great.....until the next morning.

Nice to see your smiling face on your profile.

Sorry to go off thread!!

The Sailorman
10th October 2013, 14:14
I sailed on the British Swift 1965 joined Swansea to Grangemouth then Isle of Grain then Stockholm paid off Newcastle. A very clean ship & a good feeder

Ops My mistake it was 1963 not 65 sorry

david freeman
11th October 2013, 09:22
Good Morning. Most BP Tankers were built with (At the Time) Indisn/pakistani crews at some later date Crewing the vessels. I do believe on first trips and from the builders yards, and for the first set of article (FG), the crew were white crew only!!! with the ocassional crew member replacement from the international pool in Rotterdam.
Your introduction piece of a novel/story from the Clydeside builders, appears to me to be a little wide of the mark. Your story may be more appropriate from the time the ship changed flag, and sailed foreign. To include the original white crew members, may raise a few hackles, and your story line is not what happened at sea during this white crew manning, unless written fom a crewman point of view, when as I say after some period of time the ship was recrewed from White Crew to asiatic crew form Bombay or Karachi.
From a few stand points everything was not a bed of roses, and I cannot remember from crew lists Officers who were british, with names, other than of european origin.

david freeman
13th October 2013, 09:09
Good Morning. Most BP Tankers were built with (At the Time) Indisn/pakistani crews at some later date Crewing the vessels. I do believe on first trips and from the builders yards, and for the first set of article (FG), the crew were white crew only!!! with the ocassional crew member replacement from the international pool in Rotterdam.
Your introduction piece of a novel/story from the Clydeside builders, appears to me to be a little wide of the mark. Your story may be more appropriate from the time the ship changed flag, and sailed foreign. To include the original white crew members, may raise a few hackles, and your story line is not what happened at sea during this white crew manning, unless written fom a crewman point of view, when as I say after some period of time the ship was recrewed from White Crew to asiatic crew form Bombay or Karachi.
From a few stand points everything was not a bed of roses, and I cannot remember from crew lists Officers who were british, with names, other than of european origin.

An Extra comment I wish to make at this time, is that BP Personnel in the late 60's employed on Bombay crew agreements 3 Indian Fitters as part of the GP CRew ( For engineering /mainetenance duties under the C/E.;
The men were very wary of the Sherang system of work as they were (the Fitters) enganged at the PO Rank-same as the Sherang! : However they were not christian (Goanese Catering Crew) of Mahamadan (Deck/Eng crew), or the (Jackie-Untouchable group). The fitters beleived they should have been signed on with the same agreements as the engineering Officers, with the same leave considerations. It was not BP personnels finest hour. I had experience of this rank on the 28's and 32's the older ladies of the BP Fleet, which required a lot of engineering attention at this time.(Frogger)
With modern articles and signing off and on agreements under foreign flag's I suspect one has to adapt more readily to a ships muliticultural society, and the living personally with so many nationalities and religions. Maybe as off shore there are only companies men and non companies men. The meaning of officers and crew is now a distiction confined to history????

retfordmackem
13th October 2013, 13:16
An Extra comment I wish to make at this time, is that BP Personnel in the late 60's employed on Bombay crew agreements 3 Indian Fitters as part of the GP CRew ( For engineering /mainetenance duties under the C/E.;
The men were very wary of the Sherang system of work as they were (the Fitters) enganged at the PO Rank-same as the Sherang! : However they were not christian (Goanese Catering Crew) of Mahamadan (Deck/Eng crew), or the (Jackie-Untouchable group). The fitters beleived they should have been signed on with the same agreements as the engineering Officers, with the same leave considerations. It was not BP personnels finest hour. I had experience of this rank on the 28's and 32's the older ladies of the BP Fleet, which required a lot of engineering attention at this time.(Frogger)
With modern articles and signing off and on agreements under foreign flag's I suspect one has to adapt more readily to a ships muliticultural society, and the living personally with so many nationalities and religions. Maybe as off shore there are only companies men and non companies men. The meaning of officers and crew is now a distiction confined to history????
David I was on the Gunner which in July 1970 changed its crew in Bombay. They took off the ship tons of dry goods (tea sugar etc and also sewing machines, bikes from second hand store.)that they had accumalated from the ship over there 2 years on board and were robbed by there own customs officers when going ashore. I know because we went ashore at same time .
We had 3 indian fitters on board who I thought and they did say they were christians and I believed them . The oddest experience I had with one of these chaps (JOE)was when I went to his cabin to fix his lights. He was sat on his cabin floor eating the Bhandaris curry (flying fish that day )and rice and on the bed plated up ,was an entree a dinner and a sweet.
As I finished and was leaving he got up ,opened his cabin door and threw all the food over board . I asked why he did that he promptly said in a loud proud voice "Because I am entitled to it Battywaller under articles". As a young man ,and not worldy wise at that time could not at the time fully understand his logic .

twogrumpy
13th October 2013, 15:47
Must say on the whole my preference was for Indian crew, at least you could get a damned good curry.(Thumb)

2G

retfordmackem
13th October 2013, 19:44
Must say on the whole my preference was for Indian crew, at least you could get a damned good curry.(Thumb)

2G
Hear hear twogrumpy. The (crews cook)Bhandaries curry was good also as long as you did not watch the preparation. Every part of the fish went in when we caught fish or shark.
And very trustworthy.

twogrumpy
13th October 2013, 20:15
Hear hear twogrumpy. The (crews cook)Bhandaries curry was good also as long as you did not watch the preparation. Every part of the fish went in when we caught fish or shark.
And very trustworthy.

Right, best not see the prep work, same goes for the chicken, every bit goes in.
Used to watch the Bhandari rolling out his curry paste on the old stone slab.

Deep fried chapaties were great as well for breakfast al fresco on the poop + a beer as well if on the 4-8.

2G

barnsey
21st March 2014, 22:38
The penny has only just dropped that I sailed with 'Barnsey' a couple of times (the Reliance and extra 2/0 possibly on the Kestrel). David, you persuaded me that the best way to deal with an especially nasty cold that I had was to drink hot whiskey toddies whilst listening to your Strauss Waltz records (or was it Gilbert and Sullivan?). I felt great.....until the next morning.

Nice to see your smiling face on your profile.

Sorry to go off thread!!
I'm not sorry you "Went off thread" Bill ...just following up the various threads where you are mentioned ... missed following this one up. Yup The "Reliance was the ship where I ceased drinking Whiskey .....never touched it since would you believe? Ooooooh that night we anchored at Kawasaki (?) it was cold and after hours on the bridge we needed warming up .. Whisky and Greens ginger wine ...went down a treat but ... as you remember the night and next morning was terrible ....hence never again has the stuff touched my lips ...got half a bottle of Black Label in the store, my mate has been battling away trying to drink it.

David

Batley Bill
22nd March 2014, 15:37
I'm not sorry you "Went off thread" Bill ...just following up the various threads where you are mentioned ... missed following this one up. Yup The "Reliance was the ship where I ceased drinking Whiskey .....never touched it since would you believe? Ooooooh that night we anchored at Kawasaki (?) it was cold and after hours on the bridge we needed warming up .. Whisky and Greens ginger wine ...went down a treat but ... as you remember the night and next morning was terrible ....hence never again has the stuff touched my lips ...got half a bottle of Black Label in the store, my mate has been battling away trying to drink it.

David
Hi David, and thanks for the reply. You are right about the location, and for all that I felt rough I still managed a run into Tokyo next day with our Celtic dancing, bagpipe playing 4/E Vic Black. Interesting to learn that you haven't touched a drop of Whisky since!

Kawasaki was cold, but New Jersey towards the end of our trip was much colder still. We were close to Philadelphia. My not so reliable memory tells me that the name of the town was Belle Air, but I could be very wrong on that one. It was colder than any run up the Baltic.

barnsey
22nd March 2014, 21:53
Hi David, and thanks for the reply. You are right about the location, and for all that I felt rough I still managed a run into Tokyo next day with our Celtic dancing, bagpipe playing 4/E Vic Black. Interesting to learn that you haven't touched a drop of Whisky since!

Kawasaki was cold, but New Jersey towards the end of our trip was much colder still. We were close to Philadelphia. My not so reliable memory tells me that the name of the town was Belle Air, but I could be very wrong on that one. It was colder than any run up the Baltic.
Morning Bill from a bright sunny Westport NZ ...now that the radiation fog has burnt off!!

We went right up to Philadelphia, anchored a little higher than the airport between two bridges while we filled in those masses of silly forms, got finger printed and generally kept an army of civil servants in a job for the afternoon. Then we went on up above the city to a berth just before a railway bridge.

Very slow discharge for some reason ... lack of steam? Thick cargo? High back pressure? ..... I think Graham hopped up on a table and had a dance with a disco lass???

Can't remember where we went after there but I do remember crossing the junction of the Gulf Stream and an area of "Sea Smoke" .... we also visited some South American Port .....maybe to load the cargo for Philadelphia ....???

Yup, she was a happy ship and trip .... paid off in Liverpool.

gadgee
22nd March 2014, 23:47
Hi David, and thanks for the reply. You are right about the location, and for all that I felt rough I still managed a run into Tokyo next day with our Celtic dancing, bagpipe playing 4/E Vic Black. Interesting to learn that you haven't touched a drop of Whisky since!

Kawasaki was cold, but New Jersey towards the end of our trip was much colder still. We were close to Philadelphia. My not so reliable memory tells me that the name of the town was Belle Air, but I could be very wrong on that one. It was colder than any run up the Baltic.

Think we went to this berth near Philadelphia on British Industry in 1969. The district was Delair, Pennsauken, New Jersey. Some of us went to have a look around one of the new shopping mall's just down the road at Cherry Hill. Bought a Steppenwolf and Chicago LP - still have them in very good condition! Very large and impressive in those days. It is still marked on the map; also I note that there is still an oil terminal at Delair.

Batley Bill
23rd March 2014, 00:12
Morning Bill from a bright sunny Westport NZ ...now that the radiation fog has burnt off!!

We went right up to Philadelphia, anchored a little higher than the airport between two bridges while we filled in those masses of silly forms, got finger printed and generally kept an army of civil servants in a job for the afternoon. Then we went on up above the city to a berth just before a railway bridge.

Very slow discharge for some reason ... lack of steam? Thick cargo? High back pressure? ..... I think Graham hopped up on a table and had a dance with a disco lass???

Can't remember where we went after there but I do remember crossing the junction of the Gulf Stream and an area of "Sea Smoke" .... we also visited some South American Port .....maybe to load the cargo for Philadelphia ....???

Yup, she was a happy ship and trip .... paid off in Liverpool.

You are a wise man living in NZ. A lovely country.

Having spent just 6 years at sea the memories of some of the individual trips are still reasonably fresh. Thanks to Gadgee I now know that the berth in New Jersey was Delair, not Belle Air. Thank you Gadgee.

We visited Uruguay and La Plata before going up to Delair, and then Venezuela before returning to the UK. We had also spent time earlier in the trip ferrying cargo to Porto Marghera near Venice from Milazzo in Sicily. Throw in a visit to Karachi and it was a pretty interesting voyage. Plenty of hog wash in between mind you.

Best wishes with your retirement David Regards Bill H

backsplice
23rd March 2014, 02:39
Batley Bill have,nt thought about DELAIR NJ it was my first time in the US (all be it on a SHELL tanker the ANADARA) sorry boys no offence implied ......as a boy it was an experience and a half we came from PUNTA CARDON

PS I however did sail on 3 BPTC ships one was the birdy boat "BRITISH MALLARD "

Batley Bill
23rd March 2014, 20:38
Batley Bill have,nt thought about DELAIR NJ it was my first time in the US (all be it on a SHELL tanker the ANADARA) sorry boys no offence implied ......as a boy it was an experience and a half we came from PUNTA CARDON

PS I however did sail on 3 BPTC ships one was the birdy boat "BRITISH MALLARD "

Hi Backsplice. Whilst I was in Delair I took it into my head to visit a New York/Italian family that I knew from my first trip to sea and thanks to a Nav App on said trip who was a pen pal of the daughter of the family. It was, I guess, the sort of daft thing that you do when you are a you 21 years old. I took a taxi to Philadelphia, a train up to New York, fought my way across Grand Central Station to the subway terminus and caught the Down Town Express to Sheepshead Bay (near Coney Island). Emerging from the local station after several hours travel I walked a couple of streets to their house, and knocked on the door. They were out!

retfordmackem
6th May 2014, 15:27
Hi Backsplice. Whilst I was in Delair I took it into my head to visit a New York/Italian family that I knew from my first trip to sea and thanks to a Nav App on said trip who was a pen pal of the daughter of the family. It was, I guess, the sort of daft thing that you do when you are a you 21 years old. I took a taxi to Philadelphia, a train up to New York, fought my way across Grand Central Station to the subway terminus and caught the Down Town Express to Sheepshead Bay (near Coney Island). Emerging from the local station after several hours travel I walked a couple of streets to their house, and knocked on the door. They were out!

Brilliant(Jester)(Jester)(Jester)(Jester)(Jester)( Jester)(Jester)

ChasH
6th July 2014, 03:47
Janbonde,
In between the Butterworth & the gunclean system, there were the Victor Pyrate machines. These were very similar to Butterworths but had an additional arm (3 instead of the Butterworth's 2). In BP at least, the supertankers tended to use the Victor Pyrate machines whereas the smaller ones stuck to Butterworths. At that time (50s & early 60s), there was no such thing as a slop tank & all the sludge was just pumped directly over the side. On the supertankers, tank cleaning would start as soon as the discharge port was left behind & oil trails could clearly be seen in the Western Approaches. Try doing that today.
Regards,
John F
hi I was on the British Beacon we used to lower the butterworth system down over a saddle which fitted over the hole once the plate was removed, because of the heating coils packed up the oil stuck like glue we ended up actually going into the tanks washing them with those non flexible solid rubber hoses red hot water, we wrapped the hoses with rags because the were to hot to hold you could not see a thing because of the steam I don't think that would happen today they were Italian built the light, lantern, beacon comet, star one other I think they ordered six and paid for 5 anybody sailed on them all the best to everyone.

mikeharrison
6th July 2014, 14:20
... they were Italian built the light, lantern, beacon comet, star one other I think they ordered six and paid for 5 anybody sailed on them all the best to everyone.

Hi Chas,
I think that the one which you are missing of the "Eyeties" is the British Signal. I sailed on the Signal and did my fair share of Butterworthing.

The Signal had a eventful life, including a engineroom fire off the West coast of Africa which left us drifting for 3 days. The poor engineers were worn out, but eventually got us going again. The USAF sent out a reconnaissance plane to overfly us and check that we were OK. The upside was that the shark fishing was good when we were off watch!

Regards, Mike

Hamish Mackintosh
6th July 2014, 16:36
I notice in a couple of posts the mention of "Extra" second mates, mates, and even one master, I have never run across that at sea (but heard mention of it on passenger ships)what was the function of these "extra's" and why were they there??

derekhore
6th July 2014, 16:57
Hi Hamish ....
It was usual to carry the 'extra' Deck Officers when a ship was coastal trading and working a lot of ports in a few days involving loading, discharging & tank-cleaning. .. enabling sleep to be obtained as and when by all!
Have to admit I never sailed with an 'extra' Master .. but certainly with 'extra' mates & second mates on the coast.

Hamish Mackintosh
6th July 2014, 17:21
Thanks Derek, never thought of that angle

gadgee
7th July 2014, 22:43
hi I was on the British Beacon we used to lower the butterworth system down over a saddle which fitted over the hole once the plate was removed, because of the heating coils packed up the oil stuck like glue we ended up actually going into the tanks washing them with those non flexible solid rubber hoses red hot water, we wrapped the hoses with rags because the were to hot to hold you could not see a thing because of the steam I don't think that would happen today they were Italian built the light, lantern, beacon comet, star one other I think they ordered six and paid for 5 anybody sailed on them all the best to everyone.

For a further discussion on the merits or otherwise of the "Light" class see the forum here:

http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/showthread.php?t=10964&highlight=eyeties

twogrumpy
8th July 2014, 17:16
For a further discussion on the merits or otherwise of the "Light" class see the forum here:

http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/showthread.php?t=10964&highlight=eyeties

Merits? not a lot.

ninabaker
9th July 2014, 00:37
Hi Hamish ....
It was usual to carry the 'extra' Deck Officers when a ship was coastal trading and working a lot of ports in a few days involving loading, discharging & tank-cleaning. .. enabling sleep to be obtained as and when by all!
Have to admit I never sailed with an 'extra' Master .. but certainly with 'extra' mates & second mates on the coast.

Really? I have no recollection of any extra officers when I was coastwise in the Willow, Osprey or Unity. The Old Man often took the CO's watches to release the poor sod for supervising tank washing. I really hated those Butterworths: vile work even with a tot of 4 bells at the end.

nina

John Gillespie
9th July 2014, 09:27
Really? I have no recollection of any extra officers when I was coastwise in the Willow, Osprey or Unity. The Old Man often took the CO's watches to release the poor sod for supervising tank washing. I really hated those Butterworths: vile work even with a tot of 4 bells at the end.

nina
When I was coastwise on Border Pele we always had an extra 3rd officer.I only loaded/discharged and supervised tank cleaning. Great ship,Indian crew.Captain John Hill was Master.

GeorgeM13
9th July 2014, 20:50
You must have been very unlucky Nina any time I was on the NW European coast there was an extra ?/O.. For a period in the early 70's the 50's that were on short crude oil runs around the Mediterranean and Black Sea carried an extra 3/O. I did a full trip on the Queen as x3/O..
George

ninabaker
9th July 2014, 22:58
You must have been very unlucky Nina any time I was on the NW European coast there was an extra ?/O.. For a period in the early 70's the 50's that were on short crude oil runs around the Mediterranean and Black Sea carried an extra 3/O. I did a full trip on the Queen as x3/O..
George

On the other hand, the Osprey was an exceptionally happy ship socially and although the work was tough I recall that trip as one of the best.
n

Cwatcher
10th July 2014, 11:05
In the late '50s, early '60s, it was the crude carriers that used to carry an extra C/O, who used to do the 4 - 8 watch, while the other C/O concentrated on cargo & maintenance. This was certainly the case on the Glory, Beacon & Queen, '59 to '62 on which I served. It was an easy life for them as we were doing slow trips round the Cape at the time. Maybe there was a surplus of C/Os at the time.

Pobydd
10th July 2014, 13:04
We had an X2/O on the Vision on the N.W. European coast in 1966/67 and on the Liberty in 1968. Also on the Ensign on the Cape run in 1967/68, I haven't the faintest idea why though.

Richard R617629

derekhore
10th July 2014, 18:12
When I was coastwise on Border Pele we always had an extra 3rd officer.I only loaded/discharged and supervised tank cleaning. Great ship,Indian crew.Captain John Hill was Master.

Would that be in 1976 John? :)

Graham Wallace
10th July 2014, 22:47
Derek,

April 1977 !

Graham

derekhore
10th July 2014, 23:47
Derek,

April 1977 !

Graham

Ah ... I was 3/0 on the Pele in 76 with John Hill - cannot remember who the C/O was, thought it might have been JG as I sailed with him somewhere!

Graham Wallace
12th July 2014, 03:24
Ah ... I was 3/0 on the Pele in 76 with John Hill - cannot remember who the C/O was, thought it might have been JG as I sailed with him somewhere!

Derek,

My error, did not quite check enough, flipping thru 1976/77's was causing me problems. Your memory is good.

June 1976 Master AN Smith ...CO JCG, 2 off 3M's you and AC Smith

Then SM's issue one month later!

July 12th 1976, Master J Hill...CO JCG, 3M you. Same in August issue.

Graham

derekhore
12th July 2014, 08:15
Thanks Graham!

I haven't lost it yet then!