Nice looking ships.

China hand
9th June 2011, 18:41
This may not be the right place to start this thread, but I am sure the Gentle Moderators will replace it if needed.

Looking at some of the lovely photos that members have taken over the years, I wonder has anyone ever said to themselves "now THAT is a beautiful looking ship"?

Of course, everyone has their own idea of what that means, but I am interested as to what fellow SN'ers think.

Don Matheson
9th June 2011, 19:36
I have always had a love of the old steam coasters the type with the bridge midships. Matching that is a love of the big traditional tugs, the ones that look like tugs from Europe and the US.
Nicest Cargo ships would be Brocklebanks Mahout and Markor.
Most beautiful ship ever was watching Queen Mary coming out of a dull morning, coming towards us and cracking on a good turn of speed.
Beautiful indeed.

Don

Ian6
9th June 2011, 20:20
Honestly I find any ship large or small from the pre-container age preferable to the almost identical, ugly and indistinguishable ships of today. But, I guess 100 years ago old salts from the sailing ship era were saying the same about those awful steam ships. The worst thought is that today's bulk carriers and container ships may be considered the 'the good old days' in 50 years time.
Ian

John Dryden
9th June 2011, 20:35
Though I,ve never seen one in real life,only photos in SNs fishing boat gallery,I like the lines of the big pelagic trawlers sailing today.

uisdean mor
9th June 2011, 23:19
Don
Whilst my second trip was on Mahout and I took the Markhor to hand over(to the eventual scrappers) and I did spend some time on Maihar ( loved it) - there is a snap on here somewhere of the Mahsud off Cape Town (with a London bus on deck). That I think is the finest snap I have seen of a Brocks boat. I am sure many others will disagree but Hey Ho - lets have a beer and discuss with nodding of heads , raising of elbows and a right to differ.
Rgds
Uisdean.

Peter Martin
10th June 2011, 07:48
Without doubt, the most beautiful ship I ever saw was the ED's mailboat 'Aureol'. As a small boy I was often taken down to New brighton to watch ships entering and leaving Liverpool. I used to get quite excitied when I saw Aureol leave Pier head and pass the 'Brazil', pilot on board. Little did I think then that years later I would serve aboard as officer cadet for 3 round-trips to Lagos. Sadly by this time, the late 60's / early 70's, the writing was on the wall for passenger travel by sea. The era of cruising had really to begin, we were in a sort of purgatory as regards this activity.

MervynHutton
11th June 2011, 10:41
I think that there is a thread on this subject started about 18 months ago but can't remember where?

lesbryan
11th June 2011, 11:25
This may not be the right place to start this thread, but I am sure the Gentle Moderators will replace it if needed.

Looking at some of the lovely photos that members have taken over the years, I wonder has anyone ever said to themselves "now THAT is a beautiful looking ship"?

Of course, everyone has their own idea of what that means, but I am interested as to what fellow SN'ers think.

I have not put any photos up on this site but the ones i have on others i do admire some are not mine i aggree but i do admite good looking ships especialy the likes of battleships .I think how beutiful but powerful and deadly they were

NoR
11th June 2011, 11:53
I've always liked pre war ships. Most of them have nice restrained curves and well proportioned masts and deck houses. I think this is because at that time all design was by hand in a drawing office with the full scale being fared out by the shipwrights using battens.

Most modern ships look dreadful, particularly the cruise liners.

chadburn
11th June 2011, 17:26
Some of the most beautiful vessel's built were the "traditional" Banana Boat's both pre and post WW2, before the container's of course

stein
11th June 2011, 17:39
It looked to me as for some reason reefers were made to look good? Well, I thought a lot of them looked god at least.

Some part of the appreciation of beauty is a preference for own culture i think, so that British sailors would honestly prefer the looks of British ships, the Scandinavians Scandinavian etc?

I remember that some sailors took pride in recognising the nationality of far away ships, but all i remember of details was the claim that you could recognise a Yank by the "forest" on deck.

Stephen J. Card
11th June 2011, 17:51
[QUOTE=stein;517924]It
Some part of the appreciation of beauty is a preference for own culture i think, so that British sailors would honestly prefer the looks of British ships, the Scandinavians Scandinavian etc?

QUOTE]

Stein, Very true but a few years ago there was a survey on which was the most beautiful passenger liner every built. The one ship that was voted for... far more than any other was the 1938 Holland America NIEUW AMSTERDAM.

Of course sailors mostly prefer their own but don't forget that a century most of the best looking ships in the world, regardless of the flag they wore, came from British yards.... English, Scottish and Irish!

Stephen

stein
11th June 2011, 18:20
Yes, clean and harmonious: http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/227376/title/nieuw-amsterdam-1957/cat/533

Yes of course the British were shipbuilders to the world at one time. Picking the most beautiful sailing ships built, you’d get mainly British vessels of course. Many of the later ones from J. Reid & Co in Glasgow,

Many would like to have seen a bit more sheer on British ships though, there is a bit too much of horizontality, and I might add, verticality. The Americans perhaps overdid it the other way, the Germans stuck to functionality and produced results you could measure, the French individualists did not want to avail themselves too much of other people successes, and produced some really odd shapes. But there have been good looking vessels built nearly everywhere.

chadburn
11th June 2011, 18:23
Stein, I believe it was the speed and passenger carrying element which made the design of Reefer's so "Yacht" like. Mar F had some superb vessel's but they did have some "utility" type's built where the passenger's did not have to pay for the voyage.

China hand
11th June 2011, 18:35
Some of the most beautiful vessel's built were the "traditional" Banana Boat's both pre and post WW2, before the container's of course

Couldn't agree more, but think about the Hamburg Sud ships BEFORE the CapSan yachts; CAP VILANO and CAP NORTE come to mind. Reefers always seem to be the prettiest, but a big heavy geared Blue'ey, or one of KNJCP/RIL little "Dinkey" freighters? The lines and functionality of those ships always hit the spot with me.

John Callon
11th June 2011, 23:42
Most beautiful ship ever built has to be the original Queen Elizabeth. Her profile and lines are 100% perfect. However the crew accomodation was something else.
Regards
John

Union Jack
11th June 2011, 23:47
I think that there is a thread on this subject started about 18 months ago but can't remember where?

Indeed there was - do a search in "Mess Deck" for the thread "Best Lookers", started in September 2010 by Dickyboy and you will find many of the same names there too.

Although I have a distinct bias towards Grey Funnel Line ships, I always thought that the CARONIA was a real beauty - certainly compared with present day cruise ships! - and that the Port Line ships had wonderful lines.

Jack

pete
12th June 2011, 09:56
Savannah has beautiful lines as has the Canberra
The Modern day vessel, although functional, are ugly to the extreme.
Others include the most beautiful, ship of all Queen Mary 1. Any Blue Flu vessel that were Beautiful in their Elegance.....pete

Tony Shaw
12th June 2011, 11:23
Years ago each company's ships were easily recognisible from a distance. In fact individual vessels were readily spotted. Can one remember spotting a couple of masts and a funnel (invariably spouting great plumes of smoke) on the horizon, and identifying the actual vessel. Not today though. Every company had 'good lookers' from Blueys to the Clans and Cities. Perhaps I'm sad but nostalgia is a wonderful thing. Oh, and I almost forgot, Stricks, my own company, had some 'good lookers' !

Clanline
12th June 2011, 11:59
We used to be able to identify many ships, especially our own Clan Line vessels by their lights at night.
Many of the Clans had 4 hatches forward of the bridge and one aft and that gave a distinctive gap between the lights.
The older Clan vessels from the 50's were beautiful ships such as my favourite the Argyllshire.

Chris Isaac
12th June 2011, 12:22
Caronia, Pendennis Castle and Andes.

End of discussion!

Hamish Mackintosh
12th June 2011, 16:03
Some of the shipping companies of old had their own gimmicks so that their ships were easily regognized from afar, Star boats with the oversize funnels, BTC with the high white masts ,Bank line by their scruffy appies(just kidding) but I still think the "birdie boats"of BTC take some beating

Pat Kennedy
12th June 2011, 16:17
This one was a real beauty; Shell's Sepia, seen here on sea trials in 1960.

stein
12th June 2011, 16:28
I'll agree with that, and I wouldn't expect tankers to be prominent among ships presented as beauties.

R396040
12th June 2011, 17:15
Cunards cargo boats Alsatia & Andria circa 1960s? were my idea of a beautiful looking ships. Both ex Silver Line. In those days and earlier there were some lovely looking Swedish passenger boats running into Tilbury riversite berths.
Stuart H

stein
12th June 2011, 17:34
Not many modern ships will be presented here I guess, consider this one: http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/showphoto.php?photo=286757

China hand
12th June 2011, 18:06
Caronia, Pendennis Castle and Andes.

End of discussion!

Not end, surely: I always thought the PENDENNIS CASTLE was the last "true" Union Castle liner. Long, low, very stylish.

Manchester
12th June 2011, 18:20
To my mind. passing the bar at Liverpool and seeing the beautiful looking " Royal Iris" or the "Daff" meant you were home after several months at sea.

Pat Kennedy
12th June 2011, 18:36
Not many modern ships will be presented here I guess, consider this one: http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/showphoto.php?photo=286757

Stein,
That is rather plain.
Here's another ugly duckling, but its apparently a very good shape for economy and stability. Its the X-Bow concept, designed and built in Norway and represented here by the offshore supply ship Bourbon Orca
Pat(Thumb)

kypros
12th June 2011, 19:50
Very Interesting Threads I Often Wondered If Ships Profiles Evolved Through The Particular Areas Of Trading Which The Different Companies Had Involvement.in My Time At Sea As Said By Previous Comments Most D/hands Could Indentify Ships By Thier Profile On The Horizon Is This Why When Ships Were Off There Normal Run They Looked Like Ducks Out Of Water. Kypros

Peter Eccleson
12th June 2011, 21:56
Geestbay, Geestcape of the 1960's were beauties......even their replacements in the 80's had style!

Chris Isaac
12th June 2011, 22:34
Not end, surely: I always thought the PENDENNIS CASTLE was the last "true" Union Castle liner. Long, low, very stylish.

Quite agree, she was last of the H & W built ships. They took a different form after that.

Cisco
12th June 2011, 22:44
I would go with 'Pendeniss Castle' as well but she was not really the last *pure* U-C liner... the Hope Street Gang modified her design... including lengthening to include stabilizers.
Tankers... yes some good looking tankers out there in the late 50s/ early sixties... Sepia was as good as any of them.
Cargo ships..... some of the later stuff was a bit overblown for my money.... a bit blousey... Geest had attractive ships....
There was lots of fugly stuff out there as well.....
I think a major difference between then and now was these days ships are designed by the shipbuilders... back in 'the good old days' companies had their own design offices.

TonyAllen
12th June 2011, 23:35
This one was a real beauty; Shell's Sepia, seen here on sea trials in 1960.

Pat A wonderful photo what was the crew qarters like Tony

Pat Kennedy
13th June 2011, 09:47
Pat A wonderful photo what was the crew qarters like Tony

Tony,
She was built in Cammell Laird, for Royal Dutch Shell, and at 72000tons was the largest ship in the Dutch MN at the time.
I saw the launch in 1960, and watched her go on sea trials a few months later but was never on board.
A mate of mine was on the trials as a fitter, and he said the accomodation was very spacious down aft, with large messrooms and recreation rooms, a crew cinema, hospital, and swimming pool sited between the twin funnels. There were apparently lots of spare cabins, and she did , from time to time carry a few passengers.
She was indeed a beautiful ship with the pale green hull which some years later was changed to black.
Best regards,
Pat

TonyAllen
13th June 2011, 11:15
Then I must have worked on her as I did work a few ships before I was able to pass my medical to go back in the merch in 1960 regards Tony

Pat Kennedy
13th June 2011, 11:32
Then I must have worked on her as I did work a few ships before I was able to pss my medical to go back in the merch in 1960 regards Tony
Tony,
She was launched from No 1 slipway, the one nearest the welding bays. There was another Shell tanker on No 2 slipway, the Otina, launched a year or so later, and next her was the cable ship Mercury, another beauty. (see attached photo)
regards,
Pat(Thumb)

Tony Shaw
13th June 2011, 13:24
I was at the launch of the "Sepia" as well Pat. It was quite a sight. The only other launch I saw was that of the second ship of British India's "Bulimba" class, I forget the name, was it the "Bamora" ?

Peter Martin
13th June 2011, 15:08
One of the two ships I saw launched at Lairds, the other being Windsor Castle. My Family had the Esso Garage at the main gate for about 40 years. Perhaps this may have persuaded me that a seagoing life was a good idea, that & the influence of my Grandad who served his time there then went off to sea as, first an assistant engineer & finally as 2nd.

Peter Trodden
13th June 2011, 17:58
Pat,
my Father in Law worked on the "Sepia" build as a Shipwright.
All his family were there at the launching,including the future Mrs T, watching him knock the final chocks away. He always said the Sepia was one of the finest looking ships,ever to leave the Yard.(Thumb)
ttfn.Peter.

kudu
13th June 2011, 18:24
Anything well proportioned is good on the eye.I think the British have a natural affinity to this,and in my mind at least,have generally built the best looking ships,certainly pre 1970,s.I used to like Bowater ships,smallish but well proportioned.I did many trips to Canada,St Lawrence and Great lakes,and saw many of Bowaters vessels,often loading paper.My own company,Stag Line,had two well proportioned ships .They were also the smallest of the Stag Line fleet.I've always thought ships look better,when laden,to much boot topping visible takes the eye off a ships superstructure.

Pat Kennedy
13th June 2011, 18:30
One of the two ships I saw launched at Lairds, the other being Windsor Castle. My Family had the Esso Garage at the main gate for about 40 years. Perhaps this may have persuaded me that a seagoing life was a good idea, that & the influence of my Grandad who served his time there then went off to sea as, first an assistant engineer & finally as 2nd.

Peter,
That Mercury was certainly a good looking ship, but was the scene of a very gruesome tragedy while fitting out in the basin.
There were three shipwrights engaged in caulking the deck planking on the boat deck, all kneeling and hammering oakum into the joints. The quayside cantilever crane brought a sling of steel plates aboard, and just as the sling passed above the chippies, one plate which had not been properly slung, slid out and fell, cutting the three of them in half at the waist.
I knew the crane driver, now dead, a nice chap, named George Roden, and the experience, for which he was in no way to blame, shattered his life.
Pat(Sad)

Pat Kennedy
13th June 2011, 19:17
I was at the launch of the "Sepia" as well Pat. It was quite a sight. The only other launch I saw was that of the second ship of British India's "Bulimba" class, I forget the name, was it the "Bamora" ?

Tony,
That Bamora was a good looking ship, I saw her in Singapore in the 60s.
All five of that 'B' class were built by Harland and Wolff in Govan.

kypros
13th June 2011, 19:48
Pat I Sailed On A Couple Of Post 1960 Tankers Accommodation First Class All The Vacilities You Mentioned And More Ie Single Berth Cabins With Three Quarter Spring Interior Mattresses Seperate Attached Reading/writing Room And Shared Bathroom/wc Facilities Between Two Cabins And No Two Colour Decor Clashed On The Ship I Was Only Sos At The Time But The Very Little Time In Port.

captain61
17th June 2011, 17:16
Most ships from the 30s to the 60s
I love the Chusan. A very fine vessel. And even the old IOM Steam packet ships

Stephen

Donald McGhee
17th June 2011, 22:37
Without doubt, the most beautiful ship I ever saw was the ED's mailboat 'Aureol'. As a small boy I was often taken down to New brighton to watch ships entering and leaving Liverpool. I used to get quite excitied when I saw Aureol leave Pier head and pass the 'Brazil', pilot on board. Little did I think then that years later I would serve aboard as officer cadet for 3 round-trips to Lagos. Sadly by this time, the late 60's / early 70's, the writing was on the wall for passenger travel by sea. The era of cruising had really to begin, we were in a sort of purgatory as regards this activity.

I remember the Aureol as a small boy in the early 1950's returning from Lagos to Scotland/Scotland/ Lagos (although we didn't dock in Scotland, got a train in those days) on leave with my parents. The old man was harbour master at the time in Lagos and they returned each year on an ED liner. I also sailed as a wee fella on the Apapa. The Aureol was a lovely looking ship right enough.

LANCE BALL
19th June 2011, 10:42
The Petworth, A small Stevie Clarke coastal tanker of the sixties was a lovely looking vessel, { but not very good for handling}

billyboy
19th June 2011, 11:05
Some interesting facts about the Petworth on the link below. just scroll down to Petworth. She had a colorful life.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stephenson_Clarke_Shipping

Pat Kennedy
19th June 2011, 13:02
Here's a picture of a very pretty little ship, Mac Andrew's Vives.
Both me and Cutsplice sailed in this one back in the 1960's, and although she was lovely to look at, she was not a comfortable ship to sail in, having the most sickmaking corkscrew motion I ever experienced.
Pat(EEK)

DURANGO
14th July 2011, 16:14
It looked to me as for some reason reefers were made to look good? Well, I thought a lot of them looked god at least.

Some part of the appreciation of beauty is a preference for own culture i think, so that British sailors would honestly prefer the looks of British ships, the Scandinavians Scandinavian etc?

I remember that some sailors took pride in recognising the nationality of far away ships, but all i remember of details was the claim that you could recognise a Yank by the "forest" on deck. They had a big merchant navy at one time but I think many of their ships have long gone as our,s have

woodend
14th July 2011, 16:35
I think the JOHN ROSS and the WOLRAADE WOLTEMAADE were the epitome of what a salvage tug should look like.

A sight I will always remember was the JOHN ROSS coming out of the mist with everything wide open doing in excess of 20 knots into the teeth of a N.W.'ster. A wonderful picture with the spray round her bridge.

Ron Dean
14th July 2011, 17:33
[QUOTE=stein;517924]It
Some part of the appreciation of beauty is a preference for own culture i think, so that British sailors would honestly prefer the looks of British ships, the Scandinavians Scandinavian etc?

QUOTE]

Stein, Very true but a few years ago there was a survey on which was the most beautiful passenger liner every built. The one ship that was voted for... far more than any other was the 1938 Holland America NIEUW AMSTERDAM.

Of course sailors mostly prefer their own but don't forget that a century most of the best looking ships in the world, regardless of the flag they wore, came from British yards.... English, Scottish and Irish!

Stephen
I photographed the Nieuw Amsterdam in 1958 as she was entering harbour at Rotterdam and was very impressed by her sleek appearance.
In the current "Ships Monthly" (Aug. 2011) an 11 page special article on RMS Olympic claims:- "Her almost perfect lines and beauty have not been matched".
Two ships from different era's and very different in appearance, but I can appreciate the beauty in both.

Ron.

China hand
14th July 2011, 18:25
I think the JOHN ROSS and the WOLRAADE WOLTEMAADE were the epitome of what a salvage tug should look like.

A sight I will always remember was the JOHN ROSS coming out of the mist with everything wide open doing in excess of 20 knots into the teeth of a N.W.'ster. A wonderful picture with the spray round her bridge.

Absolute! On a smaller scale, the 1960'ish Zwarte Zee of Smits was a real looker.

John Lyne
14th July 2011, 19:51
My idea of beautiful looking ships was the old Blue Funnel line

Ron Dean
14th July 2011, 20:20
There's been no mention so far of the part that the ship's livery can play on the ships appearance. It can either enhance, or detract from the lines of the hull in many cases.
The garish/fun liveries of cruise ships IMO, often spoil the ship's appearance.
What personally appeals to me are liveries combining red, black & white. (Cunard/White Star, Hurtigruten & Cal. Mac. for example).
Otherwise a white (or mostly white) hull I think is preferable for most ships, and especially the floating hotel cruise ships which seem to want to make some sort of fashion statement.

Ian Harrod
1st August 2011, 02:40
The Dutch "Straat" boats take a lot of beating; beautiful ships.

johno2449
23rd August 2011, 17:00
Queen Elizabeth, Mauretania, America. That's what ships should look like.

Pat Kennedy
23rd August 2011, 20:37
I always admired the heavy lift ships of the Hansa line of Bremen. They looked the part, well built and efficient, Saw plenty of them in the Far East. This one is the Braunfels

Tom Condren
23rd August 2011, 20:47
Those Hamburg owned reefer ships, all white with a red top to the funnel.

randcmackenzie
23rd August 2011, 21:44
Those Hamburg owned reefer ships, all white with a red top to the funnel.

Hamburg Sud

John King
11th December 2011, 13:34
Pat I Sailed On A Couple Of Post 1960 Tankers Accommodation First Class All The Vacilities You Mentioned And More Ie Single Berth Cabins With Three Quarter Spring Interior Mattresses Seperate Attached Reading/writing Room And Shared Bathroom/wc Facilities Between Two Cabins And No Two Colour Decor Clashed On The Ship I Was Only Sos At The Time But The Very Little Time In Port.Hit the nail on the head had to keep you happy at sea all the time. Jk

John King
11th December 2011, 14:02
I was at sea during the 60s and thought all the Scandinavians, French,and Italians,had some great lookers and agree in those days recognition from afar was the thing,nowadays they look just about the same.

Andrew Craig-Bennett
16th December 2011, 12:12
I am trying to separate two groups - "ships that I liked very much" from "ships that looked beautiful" because I tend to mix them up. Some ships that looked unlovely to others were rather lovely to me because they were good ships.

bill thompson
16th December 2011, 13:23
Levanos had some lovely looking ships

allanc
16th December 2011, 15:10
I'm not a seafarer, but I always thought the Swedish 'Cloud' ships were about the best I'd seen, back in the 1950s. Beautiful hull forms, capable of 21 knots (19 knots service speed), well proportioned superstructure, in a word, elegant!

TOM ALEXANDER
16th December 2011, 18:42
Probably 20 years ago now, but saw a Blue Star boat heading up Haro Strait on the way to Vancouver, B.C. What a beautiful looking ship compared to the drab bulkers which were becoming the norm, together with the "boxy" ro-ro boats bringing cars from Japan. Don't know if they still do, but up until awhile ago Blue Star were still running container ships out of Southern California to the Antipodes, and from the pictures were still good looking vessels. And yes -- the livery had a lot to do with it.

Pat Kennedy
16th December 2011, 18:52
I am trying to separate two groups - "ships that I liked very much" from "ships that looked beautiful" because I tend to mix them up. Some ships that looked unlovely to others were rather lovely to me because they were good ships.

And vice versa. Some ships hailed by many as being 'beautiful', were in fact pretty horrible to sail in.
The Empress of Britain is a case in point.
Pat

Hugh Ferguson
16th December 2011, 20:13
The Glenroy, as photographed by John Callis, as she passed the South Goodwin Lt. ship, outward bound 23rd Aug. 1956

Andrew Craig-Bennett
16th December 2011, 20:19
The Glenroy, as photographed by John Callis, as she passed the South Goodwin Lt. ship, outward bound 23rd Aug. 1956

Down to her marks, in a Conference trade - a sight to gladden the heart of a liner shipping man!

surveychile
16th December 2011, 20:24
Almost all vessels built before 80's are beautiful.

Regards

Tomi.

KIWI
17th December 2011, 00:38
Presently reading a magazine article on Captain Davey & the USSCo Awatea.There are two double page pictures of her & although only 13482 gross tonnage every thing is in proportion making her a great sight.For any NZ members reading this the article is in "NZ Memories Issue 92 Oct/Nov 2011".Well worth looking up. KIWI

KIWI
17th December 2011, 00:55
Further to my #71 one photo is accessible at http://www.paperspost.natlib.govt.nz the other is courtesy of Voyager NZ Maritime Museum. KIWI

BAROONA
19th December 2011, 09:01
Port St Lawrence

doug rowland
23rd December 2011, 21:42
Port Sydney,good looking,fast,handy and comfortable ship to sail in. Still going strong as Daphne and still looking good albeit in different form.

RayL
26th December 2011, 10:04
No one seems to have mentioned the Ben Line ships of the 1960s. There was one particular one ('Ben Lomond', perhaps? - although this doesn't seem quite right) that made me almost gasp at the sight of its beautiful lines. Its beauty was so evident that I'm sure others must have felt the same, so I'd be grateful if someone can help me to recall the name.

Battleships have been mentioned so I would like to single out the 'Scharnhorst' of WW2 for special praise.

NoMoss
26th December 2011, 11:27
Before I went to sea I took some photos of ships in Southampton Docks. One ship that I thought looked beautiful was white with a yellow funnel and to me looked like a yacht. I later found out it was the Golfito and I still have the photo and still think she was a beautiful ship.

Ron Stringer
26th December 2011, 11:46
Before I went to sea I took some photos of ships in Southampton Docks. One ship that I thought looked beautiful was white with a yellow funnel and to me looked like a yacht. I later found out it was the Golfito and I still have the photo and still think she was a beautiful ship.

And it was a great ship to sail on, with a great crowd of guys.

They say that your first was the best and the one that you always remember. Or were they talking of something else? It was a long time ago (for both). [=D]

RHL
26th December 2011, 14:10
Lomond was built in 57, maybe you were thinking of the Benloyal or Bengloe which were built in the 60ties?

Pat Kennedy
26th December 2011, 14:40
Lomond was built in 57, maybe you were thinking of the Benloyal or Bengloe which were built in the 60ties?

Sounds like the greyhound of the South China Sea, the 21 knot Benloyal, which I was privileged to see once or twice as she sped passed us trailing clouds of steam!

Photo courtesy of Wully Farquhar, who has it in the gallery

james killen
26th December 2011, 14:51
Passenger ships, cargo vessels, tankers, coasters and men o' war!
Good looking??? .........bah! Humbug! As Ebinezer used to say!

The best looking vessels ever built were the "Zwarte Zee" & "Witte Zee" - Dutch, Ocean Salvage tugs.

I know: - I have sailed as Master on both.

J.R. Killen

Mick Spear
26th December 2011, 15:33
Don
Whilst my second trip was on Mahout and I took the Markhor to hand over(to the eventual scrappers) and I did spend some time on Maihar ( loved it) - there is a snap on here somewhere of the Mahsud off Cape Town (with a London bus on deck). That I think is the finest snap I have seen of a Brocks boat. I am sure many others will disagree but Hey Ho - lets have a beer and discuss with nodding of heads , raising of elbows and a right to differ.
Rgds
Uisdean.

Totally agree with you reference the pic of the Mahsud with the London Bus on the deck; a an example of a beautiful-looking ship.
Mick S

NoMoss
26th December 2011, 16:25
And it was a great ship to sail on, with a great crowd of guys.

They say that your first was the best and the one that you always remember. Or were they talking of something else? It was a long time ago (for both). [=D]

Funny thing my first trip was on another of Fyffes', the Ariguani, not quite a yacht but rather dignified in her own way.

Andrew Craig-Bennett
26th December 2011, 19:45
Passenger ships, cargo vessels, tankers, coasters and men o' war!
Good looking??? .........bah! Humbug! As Ebinezer used to say!

The best looking vessels ever built were the "Zwarte Zee" & "Witte Zee" - Dutch, Ocean Salvage tugs.

I know: - I have sailed as Master on both.

J.R. Killen

I remember them and the "river" class and Bugsier's big tugs, but the one I liked best was, and is, Doeksen's old "Holland" - she is another handsome Dutch salvage tug and has been preserved.

She was her owner's "family pet" for decades - after she was really outclassed as a salvage tug they got her a 20-odd year charter with the Rijswaterstaat and then she was taken into active preservation. She's always been kept in a "yacht like" state. So she's a pretty smart lookinhg sixty year old!

RayJordandpo
26th December 2011, 22:07
I remember them and the "river" class and Bugsier's big tugs, but the one I liked best was, and is, Doeksen's old "Holland" - she is another handsome Dutch salvage tug and has been preserved.

She was her owner's "family pet" for decades - after she was really outclassed as a salvage tug they got her a 20-odd year charter with the Rijswaterstaat and then she was taken into active preservation. She's always been kept in a "yacht like" state. So she's a pretty smart lookinhg sixty year old!

Yes I agree with you there. there were some great looking ocean going tugs from Smits, Bugsiers, Saf Marine etc. My all time favourite was a toss up between the 'Swartze Zee' or the 'Holland' with hand rails on her foredeck instead of bulwarks

brian3
26th December 2011, 22:28
re post 74 benloyal looked a beauty ( but a F*****g misery to sail in)

RayL
27th December 2011, 14:44
Thanks RHL, Pat Kennedy and brian3. I think it must have been the Ben Loyal I was remembering. I only ever saw her in photographs so I take your point brian3!

jamesgpobog
18th February 2012, 07:19
I have always loved Savannah, I think she is spectacularly beautiful.

Ever since I was a boy I have always liked the look of T2's, then I grew up to sail on a jumboized Navy T3. Loved it...

Also a fan of Foundation Franklin...

alan ward
20th February 2012, 10:08
Sven Salens `Flower class`Orchidea,Chrysantema,Gladiola and Iris Queen.Beautiful ships and a lovely run.

granty
20th February 2012, 11:15
hi
i liked the colliers James Rowan,Sir John Snell,Charles H Merz they realy looked
something when you saw them at sea underway
regards
granty

backsplice
25th February 2012, 10:12
I alweays thought that the Shell A class tankers looked a treat when underway and down to their marks ......... I did 13 months on the "ANADARA" she was only a year old and was kept ship shape and bristol the whole trip I was proud to be a crew member
Of course the old NE coast Colliers looked good when down to the marks too ........most ships looked better loaded

R658336
25th February 2012, 14:56
Beauty is in the eye of the beholder,be it human bodies,ships,buildings,paintings.or even frogs.Yes even good looking French people. John

TommyRob
25th February 2012, 20:14
Most of the above kindle a fire in me, so there is common ground. I particularly admired several Scandinavian owner designs but especially Brostrom Group ships.

KIWI
25th February 2012, 20:59
Watched the QE come into berth here in Wellington a few days ago.She will certainly not make this thread.She would not have been out of place across the harbor standing among the apartment buildings in Oriental Bay. KIWI

alan ward
26th February 2012, 11:07
Watched the QE come into berth here in Wellington a few days ago.She will certainly not make this thread.She would not have been out of place across the harbor standing among the apartment buildings in Oriental Bay. KIWI

I went down to the landing stage to take a look at Queen Victoria when she visited and I agree,these things are enormous and until you stand alongside them it`s hard to appreciate their presence.

poseidon9
3rd May 2012, 15:48
Stella Polaris was a nice-looking ship:
http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/8243/title/m-v22stella-polaris-22/cat/520

It is a shame that she sank and a preservation could not be realized.

Scatari
25th May 2012, 16:03
Have always loved the lines of Canadian Pacific's "Empress of Scotland" ... originally named "Empress of Japan." Classic 1920s British lines.

Had the good fortune to sail in her from New York to the UK (Liverpool if memory serves) in 1957, on one of her last voyages before she was sold to the Hamburg Atlantic line.

chadburn
25th May 2012, 17:29
Sven Salens `Flower class`Orchidea,Chrysantema,Gladiola and Iris Queen.Beautiful ships and a lovely run.

Excuse the correction Alan, but they were Maritime Fruit/some Bank vessel's until Salen's put the knife in, yes they were superb vessel's.

Barrie Youde
25th May 2012, 19:23
In no particular order, the following always caught my eye, particularly if deep laden and well-maintained, as most usually were:-

1. NZS/Federal
2. MacAndrews
3. Finland SS Co(even their motor-ships, post 1955).
4. Shaw Savill pre-1960.
5. Any reefer ship.

Barrie Youde
25th May 2012, 19:29
Not forgetting the Norwegian Wilhelmsens of Tonsberg and the Danish East Asiatic Co.

alan ward
28th May 2012, 09:11
Excuse the correction Alan, but they were Maritime Fruit/some Bank vessel's until Salen's put the knife in, yes they were superb vessel's.

Sorry of course you`re right.It sometimes got a bit confusing with the changing funnels colours .I joined the Chrysantema in Aalborg early `73 and when we eventually sailed some 6 weks later we had about 4 israeli supernumeries including shlomo bentov who was one of MFC`s bosses and a lovely lecky called George,3 Swiss based Honeywell computer engineers and a danish guarantee chief>i can remember that their tastes were much different to ours they would save their fruit starters and add them to their main course with a salad.It was odd though,owned by MFC,crewed by Whitco,mixed crews the Labrador Clipper was crewed in Rotterdam by the league of nations,the Orchidea had Cape Verde and the replacement crowd when I left the Chrysantema were west indian and to top it all Salens funnel colours.

chadburn
28th May 2012, 16:44
Alan, I have two publication's on the go, one has the working title of "Industrial Tees" the other is about my own career and in particular my time with the Maritime Group which will be an eye opener on some of the thing's that went on (which you may be aware of) in my case including Plan B if "Operation Jericho" had failed. The Daughter will publish this book after I have hit the Buffer's.(*))

WilliamH
28th May 2012, 17:31
Chadburn, Why not publish now while your audience is still alive and kicking, I would love to know what exactly happened in Maritime Fruit. I was with Whitco for just over two years, I was on all four of the Queen class, either sailing, stand by building or as riding crew under tow.

chadburn
29th May 2012, 15:21
I was thinking about leaving the last Chapter for my Children/Grandchildren to complete on their thought's about Dad, Gadget Grandad or even Grandad Tumble (you will know who that is if you are in the GB and have Grandchildren) these are a few of the name's I have been called by the offspring.(Scribe).

Full and by
29th May 2012, 16:09
These old battlewagons were pretty sharp in their "Great White Fleet" splendour...

Leratty
19th September 2012, 05:13
Pat, Sepia is sure a good looking vessel more so as she is a tanker.
A vessel I served on called Warkworth I always thought was very attractive, especially for a tramper, she was a Dalgliesh vessel. The banana boats, Sth American Saint Line & Port Line often were very good looking. Port Melbourne for instance which is now I believe a cruise ship in Med after all those years which says something about her?

Samsette
27th September 2012, 01:37
I recall an early post-war built Port Line ship that was considered "streamlined" and though I no longer remember her name, she had a true lookalike in the Argentine Presidente Peron of the same period, late forties, and both seen in London's KGV. Probably from the same drawing board.
I do not think that I am alone in my opinion that the French Line's Normandie was naval architectures most beautiful creation. The Mary's sheer was marred by that well deck; something avoided in the QE.

The world's most beautiful ship, or the world's most beautiful women. It is all in the eye of the beholder.

spongebob
27th September 2012, 02:42
[QUOTE=chadburn;598963]Alan, I have two publication's on the go, one has the working title of "Industrial Tees" the other is about my own career and in particular my time with the Maritime Group which will be an eye opener on some of the thing's that went on (which you may be aware of) in my case including Plan B if "Operation Jericho" had failed. The Daughter will publish this book after I have hit the Buffer's.(*))[/QUOTe C
Come on Chadburn,get them to press otherwise your contemporaries will not get the chance to read of your glory days.

Regards

Bob

chadburn
27th September 2012, 15:02
I have given it some thought since it was suggested, but as you may have noticed there is an anti- Jewish/ Israeli "lobby" on this Site and I really can't be bothered (that's being polite) to enter into any discussion's about my "Glory Day's" (as you put it) and the right's/wrong's of what happened during my time at sea and in particular under the Israeli Flag.

A.D.FROST
27th September 2012, 15:26
I recall an early post-war built Port Line ship that was considered "streamlined" and though I no longer remember her name, she had a true lookalike in the Argentine Presidente Peron of the same period, late forties, and both seen in London's KGV. Probably from the same drawing board.
I do not think that I am alone in my opinion that the French Line's Normandie was naval architectures most beautiful creation. The Mary's sheer was marred by that well deck; something avoided in the QE.

The world's most beautiful ship, or the world's most beautiful women. It is all in the eye of the beholder.

PORT AUCKLAND/BRISBANE(*))

tom roberts
27th September 2012, 21:02
The Andria Doria was a nice looker, the South American Saint Lines were nice lookers also but it always seemed to be the Scandies had the best looking streamlined tankers in the 50s.

Samsette
30th September 2012, 04:13
Thank you, A.D. Frost, now I can look them up and learn more about them.

herky
30th September 2012, 05:26
france in my view was one of the most eye catching liners around.oriana came a close second.lines of the newer ships are all spoilt by verandas,queen mary two looks like a floating apartment block from a distance grrrrr

oldman 80
3rd October 2012, 02:51
Thanks RHL, Pat Kennedy and brian3. I think it must have been the Ben Loyal I was remembering. I only ever saw her in photographs so I take your point brian3!

I think the Benloyal was actually built in 1959 - the first of a series of similar/same design which followed in the early to mid 1960's - namely Benvalla, Bengloe, and Benarmin.
Good looking ships for sure, but nothing like as majestic as the Mid 1950's built Benreoch,Benvrackie,Benlomond, & Bendoran.
They looked like real cargo ships, and were just magnificent to view on their arrival back in the U.K. after each voyage - all freshly painted from top to bottom.
That was company policy early 1960's - full coat of paint homeward bound - every trip - ie every three months. They dry docked them each voyage too - usually Hamburg - for maybe 3 or 4 days.
Ben Boats looked magnificent - almost yachts in fact.
Paint suppliers to Ben Line at the time were Leigh's Paints, if my memory serves me correctly.
Outward bound, it was all the cargo gear thoroughly stripped and overhauled, with the funnel receiving it's full coat of paint transiting the Suez Canal. Generally the only cosmetic type maintenance done outward bound.
Later in the 60's cost controls dictated not a full coat of paint every three months (ie every voyage) but only every second voyage, alternating with just a touch up job in between. Of course the increased quality of paint around the mid 60's had some bearing on the reduction in intervals between full coating - but they (the ships) never looked as good again, once that change had been made. In fact it was not long before rust could be sighted on a Ben Boat - previously unheard of, prior to the late 1960's.
Yes indeed - Ben Line - every ship was a yacht !!!!
It is what made all Ben Line guys Proud.
That too, is nostalgia - and there is absolutely nothing wrong with it at all.
(Thumb)

Graham the pipe
13th October 2012, 18:06
Without doubt, the most beautiful ship I ever saw was the ED's mailboat 'Aureol'. As a small boy I was often taken down to New brighton to watch ships entering and leaving Liverpool. I used to get quite excitied when I saw Aureol leave Pier head and pass the 'Brazil', pilot on board. Little did I think then that years later I would serve aboard as officer cadet for 3 round-trips to Lagos. Sadly by this time, the late 60's / early 70's, the writing was on the wall for passenger travel by sea. The era of cruising had really to begin, we were in a sort of purgatory as regards this activity.

Interesting! Was with EDs from 'signing the parchment', '57 to Masters, '67 but never sailed on the Aureol. GTP

forthbridge
9th December 2012, 01:07
I think in fact Benloyal was built in 1958 and did her maiden voyage in January 1959. I remember visiting her in Victoria dock while on Benvorlich my first ship just after I joined Ben line.
I agree about the Benvrackie class though they were. Spoiled by the horrible cranes at no 4 hatch which gave me many sleepless nights.

Graham the pipe
9th December 2012, 04:27
Having just been 'notified' of a new posting, I came on site to this 'thread' and - having looked through the 'nominations' for 'good lookers' - feel I must nominate the 'twin sisters' Ebani and Eboe (not the Egori, she was a different design). Was uncertificated 4/0 on the latter during the last few months of my time with EDs of Liverpool. This was in '61, having just left the cadet ship Obuasi after a years trip. The C/O of the Eboe, 'TB', is STILL a very good friend and having given me a 'watch off', for my 21st birthday was a 'surprise' guest at my 70th birthday celebrations approaching three years ago.

slick
9th December 2012, 08:15
All,
Surely Danish East Asiatic must be in it somewhere.
Lovely to look at and beautifully looked after I won't use the word maintain it appeared to be more than that.

Yours aye,

slick

Ron Stringer
9th December 2012, 10:42
All,
Surely Danish East Asiatic must be in it somewhere.
Lovely to look at and beautifully looked after I won't use the word maintain it appeared to be more than that.

Yours aye,

slick

Absolutely! Whenever I saw one of their vessels I used to wonder why they always looked so much better and well kept than any of the Red Ensign vessels in port. Mind you, whenever I travelled back to the UK from Denmark (or many other places in Scandinavia or Northwest Europe - France excepted) I used to wonder why the buildings and streets here looked so scruffy and ill-kept.

In the past 20 years or so, the French seem to have discovered that smartening up the exterior of their homes and streets does not necessarily bring an investigation into their taxable income, so their surroundings now don't look so unloved.

Rogerfrench
9th December 2012, 18:32
Having just been 'notified' of a new posting, I came on site to this 'thread' and - having looked through the 'nominations' for 'good lookers' - feel I must nominate the 'twin sisters' Ebani and Eboe (not the Egori, she was a different design).

I'll go along with that, too. Not the easiest ships to work, but reasonably quick by West Coast standards and looked great. I sailed on both.

Chris Field
9th December 2012, 20:08
As a one-time Ellerman apprentice I have to put the City of London and City of Edinburgh as my faves- 1947 1nd 1938 builds respectively. Can't stand today's cruise liners- yughhhh!

eldersuk
9th December 2012, 23:10
Having just been 'notified' of a new posting, I came on site to this 'thread' and - having looked through the 'nominations' for 'good lookers' - feel I must nominate the 'twin sisters' Ebani and Eboe (not the Egori, she was a different design). Was uncertificated 4/0 on the latter during the last few months of my time with EDs of Liverpool. This was in '61, having just left the cadet ship Obuasi after a years trip. The C/O of the Eboe, 'TB', is STILL a very good friend and having given me a 'watch off', for my 21st birthday was a 'surprise' guest at my 70th birthday celebrations approaching three years ago.

Eboe and Ebani were generally known in EDs as 'everybody's favourite ships'. They really were handsome vessels and always seemed to be maintained to a slightly higher standard than the rest of the (well maintained) fleet. This could well be because the crews took pride in sailing on them, even though they were a workout on deck for the mates.

Derek

Scatari
10th December 2012, 00:07
Eboe and Ebani were generally known in EDs as 'everybody's favourite ships'. They really were handsome vessels and always seemed to be maintained to a slightly higher standard than the rest of the (well maintained) fleet. This could well be because the crews took pride in sailing on them, even though they were a workout on deck for the mates.

Derek

Just googled and found some photos of Eboe/Ebani. They certainly were
handsome ships ... nice lines to them.