SS Sandsend SuezCrisis 1956

ex 2 Base
12th June 2011, 19:59
Hello to all, I'm new to this site. I was recalled in the army summer 1956 and eventually was on SS Sandsend as part of a convoy en route to Egypt, the ship broke down,we never made it.I wonder if any of the crew are members of this site.Also what happened to the ship?

billyboy
12th June 2011, 21:49
A warm welcome aboard from the Philippines. Please enjoy all this great site has to offer

Cisco
12th June 2011, 22:07
Greetings, if that was Headlam's war built 'Sandsend' then she was the last 'Liberty' ship registered in the UK. I think she went for scrap about 1967.

gdynia
13th June 2011, 04:50
Welcome onboard to SN and enjoy the voyage

Cisco
13th June 2011, 05:53
A photo and a bit of info on her here http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/156603/title/sandsend-1944-headlam/cat/510
Funny sort of ship to go to war on........

R58484956
13th June 2011, 18:30
Greetings x2Base and welcome to SN. Bon voyage.

Paul Weatherill
31st July 2014, 07:47
Hello to all, I'm new to this site. I was recalled in the army summer 1956 and eventually was on SS Sandsend as part of a convoy en route to Egypt, the ship broke down,we never made it.I wonder if any of the crew are members of this site.Also what happened to the ship?

I have just read your message. I am the son of the Master of the Sandsend, Captain L.Z.Weatherill, and was on board the ship in Hull when she was requisitioned from the owners Headlam & Son of Raithwaite Nr. Whitby by the Govenment for the Suez crisis & I sailed with the ship to Southampton (flooded Queens Drydock). As a 13 year old it was a very exciting adventure as I watched the ship add accomodation for I believe 250 Army personel and load Bedford trucks and jeeps etc. The ship did not break down but was held off Cowes for a couple of months if I recall before being stood down.
My late father took command of the ship from its launch in 1944 (SS Samandora) until she was scrapped in Taiwain I believe 1977. My brothers and I have very happy memories of SS Sandsend and of the late William Headlam and his Company.

R58484956
31st July 2014, 17:22
Greetings Paul and welcome to SN. Bon voyage.

chadburn
31st July 2014, 17:35
Paul, your Father had an unusual middle name, is it an old Family name?

Paul Weatherill
31st July 2014, 18:22
Paul, your Father had an unusual middle name, is it an old Family name?

Lawrence Zebedee Weatherill. Zebedee was a family christian name from the Verill family of Staithes. My paternal grandmother was a Verill and it was her fathers name, but he perished at sea when the vessel he was commanding was lost. He was only aged 27 if my information is correct. My great grandmother never re married and wore black for the rest of her days as I believe the tradition was in Staithes although I may be corrected on that. I was aware that my father was often referred to as Captain Zeb with shipping agents etc.!

Paul Weatherill
31st July 2014, 18:37
I have just read your message. I am the son of the Master of the Sandsend, Captain L.Z.Weatherill, and was on board the ship in Hull when she was requisitioned from the owners Headlam & Son of Raithwaite Nr. Whitby by the Govenment for the Suez crisis & I sailed with the ship to Southampton (flooded Queens Drydock). As a 13 year old it was a very exciting adventure as I watched the ship add accomodation for I believe 250 Army personel and load Bedford trucks and jeeps etc. The ship did not break down but was held off Cowes for a couple of months if I recall before being stood down.
My late father took command of the ship from its launch in 1944 (SS Samandora) until she was scrapped in Taiwain I believe 1977. My brothers and I have very happy memories of SS Sandsend and of the late William Headlam and his Company.
Correction! It was in 1967 that she was scrapped in Tawain/Formosa

chadburn
1st August 2014, 02:14
Lawrence Zebedee Weatherill. Zebedee was a family christian name from the Verill family of Staithes. My paternal grandmother was a Verill and it was her fathers name, but he perished at sea when the vessel he was commanding was lost. He was only aged 27 if my information is correct. My great grandmother never re married and wore black for the rest of her days as I believe the tradition was in Staithes although I may be corrected on that. I was aware that my father was often referred to as Captain Zeb with shipping agents etc.!

Thanks Paul, I thought so, the surname Weatherill is well known in Yorkshire/Teesside, I did a trip on the 'Egton' a photo of her M/E is in my photograph section. William Headlam also commissioned a Trophy (Headlam Trophy) for the Power Boat races out of Whitby in the 1960's which I was involved in when I was home on leave. The 'tradition' is correct.

ben27
8th August 2014, 01:02
good day paul weatherrill.m.1 aug,2014.03:37;re:s.s.sandsend suez crisis,1956.thank you for a most interesting post,your father had a great career on that ship.thank you for sharing.regards ben27

Barry Hall
27th November 2014, 00:04
Amazing what you discover when you retire and have a new iPad. I was in a nostalgic mood and came across this thread during my web surfing. I was particularly interested in the submissions by Paul Weatherill. I joined the Sandsend as an apprentice in 1962 (I think) boarding the ship in Leith near Edinburgh. Our destination was Baltimore, USA, for a cargo of grain. What made this journey stand out, and the reason for this post, is that whilst I was there I purchased a newspaper which had a story about Captain Weatherill.
The story ran that he had picked up the ship, in Baltimore, for its first run under the Headlam flag (somewhere in the early 40's) and this was the ship's first return to Baltimore since. And with the same Captain. Stan Jackson was the First Mate on that voyage and my memory of Captain Weatherill is very fond. He was a huge man with a big heart and I was definitely in awe of him.

A.D.FROST
27th November 2014, 07:50
Last British owned Liberty

Barry Hall
27th November 2014, 09:25
As a Liberty ship the Sandsend had a quirk that could make life difficult sometimes. When travelling under ballast into a head sea the prop used to clear the water and the vibrations used to empty any loosely packed shelves.

Wilrog2016
27th May 2016, 13:19
Hi Ex 2 base. You must have been a member of 32 Med. Regt. RA. and one of the drivers. We convoyed down to the Queen Victoria Hospital Netley and lodged there whilst guns and vehicles were taken to Southampton to be loaded aboard the S.S.Sandsend. Once they had been loaded we became the advance/boat party and remained aboard. I was REME Sgt with LAD members. When the ship failed to sail, we had to spend the time down the holds removing vehicle batteries and hefting them top deck to be trickle charged on the apparatus rigged up by the ship's electrician. We had to wear P.T. slippers and all that up and down the hold ladders played hell with my ankles. I had to spend several days in hospital in Cowes. Happy memories.

Barrie Youde
27th May 2016, 14:32
#11

Hi, Paul,

What a splendid record for your Papa. Twenty-three years in command of the same ship! And no mean ship.

I salute you and your father!

sam2182sw
27th May 2016, 19:41
Well done to your farther. I worked on the Sandsends lots of times when she came to Hull and we dry docked her about 4 times one of my best ships. sam2182sw