Ports of Tauranga

spongebob
21st June 2011, 03:54
Ports of Tauranga

Tauranga never featured on the list of NZ ports visited by the host of Conference Lines Home boats during the earlier post war period as that port was limited to the local fishing fleet and to small coastal ships. The first piles for larger berths were driven in 1953 and the Union Co’s MV Korowai was the first to load out.
1957 saw the first log shipment to Japan, a measly 150 tons, but by 1972 the log trade and frozen export trade was booming with the Port Caroline, then the world’s largest refrigerated cargo liner, visiting for the first time.
The Kaimai tunnel through the dividing range of the same name gave Tauranga a direct rail link to the Waikato dairying districts and to Rotorua’s vast forestry region so from then the Port has never looked back as it grew to now be the largest export port in NZ by far. Being a public company they are not fettered by the political restraints against good decision making that hampers the likes of Auckland, Wellington or Lyttelton and they go from strength to strength with Maersk and the like nominating Tauranga their preferred port.
Drive out in a car in any direction from Tauranga and you will be confronted with large numbers of truck and trailer log carrying units that dominate the highways and then drive around the harbour’s Mount Maunganui area to see the huge acreages of log piles waiting to be shipped to China, South Korea and Japan. It is said that the Asian demand will increase due to Russia curtailing log exports in favour of local consumption.
Apparently the Japanese quake and tsunami has increased demand for raw Pinus logs two fold.
Logs are now our third largest export but it seems wasteful and un enterprising that we should be shipping out barely de-barked logs instead of finished timber lines cut, surfaced and conditioned to the end use requirements which would reduce shipping costs hugely and provide a greater range of employment in areas that need it.
Some times we can’t see the wood for the trees

Bob

trotterdotpom
21st June 2011, 06:30
It was a sad day when the time alongside in Mt Maunganui went from 2 weeks to 2 days! They have to spoil everything, haven't they?

John T

barrinoz
21st June 2011, 11:33
I may be mis-interpreting you, Bob, but The Lyttelton Port Company was listed on the NZ stock exchange in 1996. It is now affectionately (not) known as Stalag 13.
From memory the favourite drinking hole in Tauranga was The Anchor.
barrinoz.

Pat McCardle
21st June 2011, 20:18
I may be mis-interpreting you, Bob, but The Lyttelton Port Company was listed on the NZ stock exchange in 1996. It is now affectionately (not) known as Stalag 13.
From memory the favourite drinking hole in Tauranga was The Anchor.
barrinoz.

What was the name of the bar outside the gates at the Mount?

holland25
21st June 2011, 21:38
Thanks for that Bob. I went there this year on a cruise and was surprised at the size of the port. My previous trip to NZ had been in 1957 and I had never heard of Tauranga. Napier was still recognisable.

spongebob
21st June 2011, 21:53
Yes Holland25 Tauranga has become a popular cruise ship port of call with 54 ships scheduled to visit during the 2010/2011 season. Its handiness to Rotorua thermal region and even lake Taupo makes it a convenient stop over.
I have been over to the Mount when some of these big Cruisers are berthed and they seem bigger that the town itself.
I know no less than three Englishmen that visited here on a criuse ship and decided to come back, One of them is my landlord, I am minding his water edge house while he is doing his summer back in Staffordshire.

Bob

holland25
21st June 2011, 23:34
We didnt go to Rotorua but had a local tour which we enjoyed. The guide took us to an abandoned hydro power station which was in a deep pool. He also introduced my wife to Manuka honey, which she swears by,bit pricey though.

trotterdotpom
22nd June 2011, 01:10
What was the name of the bar outside the gates at the Mount?

Pretty sure that was the Anchor, Pat. You had as good a chance of coming out of the window as ouit of the door!

Apart from that, hard to beat the Mount for hospitality.

John T

spongebob
22nd June 2011, 22:52
I remember the Anchor from road visits to the Mount in the 70's but with the extent of building expansion that has one on it might have been moved or demolished.
I an going over there tomorrow to Bunnings Super Store so I will take a look.

Bob

vix
2nd July 2011, 06:35
Ports of Tauranga

Tauranga never featured on the list of NZ ports visited by the host of Conference Lines Home boats during the earlier post war period as that port was limited to the local fishing fleet and to small coastal ships. The first piles for larger berths were driven in 1953 and the Union Co’s MV Korowai was the first to load out.
1957 saw the first log shipment to Japan, a measly 150 tons, but by 1972 the log trade and frozen export trade was booming with the Port Caroline, then the world’s largest refrigerated cargo liner, visiting for the first time.
The Kaimai tunnel through the dividing range of the same name gave Tauranga a direct rail link to the Waikato dairying districts and to Rotorua’s vast forestry region so from then the Port has never looked back as it grew to now be the largest export port in NZ by far. Being a public company they are not fettered by the political restraints against good decision making that hampers the likes of Auckland, Wellington or Lyttelton and they go from strength to strength with Maersk and the like nominating Tauranga their preferred port.
Drive out in a car in any direction from Tauranga and you will be confronted with large numbers of truck and trailer log carrying units that dominate the highways and then drive around the harbour’s Mount Maunganui area to see the huge acreages of log piles waiting to be shipped to China, South Korea and Japan. It is said that the Asian demand will increase due to Russia curtailing log exports in favour of local consumption.
Apparently the Japanese quake and tsunami has increased demand for raw Pinus logs two fold.
Logs are now our third largest export but it seems wasteful and un enterprising that we should be shipping out barely de-barked logs instead of finished timber lines cut, surfaced and conditioned to the end use requirements which would reduce shipping costs hugely and provide a greater range of employment in areas that need it.
Some times we can’t see the wood for the trees

Bob

I went to Mt Maunganui on the Cape York, Feb/March 1960. They told us we were the largest ship to enter [up till then] and we were taking the first cargo of timber from the Ports of Tauranga...we dressed ship for the occasion. Lovely port, then. I was utterly dismayed when I went back in 1974...the lovely inner beach at the Mount wasn't even a shadow of its former self. And there were signs everywhere 'Beware of Ammonia' very sad to remember the lovely beach and beautiful people...alas...no more. Vix