Handy Tools

Macphail
25th June 2011, 00:24
The Claw Foot Spanner.
Removing a pump casing in the bilge.

The Stud Extractor..
Same job.

(Wave)

John.

chadburn
25th June 2011, 21:07
Pig's Tail's

Macphail
25th June 2011, 22:55
Pig's Tail's

Pigtail...:sweat::sweat:

How about the...

Oscilloscope...
Leaking finned exhaust gas boiler in the funnel. Cannot identify the leak because of the tightly packed nest of fins over the pipes...
Both headers blanked off and an air pressure exerted on the tube stack.
The Oscilloscope was set up for acoustic pick up.
The acoustic pick up was applied to each pipe on the header.
The leaking pipe was identified by the maximum wave form on the Oscilloscope, ( Maximum hissing.).
Pipe blanked and back on line.

Before it used to be a “Pot Luck” thing, pipes being blanked off which where sound.



The Oscilloscope, a handy tool.


John.

uisdean mor
26th June 2011, 12:29
On/off magnet with an eye twine or rod connection.
Uisdean

Burned Toast
26th June 2011, 12:30
Tennents Spanner(Jester)(Read)

chadburn
26th June 2011, 13:15
I used the term Pig's Tail's in order to give an indiction as to how they look to those who may have never used them in order not to be confused with neatly? tied hair hanging of the back of someone's head, even though they may be bald on top(Jester)

billyboy
26th June 2011, 13:48
You mean the tool used for removing old gland packing then Chadburn

chadburn
26th June 2011, 20:21
That is correct Billyboy(Thumb), Serpant A, Serpant C and not forgetting Greasy Hemp as well as the other's.

ccurtis1
26th June 2011, 20:59
The "Bahco" 6" or 8" shifter. Invaluable, tucked into the rule pocket of the overalls.

wterdbeard
26th June 2011, 22:53
The fox wedge.When violence can no longer be avoided The hammer and chisel used with intelligence.

Macphail
26th June 2011, 23:09
The "Bahco" 6" or 8" shifter. Invaluable, tucked into the rule pocket of the overalls.

The ten inch “Bahco” adjustable spanner was and still is the most used tool in the engine room.
Stuck in the hip pocket of the boiler suit.
Some with ground in personal identification marks.
The “King Dick” tried to take over, no chance. [=P]

John

spongebob
26th June 2011, 23:18
The Bahco is a nice tool but in my day the American "Crescent" shifter was the by-word.

Bob

iain48
27th June 2011, 17:38
As a lecky a cut off broom handle was a great tool for removing lamp caps from the lampholder, if the lamp glass was broken. Better by far than pliers etc.

eldersuk
28th June 2011, 01:00
One of the lecky's brass bayonet lampholders stuffed with cotton wool and with a copper wire handle. Invaluable for testing Doxford fuel valve cooling water for fuel leaks.

Derek

Alex Salmond
28th June 2011, 15:41
I joined the Act 1 in 1979,steam powered .On my first watch with the 3rd engineer he handed me a broom handle with a rag tied on the end??"Whats this for?"i asked naively he replied "weve had some trouble with steam leaks lately so if you see any steam anywhere youll know theres a leak ,but as steam doesnt condensate until its about 10 feet from the leak you have to wave this rag where you think the leak might be and it will catch fire!"I still think he was taking the piss but he looked pretty serious to me and the old donkeymen used to carry this stick around religiously...

howardws
28th June 2011, 16:15
I joined the Act 1 in 1979,steam powered .On my first watch with the 3rd engineer he handed me a broom handle with a rag tied on the end??"Whats this for?"i asked naively he replied "weve had some trouble with steam leaks lately so if you see any steam anywhere youll know theres a leak ,but as steam doesnt condensate until its about 10 feet from the leak you have to wave this rag where you think the leak might be and it will catch fire!"I still think he was taking the piss but he looked pretty serious to me and the old donkeymen used to carry this stick around religiously...
In my experience, on the 'Small Bays' with the same boiler pressure, the rag usually got blown off the end of the stick when it came near a steam leak!

Duncan112
28th June 2011, 23:20
Rags that had a trace of solvent or gas oil on certainly caught fire - taught me to use a clean one rather than one picked up off the plates!!

Nick Jones
28th June 2011, 23:48
I've still got my Bahco 10" shifter, been all over the world with it. It has the patina of a well used tool and the ground in notches for identification.
cheers,

nick jones.

john24601
29th June 2011, 19:45
The rag.......the good engineer should always carry a rag, and the good engineer shall never lose his rag!

Steve Hodges
29th June 2011, 22:46
I'm still mourning the loss of a tool that I found years ago in a deserted factory and have never seen the likes of since. Imagine a large claw-head hammer, but with no "hammer" bit, just the "claw". No wooden handle, instead a steel shaft about a foot long, with the end flattened and tapered into a wedge. Absolutely brilliant for freeing jammed machinery. And I left it on site somewhere......pillock!

spongebob
29th June 2011, 23:29
Steve, that sounds like a jemmy bar, part of the old fashioned burglar's kit,
I bet some stole it,

Bob

waldziu
29th June 2011, 23:47
Sounds like a wrecking bar. any thing upto five feet long.

Macphail
1st July 2011, 23:44
"The Cement Box".
We had a big problem, the sea water inlet to the condenser had indicated extreme perforation, we where at anchor awaiting orders.
Wooden shuttering was made up round the defective pipe, it was filled in with a 3 to 1 , sand / cement mix.
Twenty four hours later , sound as drum. Rock solid.

John.

TonyAllen
1st July 2011, 23:51
I'm still mourning the loss of a tool that I found years ago in a deserted factory and have never seen the likes of since. Imagine a large claw-head hammer, but with no "hammer" bit, just the "claw". No wooden handle, instead a steel shaft about a foot long, with the end flattened and tapered into a wedge. Absolutely brilliant for freeing jammed machinery. And I left it on site somewhere......pillock!

Sound's to me like a roofers slate remover, flat end to lift the slate off the batten, claw to lift any nails left behind as they worked their way down the roof. Maybe. Tony

ART6
2nd July 2011, 12:27
A steel wheel key is the best tool for an engineer. Although designed for turning hot valve handwheels it is also a marvelous disciplinary tool and is excellent for signaling in a noisy engine room when banged on the plates. In my day we all carried one in the rule pocket of overalls.

Macphail
3rd July 2011, 00:38
I've still got my Bahco 10" shifter, been all over the world with it. It has the patina of a well used tool and the ground in notches for identification.
cheers,

nick jones.

I have mine hanging in a prime place in the shed.
Ready for the quick dive down below.
Sigh!!



John,

Macphail
3rd July 2011, 00:39
I've still got my Bahco 10" shifter, been all over the world with it. It has the patina of a well used tool and the ground in notches for identification.
cheers,

nick jones.

I have mine hanging in a prime place in the shed.
Ready for the quick dive down below.
Sigh!!
:(:(


John,

howardws
3rd July 2011, 20:21
I have mine hanging in a prime place in the shed.
Ready for the quick dive down below.
Sigh!!
:(:(


John,
Mine is in my Driver's bag. Very useful for nipping up glands and mud hole doors on a steam loco.

Baulkham Hills
4th July 2011, 07:24
The 8 inch Bahco model 8071 shifter is just the right size for most cable glands on motors etc. I have had mine for at least 20 years, initials ground into as well.
Lost it once for about 3 months until I was working with a fitter and he pulled it out of his pocket, I checked the initials and expropriated it straight away.
The 10 inch Bahco model 9072 shifter is another handy tool. A jaw can be reversed to make it into a pipe wrench.

Pat Kennedy
4th July 2011, 19:55
The best tool ever invented in my opinion, was the Monument Autocut pipe cutter. A brilliant innovation which allowed you to cut a copper tube quickly and cleanly with one hand, doing away with the hacksaw and file previously required.

jmcg
4th July 2011, 20:12
I'm still mourning the loss of a tool that I found years ago in a deserted factory and have never seen the likes of since. Imagine a large claw-head hammer, but with no "hammer" bit, just the "claw". No wooden handle, instead a steel shaft about a foot long, with the end flattened and tapered into a wedge. Absolutely brilliant for freeing jammed machinery. And I left it on site somewhere......pillock!

It is in my shed!

BW

J

TonyAllen
4th July 2011, 21:00
The best tool ever invented in my opinion, was the Monument Autocut pipe cutter. A brilliant innovation which allowed you to cut a copper tube quickly and cleanly with one hand, doing away with the hacksaw and file previously required.

Pat you are so right I found one some years ago outside my driveway, how it got there god knows, until then it was hack saw and sandpaper being DIY man, now its push on fitttings and plastic pipe,
had a leak in a very difficult spot son came in looked at it went out came back 10 mins later with push on's and pipe 10 min's job done Progress Tony

Graham Wallace
5th July 2011, 04:02
"Pigs tail", I had forgotten that name , nowadays think of them as a packing extractor. The item in the photo attachment is around
54 years old, ex BP property.......almost unused!, never seen a ring of packing since 1962.

The claw hammer 'thingie' without the hammer head (Post #20) is a Bear Claw over here, the one in the photo is only 7 inches long. I have another one 15" in length but with identical claws at each end. Naturally its use is removing nails using another hammer to drive the fork under the nail head , then lever out. I used the larger one to dismantle a 30'x30' cedar deck so that the planking could be reused. Cannot imagine it used as a wrecking bar, much too subtle for that obscene task.

Two useful copper pipe cutters shown, large one from 1/2' up to 1" piping with a slide out cutter to remove internal burrs. The other neat little one for 1/2" copper for use in restricted spaces.

Graham

chadburn
5th July 2011, 15:48
The best tool ever invented in my opinion, was the Monument Autocut pipe cutter. A brilliant innovation which allowed you to cut a copper tube quickly and cleanly with one hand, doing away with the hacksaw and file previously required.

Pat, I think Machine Mart still sell them for 15mm and 22mm pipes, as you say a great idea.

Pat Kennedy
5th July 2011, 17:48
Chas,
I've still got mine, unused now for a few months but I would not part with them. Also got a mini pipe cutter for tight spaces, and a bigger adjustable one which opens up to 28mm.
The pride of place goes to a Chain pipe cutter for use on cast iron soil pipes up to 6" diameter.
Regards,
Pat

funnelstays
5th July 2011, 19:09
24042(egg)

I found this handy gizmo in the Carrefoure in Sarlat France.
I shall take it on my next trip.
Press down and engage shark jaws by pressing on the adjacent buttons and sever the top of yer egg.
It works on soft boiled too.

Winebuff
6th July 2011, 14:02
Condoms from the ships medical locker when we ran out of PTFE thread tape, not perfect but did the job.

Pat Kennedy
6th July 2011, 14:33
Condoms from the ships medical locker when we ran out of PTFE thread tape, not perfect but did the job.

In lieu of PTFE tape, I've rubbed a bar of soap across the threads. Works OK for gas lines, but maybe a long term problem on a water joint.

uisdean mor
6th July 2011, 22:41
And what pray tell is wrong with Stag - string - AND a good crossed thread - sealed many a joint and provided time for more permanent repairs.
Rgds
Uisdean

Nick Jones
6th July 2011, 23:08
We had a better use for the Conndoms, nuff said!

Cheers,
nick jones.

Pat Kennedy
7th July 2011, 11:28
And what pray tell is wrong with Stag - string - AND a good crossed thread - sealed many a joint and provided time for more permanent repairs.
Rgds
Uisdean
My brother, Jimmy, who was a marine engineer always used Stag but I, as a plumber didnt like it, because it was difficult to remove if you had to remake a joint. I think the only thing that got Stag off was meths.
Jimmy also used Loctite in a pinch, but I didnt rate that either.
The old Boss White was my favourite. On iron pipes I used Boss Red with plumber's hemp.
Pat

johnjames06
7th July 2011, 20:07
You mean the tool used for removing old gland packing then Chadburn

In the RN the tool used for removing gland packing is steam.

Check the master valve is closed.
Check the drains are closed.
Open exhaust valve.
Open throttle valve.
Hide behind a big pipe and open the master valve.

This will blow the packing out.

In the 50s the RN indroduced stuff called superplas which was shredded asbestos this was forced into the stuffing box with gland formers and replaced rings of packing.

After a while it was impossible to get out with standard packing extractors, hence the steam method.

eldersuk
8th July 2011, 01:16
Old Billy Williams would have murdered anyone he saw poking anything into a steam gland. Steam was the only permissable tool.

Derek

hughesy
8th July 2011, 15:26
I have to remove packings from Hydraulic elevator pistons, we use something like that long corkscrew affair, and I tap them in with round dowels of wood. Stops scarring up the piston.

all the best
Hughesy

chadburn
8th July 2011, 16:12
In the RN the tool used for removing gland packing is steam.

Check the master valve is closed.
Check the drains are closed.
Open exhaust valve.
Open throttle valve.
Hide behind a big pipe and open the master valve.

This will blow the packing out.

In the 50s the RN indroduced stuff called superplas which was shredded asbestos this was forced into the stuffing box with gland formers and replaced rings of packing.

After a while it was impossible to get out with standard packing extractors, hence the steam method.

The best way to get packing out is to blow it out (with an eye on safety as you say) if the "propellant" is available, if I remember correctly the shredded asbestos contained the dangerous blue asbestos, awful stuff. Pig's tail's had to be used with care, but that was part of an Engineer's training, it was not all flogging spanner work, Engineer's should be capable of the gentle touch when needed.

johnjames06
8th July 2011, 20:03
The best way to get packing out is to blow it out (with an eye on safety as you say) if the "propellant" is available, if I remember correctly the shredded asbestos contained the dangerous blue asbestos, awful stuff. Pig's tail's had to be used with care, but that was part of an Engineer's training, it was not all flogging spanner work, Engineer's should be capable of the gentle touch when needed.

In the 50s the dangers of asbestos had'nt been invented, we would smash off and plaster on asbestos with gay abandon blissfully unaware.
Sometimes on steam valves the shredded asbestos had solidified into a solid molten lump and if you had time you could drill and tap small holes and with screwed rod and washers you could jack it out.

chadburn
9th July 2011, 16:36
I started my Marine Engineering career in 1955 and the danger's of Asbestos were well known to "The Management" (including the R.N. who were more interested in NBC, I cannot remember going to a lecture about the danger's of Asbestos). Unfortunatly for us they did not bother to transmit the known danger's down to the workforce (no Google in those day's) who carried on oblivious to the medical problem's it would give us/me in later life. Asbestos like Carbon Fibre is good for what it was/is used for as long as it was not "interfered" with but again unfortunatly it was sometimes part of our job to remove it to get to the part we needed to repair. I did at one time pack the guage column's on a couple of old steam job's with loose blue asbestos when there was no pre-formed packing ring's available, the blue asbestos being picked up with the finger's out of a tin and then pushed/tapped into the gland's with a packing tool.

jmcg
9th July 2011, 17:58
The first asbestos products appeared in England in 1857 and by 1875 huge asbestos factories were churning out asbestos board to satisfy the demands of the Industrial Revolution.

In 1898, Lucy Dene, one of only six Factory Inspectors reported to the Chief Inspector of Factories & Workshops the ‘evil effects of asbestos dust. "

It was not until 1931 that the first regulations on exposure to asbestos fibres - The Asbestos Industry Regulations 1931 became law. These set a “safe” level that allowed one worker in three to get asbestosis after 15-19 years exposure. The 1931 Regulations (which came into force in 1932) were only partially enforced; there being only 2 or 3 check prosecutions between 1932 and 1968. Their focus on only parts of the manufacturing process meant that other more risky activities had been neglected. Shipyards were not captured by the 1931 Regulations.

In 1985 The Asbestos (Prohibition) Regulations were introduced. They prohibited the import, supply and use of many products and applications, but allowed all of the above to continue until well into the 1990s.

Dozens of particular Regulations concerning asbestos were swept away in 2006 when the Control of Asbestos Regulations 2006 entered force. These Regulations are now the only ones applicable to asbestos workings.

Crocidolite (blue asbestos) is considered by many to the "worst" type of asbestos, but make no mistake - no asbestos is safe asbestos.

The asbestos related death toll in Europe is expected to be between 300,000 & 500,000 up to year 2020 when it will start to decline.

BW

J(Gleam)(Gleam)

billyboy
10th July 2011, 00:23
How many of us remember the man made snow storms in the boiler rooms of ships. when slowly opening the main stop, water hammers in the pipes followed by the falling snow (asbestos)
A miracle I am still alive I reckon.

johnjames06
27th July 2011, 22:17
Another really handy tool was a set of easy outs for removing broken studs and if you broke the easy out or a drill we had this brilliant piece of kit called a spark eroder which would burn the broken bit out without harming the thread. All you had to do was run a tap down afterwards.

Duncan112
27th July 2011, 22:36
Got some marvellous drill bits that I would have given quite a lot to have had at sea, they have a left handed helix, so tend to loosen any threaded fastening that they are used to drill out. Apparently ex Rolls Royce gas turbines, got them from Tracey Tools.

Always found Easy Ouuts to be an equal; curse and blessing - virtually impossible to remove if some butcher snapped them off in the stud. Never with a company rich enough to supply spark erosion gear!!

John Rogers
27th July 2011, 22:40
As a lecky a cut off broom handle was a great tool for removing lamp caps from the lampholder, if the lamp glass was broken. Better by far than pliers etc.

I read that a spud will do the same thing.

John

John Rogers
27th July 2011, 22:43
I will never forget that big hammer they would make me swing while the engineer would hold the spanner when dropping the bottom end on a three leg up and down steam engine.

Always received an extra tot of Nelsons Blood when done.


John..

johnjames06
27th July 2011, 23:34
Got some marvellous drill bits that I would have given quite a lot to have had at sea, they have a left handed helix, so tend to loosen any threaded fastening that they are used to drill out. Apparently ex Rolls Royce gas turbines, got them from Tracey Tools.

Always found Easy Ouuts to be an equal; curse and blessing - virtually impossible to remove if some butcher snapped them off in the stud. Never with a company rich enough to supply spark erosion gear!!

You are absolutely right, if you broke an easy out it was the end of the line. Latterly though I worked for a company wealthy enough to provide spark eroders and it was wonderful to use an easy out with that insurance.

zebedee
1st August 2011, 13:25
As an apprentice working aboard various ships during my fourth year, my most versatile tool was a marlin spike! Mine was about 1&1/4 inch diameter for some 3 inches then tapered uniformly to 3/8 inch over 15 inches and then to a needle point in half an inch. Additional to the obvious facility for aligning holes, it took over when the fox wedge was driven home without success, also doubled as a toggle bar for box spanners. It was much valued by my "helper" as my labourer mate was known, for splitting firewood;:) but really the taper was too fine for this and caused it to jamb. It was also good for punching holes in buckets to modify them into braziers for use on deck in winter.

Pat Kennedy
1st August 2011, 13:55
Can any of you engineers recall how the collar nut was tightened up when refitting a propeller to the shaft, in drydock?
In Cammell Lairds, they used a very long bullrope hooked up to the quayside crane, and took several turns around the nut. heaving the rope would spin the nut up. It usually took three or four heaves, then the fitters would apply the big spanner and flogging hammer to finish the job.

johnjames06
1st August 2011, 13:55
As an apprentice working aboard various ships during my fourth year, my most versatile tool was a marlin spike! Mine was about 1&1/4 inch diameter for some 3 inches then tapered uniformly to 3/8 inch over 15 inches and then to a needle point in half an inch. Additional to the obvious facility for aligning holes, it took over when the fox wedge was driven home without success, also doubled as a toggle bar for box spanners. It was much valued by my "helper" as my labourer mate was known, for splitting firewood;:) but really the taper was too fine for this and caused it to jamb. It was also good for punching holes in buckets to modify them into braziers for use on deck in winter.

In Liverpool they would call this a podger, and in the RN a fid. Old sailors would hold up their hand to you and say " Every finger a marlin spike". I found them useful for splicing rope.

john g
1st August 2011, 14:42
If you could find them a full set of RR service tools, if I remember they first came in a black bag but always went missing. Release oil was a favourite as was WD40 but swarfega and rags were a luxury. If you look at health and safety these days it's a wonder any of us survived back in the 60's/70's.

chadburn
1st August 2011, 15:53
Can any of you engineers recall how the collar nut was tightened up when refitting a propeller to the shaft, in drydock?
In Cammell Lairds, they used a very long bullrope hooked up to the quayside crane, and took several turns around the nut. heaving the rope would spin the nut up. It usually took three or four heaves, then the fitters would apply the big spanner and flogging hammer to finish the job.

When you needed a Dockside Crane at Smith's it was usually busy, the method used was to lash a Capstan Bar at right angles to the nut to take it up and then flog it home using the spanner and a Tup slung from one of the Hull chain block bracket's used for removing the Prop.
I have seen a few App Engineer's with their finger end's missing after using them to align the hole's on pipe flange's, not recommended(EEK)

johnjames06
1st August 2011, 19:18
Can any of you engineers recall how the collar nut was tightened up when refitting a propeller to the shaft, in drydock?
In Cammell Lairds, they used a very long bullrope hooked up to the quayside crane, and took several turns around the nut. heaving the rope would spin the nut up. It usually took three or four heaves, then the fitters would apply the big spanner and flogging hammer to finish the job.

I have never thought about this but surely the torque reading for these nuts is far in excess of what can be achieved with a flogger. I would think that you would have to know how tight the nut had been done up. Just before I retired I was tightening up nuts only about 12 inches across the flats and that required thousands of ft/lbs and was done with hydraulic torqe machines. Offshore we used Pilgrim gear that would stretch the stud enough to tighten the nut by hand and release the pressure, not practical on prop shafts. I have never been involved in this so what do I know?.

johnjames06
1st August 2011, 19:25
I have never thought about this but surely the torque reading for these nuts is far in excess of what can be achieved with a flogger. I would think that you would have to know how tight the nut had been done up. Just before I retired I was tightening up nuts only about 12 inches across the flats and that required thousands of ft/lbs and was done with hydraulic torqe machines. Offshore we used Pilgrim gear that would stretch the stud enough to tighten the nut by hand and release the pressure, not practical on prop shafts. I have never been involved in this so what do I know?.


PS With hydraulic torqe machines you had to have something to react against eg the next nut along. I suppose on a prop nut you would have nothing to react against.

You could always try a crane and flogging spanner and big hammers.

Duncan112
1st August 2011, 20:03
I have never thought about this but surely the torque reading for these nuts is far in excess of what can be achieved with a flogger. I would think that you would have to know how tight the nut had been done up. Just before I retired I was tightening up nuts only about 12 inches across the flats and that required thousands of ft/lbs and was done with hydraulic torqe machines. Offshore we used Pilgrim gear that would stretch the stud enough to tighten the nut by hand and release the pressure, not practical on prop shafts. I have never been involved in this so what do I know?.

Pilgrim nuts are indeed used on propeller shafts, a diagram and brief explanation can be found here

http://uk.images.search.yahoo.com/images/view?back=http%3A%2F%2Fuk.images.search.yahoo.com% 2Fsearch%2Fimages%3Fp%3Dpilgrim%2Bpropellor%2Bnut% 26ei%3DUTF-8%26fr2%3Dtab-web&w=469&h=489&imgurl=www.marineengineering.org.uk%2Fnavarch%2Fpi lgrim1.gif&rurl=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.marineengineering.org.uk%2Fn avarch%2Fnavpilgrimmain.htm&size=8k&name=pilgrim1+gif&p=pilgrim+propellor+nut&oid=1f0e397530793002&fr2=tab-web&spell_query=pilgrim+propeller+nut&no=1&tt=1&sigr=11ub5o2c7&sigi=11hn48n12&sigb=12s52abfh&.crumb=H1uriwTV9.c

Sorry about the length of the link, attempting to do it through the site marineengineering.org.uk merely brings up the home page - the site is well worth a look, being run by an ex shipmate of mine, Brian Beattie

When I was up doing my tickets at South Shields one of the lecturers was talking about swinging a large tup from the dockyard crane - (Health and Safety not having been invented) then whilst the foreman used a small ball pein hammer to tap the nut to see if it rang solid.

Incidentally the Pilgrim Nut was designed by a Mr Bunyan, a descendant of John Bunyan who wrote "Pilgrims Progress" the name being a nod to his famous ancestor.

johnjames06
1st August 2011, 21:19
Pilgrim nuts are indeed used on propeller shafts, a diagram and brief explanation can be found here

http://uk.images.search.yahoo.com/images/view?back=http%3A%2F%2Fuk.images.search.yahoo.com% 2Fsearch%2Fimages%3Fp%3Dpilgrim%2Bpropellor%2Bnut% 26ei%3DUTF-8%26fr2%3Dtab-web&w=469&h=489&imgurl=www.marineengineering.org.uk%2Fnavarch%2Fpi lgrim1.gif&rurl=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.marineengineering.org.uk%2Fn avarch%2Fnavpilgrimmain.htm&size=8k&name=pilgrim1+gif&p=pilgrim+propellor+nut&oid=1f0e397530793002&fr2=tab-web&spell_query=pilgrim+propeller+nut&no=1&tt=1&sigr=11ub5o2c7&sigi=11hn48n12&sigb=12s52abfh&.crumb=H1uriwTV9.c

Sorry about the length of the link, attempting to do it through the site marineengineering.org.uk merely brings up the home page - the site is well worth a look, being run by an ex shipmate of mine, Brian Beattie

When I was up doing my tickets at South Shields one of the lecturers was talking about swinging a large tup from the dockyard crane - (Health and Safety not having been invented) then whilst the foreman used a small ball pein hammer to tap the nut to see if it rang solid.

Incidentally the Pilgrim Nut was designed by a Mr Bunyan, a descendant of John Bunyan who wrote "Pilgrims Progress" the name being a nod to his famous ancestor.


Thanks for that Duncan, we never knew why it was called Pilgrim gear. I do'nt do safety myself but I agree that the HSE would'nt be too happy with ropes and cranes and blokes swinging off big hammers on high staging.

Thats another Story
1st August 2011, 21:32
has anyone thought of the best tools ever { your fingers}(Thumb)(Jester)

johnjames06
1st August 2011, 23:14
has anyone thought of the best tools ever { your fingers}(Thumb)(Jester)

Never thought of that John.

johnjames06
1st August 2011, 23:25
I have just thought of another one though, the old faithful Spanish windlass, a strop and a tommy bar to line pipes up, or anything for that matter, but I suppose that these days that has fallen foul of the safety zealots.

spongebob
1st August 2011, 23:26
A podger

chadburn
1st August 2011, 23:43
Pilgrim nuts are indeed used on propeller shafts, a diagram and brief explanation can be found here

http://uk.images.search.yahoo.com/images/view?back=http%3A%2F%2Fuk.images.search.yahoo.com% 2Fsearch%2Fimages%3Fp%3Dpilgrim%2Bpropellor%2Bnut% 26ei%3DUTF-8%26fr2%3Dtab-web&w=469&h=489&imgurl=www.marineengineering.org.uk%2Fnavarch%2Fpi lgrim1.gif&rurl=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.marineengineering.org.uk%2Fn avarch%2Fnavpilgrimmain.htm&size=8k&name=pilgrim1+gif&p=pilgrim+propellor+nut&oid=1f0e397530793002&fr2=tab-web&spell_query=pilgrim+propeller+nut&no=1&tt=1&sigr=11ub5o2c7&sigi=11hn48n12&sigb=12s52abfh&.crumb=H1uriwTV9.c

Sorry about the length of the link, attempting to do it through the site marineengineering.org.uk merely brings up the home page - the site is well worth a look, being run by an ex shipmate of mine, Brian Beattie

When I was up doing my tickets at South Shields one of the lecturers was talking about swinging a large tup from the dockyard crane - (Health and Safety not having been invented) then whilst the foreman used a small ball pein hammer to tap the nut to see if it rang solid.

Incidentally the Pilgrim Nut was designed by a Mr Bunyan, a descendant of John Bunyan who wrote "Pilgrims Progress" the name being a nod to his famous ancestor.

That's how it was done Duncan as I mentioned in my #59, you could usually tell when the nut was hard home by the different noise when the Tup hit the spanner.

zebedee
2nd August 2011, 13:35
In Liverpool they would call this a podger, and in the RN a fid. Old sailors would hold up their hand to you and say " Every finger a marlin spike". I found them useful for splicing rope.

I know that these things were often called podgers, but the original podger, at least to me, was a short stubby drift used by boilermakers/platers to align holes in plates WITHOUT moving the plates. Greater misalignments were cured using tapered reamers. In the MN a fid was a large marlin spike for use on ropes such as hawsers.
Kind regards, Zebedee

johnjames06
2nd August 2011, 13:41
I know that these things were often called podgers, but the original podger, at least to me, was a short stubby drift used by boilermakers/platers to align holes in plates WITHOUT moving the plates. Greater misalignments were cured using tapered reamers. In the MN a fid was a large marlin spike for use on ropes such as hawsers.
Kind regards, Zebedee

As we used to say in the RN different ships different cap tallies.

zebedee
2nd August 2011, 14:02
has anyone thought of the best tools ever { your fingers}(Thumb)(Jester)
Hello John Pruden, I have always considered tools, especially spanners, as extensions of my fingers! Think of it: we start a nut with our fingers and screw it down/up to take up the slack and then apply our "extended", extra strong fingers to achieve the correct torque.
Which reminds me, many years ago I read of a gorilla's enclosure where for reasons I've forgotten, the padlock was to be temporarily replaced with a nut and bolt. The gorilla watched this unusual activity with interest: when the spanner-wielder (real title lost in mists of time) had applied maximum torque he started to walk away but he looked back and saw the gorilla calmly reach through the bars and undo the nut with his fingers.
I also remember Sir George Porter, a well known engineer at the time, talking about our "tool kit for life". He suggested that it changed throughout our life. It starts out as a nappy/diaper and feeding bottle, progresses through spoon and feeder to normal cutlery, moves on to include spectacles, false teeth, possibly hearing aids, walking sticks etc. We engineers are thus privileged? to have two tool kits to see us through our travails! Best regards, Zebedee.

zebedee
2nd August 2011, 14:15
In Liverpool they would call this a podger, and in the RN a fid. Old sailors would hold up their hand to you and say " Every finger a marlin spike". I found them useful for splicing rope.
Dear johnjames06, thanks for your almost instant, non-critical reply. I understand that in the sailing ship days there was a saying to the effect "Different ships, different long splices". No, I wasn't really there but I did hear it quoted on the Pamir, or was it the Passat, on the run from Penarth to Barry! Zebedee

Pat Kennedy
2nd August 2011, 15:05
We used podgers in Blue Funnel ships for lining up the bolt holes in deep tank tops and then tightening the bolts.
I've seen scaffolders using short versions of the podger in the days before the swivel ratchet tool they use nowadays.
Pic of two podgers attached.

johnjames06
2nd August 2011, 15:36
Dear johnjames06, thanks for your almost instant, non-critical reply. I understand that in the sailing ship days there was a saying to the effect "Different ships, different long splices". No, I wasn't really there but I did hear it quoted on the Pamir, or was it the Passat, on the run from Penarth to Barry! Zebedee

Zebedee, What that phrase ment in the RN was thaton different ships there were different ways of doing things and different names for the same thing.

zebedee
4th August 2011, 16:51
Zebedee, What that phrase ment in the RN was thaton different ships there were different ways of doing things and different names for the same thing.
Dear johnjames06, I accept without reservation that my reference to splices and your reference to cap tallies are different expressions for the same thing. To try to explain my ignorance of the meaning as I quoted it, I would merely point out that when I heard it I was a schoolboy supernumerary, which puts it at 70+ years ago!
I was aware that podgers came in many shapes and sizes, including some with a spanner built in, as used by sailors and boilermakers for securing deep-tank covers.
I have no desire or intention to upset any members so I am trying to be diplomatic.
The reason that I called my marlinespike by that name was that it was a marlinespike. Although clearly it was being used as a podger, as well as having many other uses.
Consider a screwdriver being (mis)used to open a tin of paint and then to stir the contents: it acts as a lever & then a stirrer but IMHO it remains a screwdriver. Albeit one in need of cleaning, after which it could resume its normal function. Logically, I think, my marlinespike could have been used as a marlinespike when not doubling as a podger. Besides, having thought of it as such for 60 years I shall probably continue to think of of it in those terms. Incidentally, after I had to give up my chosen career in 1963, as the result of a serious accident, I presented it to a farmer friend who found it superior to anything he had come across for removing staples from fence posts, It had been given a good training on split pins.
Anyway, according to the dictionary in my I-Pad, the definition of a marlinspike, marlinespike & less commonly marlingspike is- nautical: a pointed metal tool used as a fid, spike and for various other uses. The attached thesaurus lists it as "A pointed iron hand tool that is used to separate strands of a rope or cable (as in splicing)". Out of curiosity, I tried "podger" and the nearest it could find was"podge", listed as informal a short tubby person! Zebedee

Pat Kennedy
4th August 2011, 17:05
I think podger can mean anything you want it to mean, its one of those multi-purpose words. I've heard it used as a variant of todger, and I've heard to podge as a variant of to f***.
There is even a pub in Leeds called The Podger.
However, the podger used to line up bolt holes in tank tops had to be quite a lot bigger than your normal marlin spike. My spike, which I've still got in my shed, is about 8" long. A podger would be about 18"
best Regards,
Pat(Thumb)

johnjames06
4th August 2011, 18:05
If you could find them a full set of RR service tools, if I remember they first came in a black bag but always went missing. Release oil was a favourite as was WD40 but swarfega and rags were a luxury. If you look at health and safety these days it's a wonder any of us survived back in the 60's/70's.

We found that a really good release fluid was vinegar mixed with coca cola.

ART6
4th August 2011, 18:58
How many of us remember the man made snow storms in the boiler rooms of ships. when slowly opening the main stop, water hammers in the pipes followed by the falling snow (asbestos)
A miracle I am still alive I reckon.

Quite! I can well recall plastering the damned stuff over main steam pipes where it had fallen off, and I vividly remember joining a ship as a relief crew where a main steam joint had burst. The whole engine room looked as if a snowstorm had taken place inside it.

In later years outside the service, as the asbestos scare entered the public domain, I just shrugged my shoulders and told myself it wasn't an issue. Then, a year ago, and old friend of mine died of lung cancer caused by asbestos. He had experienced the same things as me at sea. He was 69 and a year younger than me. It took him only a few months from the onset, to diagnosis to death. In his final weeks he was confined to a wheelchair with an oxygen supply.

To me the real heart wrenching moment was when his son 'phoned me that morning and said "Tony, I have to tell you, Dad passed away two hours ago. His old heart gave out. He was only saying last night that he had intended to call you but forgot. He told Mum 'remind me to 'phone Tony in the morning'."

He was a big, burly guy, to whom every challenge was dealt with by "Oh f**k it. Let's fix the bastard."

Concentrates the mind a bit?

rodfair
22nd April 2012, 22:08
I still have my 12" bahco from 1986. The smaller ones "dissappeared" Found it amusing that on the bahco guarantee, for life, it said: "This guarantee will be void if external forces such as a hammer or pipe placed over the handle are used" Mine has the markings of both!

rodfair
22nd April 2012, 22:10
A steel wheel key is the best tool for an engineer. Although designed for turning hot valve handwheels it is also a marvelous disciplinary tool and is excellent for signaling in a noisy engine room when banged on the plates. In my day we all carried one in the rule pocket of overalls.

As a project on the boiler room 12-4 one trip I made a bottle opener out of 5/8" x 3" bolt in the shape of a wheel key. Lot of turning and filing but was good.

Ron Dean
23rd April 2012, 12:43
I still have my 12" bahco from 1986. The smaller ones "dissappeared" Found it amusing that on the bahco guarantee, for life, it said: "This guarantee will be void if external forces such as a hammer or pipe placed over the handle are used" Mine has the markings of both!
Yes rodfair. Strickly speaking it may not be a tool. But who hasn't at some time used a length of steel pipe, (instead of a flogging hammer), on an open ended (or even a ring spanner), to give more leverage on those stubborn nuts that just refuse to budge.

Pat Kennedy
23rd April 2012, 19:59
Amazing! This must be the best tool ever!
I want one

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2iJ3oYRdG0w&feature=related

ART6
23rd April 2012, 20:30
This is the engineer's tool. Opens valves, shifts anything, maintains discipline.

http://www.btowstore.com/epages/BT2839.sf/en_GB/?ObjectPath=/Shops/BT2839/Products/TS1373

Everyone should have one stuffed into the rule pocket of his boiler suit. I did!

john richards
23rd April 2012, 21:32
Pat, KWK Toolmakers used to employ Centre Lathe Turners & Milling Machine Operaters who could do the same job at a fraction of the cost of these robots. They would have made up with Everton`s 4-4 against United. KWK Corpration Road Birkenhead by Oddesey main gate Cheers John Richards

chadburn
24th April 2012, 00:09
Amazing! This must be the best tool ever!
I want one

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2iJ3oYRdG0w&feature=related

Certainly quite a machine Pat, I use to enjoy turning Brass item's on a Lathe, far better than working with Steel.

hughesy
24th April 2012, 03:00
We used podgers in Blue Funnel ships for lining up the bolt holes in deep tank tops and then tightening the bolts.
I've seen scaffolders using short versions of the podger in the days before the swivel ratchet tool they use nowadays.
Pic of two podgers attached.

Hi Pat
I was installing rails on a high rise elevator, near Vancouver and the crew there called the tool to line up the rails for connection a Podger.
I thought it sounded like an English word?
I"ve got one from an ironworker friend of mine in the States, its like a big marlin spike, but they call it a "Bull Pr--k" it works great for lining up steel rails and beams etc.

all the best
Hughesy

jamesgpobog
24th April 2012, 04:34
In the boiler room on board Mispillion we had what we called the "BMFH". It was a 16 pound sledge on a handle about 10 inches (26cm) long. It could not be swung with one hand. It did get used on occasion.

spongebob
24th April 2012, 23:24
At the NZ Devonport Dockyard we used a 28 pound hammer to loosen the propellor nuts on frigates and cruisers and the rule was no more than three blows per man least he loose balance and fall off the plank staging.
My father, who owned a 14 pound hammer, declared that such a big hammer did not exist and that I was telling porkies so I took out a loan tool store pass, strapped a big 28 pounder to the pillion of my Matchless 500 and took home the evidence.

Bob

gordy
25th April 2012, 08:22
At the NZ Devonport Dockyard we used a 28 pound hammer to loosen the propellor nuts on frigates and cruisers and the rule was no more than three blows per man least he loose balance and fall off the plank staging.
My father, who owned a 14 pound hammer, declared that such a big hammer did not exist and that I was telling porkies so I took out a loan tool store pass, strapped a big 28 pounder to the pillion of my Matchless 500 and took home the evidence.

Bob

Our test kit for Sulzer cylinder heads did not include hydraulic tightening gear. It was still a hammer up job. A 28 pounder was used and the best man for the job was Desperate Dan, the strongest fitter I've ever seen.
His lunch was pigs trotters, fried by himself in brown tallow, his tea can home made from a pineapple tin.
(Fairfields-1962)

A.D.FROST
25th April 2012, 09:44
A Doxford engineer is 6ft. across the shoulders and 3inches between the ears.Sulzer engineer is a watch maker, a M.A.N. engineer is some one who can read German drawings and a H&W engineer is just greatful he's not on a double banger.(Mackem and Tackem)

spongebob
25th April 2012, 10:19
Sounds crude today but we used to use "flogging spanners"for all sorts of jobs. some made in the USA by Bonney and Blue Point were ring configuration with a short stub for clouting.

Bob

Duncan112
25th April 2012, 17:23
A good selection of "interesting" useful tools here http://wrenchingnews.com/york-auction-2012/all-pics-one-page.html
I've got a set of item 701 and find them particularly useful in confined spaces but a proper spanner will never fit once they have been used!!

JohnGrace
25th April 2012, 18:55
I have found the Bahco 31 (photo attached) useful. The length size is 8" but the jaws open to 1 1/4" and the jaws are a little slimmer than the standard 8". In addition there is a small "Stilson" style jaw at the free end. On an earlier one I filed the "Stilson" jaw ends to flat screwdriver blade. A hole drilled in the shank is another useful modification.

Duncan112
25th April 2012, 19:50
One other Bahco modification was to braze a gas bottle key in the rope hole on the free end - very handy when doing the fridges!!

jamesgpobog
25th April 2012, 19:55
Sounds crude today but we used to use "flogging spanners"for all sorts of jobs. some made in the USA by Bonney and Blue Point were ring configuration with a short stub for clouting.

Bob

Standard tool for sectional header boilers, though we called them a "slugging wrench".

Pat Kennedy
25th April 2012, 19:55
Sounds crude today but we used to use "flogging spanners"for all sorts of jobs. some made in the USA by Bonney and Blue Point were ring configuration with a short stub for clouting.

Bob

Here's a pic of a selection of ring wrenches designed to be used with the flogging hammer.

Mad Landsman
25th April 2012, 20:39
A good selection of "interesting" useful tools here http://wrenchingnews.com/york-auction-2012/all-pics-one-page.html
I've got a set of item 701 and find them particularly useful in confined spaces but a proper spanner will never fit once they have been used!!

Antiques!!? - I'm still using tools like that!
You mean I could get money for the stuff in my old tool box.....

Yes, I also have item 701, Not really intended for use on anything with flats, but useful nevertheless in an emergency, like the ever faithful Footprints and Moles, in various sizes.

If pressed I would say that the most useful (and used) thing on my bench is a watchmaker's loupe - Bad things look really bad when magnified.

jamesgpobog
25th April 2012, 20:54
Here's a pic of a selection of ring wrenches designed to be used with the flogging hammer.

Looks very familiar.

davemackay
25th April 2012, 21:33
to zebeedee a fid was made of wood never used on metal only rope marlinspike used only on wirecable marlinspike used onrope would cause damage dave mackay deckhand

eldersuk
26th April 2012, 00:53
A good selection of "interesting" useful tools here http://wrenchingnews.com/york-auction-2012/all-pics-one-page.html
I've got a set of item 701 and find them particularly useful in confined spaces but a proper spanner will never fit once they have been used!!



Looks like the drawer under the 2nd's bunk.

Derek

rodfair
26th April 2012, 01:21
A Doxford engineer is 6ft. across the shoulders and 3inches between the ears.Sulzer engineer is a watch maker, a M.A.N. engineer is some one who can read German drawings and a H&W engineer is just greatful he's not on a double banger.(Mackem and Tackem)

A Cunard Engineer is adept at all the above, with outside help of course, and at the end, can raise a glass with a millionaire while looking for another job at a Captains Cocktail party!

davemackay
27th April 2012, 21:53
When you needed a Dockside Crane at Smith's it was usually busy, the method used was to lash a Capstan Bar at right angles to the nut to take it up and then flog it home using the spanner and a Tup slung from one of the Hull chain block bracket's used for removing the Prop.
I have seen a few App Engineer's with their finger end's missing after using them to align the hole's on pipe flange's, not recommended(EEK)
so yoin u lashed a tup to the capstan then chained to block bracket then
let the app engineers clean its bum then insides with fingers then
BAR B CUE down engine room(Thumb)

john richards
27th April 2012, 23:18
I remember doing a dry dock at Smiths on The Tyne WD Fairway scafold rigged fitters working on tailend I swear this lad arrived swung his Monday hammer Bang Bang Ship Shuddering on the Blocks He looked like Quasimodo without the hump it was the bigest hammer i`ve every seen 56 lbs at least, job done everything loose climbed backdown into the dockbottom amazing . John Richards. PS It Might Have been Redheads medicine just kicked in .