Blue Funnel And Glen Line Masters

IAN M
30th June 2011, 21:13
Masters I sailed with on deep-sea voyages and my opinion of them. Did you know any of them?

Leonard Eccles. A good man who had a hard war.

E.A.H. Gepp. A pleasant man who mixed with all the officers without any lack of discipline.

A.J. Ffoulkes. A Cape Horner and a gentleman. One of finest men I ever met.

Peter Dunsire. Not well liked by most, but I got on fine with him.

J.M. Anderson. An austere man whom I didn't get to know.

Duncan MacTavish. A gentleman. A Scotsman with a law-di-daw English accent.

W.K. (Film Star) Kerr. The rudest and worse master I sailed with who was a fine marine artist.

price
1st July 2011, 17:02
I sailed with a Capt. Anderson for three voyages on the Rhexenor, Capt. Singleton was master during my first voyage on this vessel. I sailed around the land with Capt. Kerr on the Dolius prior to her maiden deep sea voyage in 1956.
Bruce.

Pat Kennedy
1st July 2011, 18:43
Captain Gepp was the Marine Superintendant in Birkenhead during my time in Blue Funnel. He always appeared at the locks wearing a bowler hat. I had little knowledge of him, but when I was in the shoregang his reputation was not good. I believe he came up through the hawsepipe.
The best BF master I sailed with was 'Radar Robb'.
Pat

holland25
1st July 2011, 19:58
I sailed with Captains Willis,Curphey, Lane, Auchterlony and Valk. There was one other but I cant remember his name. I have to say that all of them got us there and back in one piece.

rothesian
1st July 2011, 20:17
A.R.Davidson on the Maron, Edwards on the Machaon, Dougal on the Theseus, Fred Punchard on the Flintshire, S.S. Howie on the Hector, ? Talthybius((Thumb)

IAN M
1st July 2011, 20:56
Would be surprised if he came up through the hawsepipe, Pat. I heard he married into the Holt family.

Macphail
1st July 2011, 21:40
Early nine-teen sixties I sailed on the “Antilochus”.
Captain Thomas was the master, a fine and fair man.
Had a joiners bench on the bridge wing, was keen on making wood furniture,
If you looked up, you could see him giving it laldy with the big wood plane.

Other masters of note I sailed with whilst with Alfred Holt.''. Captain Liptrop. Captain HS Clarke.

John.

Pat Kennedy
2nd July 2011, 12:25
Would be surprised if he came up through the hawsepipe, Pat. I heard he married into the Holt family.

You're correct Ian, I was confusing Capt Gepp with another unpopular master, who was mentioned in the previous post by MacPhail, which jolted my memory. It was Liptrot who came up through the hawsepipe, and he was definitely not a pleasant man.
Another master of note was Digby-Jones who had the Achilles in 1958.
Regards
Pat

Union Jack
2nd July 2011, 16:58
Forgive the Grey Funnel intrusion on a Blue Funnel thread, but does the name Brian Jones ring a bell with any of you gentlemen? I'm almost certain he joined Blue Funnel in the latter part of the 1950s, but I don't know how far he went.

With many thanks

Jack

Tom Inglis
2nd July 2011, 20:52
Forgive the Grey Funnel intrusion on a Blue Funnel thread, but does the name Brian Jones ring a bell with any of you gentlemen? I'm almost certain he joined Blue Funnel in the latter part of the 1950s, but I don't know how far he went.

With many thanks

Jack

Yes I know Brian Jones, in fact I saw him 2 weeks ago.
Assuming it's the same Brian Jones we are talking about he was a middy in Blue Funnel at same time as me [1957 to1960] . In 1967 we did our Master's tickets together in Liverpool. We both lived in Neston, Wirral and travelled together each day. Brian stayed on in Blue Funnel to the end and was master of the last Bluey to sail up the Mersey. He now lives in Heswall. I saw him 2 weeks ago at a golf day for retired Ocean people organised by what was Exel Logistics who amalgamated with Ocean and then were taken over by DHL.

regards
Tom Inglis

Union Jack
2nd July 2011, 22:41
Tom

Thank you very much for your speedy response - not absolutely sure if it's the same man so I will pass on your very interesting input.

Jack

david_crosby
4th July 2011, 03:48
Punchard, Howie ... two of the worst tempered men it was ever my pleasure to sail with. Yes, skilled shipmasters, but NASTY bastards.

Peter Martin
4th July 2011, 09:37
HK Timbrell - Calchas 1968 - V 'remote' type.
Duncan Campbell - Menestheus 1969 - Scots and OK sort of chap.
Noel Joyce - Memnon 1971 - Accompanied by his very shapely and much, much younger Dutch wife, Ingaar.

jmcg
4th July 2011, 13:17
Masters Squires, Stubbings and Edwards are 3 that I can recall in my minds eye without recourse to the Dis. book. All very fine and fair "Old Men".

Capt Howie I recall too but had not much to do with him on Hector. Joe Bates (bosun) was in "command" of the deck crowd (he was in her from slipway to scrapper I believe) so little or no involvement from Howie or the c/o. If my memory serves me well JB had a FG 2nd Mates "ticket".

The other BF Masters I sailed with have left no distinct memories or scars.

BW

J(Gleam)(Gleam)

R651400
7th July 2011, 18:32
My recollection of all the Blue Flue masters I sailed with was aloofness to the point of condescension and little or zilch comprehension of man management skills.
My opinion may sound a little bit severe but I wonder how many of our Blue Flue posters ever had the company of their master on a run ashore?

Pat Kennedy
7th July 2011, 18:46
My recollection of all the Blue Flue masters I sailed with was aloofness to the point of condescension and little or zilch comprehension of man management skills.
My opinion may sound a little bit severe but I wonder how many of our Blue Flue posters ever had the company of their master on a run ashore?

I definitely agree.
Remote was the word I would use. Most of them would not address a rating directly, but communicate through a third party, ie the Mate or Bosun.
I certainly never went ashore with any merchant ship captain, except one, the skipper of one of Fisher's rock dodgers, who would buy his round in the pub in Warren Point every trip.
Pat

Ron Stringer
7th July 2011, 18:57
RS651400

Run ashore with the Master? They did things better in Ellerman's!

On a very hot afternoon in December 1962, the Extra 2nd Mate and myself were walking along the quayside in Newcastle, NSW when the Master of the City of Lucknow, Capt. Bernard Theodore Wortley, RNR no less, pulled up alongside us, driving a hire car provided by the Agents. He surprised us by offering a lift into town and we rather nervously accepted. I sat in the back, with the 2/O in the front passenger street.

Soon after we reached the town centre, he took a left turn against No Entry signs. We passengers both (ungratefully perhaps) pointed out his mistake but he swept our comments aside and continued driving against the oncoming traffic until a NSW policeman waved us to a halt.

BTW opened his window and addressed him.

"Good afternoon, constable. I am Captain Wortley, Master of the British ship City of Lucknow. This is my Navigating Officer and in the back is my Communications Officer." (The capital letters were definitely emphasised). The policeman gave us all a long, slow, look and said, "I don't give a damn if you are Captain Cook, turn this car round and get out of here before I arrest the lot of you."

Hugh Ferguson
7th July 2011, 19:20
Ding Dong Bell......remember nursing him when he got malaria in W.Africa.

Mevagissey Evans.....a very big man.

Anglesey Evans....a very Welsh man.

Longair......a Bridge of Allen man

Robb..........a very jolly Scot.

Percy Cross (3 voy's).......apprenticed in sail: ship called the John Lockett.

Anderson......coasting.

Large...........a nagger.

Ron Wilks.....a neighbour of mine in Newport.

Ellams........the first Blue Funnel trained man. Son killed in a Blue Funnel ship.

Tyller ..(2 voy's) an original Glen Line man, very understanding of a misdemeanour of mine!
Walter Simmonds OBE, (6 voyages) also a Glen Line man and a gentleman.

Hanney...(1 voy. in Glenroy)..he had been chief officer of Glenorchy in Pedestal convoy.

Three of them had been apprenticed in sail: Percy Cross; Walter Simmonds & Tyller.

IAN M
7th July 2011, 21:11
My recollection of all the Blue Flue masters I sailed with was aloofness to the point of condescension and little or zilch comprehension of man management skills.
My opinion may sound a little bit severe but I wonder how many of our Blue Flue posters ever had the company of their master on a run ashore?

I used to go ashore with Captain A.J. Fffoulkes when on the Samnesse during 1946/47 and, many years after he had retired, my family and I spent holidays at his home in Birkenhead. As 1st R/O/Purser, I had regular dealings with masters and never sailed deepsea with any who could be described as 'aloof'.

IAN M
7th July 2011, 21:23
Re Percy Cross being an apprentice on the John Lockett. In his book, 'FROM THE LOG-BOOK OF MEMORY', Shalimar (Captain F.C. Hendry) has a story called 'THE LUCK OF THE JOHN LOCKETT'. I regard Shalimar as the greatest writer of sea stories - at least on a par with Conrad and, in my opinion, more enjoyable. I believe I have all his books and have re-read them many times.

Hugh Ferguson
7th July 2011, 22:42
On my one and only trip to Australia I was 3rd mate of the Elpenor with Captain Cross and we were arriving Brisbane when his attention was taken with a derelict old sailing ship abandoned on the river bank.
Captain Cross asked the pilot if he knew anything of her. Yes, said the pilot, she's an old coal hulk and she was the John Lockett!
You can scarcely imagine his feelings at that revelation-he couldn't take his eyes of of her: I heard him remark how small she looked.

Orestes
8th July 2011, 02:23
The worst master I ever sailed with was Frank Fisher on the Ajax, a real cranky sour faced little Aussie..Captain Willis on the Orestes was a genial type who lived most of the day in a Gin bottle. "Cocoa"McDavis, whilst unpopular with the crown and a few mates was always chatty with us middies!
The master on the Glenartney was Gordon Rippon, a very nice Yorkshireman, who took a lot of interest in the middies. His name has been mentioned in the press out here , as he was 2nd mate on the Centaur when she was torpedoed!!
If you start a thread on mates " bastard" Bold would be the top of my hit list. he was the most miserable man I have ever met!!!

Jim Quinn

R651400
8th July 2011, 04:47
Aloof, remote or whatever word one cares to choose I stick by what I say and I feel this could have been India Buildings doctrine once the "in charge" mecca had been reached.
In all my deep-sea voyages the old man never socialised with his fellow officers or in port came near the officers mess when a party was in full swing.
Only sighted at meal times, inspection and noon position taking, my first going as far as to avoid the former by having his meals plus the ubiquitous bottle of Gordons served in his cabin.
What a difference to foreign flag when regular runs ashore with any member of the crew including the old man were the norm.

ps "Orestes" most of the above mentioned parties were on the Orestes/GFPQ on the Singapore/Oz run which I remember with affection but for the life of me cannot remember the master's name!
Will have to dig out my discharge book.
pps How remiss of me an ex R/O. His name was AC Sparks!!

holland25
8th July 2011, 08:20
The Captain Willis I sailed with used to do embroidery. Captain Curphey tried to persuade me to go and live on the Isle of Mann, I told him there were no jobs there, he said "you have got a job",I believe he had a number of daughters.He looked after me when I was relieved in Hong Kong, I was due to go home on one of the P boats which was outward bound round Japan.He intervened and got me on the Alcinous which was homeward bound and got me home on Boxing Day. We should have made Christmas but hit bad weather in the Bay.My memory of Captain Lane was that he was somewhat officious.I had a friend over one afternoon in Singapore and we were sitting in the smokeroom on the Ulysses.Captain Lane walked passed and a few moments later the Chief Steward appeared to tell me that the Captain had seen us drinking. He was right, though it was only orange juice. He asked one of the engineers what his mother would think of his bar bill.

Hugh Ferguson
8th July 2011, 10:33
So many of these names are familiar to me, Rippon and Curphey even before I set foot aboard a Blue Funnel ship. They were two of the instructors at Outward Bound, Aberdovey, an institution that had been devised by Lawrence Holt in co-operation with Kurt Hahn of Gordonstoun Sea School when it was realised that a large proprtion of the lives lost at sea during the war were being lost when abandoning ship and attempting to survive in a life-boat.
All of the instructors, including the Principal, Freddie Fuller, at Outward Bound in 1942/43 had been through the mill and had had the experience of surviving after their ship had been sunk.
Despite losing about a half of the fleet the loss to personnel in the Blue Funnel was about 9% and well below the 17.5% of the Merchant Service as a whole.
They were magnificently built ships, always a joy to pilot, and that must say a lot about the way in which the company was managed and the ships manned.
Taking all that into account I would think that sailing with a "pally" captain would come pretty low down on the list of priorities.

Patrick Finselbach
8th July 2011, 13:06
A Captain Povey,Master on the Perseus suffered an accident in his cabin where the Chief Officer had to sew up his face,the C/o went on to write an article in the Sea Breezes,titled My First Command,does anybody recollect this incident.Capt.,Povey rejoined the next voyage and you would be hard done by to see the scar.I do remember the C/o's name.

holland25
8th July 2011, 13:12
The school that two of my grandsons attend, pay their respects to Blue Funnel, Lawrence Holt, Outward Bound,and the reasons for its inception, in the form of a course they do. I was quite surprised when they started talking about it, they were likewise surprised that I knew about it.

commander
8th July 2011, 14:07
Captain Donald ? Howe of Ascanius on Barber Blue Sea run 1965. A gentleman.
"Crasher " Jackson on the Bulker Ajax, a very nice man who had a habit of handcuffing ones ankle to the foot rail at the bar if he wanted someone to stay late drinking with him.
Gwillam Owen. Not such a nice man. Rules were rules.
D.C.Evans, Menestheus 1963. I was first trip apprentice and I can only recall him grunting at me once after demanding to know who I was.
And several others good and bad whom I cannot ecall at the moment. Must dig out the old discharge books.

Captain Nick
8th July 2011, 17:45
Does anyone remember Capt Desmond Stewart? I sailed with him on the Glengyle in 1968. He was the Commodore List 1 RNR at the time. He looked and sounded like the actor Jame Robertson Justice playing Sir Lancilot Spratt!

Pat Kennedy
8th July 2011, 18:30
I remember a post by 'Agamemnon' on the Blue Funnel Nostalgia thread a couple of years ago, in which he refers to three BF masters, Rippon, Liptrot, and Tiplady, as 'Rip,Lip and Tip'
regards,
Pat

commander
9th July 2011, 10:24
I posted this originally under "Masters we have sailed with" not realising that that thread refers to Bank Line. Also I had the masters name as Freddie Squires which I'm now sure was wrong, and it was in fact Desmond Stewart.

I was third mate on a coastal voyage entering Birkenhead docks on a stormy, cold winter's afternoon in around 1971.

The Old Man was Desmond Stewart.

He had his very pretty and somewhat younger Dutch wife with him.As we rounded the knuckles into the locks and dock he was storming up and down the bridge wings getting very worked up at the antics of the rope men and 'knuckle 'arries', shouting "well stitch my bum, stitch my f*****g bum",and chain smoking what I think were Bulkan Sobranie..

He and his wife left the ship later that afternoon to go back to Hull where he had left his car.

Sadly he had a heart attack and died in the taxi in the Mersey tunnel en route to Lime Street station.

Hugh Ferguson
9th July 2011, 10:38
That description tells me that it was Noel Joyce and not Desmond Stewart.

Captain Nick
9th July 2011, 11:48
It does indeed sound like Noel Joyce who was master of the Calchas in early 1967 which was my first voyage. Another fearsome master who , thankfully, seemed to like me enough to give me a good report. Des Stewart was very much alive in the early eighties when he made a guest appearance on "This Is Your Life" honouring Capt Warwick, 1st Master of the QE2. They had been on the " Conway" together before joining the RN during the war.

Hugh Ferguson
9th July 2011, 12:57
Click HERE (www.shipsnostalgia.com/showthread.php?t=16067#25) for a happy memory when Noel Joyce was a brand new chief mate aboard the Glenroy sixty years ago!

capt.jim
11th July 2011, 20:05
I remember a post by 'Agamemnon' on the Blue Funnel Nostalgia thread a couple of years ago, in which he refers to three BF masters, Rippon, Liptrot, and Tiplady, as 'Rip,Lip and Tip'
regards,
Pat

sail as 3rd mate with captain tiplady on the glenshiel (x sam boat) in 55 was a year on her ,also with albert lane (just call me samboat lane ) happy days ? on the whole got on fairly well with both of them.
all these names bring back a lot of memories

makko
11th July 2011, 20:38
I remember three: "Dickie" Richards (?), JC Ray and Colin Sandy. Memory fails on others!
Rgds.
Dave

IAN M
11th July 2011, 21:01
My book LIFE ABOARD A WARTIME LIBERTY SHIP tells of my experiences on the Samite and Samforth. Has anyone bought it, as there has been little or no interest shown by members?

R651400
16th July 2011, 06:04
sail as 3rd mate with captain tiplady on the glenshiel (x sam boat) in 55 was a year on her ,also with albert lane (just call me samboat lane ) happy days ? on the whole got on fairly well with both of them. all these names bring back a lot of memories
Jock Chapman was captain of Glenbeg ex Samjack on the single and one of my best voyages with BF & GL.
Glaswegian and a bit of a martinet who may have come up the hawsepipe, Jock stopped me going ashore in Shimonoseki wearing jeans. "Not having my officers going ashore in dungarees!" was the reason.

Tony Mundella
13th September 2011, 10:01
I posted this originally under "Masters we have sailed with" not realising that that thread refers to Bank Line. Also I had the masters name as Freddie Squires which I'm now sure was wrong, and it was in fact Desmond Stewart.

I was third mate on a coastal voyage entering Birkenhead docks on a stormy, cold winter's afternoon in around 1971.

The Old Man was Desmond Stewart.

He had his very pretty and somewhat younger Dutch wife with him.As we rounded the knuckles into the locks and dock he was storming up and down the bridge wings getting very worked up at the antics of the rope men and 'knuckle 'arries', shouting "well stitch my bum, stitch my f*****g bum",and chain smoking what I think were Bulkan Sobranie..

He and his wife left the ship later that afternoon to go back to Hull where he had left his car.

Sadly he had a heart attack and died in the taxi in the Mersey tunnel en route to Lime Street station.

Definately NOT Desmond Stewart, as his nephew I should know! He never had a Dutch wife and retired to live quietly in N. Ireland. Hedied about 20 years ago

Trevorw
13th September 2011, 21:45
Punchard, Howie ... two of the worst tempered men it was ever my pleasure to sail with. Yes, skilled shipmasters, but NASTY bastards.

Don't agree with you about Punchard - yes he was a hard man, and set very high standards, but if you towed the line and did your job properly he would back you through thick and thin!

Trevorw
13th September 2011, 21:56
The most dictatorial Captain I sailed with in Blue Flu' Was Corlett on "Demodocus", but even he had his good points!
The most gentlemanly had to be Morley on "Glengarry" and the most laid back, Laxton, also on "Demodocus"

Ranjith Gurugamage
14th September 2011, 08:03
I remember three: "Dickie" Richards (?), JC Ray and Colin Sandy. Memory fails on others!
Rgds.
Dave
I sailed with J.C.Ray ( Chinese ray) in M.V.Anchises in the early 70s as a Junior Engineer.Remember him very well- Ranjith

kingorry
14th September 2011, 09:03
As a boy and 'teen-ager', I used to live next door to Captain Gepp in Bonnington Avenue, Crosby. On the other side lived Captain Robert Smith, the then Superintendent of Liverpool Pilotage. Captain Gepp was Marine Superintendent of Blue Funnel at the time. I moved away in 1960 when I went to sea, and lost touch with these two fine guys.
kingorry.

Peter Trodden
14th September 2011, 11:37
The most dictatorial Captain I sailed with in Blue Flu' Was Corlett on "Demodocus", but even he had his good points!
The most gentlemanly had to be Morley on "Glengarry" and the most laid back, Laxton, also on "Demodocus"

I did the xmas trip on Demodocus. 1956/57. And the Bosun,of many yearson Her was Dan Corlett (I.oM.) Trev, are you getting names mixed up. It happens to us all(Ouch)
ttfn Peter T.

Trevorw
14th September 2011, 20:23
I did the xmas trip on Demodocus. 1956/57. And the Bosun,of many yearson Her was Dan Corlett (I.oM.) Trev, are you getting names mixed up. It happens to us all(Ouch)
ttfn Peter T.

Typing error, I'm afraid. Just had another look at my Discharge Book, it was actually, Collett (not Corlet), from Feb 1961 to June 1961

Howard S
17th September 2011, 22:03
I recall in early 70 when en route to UK from Aussie to start a seafaring career N.A. Joyce was in Stentor (Alan?? was Ch.Officer) and N.D.B. Martin in Helenus. Funny how one can remember 41 years ago yet one needs a list to go to the store!!

gregor12
18th September 2011, 17:47
JC Ray w as known in my time as either "one way Ray" or "full away Ray" due to his love for getting to the mext port ahead of time. Intererseting experience with him in Liverpool inlate 1980 when the ship managed to hit the Chief Stewards car.

capt.jim
18th September 2011, 21:44
I recall in early 70 when en route to UK from Aussie to start a seafaring career N.A. Joyce was in Stentor (Alan?? was Ch.Officer) and N.D.B. Martin in Helenus. Funny how one can remember 41 years ago yet one needs a list to go to the store!!

difficulty remembering what day it is yet can remember `jock` weir master on the old Rhesus (coal burner built 1911)

Howard S
23rd September 2011, 19:43
Also known as Shanghai Ray! I recall seeing him at Lagos Anchorage in the days when there were ships anchored all the way to Cotonou almost. He was Master of a Blue Funnel M Boat (as I recall?). I suspect the very smart ED funnel was not much to his liking! Imagine loading logs in those ships.

Howard S
23rd September 2011, 19:47
I recall in early 70 when en route to UK from Aussie to start a seafaring career N.A. Joyce was in Stentor (Alan?? was Ch.Officer) and N.D.B. Martin in Helenus. Funny how one can remember 41 years ago yet one needs a list to go to the store!!

Now I remember! Alan Proudfoot was the Chief Officer I was trying to recall.

AGAMEMNON
25th September 2011, 10:12
I remember a post by 'Agamemnon' on the Blue Funnel Nostalgia thread a couple of years ago, in which he refers to three BF masters, Rippon, Liptrot, and Tiplady, as 'Rip,Lip and Tip'
regards,
Pat

As a follow-on, a few weeks ago I saw an article in a newspaper about twin ladies who had their 100th birthday. One, a Mrs Rippon had apparently married a Merchant Navy officer......I just wondered. The age would be about right.

Hugh Ferguson
31st October 2011, 11:39
These are the only photos I have of old Blue Funnel and Glen Line captains.
They are Captain Walter Simmonds & his wife and Captain (radar) Robb.

Hugh Ferguson
31st October 2011, 13:15
Captain Simmonds, with whom I made six of my seven voyages in the Glenroy, was a man for whom I held immense regard. He came out of sail and was one of the two original Glen Line masters with whom I sailed-the other was Captain Tyller.
His manner and speech were, what can only be described, as cultivated and I'm sure that resulted from his having been interned in Germany during the entire W.W.1 with British professors and other academics. His internment being due to his ship, the Glenearn having been illegally detained whilst sailing from Hamburg at the outbreak of the war.
I have many memories of him. One, of a Christmas Day in Hong Kong, when, whilst carrying a pink gin across the passenger lounge prior to dinner, I stumbled and spilt the drink all over his white buckskin shoes which suddenly changed to a delicate shade of pink!
His first command had been in 1943/44 in the Ocean Verity on a Russian convoy.

I was given the photograph, some years ago, by his son Howard, whom I remember as a small boy, scampering around the boat-deck of the Glenroy with his sister as they saw their father off on yet another voyage east. Sadly, Howard has since died.

Jardine
5th November 2011, 09:26
Many names I recognise. Only one stands out and that was LIPTROT. He was first trip Mate on an A boat I was middy on . A very difficult/unpleasant man.

Jardine
5th November 2011, 19:21
As a follow up to my previous I would say Capt Laxton was the most pleasant Master I sailed with in Blue Funnel. I think he was referred to as laid back in one of the posts but I would say he exuded a quiet confidence which impressed me.

Jardine
6th November 2011, 08:56
This thread is addictive. Anyone remember a Captain McDavid, often referred to a 'Cocoa'(not to his face). I will not not even attempt to quote stories except to say I found him OK although I suspect he did not register I was on board for three month. His brother was Sir Herbert, MD of Glen Line.

Tom Inglis
6th November 2011, 17:51
As a follow up to my previous I would say Capt Laxton was the most pleasant Master I sailed with in Blue Funnel. I think he was referred to as laid back in one of the posts but I would say he exuded a quiet confidence which impressed me.


Hi Jardine,
yes , I remember Capt Laxton. I sailed with him on a Glen boat when I was 4th mate [Glenroy I think] He was hospitalised in HK homeward bound having collapsed due to severe effects of diabetes which he was not aware he had. That would have been mid 1960's He did not return to the ship but did continue as master for a number of years.
As you said he was a nice guy.

Tom Inglis

Jardine
6th November 2011, 21:35
Hi Jardine,
yes , I remember Capt Laxton. I sailed with him on a Glen boat when I was 4th mate [Glenroy I think] He was hospitalised in HK homeward bound having collapsed due to severe effects of diabetes which he was not aware he had. That would have been mid 1960's He did not return to the ship but did continue as master for a number of years.
As you said he was a nice guy.

Tom Inglis

Hi Tom,

I was 4th Mate with Capt Laxton in 1956/7.

Trader
6th November 2011, 23:21
This thread is addictive. Anyone remember a Captain McDavid, often referred to a 'Cocoa'(not to his face). I will not not even attempt to quote stories except to say I found him OK although I suspect he did not register I was on board for three month. His brother was Sir Herbert, MD of Glen Line.

I remember Capt. McDavid Jardine, he was master on the Bellerophon when I was there in 1954. As you say there were lots of stories about him and like you he probably never noticed me either as a lowly S.O.S.

Alec.

Jardine
7th November 2011, 22:33
I remember Capt. McDavid Jardine, he was master on the Bellerophon when I was there in 1954. As you say there were lots of stories about him and like you he probably never noticed me either as a lowly S.O.S.

Alec.

There is one story about McDavid that circulated. He was Master of one of the Cadet ships discharging at Holts Wharf. The middy's were over the side painting and they decided to paint COCOA in foot high letters on the half round. He was not happy and sacked them all.

Jardine
17th November 2011, 20:29
Anyone remember Scar Face Sanderson?

Pat Kennedy
17th November 2011, 21:20
Anyone remember Scar Face Sanderson?

I sailed with him on the Peleus in 1959.
I was deck boy, I remember him as being very thorough with his daily inspections, but at least he did murmer the occasional 'good work' as he passed through the sailors messroom.
Pat(Thumb)

TonyAllen
18th November 2011, 00:48
I sailed with him on the Peleus in 1959.
I was deck boy, I remember him as being very thorough with his daily inspections, but at least he did murmer the occasional 'good work' as he passed through the sailors messroom.
Pat(Thumb)

Hi Pat did 2 trips with him on the Pyrrhus 56/7 first as galley boy the next up a notch as scullion.The next 2 trips was the peleus
never new he was called scarface but as you said was always polite to the galley staff

Regards Tony

Jardine
18th November 2011, 08:36
Hi Pat did 2 trips with him on the Pyrrhus 56/7

Regards Tony

We must have sailed together!

TonyAllen
18th November 2011, 23:18
We must have sailed together!

Hello Jardine first trip left b/head 8.8.56 home 29.11.56
second trip19.12.56. home29.3.57
we had a band on board called the phantoms, I was the singer does that ring any bells. the youngest on board was the peggythe chef was Alf Briarley,can't recall the bosun's name but he hand stitched a guitar bag for me out of new brown canvas started in HK it was ready for payoff cost me 2 bottles of beer a week and I kept it for years till I sold the guitar and bag to buy a better on
2 great trips like all of them with blue funnell
Regards Tony Allen

Jardine
19th November 2011, 09:17
Tony,

Apologies for the slow response as I had to check with my discharge book and yes, we sailed together on your second trip. I was 4th Mate (first trip). Cannot recall a band or recognise names mentioned but I am sure you will understand it was a long time ago.

TonyAllen
19th November 2011, 17:08
Jardine.Yes it was a long time ago but memories makes it seem like yesterday
oh to have one more shot at it all, would do the same things again without hesitation Regards Tony

Barrie Youde
24th January 2012, 23:56
Many thanks, Hugh (52, above) for the reminder of Ellis Milne (Radar) Robb. A pleasant photograph of a pleasant man. I sailed with him in Memnon in 1960. A most practical man with a highly intellectual manner and bearing. Yes, he was aloof, but one pitch-dark night during bad weather in the Indian Ocean when the lashings on some deck cargo were showing signs of coming adrift, he was on the centrecastle deck in his oilies taking charge of the re-lashing. On the bridge, he had the air of an absent-minded Oxbridge professor; but was anything other than absent minded!

Others I knew were Farmer Gould of Tyn-y-Gongl in Jason. (Please see the thread Inspiration of Youth).

The only other I sailed with was George Carney (Radnorshire, 1960). He was described to me (before I joined the ship) as a "decent, clean-living man" - a desciption I never had the slightest cause to doubt.

All were aloof. As a first-year Middy, I didn't expect any of them to be anything else. Happy days (by and large, with some more by than large!).

BY

Hugh Ferguson
25th January 2012, 13:30
The misdemeanour, referred to in post #18 was, in fact, probably worse than that and could have resulted in serious consequences.
As you may guess it's a case of "cherche la femme".
I had gone ashore in Genoa with a couple of mates and finding ourselves somewhat disenamoured with what the Genoa waterfront had to offer we took ourselves off to a night-club known as the "Ippo Campo" some way out of the city.
This night club was a bit posh, and consequently expensive for the likes of us, and the lady of the night who joined us at our table, was way out of our range. We had a lovely evening but returned back aboard somewhat sooner than had been anticipated!
Nevertheless, I had become so smitten with the gorgeous girl that I found myself determined to see her again come what may. But cash, in the form of thousands of lira, was the commodity most required.
I sounded out the purser who told me that the Captain had it and I would need to see him. That gave me some second thoughts but I was determined, and after, somewhat timorously knocking on his door, he came up with the necessary!
So, come the evening off I went, by myself this time, to the "Ippo Campo".
She was there alright but at another table in the company of two expensive looking gentlemen. However, she noticed I had arrived and came to tell me that she would meet me later at a hotel: she gave me the address and I left in absolute trust that she would do as she had said.
I found the hotel and went to bed and fell sound asleep. I woke up to the sound of bird song and only then did the realisation that it was sailing time and I would need to get back to the ship toute suite.
That took time and after a hair-raising taxi drive back to the docks I was met at the gates by two agent's runners who clung on to each side of the taxi as we raced to the berth to find the ship, Glenartney, had already left and was manouvering away from the berth.
From the ship they saw us arrive and I saw Captain Tyller take up a megaphone and bellow, "I'm sending the tug for you". Thus I arrived alongside the ship to be viewed by everybody, including all the passengers, climbing the pilot ladder to be bellowed at again by Captain Tyller, "I'll see you after breakfast".
I got the mother and father of a dressing down but was allowed to keep my 8 to 12 watch. Come the noon derby all seemed to have returned to normal: in fact the nice old boy said to me, "was she nice?" I didn't tell him that she had failed to keep the appointment!

I left the Glenartney after arrival in London and, would you believe, he sent me a reference, which I had not requested, posted from Port Said.

Pat Kennedy
25th January 2012, 14:39
Many thanks, Hugh (52, above) for the reminder of Ellis Milne (Radar) Robb. A pleasant photograph of a pleasant man. I sailed with him in Memnon in 1960. A most practical man with a highly intellectual manner and bearing. Yes, he was aloof, but one pitch-dark night during bad weather in the Indian Ocean when the lashings on some deck cargo were showing signs of coming adrift, he was on the centrecastle deck in his oilies taking charge of the re-lashing. On the bridge, he had the air of an absent-minded Oxbridge professor; but was anything other than absent minded!

Others I knew were Farmer Gould of Tyn-y-Gongl in Jason. (Please see the thread Inspiration of Youth).

The only other I sailed with was George Carney (Radnorshire, 1960). He was described to me (before I joined the ship) as a "decent, clean-living man" - a desciption I never had the slightest cause to doubt.

All were aloof. As a first-year Middy, I didn't expect any of them to be anything else. Happy days (by and large, with some more by than large!).

BY
Fergus,
I was also in the Memnon in 1960 , and I agree with your opinion of 'Radar Robb'.
I remember being on the wheel in the Indian Ocean one afternoon, and Capt Robb came into the wheelhouse and burying his head in the radar hood, he ordered hard aport. We did a couple of complete circles while he studied the screen. I never found out what these evolutions were all about.
The bosun on Memnon at that time was Harry Hands.
of the officers, I recall the third mate was an affable Scot, and the Chief Officer was heavily bearded, a bit of a tyrant and unpopular with the crowd. His name has gone in the mists of time.
Regards,
Pat

Barrie Youde
25th January 2012, 15:24
Hi, Pat!

How good to hear from you!

A slight crossing of wires, perhaps (thine or mine)? My recollection is that the bosun was Mike Brabander!

The Mate was (I think) Broomfield(cleanshaven!), 2M was McCaffrey (who was later wounded by shellfire when in command in the Middle East), 3M was Barry Martin (wholly affable but not Scottish, as far as I ever knew) and 4M was Barry Cushman who I did hear was one of the last ever to gain command in BF. I stand to be corrected in all of the above!

Broomfield I recall as being (as you suggest) tyrannical at first; but proved ultimately to be a decent man. I wrestled with my navigation (particularly when Broomfield breathed down my neck). The sextant provided for the middies had been made in the 19th century and was past its best. One day at noon (for some reason which I cannot recall) I was allowed to use Barry Cushman's brand new sextant. When Broomfield inspected my sight-work, he said, "You've got it right." "Yes, sir," I said, "It's the fourth Mate's sextant".

"No", he said, "You've just proved that practice makes perfect." A kind man.

Another name I remember from Memnon was Fred Ball, AB, from the Isle of Man.

v best,
Barrie Youde

Barrie Youde
25th January 2012, 15:25
PS

My time in Memnon was June to October 1960.

Perhaps we were on different voyages?

B

Pat Kennedy
25th January 2012, 15:46
PS

My time in Memnon was June to October 1960.

Perhaps we were on different voyages?

B
We were Fergus, I was on her a couple of voyages before you. Signed on in Birkenhead on 2/10/59 and paid off in London on 12/1/60.
It seems the personnel changed quite a lot. I knew Mick Brabander from other ships, also Fred Ball, Neither were in Memnon with me.

3rd mate was a Scot with an impenetrable accent, buit he was a good sort, and as I said, the chief officer was a bearded bully. On captain's inspections, this piece of work would empty the contents of your bunkshelf ashtray over your pillow if you had forgotten to clean it out.
The voyage I was in her was notable because we had to rendezvous with HMS Belfast in the South China Sea to transfer an AB, Peter Mooney, who had peritonitis after a burst appendix. Belfast's surgeons operated on him within two minutes of the transfer and saved his life.
Best Regards,
Pat

Barrie Youde
28th January 2012, 21:00
Other Blue Funnel Masters' names remembered by nickname in addition to Farmer Gould and Radar Robb are:-

One-Egg Turner - whose philosophy was that one egg was enough for any man. He forbade the serving of any more in the saloon. My Dad sailed with him in the early 1930s.

God Bless You Cosker - His grandson was my best man: I returned the compliment and we remain good friends to the present day. Cosker was a devoutly religious man who signed his signals to India Buildings "GBY - Cosker."

On joining Blue Funnel myself in 1959 I recall the names (of Masters) as Alehouse Jones and Short-time Thomas (not to be confused with Ten-bob Thomas, who was the retired RN Petty Officer in charge of the signals-school at the Liver Buildings.) The name Short-time Thomas referred (as my 16 year old ears were informed) to his social habits in Singapore and Hong Kong.

Another unforgettable name (although I never met him) was Bangor Bull; who I understood to be the Bosun of the training-ship Diomed.

Bosun of Jason (my own first ship) was known (although not to his face) as Mrs Horrocks.

jmcg
28th January 2012, 22:01
Pat

That C/0 with the heavy beard on the Memnon could possibly be Mr Stubbings. He reached command; as a lowly deck boy on Clytoneus I had no occasion to encounter him (save for weekly inspections).

He had a bit of form with the AB.s and LS. Otto Goblowski was bosun which made for an all round lousey trip.

"Hector" came along some time after and I managed 4 voyages with Joe Bates

BW

J(Gleam)(Gleam)

Pat Kennedy
29th January 2012, 08:07
Pat

That C/0 with the heavy beard on the Memnon could possibly be Mr Stubbings. He reached command; as a lowly deck boy on Clytoneus I had no occasion to encounter him (save for weekly inspections).

He had a bit of form with the AB.s and LS. Otto Goblowski was bosun which made for an all round lousey trip.

"Hector" came along some time after and I managed 4 voyages with Joe Bates

BW

J(Gleam)(Gleam)
It could be him John, I just cant recall his name at all.
I was in that Clytoneus round the land in July 1961, London, Rotterdam, Newport, Birkenhead.
Pat(Smoke)

nav
29th January 2012, 09:52
My engineering brothers were Blue Flue and referred to a master called "Evans above". Mind you, they also referred to those on the bridge as "the ornaments on the mantelpiece."

Tai Pan
30th January 2012, 09:56
Buster Brown, Glengarry, a gentleman in every sense.
Bullshit Harris on Ulysses- deep down OK.

d.cook
4th February 2012, 21:06
He was a fine man, my mother's brother and lived in Hull. As you say, he had a hard war and I remember lots of the stories he told, some harrowing and some amusing, like the time his ship was bombed and the condensed milk they were carrying came down on them all mixed with oil! He was torpedoed twice and cast adrift for 17days in an open boat. I would be really pleased to hear of your experiences with him. d.cook

IAN M
5th February 2012, 01:20
He was a fine man, my mother's brother and lived in Hull. As you say, he had a hard war and I remember lots of the stories he told, some harrowing and some amusing, like the time his ship was bombed and the condensed milk they were carrying came down on them all mixed with oil! He was torpedoe twice and cast adrift for 17days in an open boat. I would be really pleased to hear of your experiences with him. d.cook

Leonard Eccles was Mate of the Protesilaus when she struck a mine in the Bristol Channel on 21 January, 1940.
Master of the Rhexenor when torpedoed on 3 February, 1943 and landed at Guadeloupe after 17 days in a lifeboat.
Master of the Samite when she was struck by a glider bomb on 4 October, 1943 and when struck by an aerial torpedo on 20 April, 1944. The story of being covered with condensed milk and oil during the glider bomb incident is a fallacy. I was the Samite's 3rd Sparks and her story in fully described in my book LIFE ABOARD A WARTIME LIBERTY SHIP.

Best wishes

Ian

Boatman25
5th February 2012, 09:56
Sounds like you are trying to sell your book he he

Hugh Ferguson
5th February 2012, 18:14
Pat

That C/0 with the heavy beard on the Memnon could possibly be Mr Stubbings. He reached command; as a lowly deck boy on Clytoneus I had no occasion to encounter him (save for weekly inspections).

He had a bit of form with the AB.s and LS. Otto Goblowski was bosun which made for an all round lousey trip.

"Hector" came along some time after and I managed 4 voyages with Joe Bates

BW

J(Gleam)(Gleam)

If the C/O was Stubbins he would have been the 4th mate of the Chilean Reefer-a Holt managed Danish ship-when she took on the Gneisenau. Stubbins was in charge of the 4" gun which fired shots at the battle cruiser and then got blown out the water as a result.
He had a younger brother with whom I sailed in early 1947: he is on the right in the left hand lower picture.

jmcg
5th February 2012, 19:42
Hugh

Thank you for the additional information. It was early 1966 when I made my first "voyage" on Clytoneus.

Recognising the number of years it took to reach command in AH&Co and indeed Glenn Line, does 1966 indicate a possibility.

Capt. Stubbin(g)s appeared to be a man of much phlegm - I do recall him snorting quite a lot as he made his way through the sailors' accommodation and then, with military precision releasing it to the deep as he exited the other end(side) of the accommodation.

He also sported a fine beard of Taliban quality & proportions.


BW

J(Gleam)(Gleam)

Hugh Ferguson
5th February 2012, 20:10
Supposing he, Stubbins, had been say, a 22 year old 4th mate in 1942 he could just about have reached command 24 years later: I never knew or met him but I do know that he and his younger brother are deceased.

d.cook
6th February 2012, 16:07
Thank you for your helpful reply Ian, it's good to hear from someone who remembers him. Although I remember extremely well listening to the experiences my uncle, Capt Eccles, had when the Rhexenor was sunk, and have newspaper cuttings relating to it, since contacting you I have researched the story on www.theshipslist.com which gives even more detailed information. Thank you also for the names of some of the other ships he sailed on.
Kind regards
Doreen

IAN M
6th February 2012, 17:59
Glad to hear from you, too, Doreen. At (almost) 87, I'm perhaps the last of those who sailed with your uncle on the Samite. It was my first voyage and lasted for fifteen months. Mr Thomas, who was 2nd Mate of the Rhexenor, was 1st Mate of the Samite. Here is a quote from LIFE ABOARD A WARTIME LIBERTY SHIP.

"News which arrived that day (16 November, 1943) was that Captain Eccles and Mr. Thomas had both been awarded decorations for their courage and leadership following the torpedoing of the Rhexenor in the Atlantic when each had commanded a lifeboat and sailed over 1000 miles to the West Indies. Capt. Eccles was given the OBE and Mr. Thomas the MBE. Due to their courage, seamanship and navigational skills, they had saved the lives of the occupants of their lifeboats, yet, because they were in the civilian Merchant Navy, they were given the same awards as those given to civilians in peacetime. I never read the Monarch's Honours Lists without thinking of Eccles and Thomas and the men in the lifeboats without whose courage and fortitude the West Indies would never have been reached. It seems odd too that Mr. Thomas was not considered to be worthy of the same decoration as Captain Eccles when both had shared the same responsibility in the same situation. Obviously the decorations were given according to rank although it would seem to most of us that a higher decoration should reflect a greater endeavour."

Best regards

Ian

Hugh Ferguson
6th February 2012, 19:27
With reference to the sinking of the Rhexenor:- the 4th mate, Graham Allen was forcibly taken aboard the attacking U.boat,U.217....see thumbnails of Mr Allen saying Aufweidersen to the crew when he landed in Brest. Graham had his 21st birthday aboard the U.boat-they gave him a creme de menthe.
I still have chat with him now and then.

John Gillespie
7th February 2012, 16:51
sailed with Capt Pound on the Anchises 1967/68
Capt Ted Willows on the Glenorchy 1967
Capt Milmine on Myrmidon 1971
Capt Goldie on Ascanius 1972
Capt Broomfield on Dolius 1972/73
All gentlemen

John Gillespie
7th February 2012, 17:00
Sailed with
Capt Ted Willows on Glenorchy 1967
Capt Les Pound on the Anchises 1967/69
Capt A Milmine on Myrmidon 1971
Capt Goldie on Ascanius 1971/72
Capt Broomfield on Dolius 1972
All gentlemen

Hugh Ferguson
7th February 2012, 17:21
Believe it, or not, this is Mr Goldie-as he then was- at the tiller of a boat from the Prometheus going to the rescue of the owner's wife and her two small children from the Swedish ketch Globe in the southern end of the Red Sea, March 1956. Photo by Joe Rath R/O..
(My wife to be was a deck-hand aboard the Globe)

jmcg
7th February 2012, 22:48
Gosh, were'nt we all so vulnerable in those open type clinker built lifeboats.

Im sure most of us deck department had BoT Lifeboat Tickets of competency - it was a very different story getting them under way and maintain heading.

All ABs had to have a Lifeboat Ticket - no ticket and you remained an EDH.

Was it a requirement for all Deck officers to have a Lifeboat Ticket?


BW

J(Gleam)(Gleam)

Strachan
7th February 2012, 23:01
Was it a requirement for all Deck officers to have a Lifeboat Ticket?



It was in Bluies, and an EDH ticket. Most updated them to AB before 2nd Mates.

Pat Kennedy
8th February 2012, 06:42
One of the tasks in the EDH exam was to reeve a set of lifeboat falls. As far as I can recall these were four fold rope falls with a twist, and many had some difficulty getting it right.
I dont think I actually sailed in a ship with this set up, most had Welin-Mclachlan davits with wire rope falls.
Pat

price
8th February 2012, 08:49
Hi Pat; I sailed in quite a few ships with rope lifeboat falls, from my memory, they were three fold purchases, the top block was reeved through the centre sheave to start, the bottom block was at 90 degrees from the top block, I clearly remember the process but find it difficult to describe it on paper. The reason for this method was to prevent the blocks from toppling, keeping them upright at all times. Bruce.

Hugh Ferguson
8th February 2012, 13:53
The thumbnail-#90-showing Mr Goldie at the tiller of the Prometheus life-boat displays the most appalling seamanship imaginable. (Let alone seamanship, a little bit of common sense was all that was required).
In a moderate to fresh breeze the boat has been dropped to leeward of the vessel in distress, leaving Mr Goldie not just to struggle up-wind but with a Chinese crew more accustomed to pushing an oar rather than pulling on one-they are all over the place. (Most of the Blue Funnel Chinese would, in all probability, have been born afloat and more at home on water than on land).
None of these factors has been taken into account by the master of the Prometheus and whatever is the reason for sending the Chief officer away in the boat: surely the 2nd mate should have been the man for this job: it was when I was 2nd mate of the Glenroy.

jmcg
8th February 2012, 15:23
Yes, in my time it was always the 2nd Mate in the boat when on drills on the water outbound in the Indian Ocean.

BW

J(Gleam)(Gleam)

makko
8th February 2012, 18:46
Confirm that all deck officers had a lifeboat certificate. As said, a lot would get AB certs prior to 2/M.
In my time, we were prohibited from swinging the lifeboat out when underway. There had been some accidents involving loss of the boat! From memory, the only time we actually lowere one was on the Barber Memnon for a Lloyds survey whilst in dock at Balbao, Panama. I believe that this was due to the change of registry from Liverpool to Monrovia.
The main concern when arriving to port was to strip the stores especially the morphine phials for safekeeping.
The main concern in Panama were stowaways.
Rgds.
Dave

Hugh Ferguson
10th November 2012, 10:36
Anyone remember a Captain Phil Savery?

Ken Green
11th November 2012, 14:49
Hugh.
I joined the "Breconshire"in Victoria Docks, London on 5th. June 1953 as third mate.(with a second mates ticket). Capt Savery was master and he made it very clear to me that he had never sailed with a third mate without a mates ticket. He even called head office to get me removed but to no avail!
Must admit though we got on eventually!!
Oh, happy days, Cheers, Ken.

Hugh Ferguson
11th November 2012, 17:26
Thanks, Ken, now I need to know where he was between his being sunk in the Agapenor in 1942 and the end of 1944. Many thanks, Hugh.

Colin Jackson
24th February 2013, 18:52
Captain Simmonds, with whom I made six of my seven voyages in the Glenroy, was a man for whom I held immense regard. He came out of sail and was one of the two original Glen Line masters with whom I sailed-the other was Captain Tyller.
His manner and speech were, what can only be described, as cultivated and I'm sure that resulted from his having been interned in Germany during the entire W.W.1 with British professors and other academics. His internment being due to his ship, the Glenearn having been illegally detained whilst sailing from Hamburg at the outbreak of the war.
I have many memories of him. One, of a Christmas Day in Hong Kong, when, whilst carrying a pink gin across the passenger lounge prior to dinner, I stumbled and spilt the drink all over his white buckskin shoes which suddenly changed to a delicate shade of pink!
His first command had been in 1943/44 in the Ocean Verity on a Russian convoy.

I was given the photograph, some years ago, by his son Howard, whom I remember as a small boy, scampering around the boat-deck of the Glenroy with his sister as they saw their father off on yet another voyage east. Sadly, Howard has since died.

Only recently found this thread. Howard and I were first trip middies on the maiden voyage of Menetheus, March 1958. Sad to learn of Howard's passing.

Colin Jackson
24th February 2013, 19:30
Buster Brown, Glengarry, a gentleman in every sense.
Bullshit Harris on Ulysses- deep down OK.

Many stories as to how Capt. Harris acquired the nick name "Bullshit". His reaction to not being believed when he told an american passenger that he knew a certain admiral who commanded the US seventh fleet, and subsequently producing a radio message addressed to Capt Harris, Master SS Ulysses is a classic. How he obtained the mesage circulated widely at the time.
I have first hand experience to know that his stories could not always be dismissed. I was 4th mate on the Neleus and we arrived in Newport on 28/10/63 for a 10 day stay to load tinplate. The All Blacks were due to play Newport on the 30th. I was lucky enough to have a ticket obtained for me by my grandfarther who lived locally. Capt Harris came into our bar/messroom at lunchtime on the Monday as we were trying to set up a TV that we had hired for our stay, and wanted to know why someone was lashing a TV aerial to the top of a samson post. When told it was so that the match could be viewed on Wednesday afternoon and there would be no cargo after 12.00, and the lucky b. of a 4/0 had a ticket and there was not a chance getting any more. Harris replied " don't worry, I know the New Zealand High Commissioner. I'll see what I can do". Needless to say that behind his back his claim was dismissed out of hand.
At smoko on matchday, Harris marched into the mess with 5 front of stand tickets!!! A few people had to eat their words.
Newport won 3 - 0, the only time the All Blacks were beaten on the 1963 tour.

AGAMEMNON
26th February 2013, 16:56
Does anyone know how Claude Goodman came by a CBE?

Samsette
26th February 2013, 21:42
Captain Cockburn, Samsette/Eurypylus
Captain Powell, TSS Nestor
Captain Evans (van Dyke beard,) Radnorshire (Voyage #1 - ex Achilles.)

All good skippers. Aloof, but what else would they be, back then.

R651400
9th March 2013, 10:50
Samsette: Aloof?
They were never anything else and that was probably not only the BF but Red Duster norm!
What a difference to when I sailed FOC.

Hugh Ferguson
9th March 2013, 11:34
I have only just discovered how captain Walter Simmonds was awarded an O.B.E. I did 6 voyages on the trot in the Glenroy with him 1950/53.
I well remember his young son and daughter scampering around the boat-deck when his family came to see him off on a voyage east.
Sadly, his son died prematurely and when I wrote condolences to his wife I asked her about her father in law's O.B.E..
She told me that he was awarded it after having had to spend the whole of the 1914/18 conflict interned in Germany after his ship, Glenearn, was illegally detained sailing from Hamburg at the outbreak of that war!

Samsette
11th March 2013, 04:29
[QUOTE=Hugh Ferguson;661433} after his ship, Glenearn, was illegally detained sailing from Hamburg at the outbreak of that war![/QUOTE]

Only diplomats are allowed to leave unhindered upon commencement of hostilities, I believe.

The Ferdinand Laeisz motorship POMONA arrived in London in late August 1939, with a cargo of bananas from Tiko. She should normally have been cleared to leave, when rid of her cargo, but on August 26 was prevented from doing so, and when Britain declared war on Germany, some days later, she was boarded by a naval party. Her crew were shipped off to some Butlins camp in the West Country, eventually reaching Canada as internees, and being spared the horrors of the war.
I learned of this from a former crew member, who was only sixteen years old at the time. He returned to Canada as an immigrant.

Hugh Ferguson
11th March 2013, 17:44
War was declared on 28th July 1914. The Glenearn was seized, on departure from Hamburg on the 4th August. Why it is documented as an illegal seizure I do not know.
Whatever, Walter Simmonds, junior officer, was interned throughout the ensueing four years, as were the many others such as sundry academics from various German universities. It is thought that was how he lost his sail trained seaman characteristics and began to speak in the cultivated accents of a very well educated individual!

Samsette
21st March 2013, 05:33
Whatever, Walter Simmonds, junior officer, was interned throughout the ensueing four years, as were the many others such as sundry academics from various German universities. It is thought that was how he lost his sail trained seaman characteristics and began to speak in the cultivated accents of a very well educated individual!

Every cloud has a silver lining, or a silver tongue in his case.B\)