twenty first century engineers

jim garnett
9th July 2011, 07:34
As a mid 20th century engineer I would like a modern engineer to tell me how things are different in the modern era.Do you still do 4 hour watches,does the engineer control the engines during manoeuvering,and any other changes that may have occurred.
Jim Garnett

surfaceblow
10th July 2011, 02:19
As a mid 20th century engineer I would like a modern engineer to tell me how things are different in the modern era.Do you still do 4 hour watches,does the engineer control the engines during maneuvering,and any other changes that may have occurred.
Jim Garnett

Most of the newer commercial vessels are computer controlled and are capable of being Unmanned (UMS) during most situations. During maneuvering the Engine Room is manned and the engineers monitor the engines and other machinery to make sure all goes well with the bridge changing the speed and direction of the vessel.

When there is fault in the control system than the engineers will be on 4 hour watches at sea. Other wise the engineers are on day work with one engineer designated as the duty engineer.

Passenger ships and some ferries do retain the four hour watch system.

Joe

R58484956
10th July 2011, 17:52
When I was at sea we only had a 3 watch system, 8 to 12, 12 to 4, 4 to 8.
am & pm.

Don Matheson
10th July 2011, 19:37
On my last cargo ships many years ago, we sailed UMS engine room with the engine room being covered around 10-12 hours per day. Last thing at night I would take a look round the engineroom always reporting my entry and exit to the bridge so they knew it was empty.
Never had much trouble but if it was required we would return to full watches and again when entering or leaving port.

Don

Landi
11th July 2011, 03:54
As above replies and you also have to be an electronics and computer engineer.(Cloud)

Ian

Kingham SJ
11th July 2011, 12:26
I left the MN in 1991,Unmanned engine rooms were the norm for aleast 10 yrs before.Engineers took it in turns to be on standby through the night.(==D)

Don Matheson
11th July 2011, 12:55
Further to my last post, I was 2/E on a container ship which was UMS and it worked well. On the electrical side if we had a problem which seemed to be a control problem, every control panel was numbered and we went to a box, took out the number for that pump and changed the control panel. If that was the problem then the faulty part went into a second box and went ashore for inspection/repair at the next port. If that was not the problem then it was back to the good old fashioned engineering to repair it

Don

jim garnett
12th July 2011, 07:06
Many thanks for the answers to my questions;they have however raised a lot more.
1.Is manning just that or have women broken through the glass deckhead. I have not seen any threads or replies in Ships nostalgia that appear to be from women but with all the pseudonyms used its hard to tell.
2doesthe old hierarchical system still exist, that is chief down to junior or are most of the engineers on the same level.
3.I see multi-skilling is the order of the day as happens now in large power station ashore;what training is given for electronics or is it just replacing modules as mentioned by Don.What about chemical testing for confined spaces and water treatment for high pressure boilers.
4.What is now the preferred propulsion, steam turbine or turbo electric.diesel or diesel electric.What pressure is used in the most modern boilers.
5.What is the career path for engineers after sea.
6 How long does it take to get a chief's ticket,and how long does it take to get a seconds or chief's job.In the 1950's you were offered a second's job before the ink was dry on your new ticket.That's how it was with me and that certainly was not because I was a brilliant engineer.Its no wonder most of the wartime built ships didn't have a long life.

Jim Garnett

mansa233
12th July 2011, 09:21
Hello Jim,
1. Yes - quite a few women on my (container) ships. We even had a female wiper join last week. But personally I haven't sailed with any that have made it beyond 2nd mate or 3rd eng.
2. We still use the same ranking structure - just fewer! Only Chief, 2nd and 3rd these days. UMS when eveything's working. And the more major maintenance tasks involve flying-in repair teams.
3. We have gone back to carrying dedicated electronics engineers having tried a few years with the 'normal' (?!) engineers following a fortnight's training and then being expected to fix anything and everything electronic.
4. Diesels on my box boats.

Can't say much about the rest - I'm a humble deckie!

Chris

Satanic Mechanic
12th July 2011, 12:02
Many thanks for the answers to my questions;they have however raised a lot more.
1.Is manning just that or have women broken through the glass deckhead. I have not seen any threads or replies in Ships nostalgia that appear to be from women but with all the pseudonyms used its hard to tell.
Fair few lassies at sea nowadays both on deck and in the Engineroom - and there are a couple who post on here

2. does the old hierarchical system still exist, that is chief down to junior or are most of the engineers on the same level.
Yes though 4th is normally the lowest 'numbered rank' Juniors and 5ths are very thin on the ground

3.I see multi-skilling is the order of the day as happens now in large power station ashore;what training is given for electronics or is it just replacing modules as mentioned by Don.What about chemical testing for confined spaces and water treatment for high pressure boilers.
Oh boy where to begin - a lot of electronics today are self diagnostic with auto back up and redundency so they are tending much more towards module replacement nowadays - and frankly its no bad thing.
Chemical testing can be done automatically with continous dosing, the effectiveness and relaibility of these systems is a whole debate in itself, personally I like to do a manual check every couple of days for comparison
Confined Spaces - still killing people I'm afraid, we just do not seem to be able to eradicate the problem fully. I'm actually working on a few ideas on this subject even as I am writing this


4.What is now the preferred propulsion, steam turbine or turbo electric.diesel or diesel electric.What pressure is used in the most modern boilers.

Depends on what type of ship, standard cargo vessels slow speed diesel by a country mile.
Up until recently LNG tankers were still steamers but they have moved towards slow speed diesels and dual/Tri fuel diesel electric. Apart from them consider steam to be at an end at sea.

Main boiler on a steam ship around 60 Bar/ 900psi


5.What is the career path for engineers after sea.
Usually a cadetship but shoreside trained also accepted on occasions


6 How long does it take to get a chief's ticket,and how long does it take to get a seconds or chief's job.In the 1950's you were offered a second's job before the ink was dry on your new ticket.That's how it was with me and that certainly was not because I was a brilliant engineer.Its no wonder most of the wartime built ships didn't have a long life.

18 months sea time for both senior tickets.

As for promotion - very variable at the moment it is pretty steady not dead mans shoes but not super fast either

Jim Garnett

Above in ooh lets see- I think Blue today