Nautical Colleges

DCMARINE
23rd December 2005, 13:08
I was at Robert Gordon's School of Navigation (now taken over by Aberdeen College) for 2nd Mate's in the last quarter of 1968, Mate's in the same period in 1970, and Master's in same period in 1975. These were large classes with most of the same people on each one. Would like to hear where any of them are now.
Donald Campbell

mclean
17th March 2006, 18:15
Attended College of Technology Belfast for Pre-Sea training in 1957. Studied for tickets at Blythe Street in Belfast. Anyone remember Blythe Street? Colin

R651400
18th March 2006, 07:35
Leith Nautical College 54/56. I have the college's centenary "Sea Dominies" if anyone wants a copy.

tercar
25th March 2006, 11:00
Hull Trinity House 1946-1949. Anyone else out there?

lakercapt
25th March 2006, 16:13
Leith Nautical College 54/56. I have the college's centenary "Sea Dominies" if anyone wants a copy.
I was there for presea training in 1952 and did my other certificates there as well.
Would be interested in reading about "sea Dominies" asthe only guy I remember from that period was Capt Wright. Of course Captain Tait of the Dolphin will forever be in my memeory

WLH
25th March 2006, 19:51
Pre-sea early forties, Captain MacKay, Mr. Bogie, Pricipal W.Fisher: Enormous fun with lifeboat drill (Board of Trade Sports) for Lifeboat Ticket, West Old Dock. Much later at Radar School, Imperial Basin, Next to Pilot Station - Mr. Moffatt.
Regards...............WLH

Jim S
25th March 2006, 20:09
Did my 2nd Class Steam Certificate at the West Graham Street annexe of Stow College, Glasgow. Before it went all upmarket as the "Stow College of Nautical Studies"
Ist Class Steam Cert and Motor endorsement at Kingsway Technical College, Dundee. There were only two class rooms and two lecturers in an annexe well away from the great unwashed that attended the Tech College.
Mr Barrie did all the Part A subjects. Mr Simpsons all the Part B subjects.
Much of the Engineering Knowledge was done on a "self teach" basis using past exam papers. Mr Simpson for some reason always wanted candidates to take their exams at Leith - just to be different I went to Glasgow.

BarryM
13th October 2006, 20:13
Did my 2nd Class Steam Certificate at the West Graham Street annexe of Stow College, Glasgow. Before it went all upmarket as the "Stow College of Nautical Studies"
Ist Class Steam Cert and Motor endorsement at Kingsway Technical College, Dundee. There were only two class rooms and two lecturers in an annexe well away from the great unwashed that attended the Tech College.
Mr Barrie did all the Part A subjects. Mr Simpsons all the Part B subjects.
Much of the Engineering Knowledge was done on a "self teach" basis using past exam papers. Mr Simpson for some reason always wanted candidates to take their exams at Leith - just to be different I went to Glasgow.

Stow College remained Stow College and still exists having avoided being built over by the M8. West Graham Street also still exists but the Annexe building is long gone under new housing.

The Glasgow College of Nautical Studies was built on the south side of the Clyde and all marine courses (and W.Graham Street staff) transferred there. These days the last two words in the title seem to be getting smaller and smaller - just like the British MN. You may remember lecturers Tommy Main, Alec Bolwell amd Tom Smith?

Fergus 62
13th October 2006, 22:26
Hi Mclean

Ex Blythe Street Belfast. Pre Sea 1961/2 2nd Mates 1966. Fond memories of some great times, Capt MacDonald, "Kit" Carson, Capt Boyd among others. Old school long gone but Blythe Street still there, all redeveloped housing with a wall mural of George Best at the Sandy Row corner.

Regards

Fergus 62

Jim S
13th October 2006, 22:59
Stow College remained Stow College and still exists having avoided being built over by the M8. West Graham Street also still exists but the Annexe building is long gone under new housing.

The Glasgow College of Nautical Studies was built on the south side of the Clyde and all marine courses (and W.Graham Street staff) transferred there. These days the last two words in the title seem to be getting smaller and smaller - just like the British MN. You may remember lecturers Tommy Main, Alec Bolwell amd Tom Smith?

Hi Barry M,
It was so long ago, circa 1965-66 - I cannot remember any of the lecturers at West Graham Street Annexe. Strangely though I can remember an attractive young lady washing her windows in a tenement building that looked onto the back of the annexe - I guess in Buccleuch Street.

Jim S

BarryM
14th October 2006, 10:11
Hi Barry M,
It was so long ago, circa 1965-66 - I cannot remember any of the lecturers at West Graham Street Annexe. Strangely though I can remember an attractive young lady washing her windows in a tenement building that looked onto the back of the annexe - I guess in Buccleuch Street.

Jim S

Jim,
Could it have been Velma of the Buccleuch Street Chippie who had a fragrance of chip fat and an extra scoop of chips for those she fancied?

BarryM

PS. I started there in '63.

mclean
14th October 2006, 17:50
Hi Mclean

Ex Blythe Street Belfast. Pre Sea 1961/2 2nd Mates 1966. Fond memories of some great times, Capt MacDonald, "Kit" Carson, Capt Boyd among others. Old school long gone but Blythe Street still there, all redeveloped housing with a wall mural of George Best at the Sandy Row corner.

Regards

Fergus 62

Hi Fergus 62. Remember the dash to the dole on a friday afternoon? Cannot remember the amount, but it was small, and a few pints put a big holr in it. Marvellous times. Regards Colin

Split
14th October 2006, 19:56
I went pre-sea to The London Nautical School, formerly Rotherhithe Nautical.
2nd mate at Edward VII, mate and master at Sir John Cass.

Split

Wee John
14th October 2006, 22:24
I was in West Graham St. in 1966, The lass who typed the cadet test papers caught my eye, went out with her and 38 years later am still stuck with her. Wee Margaret was her name and she still has fond memories of what she called her engineers. She went down to the new college but packed it in as she said " cant stand deckies" Old Mundie was the head in West Graham St and a true gentleman he was. Great memories of the place and I still think they taught engineering the proper way. The Wee Barra sends her regards to any SN members who passed through her gentle hands.

Jim S
15th October 2006, 20:00
Jim,
Could it have been Velma of the Buccleuch Street Chippie who had a fragrance of chip fat and an extra scoop of chips for those she fancied?

BarryM

PS. I started there in '63.
Barry,

I have kept this vision of beauty for some 40 years and you have done your best to sully it. - Velma from the Chippie how could you!! - I never had the pleasure by the way.
A later contributor mentions the rush o a local dole office (Belfast) on a Friday afternoon. I recall the same at Sauchiehall Street where the staff treated we students with contempt while welcoming the long term unemployed like old friends. It was with some relief that the policy of shipping companies paying wages less unemployed benefit was changed later on when I was studying for Chief's.

Jim S

BarryM
15th October 2006, 20:09
Barry,

I have kept this vision of beauty for some 40 years and you have done your best to sully it. - Velma from the Chippie how could you!! - I never had the pleasure by the way.
A later contributor mentions the rush o a local dole office (Belfast) on a Friday afternoon. I recall the same at Sauchiehall Street where the staff treated we students with contempt while welcoming the long term unemployed like old friends. It was with some relief that the policy of shipping companies paying wages less unemployed benefit was changed later on when I was studying for Chief's.

Jim S

Jim,

I can assure you that Velma was a vision of loveliness - especially to Shetland Bob who ended up as a 21 stone weakling and thus unable to resist her oily charms.

Barry

BarryM
15th October 2006, 20:15
I was in West Graham St. in 1966, The lass who typed the cadet test papers caught my eye, went out with her and 38 years later am still stuck with her. Wee Margaret was her name and she still has fond memories of what she called her engineers. She went down to the new college but packed it in as she said " cant stand deckies" Old Mundie was the head in West Graham St and a true gentleman he was. Great memories of the place and I still think they taught engineering the proper way. The Wee Barra sends her regards to any SN members who passed through her gentle hands.

Wee John,

I think I remember the "Wee Barra". She may be the one who gave Peter G a rollocking for setting off the fire alarms leading to an evacuation of the building after leaning on and cracking the alarm break-glass. I think that anyone who remembers Old Mundie would echo your opinion of a "true gent" and Tom Smith, Alec Bolwell and Tommy Main (arch-skiver) still stick in the mind.

Fergus 62
15th October 2006, 21:02
hi Colin

Remember to dole dash well, must be part of some sort of a record for the maximum number squashed into a Ford Corsair -not mine I hasten to add. I have a faint memory it was something like £4 - 4s - 0p per week. I also remember walking to hte College along the little streets off Sandy Row, you had to walk on the road and not the footpath which was being scrubbed stopless by the women from the houses, you dare not dirty the footpath. Great times, friends and wonderful memories, Clarendon Dock for boatwork, Carrickfergus Radar School etcetc, wouldnt have missed it for the world

Rgds
Fergus 62

Wee John
15th October 2006, 21:07
The Wee barra remembers a few bollickins she had to hand out to various people, particularly lecturers. Tommy Main was a lovely man, O.K. not the greatest of lecturers, but a great fund of stories for green cadets. The Wee Barra still thinks that the generation of engineers from her time were true gentelmen. Honest ,she still says it.

John Cassels
16th October 2006, 08:11
Pre-sea and 2nd.mates at the old James Watt college in Greenock.
Now (sadly) teaches everything from hairstyling to cookery , nearly
everything but navigation and engineering.
mates and Masters in Glasgow (then a fairly new school of nautical studies.

JC

Bob
16th October 2006, 10:56
I attended a Catering school run by Liverpool Education Dept, it was a six weeks course, which I think was run to feed the upper crust, as thats what happened of a lunch time, having completed the course it was the devils own job to get on the pool or to join the union, talk of catch 22s, this being 1947,I did eventually get to sea with Royal Mail. cheers Bob

ed glover
16th October 2006, 12:38
I attended the sea school in Glasgow if memory (its going fast)serves me right it was the Royal Collage of Science and Technology on Martha street. Was there Jan 61 as a cadet and back for 2nd mates in 65 or 66 ? Dole if I remember was 4 pounds and something. yes we would rush to the Dole office the drink most of it. Remember Capt. Den or Dent for 2nd mate orals he could put the fear of God into that Nutter in Noth Korea.
Ed Glover

John Cassels
16th October 2006, 12:53
I attended the sea school in Glasgow if memory (its going fast)serves me right it was the Royal Collage of Science and Technology on Martha street. Was there Jan 61 as a cadet and back for 2nd mates in 65 or 66 ? Dole if I remember was 4 pounds and something. yes we would rush to the Dole office the drink most of it. Remember Capt. Den or Dent for 2nd mate orals he could put the fear of God into that Nutter in Noth Korea.
Ed Glover

Morning Ed,

Yes - oh boy - do I remember Capt.Denne for 2nd.mates orals 1968.

I was fourth in line that morning for orals but arrived early enough to hear
the screams and shouts from the other side of the waiting room door.
Then the door opened and the previous candidate came out , white as
a sheet. Did not feel too happy going in.
Capt.Denne had this habit of asking a lot of sailing ship questions and if
you didn't know the answer his face used to get very red as if he would
blow up. It was frightening.
I believe he wrote a book about either handling under sail or compass
work.
He must have been very near retirement even in '68.

JC

mikeg
16th October 2006, 13:05
R/O college at St Mary's and later East Park Terrace (7th Floor) Southampton. Good to hear from any other R/O's who studied there.

Mike

mclean
16th October 2006, 15:14
I attended the sea school in Glasgow if memory (its going fast)serves me right it was the Royal Collage of Science and Technology on Martha street. Was there Jan 61 as a cadet and back for 2nd mates in 65 or 66 ? Dole if I remember was 4 pounds and something. yes we would rush to the Dole office the drink most of it. Remember Capt. Den or Dent for 2nd mate orals he could put the fear of God into that Nutter in Noth Korea.
Ed Glover

Hi Ed. We had a similar type of chap in Belfast by the name of Capt. Newberry. He was ex Blue Flu if I recall correctly, and seemed to have a dislike for those who served their time on tankers. Threw me out of orals for 2nd.Mates because I did not know the dimensions of a chain hook. Told me to come back in the afternoon with the answer! Regards Colin

BarryM
16th October 2006, 15:40
The Wee barra remembers a few bollickins she had to hand out to various people, particularly lecturers. Tommy Main was a lovely man, O.K. not the greatest of lecturers, but a great fund of stories for green cadets. The Wee Barra still thinks that the generation of engineers from her time were true gentelmen. Honest ,she still says it.

Was it the Wee Barra who gave us apprentices an early Christmas one year ('64??) when we found the carbons used for duplicating the College exam papers in a waste bin? That year we all went on leave having obtained scores in the College EK's exam never achieved before and certainly never achieved again.

The problem with Tommy Main was that he spent so much time reminiscing (a pastime in which we encouraged him - anything but work) that he never completed a syllabus. The result was that in the week before exams, he would arrive and spray handouts in all directions of the stuff we should have covered but he had never got around to teaching. When I met him again at GCNS, nothing had changed.

ed glover
16th October 2006, 20:57
Yes it was Capt. Denne I was second in after lunch and sat and listend to him dropping "F" bombs all over the place on a guy i had been to school with. poor guy came into the waiting room shaking like a leaf took his jacket an left. he didn't even look at me. I could here old Denne apologizing to he old lady (I assume his Secretary). Five minutes later she said I could go in. I thought i was going to throw up. I passed the oral exam thank Goodness the smell of fear on that whole floor was enough to give me the willies.
Ed Glover

Split
16th October 2006, 21:48
Captains Lewis and Wallace were at Dock Street, London. When I was up for something, I remember taking an angle with a vernier sextant and I unscrewed it until the bits fell on the floor. Wallace gave me a bulging eyes glare and said "Well, put the bloody thing together again"! I did and passed my orals, as well.

Split

Fergus 62
16th October 2006, 22:43
(Thumb) Colin

Ah, Capt Newberry. My first attempt at 2nd mates orals lasted what seemed a lifetime, I think it was approx two hours from said Capt Newberry who at the end failed me saying I had got something (cant remember what) wrong after 5 mins, everything else was ok. If it was that serious why didnt he throw me out then other that to satisfy his sadistic streak. I can still clearly remember that you were placed in a seat opposite the window and the only thing you could see was the face of the Albert Clock with the hands moving very slowly. I always thought that was a deliberate ploy by the good Captain. Went back the next week and passed with no problems

Rgds
Fergus 62

Robinj
16th October 2006, 22:52
The Radio School at Brookes Bar in Manchester just across the road from the Whalley Hotel.(Pint)

Trevorw
16th October 2006, 22:58
Is anyone out there from the North Eastern School of Wireless Telegraphy at Bridlington? Did my PMG there before going to sea as an R/O. Sadly, it is now a block of flats!

Trevor Waddington

Ron Stringer
16th October 2006, 23:12
The Radio School at Brookes Bar in Manchester
Me too, in 1958/59. Don't know where all the students went - if you look on Friends Reunited, there are only 3 of us logged in as past students over the whole history of the place. Remember the approriately-named secretary? Mrs Sparks!

Tom S
17th October 2006, 16:36
Had Captain Denne and Captain Fields for orals dont know who I was more scared of they both put the fear of God in to me. I Suppose Captain Denne had the edge you were okay if you knew your sailing ship question and had an answer for that mystic subject the deviascope.
I guess it was all part of character building.
Tom

lakercapt
17th October 2006, 22:47
Captain Denne was in Leith as an examiner when I went up for masters in 1962.
Certainly tried to intimidate you and maybe that was part of the exam as if you became flustered under pressure you were not the "right" person.
He did write a book about the compass and if you were smart referred to having read it. Did a number on the deviscope as it was almost impossible to correct.
Was(I thought) finished and was walking to the door when he called me back and handed me a piece of paper and told me to draw a lifeboat sails and name the parts. Course I had it wrong as that was second mates stuff.
Come back tomorrow and have it right.
Next day he was not there and was taken through the complete orals again by Capt Ross. (No relative)
When I was finished asked what I was back for and then I told him his response was "well I suppose you know that now".
Handed me my papers to take to the clerk and they were signed "PASS" by Capt Denne the day before.
An evening and two hours of anguish for nothing.
THey had a weird sense of humour those guys!!!!

lakercapt
17th October 2006, 22:53
Captain Denne was in Leith as an examiner when I went up for masters in 1962.
Certainly tried to intimidate you and maybe that was part of the exam as if you became flustered under pressure you were not the "right" person.
He did write a book about the compass and if you were smart referred to having read it. Did a number on the deviscope as it was almost impossible to correct.
Was(I thought) finished and was walking to the door when he called me back and handed me a piece of paper and told me to draw a lifeboat sails and name the parts. Course I had it wrong as that was second mates stuff.
Come back tomorrow and have it right.
Next day he was not there and was taken through the complete orals again by Capt Ross. (No relative)
When I was finished asked what I was back for and then I told him his response was "well I suppose you know that now".
Handed me my papers to take to the clerk and they were signed "PASS" by Capt Denne the day before.
An evening and two hours of anguish for nothing.
THey had a weird sense of humour those guys!!!!
Wasn't the exam rooms in Hope street?
Must have been there about the same time as Tom S. as I remember Capt Shields too.
They were all fearsome!!!

trotterdotpom
18th October 2006, 12:24
Is anyone out there from the North Eastern School of Wireless Telegraphy at Bridlington? Did my PMG there before going to sea as an R/O. Sadly, it is now a block of flats!

Trevor Waddington

You are not alone, Trevor - Hawkeye01 and myself were also at Brid, although later than you. I was in the last class to commence before the school went bust in 1965.

My claim to fame is that I reckon I'm the only ex student to join a ship at Bridlington - the Grimsby trawler Ross Kelvin.

You may be interested in the website: http://daimler.co.uk/neswt/

Regards, John T..

Trevorw
18th October 2006, 19:01
Thanks John T! I wasn't even aware that web site existed! Looked up my class year and saw a photo of myself!!

Trevor W

Robinj
18th October 2006, 23:21
Hi Ron, I remember her I was there in 1959/60. So just missed you.

Dave437
8th December 2006, 21:28
Hi Split. I too attended the London Nautical School from 1949 to 1953 and served my Apprenticeship with Counties Ship Management. The MV London Banker and the SS Akti Hill. Did 2nd Mates at King Teds, joined Clan Line, did Mates at John Cass, married a Scots Lass and did Masters at Glasgow.
Dave 437

GeorgeM13
12th December 2006, 01:32
Hi DCMARINE,
Last time I passed the old School of Navigation in King Street, Aberdeen it was being converted into upmarket housing. A shame it was a great building. I did my Pre-Sea Training there in 1966/1967 and back in 1971 to study for 2nd Mates.
Cheers

Tony Breach
12th December 2006, 11:39
Pre-sea @ Plymouth Tech 59/60. Anyone else out there?

Paul Barford
13th December 2006, 11:12
Looking through the thread, find no mention of one of the best colleges of all ! Having been around a few,believe this to be, or was, true.

Have had a long association with this school, from being in the guard of honour, when H.M. Queen opened it, to attending the school through-out my shore apprenticeship in the shipyards. At that time (late sixties)the college was swarming with cadets, who generally looked down their noses at us 'craft' apprentices. This I have still found occasionally prevalent to-day in dealing with some shore management....30 odd years later!

Did 2nd's Part A there, but later moved to Yorkshire doing Part B at Hull College. This was a new building, but the heating came from across the road from the main college building and frequently broke down. Didn't like the place, but the lecturers at that time were first class. Did a motor endorsement to my 2nd also at Hull and that place closed down not long afterwards.
Returned to 'Shields for Chiefs in 1991 to find the marine side had shrunk drastically,being renamed South Tyneside College. By all accounts, the marine side was under pressure and the place was filling up with hairdressers and such like.
Sad to think of all the equipment in that college and wonder if it still al there now?:@

Wee John
13th December 2006, 12:38
I am not sure but I think the Doxford from South Shields is at Beamish being restored.

Paul Barford
13th December 2006, 14:33
Thanks Wee John,
as apprentices,we made some of the piping during the installation of the Doxford, but never got to "play" with it.

Wee John
13th December 2006, 20:15
If it is in Beamish count me first in line to view it. When I talked to cadets that had been at Shields They could never understand why I went into rapture when talking about Doxfords

Paul Barford
14th December 2006, 11:56
Can understand the lack of enthusiasm from cadets, too much like hard work! But you had to sail on them to appeciate them.
Having served my time in ship-repair, had seen enough of motor-ships so opted for steam (initially).Later sailed on "P" & "LB" type Doxfords and finally on a 7J 90. This was a great engine, smooth and easy to work on, four turbo-chargers (Napiers) which gave good response. However the ship and auxiliaries built around it were "old" when it came out of the ship-yard, but never a dull moment!

Have just done a little research and find that the Doxford at Beamish is the 58JS3, this engine design was started in 1976 and the first engine completed trials in 1978. Consequently, this cannot be the engine that was at 'Shields college. The one there was installed around 1970 as far as I remember, so I'm not sure which model it is and suppose it is still there ?

Derek Roger
14th December 2006, 15:14
Are any of the Nauticle Schools / Engineering Apprenticeship Colleges still going or have the Brits given up totally ?
What happened to HMS Conway ??

Derek

Doxfordman
15th December 2006, 02:11
London - Poplar Tech is certainly long gone - we used to trash the Geordies at soccer every year! Was always a great weekend - and so cheap up there compared with London!

mclean
18th December 2006, 02:01
Are any of the Nauticle Schools / Engineering Apprenticeship Colleges still going or have the Brits given up totally ?
What happened to HMS Conway ??

Derek

Derek, HMS Conway closed down in 1974. Regards Colin

jimmys
8th January 2007, 09:46
I started my studies at West Graham Street Glasgow and the names I remember well. They were all at Thistle Street in the new college.
But there was another famous marine engineering college in Glasgow called McGibbons. It was situated in a tenement in the Gorbals/Tradeston area in I think Bridge Street. They had an especially famous book on engineering drawing which was around away into the 1970's. My father was a student there between the wars.
I think it closed around 1950, the name on the tenement was quite clearly visible into the 1970's but is now gone.
In my time at West Graham Street the "Buroo" money was collected at the pool in Broomielaw, a small office was set aside. The reason for this was the altercations between the officers and great unemployed.

best regards
jimmys

jimmys
8th January 2007, 11:56
Here are a few names from Glasgow College all engineers around 1980
Depute head D. Duff
Head of engineering A.C. Smith
Sen Lect. T. Kerr, J. McGinness, D. J. MacLeod, J.R.W. Nairn, D.H. Taylor
Lect A. A. Mcw Barclay, J.M.W. Brown, J.J. Carvalho, W.W. Cloughley, J. Douglas, I.C. Drummond, H.C. Ferguson, T. Hamilton, D.C. King, J.W. Lennox,
G. Louden, I.A.B. MacLean, S. McClements, T.W. Mahon, J.S. Riddel, A.D. Small, J. Sullivan, C.B. Taylor.

Powerplant head A.W. Bolwell
Sen Lect D.C. Davidson, W.Macdonald. J. Macgregor

A lot of these names were at West Graham Street including Wee Sammy McClements who taught motor written and ek's. I think Sammy was an engineer at Trafalgar.
I will put on Nauticals later.

best regards
jimmys

jimmys
8th January 2007, 15:55
A few more names from Nautical Dept Glasgow around 1980

Principal Tom Ireland
Head of navigation M.M. Cornish
Sen. Lect. A. Callendar J.A. Douglas, G.H. Gordon, D.S. Lewis, W.R. Whiteford

Lect A. F.D.C. Brown, J. Campbell, A.H. Carfrae, A. Mck. Crozier, J.McD Kane, I.F. Kerr,S.W.McDonald, J.J.G. Mcenaney, G. Milne, J. Swan, J.H. Woodward.

Hope they jog a few memories

Best regards
jimmys

BarryM
8th January 2007, 21:33
Here are a few names from Glasgow College all engineers around 1980
Depute head D. Duff
Head of engineering A.C. Smith
Sen Lect. T. Kerr, J. McGinness, D. J. MacLeod, J.R.W. Nairn, D.H. Taylor
Lect A. A. Mcw Barclay, J.M.W. Brown, J.J. Carvalho, W.W. Cloughley, J. Douglas, I.C. Drummond, H.C. Ferguson, T. Hamilton, D.C. King, J.W. Lennox,
G. Louden, I.A.B. MacLean, S. McClements, T.W. Mahon, J.S. Riddel, A.D. Small, J. Sullivan, C.B. Taylor.

Powerplant head A.W. Bolwell
Sen Lect D.C. Davidson, W.Macdonald. J. Macgregor

A lot of these names were at West Graham Street including Wee Sammy McClements who taught motor written and ek's. I think Sammy was an engineer at Trafalgar.
I will put on Nauticals later.

best regards
jimmys

Some of these were at West Graham Street and the Springburn Annexe of Stow in the 60's and GCNS in the 70's. Alec Bolwell taught us Tech Drawing and maths, John Carvalho for Applied mechanics (?) and Tommy Main/Mahon for tall tales and skiving. Was the D King of the 80's the same irascible Denis King - a Kiwi - who advised the Apprentices "you're not an engineer until you've had gonorrhoea twice"? His sexual history was never revealed....

Why is the Thistle Street building now called 'GLASGOW COLLEGE of nautical studies'? The last two words in very small print as though they were ashamed of it?

Keith Adams
9th January 2007, 06:00
Can`t believe noone has given a call about Liverpool Nautical... was there for
Pre-sea 1951, 2nd Mates and Mates. A Lt Cmdr. Coffey was Principal, and my favorite instructor was Capt. Steer ex Elder Dempster. Does anyone recall the name of the most dreaded Mates` Examiner in Liverpool?... had one eye and his bad eye drained all the time,also drooled from one side of his mouth... had him both times and was scared shitless... no idea how I passed. Probably received his injuries during the war... he was legendary.
There was also a Lifeboat Examiner whose favorite admonishment to the
less fortunate was "You`re the sort of man who would piss to windward!"
Funny the stuff we remember after all these years... Snowy,

vic pitcher
9th January 2007, 09:31
Can`t believe noone has given a call about Liverpool Nautical... was there for
Pre-sea 1951, 2nd Mates and Mates. A Lt Cmdr. Coffey was Principal, and my favorite instructor was Capt. Steer ex Elder Dempster. Does anyone recall the name of the most dreaded Mates` Examiner in Liverpool?... had one eye and his bad eye drained all the time,also drooled from one side of his mouth... had him both times and was scared shitless... no idea how I passed. Probably received his injuries during the war... he was legendary.
There was also a Lifeboat Examiner whose favorite admonishment to the
less fortunate was "You`re the sort of man who would piss to windward!"
Funny the stuff we remember after all these years... Snowy,

Hi Snowy
I did my "pre-sea" at Liverpool the end of 1955, the college was then based in the College of Building, Clarence Street, off Brownlow Hill. Commander Coffey was still the Principal, he was succeded by Captain Main. I remember Frank Steer well, he later went to Riversdale. Other lecturers there were,Ossie Stewart (Masters Class-"No bags on the desk,Sir!") Tholen, Holland, Ferryman, Lewthwaite , Gordon Salisbury (he became a good friend in later years, sadly crossed the bar a few years ago-he was an Edinburgh man, but was brought up in Rio and spent his sea career with Lamports) During my pre-sea course, the redoubtable Bengali, Captain Azad arrived to take over the "Cadet" course, he was later to die in tragic circumstances.
The examiner was the famed Geordie Captain Fletcher, who one one occasion, when I was up for 2nd mate, threatened me with prosecution under the 1892 Merchant Shipping Act for "insolence to a Board of Trade Examiner!" I always understood that his injuries were caused in an air raid in South Shields.
I have a group photograph of the college staff that Gordon Salisbury gave me and will try and find it and post it on the site.

cheddarnibbles
9th January 2007, 15:00
Hi Snowy
The examiner was the famed Geordie Captain Fletcher, who one one occasion, when I was up for 2nd mate, threatened me with prosecution under the 1892 Merchant Shipping Act for "insolence to a Board of Trade Examiner!" I always understood that his injuries were caused in an air raid in South Shields.
.

I suffered the wrath of old 'Fletch' also in 1962 when up for 2nd.mate.....I got my buoys all wrong and he sent me back to sea for 6 weeks for sic, "sinking the Queen Mary three times in a minute "!!!!!
On the retake, a younger examiner asked why I failed first time. I replied that I had faced Captain Fletcher with my heart in my mouth and consequently had to talk through my ****. The examiner put the magical 'P' on my papers and I was out in ten minutes and in The Crocodile within the hour.

non descript
9th January 2007, 16:56
These reports are interesting as clearly this curious technique of Failing and then being immediately invited back for a Pass was not as unique as I imagined. – At Dock Street I failed my Second Mates Oral Exam after an unbelievable 2 hours in front of the examiner, was told to come back in 2 weeks and then a different examiner picked up a long length of small size rope with a big knot at the end, and said “What’s this?” – I replied “A Heaving Line Sir” – He wrote P in blue pencil on the slip and that was it.

Strange times, good for the soul I'm sure but quite odd none the less.

Brent Pyburn
9th January 2007, 18:07
I remember taking second mate's orals at Hull. I had just got married and we had spent every night burning the midnight oil by reading the rules to my wife in bed. (Yes this is absolutely true) Come the big day I failed on the rules. The examiner told me to 'Go away and read the Rules and come back and see me tomorrow' I was staying at the Merchant Navy Hotel at Hull. I frantically called my wife who was in Stoke and asked her to come up and help me learn the rules. She arrived really late and I sneaked her into the hotel. We spent all night going over them bl**dy rules and I returned to the examiner the next morning, who had obviously forgotten me and he asked me a question on bl**dy lifeboats, then gave me a pass. When I got back to the hotel, I got called in by the manager who bollocked me for having a woman in my room overnight. When I tried to explain it was my wife and that she was helping me with my orals, well you can imagine the rest!!

Angus Murray
10th January 2007, 14:57
Second Mate/ Mate/ Master - all at Glasgow (2nd Mates at John Street before the move to Thistle St).
In addition to lecturers Callender,Douglas, and Gordon, there was lecturers Baldwin and Kennedy (Kennedy's Drama Class!). Alistair Douglas - a great lecturer who excelled in Ship Stability (Always wondered if the Editor of Sea Breezes of that same name was the one and same ?). Also the Met lecturer (of Polish origin) whose name i can not remember.
Angus

A few more names from Nautical Dept Glasgow around 1980

Principal Tom Ireland
Head of navigation M.M. Cornish
Sen. Lect. A. Callendar J.A. Douglas, G.H. Gordon, D.S. Lewis, W.R. Whiteford

Lect A. F.D.C. Brown, J. Campbell, A.H. Carfrae, A. Mck. Crozier, J.McD Kane, I.F. Kerr,S.W.McDonald, J.J.G. Mcenaney, G. Milne, J. Swan, J.H. Woodward.

Hope they jog a few memories

Best regards
jimmys

Derek Roger
10th January 2007, 16:56
I was at Stowe in 64/65 at the Springburn Annex for Phase 3 of my appenticship . On a Wednsday we were at the Dobbies Loan annex ( Opposite a Brewrey ) for Naval Architecture .

BarryM
10th January 2007, 19:57
I had forgotten about the Dobies Loan annexe. If memory serves right the whole building shook if the stairs were taken too energetically. Now the landscape has changed so much that it is difficult to see where the old building stood.

jimmys
10th January 2007, 20:13
Hi BarryM
It is the same Dennis King who laterly taught Naval Architecture. There could only be one.
The sexuality I do not wish to comment upon, we will leave that to personal opinion.
Laterly the college has been full of nursery nurses, which you must admit was an improvement on the apprentices. It is anything to keep going.

best regards
jimmys

Keith Adams
10th January 2007, 22:53
Many thanks to vic pitcher for the details on Liverpool Nautical and all the
other member imputs on Capt. Fletcher (Examiner). I was at the Clarence St.
Bldg. also and can,t remember the name of the pub out the back way... Capt.
Stewart would lock the door on late returnees so would miss the lecture. Also,if he was particularily annoyed... would close the blackout curtains so one could not take notes off the blackboard through the windows. Once, on the way back we saw Capt. Steer arguing with a Tram Driver as the rear wheel of his 3-wheel Morgan was stuck in the Tram rails... as a group, we lifted it clear without damage and gained much needed brownie points from the staff. Snowy.

Stephen J. Card
11th January 2007, 06:59
Second Mate/ Mate/ Master - all at Glasgow (2nd Mates at John Street before the move to Thistle St).
In addition to lecturers Callender,Douglas, and Gordon, there was lecturers Baldwin and Kennedy (Kennedy's Drama Class!). Alistair Douglas - a great lecturer who excelled in Ship Stability (Always wondered if the Editor of Sea Breezes of that same name was the one and same ?). Also the Met lecturer (of Polish origin) whose name i can not remember.
Angus


The Met lecturer was Captain Porry (sp?) ex Polish destroyers during WW2.

Captain Ian Pearson? Murmansk covoys etc etc. He came into the chartroom one morning on Phase I ONC and handed me an examination paper and asked me to work through the questions when I had time. Top of the page said, "Irish GCE 'O' Level"
1. There have been six kings of England named George. the first was George the First, name the other five.

2. Explain Einstein's theory of relativity OR write your name in block capitals.

etc etc

Jim Milligan passed away just a few months ago. I last saw him about seven years ago in the MN Hotel at Lancaster Gate.

I exchange a card and short letter each Christmas with Alistair Douglas. One way to keep up to date with some of the old boys.

Dougie Watkinson... Head of Navigation Dept or Head of College?
Captain Drummond..... and his brother from the Engineering Dept who came up to the 7th floor to teach Master's Engineering.

Captain HH Brown!

I 'attempted' to do master's in London at the Polytechnic. I lasted for three weeks before I gave up. Their teaching system seemed to fall far short of of GCNS. I went back to sea for six months and then went up to Glasgow.

Stephen

slick
11th January 2007, 13:44
All,
Any Boulevardier's out there?,
I was there Sept. 1956 - Dec.1958.
Yours aye,
Slick

Naviguesser
21st January 2007, 01:42
I'm a 1/C cadet at California Maritime Academy right now and will graduate this Spring.

Derek Roger
21st January 2007, 02:21
Barry the Dobies Loan annex was built like a brick Sh--house ! Big blocks of stone ! I think the cast iron railings were a bit loose and if one swung around the corners on them they tended to rattle a bit ! Is that what you remember ?? Often times there was an awfull smell from the Brewrey !

I was prone in those days to "punting " and would go to a bookies across the road where I bumped into Dick Mc Taggert on a few occasions . We hit it off both being frae Dundee . He was working for the brewrey in a sales capacity of some kind . He wore his blazer with " Olympic Badge " Sadly he was not well heeled in those days ( 1964 ) and I often wondered what became of him ? Today Olympic Champions are instant Millionaires !! Changed days . He was very pleasant to talk to and very unasuming considering his achievments .
Derek

slick
21st January 2007, 06:39
All,
Dick McTaggart, now there is a name from the past, my father used to manage an RAF boxing team and he would talk about his team's encounters with Dick McTaggart, he gave my brother and I a pair of boxing gloves each for a Christmas present and instructed us in the noble art.
I think he would have liked us to emulate Dick McTaggart!!
I to wonder what happened to him.
Yours aye,
Slick

BarryM
21st January 2007, 08:50
Quote Barry the Dobies Loan annex was built like a brick Sh--house ! Big blocks of stone ! I think the cast iron railings were a bit loose and if one swung around the corners on them they tended to rattle a bit ! Is that what you remember ?? Often times there was an awfull smell from the Brewrey !
Derek, Unquote

Derek, the walls may have been of stone but a good pull on those cast iron bannisters set the floors moving! We sprogs hoped that the sole secretary in the building was similarly loose but alas she withstood all our assaults. Happy days, Barry

Derek Roger
21st January 2007, 15:22
Slick;
I googled Dick Mc Taggart. Found him on the BBC web . When he left boxing he worked as a Rat Catcher in Glasgow ( must have ben after the Brewrey job ? then Rolls Royce. Also later coach for Scotland etc . so seems he did OK . Was voted into the British Boxing Hall of Fame in 2000 . His record was 610 Wins 24 losses which by any standard is amazing .

jazz606
25th January 2007, 12:33
Pre Sea at the Worcester 1959-63
2nd Mates in Leith1966
Mates Cardiff 1969
Masters London 1973


I dallied with the idea of re validating my ticket recently but soon gave that idea up- the apparatchiks have made that nigh on impossible. It seems that the easiest way would be to get someone to give you a job in a superlunary position on a ship for three months. But then there's simulator and a host of new non subjects to contend with and since it was a notion and not a serious career move I gave up. Why is it that in the UK we make things so bureaucratically difficult.

R.Philip Griffin
26th January 2007, 01:25
These reports are interesting as clearly this curious technique of Failing and then being immediately invited back for a Pass was not as unique as I imagined. – At Dock Street I failed my Second Mates Oral Exam after an unbelievable 2 hours in front of the examiner, was told to come back in 2 weeks and then a different examiner picked up a long length of small size rope with a big knot at the end, and said “What’s this?” – I replied “A Heaving Line Sir” – He wrote P in blue pencil on the slip and that was it.

Strange times, good for the soul I'm sure but quite odd none the less.
I knew an Examiner of Masters and Mates socially. He told me 5% are brilliant and you could pass them after 10 mins, but you have to keep them for 2 hours; 5% are dumb, again could fail them after 10 minutes, but have to hang on for 2 hours; and then us 90% where you have to drag every bloody answer out of us and that takes 2 hours. So on a fairness level everyone is in there for 2 hours. And as I recall I did a 2 hour oral for all my tickets [naughty- they are certificates]

Derek Roger
26th January 2007, 01:44
In Aberdeen there was a " Professional Third ' who was up for his ticket for about the 5th time ( I should say the chap was well versed in watchkeeping and engineering generaly but had difficulty with his part "A " which he had eventually managed to pass )
He was ; when I knew him doing is EK, s ( Engineering Knowledge ) and he was going for his Orals in the morning .
The poor chap came back to the College at noon saying he had made a bollicks of his orals with regard to fire extinguishers !!

The examiner had told him " I havn't failed you yet ! Im off to lunch ; go up to the Fire Department and ask them all about how to recharge the extinguishers and come back at 2' oclock ."

We all gave him all the help we could ( as did the teachers ) and he did go to the fire department .

He was back at the college by shortly after 3 with his ticket !!! Everone was so happy for him and a good party ensued .

Im sure to this day if the lads still with us he could tell you how to recharge any kind of fire extinguisher !!

And Im sure the Examiner was also pleased that he eventually passed as its not easy to send a lad back to sea who obviously knows the job and has made a career of the life .

Derek

jazz606
26th January 2007, 09:20
I remember Captain Denne. When I did 2nd Mates in Leith 65/66 many of us used to fail signals (morse) not because we couldn't read it but because the examiner in Leith sent it entirely differently (slow no rhythm) to Johnnie our lecturer. So it was almost traditional to go across to Glasgow do one day's instruction with the yeoman (who also did the exam) and then surprise surprise pass morse the following day. BUT you had to go in front of Denne to do the International Code and the Flags. He was just as described by previous posters shouted and bawled effed and blinded and apologised to his secretary. I passed though and I suspect that he was in reality very good hearted - rather him than the smiling assassins.

The examiner at Leith was Captain Field. He was supposed to be really tough for orals but I passed first time despite being a hot tip from Johnnie to fail (pointed out to the rest of the class as an example of how not to study orals). Years later 1984 when working in Glasgow I decided for reasons unknown to myself and others to get a boatman's certificate. To my amazement the examiner was Capt Field. I passed that time as well but he didn't ask me any questions!

slick
27th January 2007, 05:24
All,
There is no truth then in the story doing the rounds in Hull whilst I was there that a clerk at the Shipping Office had said to a successful candidate who had presented his Yellow Authority for the delivery his Master's Certificate, that "here it is too stiff to wipe your a---- with and too hard to light a fire with!!"
Yours aye,
Slick

Derek Roger
27th January 2007, 16:31
At the Springburn Annex in the mid 60s all the marine classes were given a
" pep talk and information class " with the Port Doctor who seemed quite shy when giving us all the information on " doses etc .

During question time one wag asked " Is sterility heriditory ? "
We managed to withhold our mirth as the poor Doc went on at length to try and answere the question .

Derek

methc
7th April 2007, 22:03
Captains Lewis and Wallace were at Dock Street, London. When I was up for something, I remember taking an angle with a vernier sextant and I unscrewed it until the bits fell on the floor. Wallace gave me a bulging eyes glare and said "Well, put the bloody thing together again"! I did and passed my orals, as well.

Split
November 1953.After three months at King Edward VII went to Dock Street for the orals on the Friday. Captain Lewis asked what would I do if the wind got up whilst at anchor. "Where is the ship anchored and with which anchor?" I asked. "Where would you like to be anchored and choose your own anchor" "Starboard then and Tail of the Bank" "All right" he said."What time of year is it and what is the wind direction, please?"I then asked. "How does that apply to my question."He said. "I would like to try to work out the probable wind shift accompanying this rising wind." "OK, what time of year would you like?" "November"says I "Because then the rising wind is due to an approaching depression and the wind will shift to the NW. I would pay out more cable." "And if the wind got up more?" "More cable." "And if the wind got up even more?" "More cable, up to seven shackles, and if it looked as is she would start to sheer about, put the port anchor out on one shackle""Why couldn't you have said that in the first place?" he said. "Because, I wanted to be practical.""Well,"Capt Lewis said,"With 25 other candidates to exam I only want short answers. Not an exercise in seamanship!"
I had my signals, on Saturday morning with that wonderful yeoman whose technique with the morse key was superb.Wish I could remember his name.Shortly after the exam was over, we were given our results and for a back-hander of half-a-crown he gave you your written results so you didn't have to hang around over the week-end to get that lovely little yellow slip telling you when to collect your Ticket. That was posted to me. After almost four and half years with Lyles I was over 21 years of age and very anxious to become an officer at last. What a marvelous feeling to know that all that time on a tramp ship was not wasted and a new career was beginning.
There were so many of us living at the College or nearby that we were able to form a rugby team and suffered several very hard games. One I remember was against the Customs and boy, were we keen to beat them. I think we did! That's enough.

Hague
8th April 2007, 01:10
Many thanks to vic pitcher for the details on Liverpool Nautical and all the
other member imputs on Capt. Fletcher (Examiner). I was at the Clarence St.
Bldg. also and can,t remember the name of the pub out the back way... Capt.
Stewart would lock the door on late returnees so would miss the lecture. Also,if he was particularily annoyed... would close the blackout curtains so one could not take notes off the blackboard through the windows. Once, on the way back we saw Capt. Steer arguing with a Tram Driver as the rear wheel of his 3-wheel Morgan was stuck in the Tram rails... as a group, we lifted it clear without damage and gained much needed brownie points from the staff. Snowy.

I believe the pub was the 'Cross Keys'

BarryM
8th April 2007, 08:41
Those who went to Glasgow's West Graham Street annexe of Stow College or afterwards at GCNS, will no doubt be saddened to hear that the death of Alec Bolwell in August 2006 is reported in the latest IMarEST newsletter. His is one of those names that has stuck in my memory for over 40 years for his endless patience and good humour. A good man.

Barry M

makko
9th April 2007, 16:36
Any Birkenhead Tech or Riversdale EngCadets out there?

Dave

BarryM
9th April 2007, 18:23
[QUOTE=makko;120678]Any Birkenhead Tech or Riversdale EngCadets out there?

Dave[/QUOTE

"out there" - I thought most of them were inside...(==D)

Douglas Young
9th April 2007, 19:17
Glasgow Tech pre-sea 1958/59, 2nd Mate 1962, Mate 1964 and Master 1967. Can't remember most of the lecturers but do remember the Principal was Captain Corse. For Mate and Master got Capt. Braid for orals who was very keen on towing (believe he was writing a book on this) and was a great boon if you had some towing experience. Spent most of the orals discussing being towed on the City of Bath by the City of Manchester - details of how it was done being pried out of me.

Hague
15th April 2007, 11:33
Can recall a story that was circulating around Byrom Street in the late 60s of a certain BF 'middie' up for Second Mates Orals with Captain Fletcher. At the commencement of the section on 'How's she Heading' the 'middie' asked Fletcher why he should be given questions on sailing ships in the 60s. Fletcher quickly responded by giving him 3 months 'sea time' instead.

If the story is true I can only say the individual was either very brave or very mad as Fletcher terrified me each time (3) I was before him for Second, First Mates and Master's (FG)

GRHH
21st April 2007, 15:19
South Shields was brilliant. I did my 2nd Mates there with Common Brothers and it was fantastic meeting with cadets from so many other great and sometimes not so well known companies as well as others from different countries. We worked hard but were given the opportunity to play hard as well. If all else failed there was always the Martec bar!

Down at the river side was the 'seamanship centre' was a source of learning and entertainment. Rowing up, down and across the Tyne, sailing on a saturday morning in the outer harbour recovering from a skinfull the night before. There was a bar not far from there I think it was called the Bees Nest or Beehive or something but anyway it sold pints of IPA which was very cheap and very weak.

I am sure there were others there who read these threads and were there in the 70's and can remember Roy Swann (the first C/O I sailed with), and others whose names are in a fog bank at the moment.

Tony Sprigings
21st April 2007, 20:49
Snowy,
I was at the College from August 1944 to October 1944 and remember all the folk mentioned by Vic Pitcher. They were ten years younger then!
The Examiner in my day was a Capt. Vincent also of fierce reputation. He fired me the first time for 2nd. mate and when I resat a year later he was the examiner again! Fortunately he passed me the second time.
Cheers, Tony

EBenarty
21st April 2007, 21:21
Robert Gordon's School of Navigation, Aberdeen.
I was at Robert Gordon's School of Navigation (now taken over by Aberdeen College) for 2nd Mate's in the last quarter of 1968, Mate's in the same period in 1970, and Master's in same period in 1975. These were large classes with most of the same people on each one. Would like to hear where any of them are now.
Donald Campbell

Hi Donald,
I did my second mates there in 1970 and Mates in 72/73. Are you the same Donald who was on the Seaforth Conquerer with me (Stayed in Dingwall at that time Dingwall at that time ) ?
Billy Sinclair

PatBaltic22
24th April 2007, 01:36
Forgive me if this is off topic, but if I wanted to become a naval architect, what would I have to do on a day to day basis? I'm not the kind of "hands on" person that would literally construct the vessel. I would rather use a computer to design the ship or yacht or whatever.......My point is, could I still be a naval architect and just be the designer persay and not the one to actually construct? -Patrick

Keith Adams
24th April 2007, 05:54
First I want to thank vic pritcher, cheddernibles,Hague and Tony Sprigings for your supportive comments and information ... Hague once more for the pub name 'Cross Keys' ... have to look it up next visit to UK... last time I was pleased to find the 'Corn Exchange' still going strong in the back jigger by the Town Hall.
For PatBaltic ... try looking up Naval Architects in major US seaports for advice on how to get a foot in the door ...Best regards to all, Snowy

Hague
24th April 2007, 08:00
Snowy,
Many thanks yours.
Being and ex Wallasey resident you will also have to find time to visit the Magazines and Pilot Boat House (PBH) both in Magazine Lane, New Brighton. Magazines hasn't changed a bit. The PBH has gone the same way as the rest. Old Blue Funnel haunts such as the 'Sandridge' (Strouds Corner) Boot Inn (Liscard) have gone same as PBH.
Stick with the 'Magazines' as it will be the same as you walked out of it in the 60s. I assume they wash the glasses.

makko
24th April 2007, 15:13
My great aunt (grandmother's sister) and her husband were the publicans of the Magazines for a number of years. I remember visiting with the Old Fella during summer holidays and the lovely sitting room above the pub!

Now, which is the worst pub in Liscard, the Boot or the Tower?! Oh, and then theres the Ship, down on the Breck - nuff said! I can somehow never see the Yuppification of that Dodge City stalwart, the Oyster Catcher! The Pool Inn was a haunt of my maternal grandfather being as he crossed over the Penny Bridge on his way back from Spillers, while old T.R. fancied the Rose & Crown on Poulton Rd - always good for a pint and a scrap!

LOL - Regards,

Dave

Hague
24th April 2007, 18:01
My great aunt (grandmother's sister) and her husband were the publicans of the Magazines for a number of years. I remember visiting with the Old Fella during summer holidays and the lovely sitting room above the pub!

Now, which is the worst pub in Liscard, the Boot or the Tower?! Oh, and then theres the Ship, down on the Breck - nuff said! I can somehow never see the Yuppification of that Dodge City stalwart, the Oyster Catcher! The Pool Inn was a haunt of my maternal grandfather being as he crossed over the Penny Bridge on his way back from Spillers, while old T.R. fancied the Rose & Crown on Poulton Rd - always good for a pint and a scrap!

LOL - Regards,

Dave

Dave,
Know them all! You are scraping the barrel a little with the Oyster Catcher!!!
The Rose and Crown was omitted in error from Snowy's visiting list. It was a real ' China Boat' haunt (Alf Brierly and Tommy Fleetwood both C/Cooks and Bosun Butch Mason (there would be no scrapping with those men present). Good when it was Yates's Ale but John Smiths took over in the late 60s.
I mentioned the 'Pool Inn' in a thread several days ago.

BarryM
7th August 2007, 16:16
At the Springburn Annex in the mid 60s all the marine classes were given a
" pep talk and information class " with the Port Doctor who seemed quite shy when giving us all the information on " doses etc .

During question time one wag asked " Is sterility heriditory ? "
We managed to withhold our mirth as the poor Doc went on at length to try and answere the question .

Derek

Derek,

I can remember those lectures in the 60's and also the apprentice who collapsed noisily to the floor as a more gruesome slide of the result of sexual excess was projected on the screen. Whether it was because of the subject or because it was a reminder to pay a visit to Black Street, we never found out.

By the by, I see the GCNS is offering an HND in "Acting & Performance". I can think of a few comics who would have sailed through.

Barry M

The Captain
8th August 2007, 01:06
I did all my tickets at the Boulevard (later Hull Tech) 2nd Mates late '68, Mates late '70 and Masters in early '75. I worked on the principal that if they could get me through 2nd Mates they could get me through anything, even toyed with going for extras but decided that might be pushing the friendship too far. I managed to get through them all, be it 2nd go on each, signals for 2nd Mates, Orals for Mates and a referal in Ship Masters Bussiness for Masters. That referal idea was great as far as I was concerned. The chief examiner at Hull in 1975 came to the college to give a chat on the examinations etc. and answer questions (a good idea). The was one about the use of calculators to which he responded by saying that if enough aplications were made they (BOT) would eventually allow them. However, it should be remembered that the questions were worked out so that candidates would have time to do the calculations using accepted means (log tables etc.). If calculators were introduced then they could make the questions harder to make up for the reduced time required for the calculations. Slide rules were allowed but the examiner was entitled to ask a candidate using one to explain the theory behind the use of them. It was decided by all those present (about 30) that we could manage quite well without a calculator and keep the questions "easy". As far as some people saying "Oh! marine exams were a doddle and I breezed through them", I found all of them difficult and requiring all my concentration.
Another comment the examiner made was that the British Marine Tickets (deck and engine, can't talk about radio) were the best in the world and the basis of most other countries. We should keep them as industy based exams, using actual experience and learning as guide lines and NEVER allow the "acdemics" to get control of them. The 70% general average should be maintained and they should NEVER be used as "academic" qualifications.
This man (I think his name was Diston) was quite elderly in '75 but he seemed to have some foresight in to where the marine exams were heading and obviously didn't like the idea of "tickets" being handed out by colleges, oh! how times change.

John

kwg
9th August 2007, 21:49
Went to BNS Hull 1958-60. When I took 2nd Mates in 63....they always said didn't matter what you wrote in the English paper, as long as it was English....That is true!!

There were 18 of us taking our 2nd mates....I thought I had made a right 'foxes pass' of the maths paper, no-one seemed to agree with my answers at the autopsy in the bar of the MN hotel. Anyway at the English paper after a liquid lunch, there was an essay option -'A night Ashore' so I wrote an essay about a night out in a brothel (nothing explicit). The following Monday a telegram arrived at home 'ordering' me to report at 0900 to Capt. McQueen (The BOT examiner) the next day. Hell I thought...extra sea time coming up...no...read the riot act, sit down and take the English again...I sat writing on my '1st trip to sea' for 4 hours...I was called into his office, didn't even read the thing, just handed me my pass slip and told me to b*gg*r off and don't P*ss about at my Mates....where I kept a very low profile hoping he had forgotten the incident...He hadn't....Incidentally there were only 4 of us passed 2nd Mates that sitting...I never told anyone at BNS about it but seems they all knew something had happened, any who read this will now know 40 odd years later.

Irvingman
9th August 2007, 23:01
Here are a few names from Glasgow College all engineers around 1980
Depute head D. Duff
Head of engineering A.C. Smith
Sen Lect. T. Kerr, J. McGinness, D. J. MacLeod, J.R.W. Nairn, D.H. Taylor
Lect A. A. Mcw Barclay, J.M.W. Brown, J.J. Carvalho, W.W. Cloughley, J. Douglas, I.C. Drummond, H.C. Ferguson, T. Hamilton, D.C. King, J.W. Lennox,
G. Louden, I.A.B. MacLean, S. McClements, T.W. Mahon, J.S. Riddel, A.D. Small, J. Sullivan, C.B. Taylor.

Powerplant head A.W. Bolwell
Sen Lect D.C. Davidson, W.Macdonald. J. Macgregor

best regards
jimmys

Sod the staff, can you remember the names of the two mini skirted lasses that used to be in reception in Thistle street in the mid 70's [=P] (Jester)

BarryM
10th August 2007, 08:37
No - but I well remember Helen and Wee Jean, the two barmaids in the Cleland Bar across the road. Extra chips for the favoured!

Barry M

Irvingman
10th August 2007, 09:05
I passed through Glasgow a year or so ago and took a drive down "memory lane".

It came as no real surprise to see that The Cleland and some of the streets in the immediate vicinity had all dissappeared. What really stunned me was to see "The Gorbals Cyber Cafe" ...........surely not frequented by the old Cleland clientele. (EEK)

BarryM
10th August 2007, 09:23
I recall The Cleland had a flexible approach to licensing hours. If you were still sitting there at lunchtime closing, the door was locked and you were forced to spend the afternoon there (with service of course). On one occasion some large persons, who evidently had a grudge against the landlord, entered and commenced to hurl glasses across the bar. The police arrived after the glass-hurlers had gone but didn't seem to think it worth asking why we were still sitting there after closing time. Happy days. (==D)

Barry M

Irvingman
10th August 2007, 10:02
We used to go over in the early evenings a couple of times a week as we had to do some late nights in the workshops in the final year of the Cadetship.

While their approach to hours may have been flexible there was a strict rule of College Staff in the lounge and Cadets in the Public Bar (Jester)

Vital Sparks
21st September 2007, 14:03
MRGC/Radar at Leith Nautical College (Milton Road) and later ENEM at Southampton (East Park Terrace)

Orbitaman
29th November 2007, 14:25
I am not sure but I think the Doxford from South Shields is at Beamish being restored.

The doxford at South Shields was taken away to be scrapped at the beginning of this year. It was offered to a number of local museums, but no one wanted it!

There is a quadruple expansion steam engine at Beamish in the big storgae warehouse, but you can't get near it.

Derek Roger
29th November 2007, 16:43
[QUOTE=makko;120678]Any Birkenhead Tech or Riversdale EngCadets out there?

Dave[/QUOTE

"out there" - I thought most of them were inside...(==D)


Dave I was at Riversdale 63/64 Regards derek

DCMARINE
3rd December 2007, 11:50
Robert Gordon's School of Navigation, Aberdeen.
I was at Robert Gordon's School of Navigation (now taken over by Aberdeen College) for 2nd Mate's in the last quarter of 1968, Mate's in the same period in 1970, and Master's in same period in 1975. These were large classes with most of the same people on each one. Would like to hear where any of them are now.
Donald Campbell
Those of us who lived in the Sailor's Home in Mearns Street when attending Robert Gordon's, and seafarers who stayed there when passing through Aberdeen, will be saddened to hear that the building has now been demolished and the site cleared for the building of luxury flats. That building could have told a few tales.
Donald Campbell

Duncan112
3rd December 2007, 13:03
The doxford at South Shields was taken away to be scrapped at the beginning of this year. It was offered to a number of local museums, but no one wanted it!

There is a quadruple expansion steam engine at Beamish in the big storgae warehouse, but you can't get near it.

The Doxford is at the Anson Engine Museum Poynton Cheshire (In pieces) some photos in my gallery and a bit of info in the Doxford Engine thread.

Duncan

Derek Roger
3rd December 2007, 14:40
Those of us who lived in the Sailor's Home in Mearns Street when attending Robert Gordon's, and seafarers who stayed there when passing through Aberdeen, will be saddened to hear that the building has now been demolished and the site cleared for the building of luxury flats. That building could have told a few tales.
Donald Campbell

Ah the Sailors Home ! I remember it well when doing my chiefs ; the oil offshore had just begun and it was impossible to find flats . i was lucky to get a room there ( if you look in my gallery you will find a scan of a receipt )
The "Snug Bar " around the corner is also alas now gone .
Oh happy days Derek

randcmackenzie
3rd December 2007, 20:07
Yes, and the National, the Bistro and doubtless many others.

Peep Peeps still survived, last time I was in Aberdeen.

Derek Roger
3rd December 2007, 20:58
Peep Peeps was a place to go on a Sunday before the other pubs opened . Dont know how he got away with it !
If he knew you " you were in " any dodgy looking characters were not given admission .
Cheers Derek

DCMARINE
5th December 2007, 13:54
Peep Peeps, Fittie, St. Clements, Neptune, Crow's Nest, Carlton, Crown & Anchor, Regent Bridge, Moorings, and Blue Lamp are still here but others like the Waterloo and National (now Thos Gunn Navigation Services - at least still providing a service to the Marine industry) are long gone. The Royal Oak has come up in the world and is now Old Blackfriars (stovies have gone). Meant to have a look to see what the Yardarm is now.
Donald Campbell

Derek Roger
5th December 2007, 14:28
Prince of Wales ? Argo ? Derek

DCMARINE
5th December 2007, 14:35
Prince of Wales still there but Argo long gone.
Donald