Scanning old Negatives (not 35mm)

benjidog
23rd December 2005, 19:55
Has anyone managed to find a way to scan old large format colour negatives (620 and 2 1/4 inch square jobbies)?

Normal flatbed scanners can't cope with the orange cast.

Any ideas other than pay a specialist?

airds
23rd December 2005, 23:18
Has anyone managed to find a way to scan old large format colour negatives (620 and 2 1/4 inch square jobbies)?

Normal flatbed scanners can't cope with the orange cast.

Any ideas other than pay a specialist?

My way round is to use a Epson 3200 flatbed scanner that has FILM scanning facilities. It, and more updated models come with a selection of masks for different film sizes - up to 4 x5 ". Obviously, not up to the standard of professional and expensive (drum) scans, but very good. You just set the film (tranny/negative) option in the scanning software and the cast is automatically deal with.

If you've got a few scans to do, get a good pro lab to do it; if it's a collection it's more economically to get the scanner.

But warning, the file sizes can get pretty large if you scan at full resolution 150MB+ , so your computer has to be relatively new to handle this, and it can be very time consuming.


ps A scan from a 6x7 slide and then a crop to the deckie having a puff just for'd of the foremast, from the same pic attached. Both reduced in size for the web but the detail is amazing!

rdgs

Baltic Wal
24th December 2005, 13:16
I support David's recommendation. I have one ans so far have scanned over 1,000 slides and negarives of a wide range of sizes, quality is god but one has te remember to clean it every so often.

Can sit watching television with the scanner working then after scanning 50 or so photo's can down load them to the PC. It does not have to be connected so scanning can be done anywhere.

R58484956
24th December 2005, 14:14
Perhaps this question should be asked on the advertisement at the top of this page for WPF,but do not advertise your own site on here, it is frowned upon.

Baltic Wal
24th December 2005, 16:21
Perhaps this question should be asked on the advertisement at the top of this page for WPF,but do not advertise your own site on here, it is frowned upon.

????????????? I've not seen any advert for a site in this thread????????

R58484956
24th December 2005, 16:24
Perhaps wrong definition, words in the typing of the thread might be better.

Baltic Wal
24th December 2005, 16:41
You still confuse me, unless I have misread it, the thread title asks a question on what to use, certainly does not advertise.

airds
24th December 2005, 18:13
Sorry R58484956, you lost me too. I've re-read the thread a few times and still can't understand your remarks. Can you elaborate?

If it's the ad for WPF you're talking about that comes with the shipsnostalgia site - and is found on other pages here - assume to help fund and provide this website & service. If you've a problem with that I suggest you take it up with the website admin.

If your are referring to my recommendation for a specific Epson product, that is all it was - along with wee samples, and I hope helpful advice/information for the original poster. If you've a problem with that, it is, unfortunately your problem.


rdgs

Mad Landsman
24th December 2005, 19:47
Another flatbed scanner with transparency hood built in is made by CANON. I have been using a D2400UF for some time now. When I bought it it cost an arm&aleg but I have seen the same for well under 100 recently (dammit!).
It comes with masks for 35mm, medium & large format. It can be a bit fiddly to load but it is capable of up to 2400 x 4800dpi, @48 bits. The Dmax is not as good as a film scanner so it does not get the full tonal range on transparencies, but negative input is more than adaquate for most purposes.
Watch the file size on the preview though, they can be HUGE!

ruud
25th December 2005, 06:44
Ahoy,

Is this where it's all about? Calm down lads, and try to act like adults. After all it was only a quest for scanning old negatives,and asking for some ideas. Haven't seen an URL that was linked to someones homepage or site.

cynter
25th December 2005, 08:02
Dead right Ruud.....
I use an Acer scanner and get fine results with various slides/prints....
I think the proverbial mountain from the molehill is very apt....
Cheers to all you blokes out there.... happy scanning.

benjidog
25th December 2005, 17:29
Thanks to everyone who responded to my question. I have a flatbed scanner and a 35mm film scanner already but have decided to splash out on a new scanner that will deal with 35mm, large format and also normal A4 scanning. Having looked at the latest models it seems that they are much faster and some you can load a bunch of negs in one go and let it get on with the job. As time is precious I think it will be worth the expense.

I hope the answers to the question will also benefit other people.

Regards,

airds
25th December 2005, 18:01
and some you can load a bunch of negs in one go and let it get on with the job. As time is precious I think it will be worth the expense.

I hope the answers to the question will also benefit other people.

Regards,

Note the large 'batch scanning' is for 35mm slides or negatives only, obviously larger formats are usually 1, 2 or 3 's

And for 35mm, your dedicated film scanner will provide better results - unless it's ancient.

The scanner review section of photo-i (http://www.photo-i.co.uk) will help, and while this page (http://www.photo-i.co.uk/Reviews/interactive/Epson%204870/page_1.htm) shows examples of the Epson supplied film holders.


rdgs

benjidog
26th December 2005, 15:30
Hi David,

I was originally looking at mainly 120/620 colour negs, but I also have a fair number of 5x4 black and white, a few half-plate and miscellaneous other photographic negs to scan. My old Scanwit film scanner only takes 35mm, you can only insert a strip of 6 negs at a time and it can only manage 2,400 dpi. I am going to replace both it and my HP 4600 Scanjet with the Epson 4990. Apart from the higher 4,800dpi resolution, according to the excellent review on photo-I that you referred me to, you can load an entire set of 36 35mm colour negs and scan them in one pass. This is another advantage as I have about 30 years worth of colour negs to scan. It also takes basically any negative you can fit on the bed. I will certainly be looking at photo-I again as its reviews seem to be down to earth and realistic. Many reviews of computer equipment are basically playing back what manufacturers say in their blurb because the reviewers can't be bothered to do their job properly.

Before anyone groans - very few of my 30-year backlog of pics are of ships so I won't be flooding the Gallery :-)

Thanks again for your input.

R651400
27th December 2005, 15:59
I scanned a 1930's negative with similar toning.
The secret is to save the scan put it through whatever print program you have and using the colour enhance/remove, reduce to a black and white "image."
Next step using any image inverter change negative to a positive b&w photo. Think I did this last step using Windows XP Paint.
Result? Negative was a shot of my grandfather and my octogenerian aunt, his daughter, was chuffed to bits.

rickles23
17th August 2007, 07:56
To turn colour to b/w or to play around with b/w try "Pog Mono Renditionizer"

web site: http://gopog.net/


Its a plug in for Photoshop and is FREE...(Thumb)

Regards

Jan Hendrik
17th August 2007, 08:58
Benjodog,

There have been other threads about this subject and e.g. take number 4 from top of the list in the camera/photographic section and you will get some more tips.

You consider an Epson 4990. I did too but still chose the Canon 9550F as that one is faster and does 12 slides instead of 8 by Epson.
Further Canon also takes large colour negatives etc. and you can choose 2400 (most convenient), 4800 but even up to 9600 dpi.
I used everything with 2400 which is ample with excellent results.
Jan

benjidog
17th August 2007, 23:56
This is an old thread but I can say that I was able to do everything I wanted with the Epson 4990 and Photoshop. Both expensive but you get what you pay for like most things in this world.

Regards,

Brian

andysk
20th August 2007, 16:26
Benjidog, I couldn't agree more !

I'm very pleased with my 4990 and Elements 2 that came with it (FoC)

My workflow is to set it up to scan 8 slides as I wind myself up for work in the morning ! I have enough time then to have a shower and get breakfast while it chunters away in the background - that's with full dust removal, & set at 2400 dpi.

I'm just waiting for Elements 5 to come then I'll be away !

steviej
14th September 2007, 18:03
Benjidog, I couldn't agree more !

I'm very pleased with my 4990 and Elements 2 that came with it (FoC)

My workflow is to set it up to scan 8 slides as I wind myself up for work in the morning ! I have enough time then to have a shower and get breakfast while it chunters away in the background - that's with full dust removal, & set at 2400 dpi.

I'm just waiting for Elements 5 to come then I'll be away !

I agree with Andy the Epson 4990 is a nice peice of kit. I think you can pick one up for around 250.

andysk
17th September 2007, 14:05
Thanks Steviej; just as a follow up, I have now got PSE5 installed, and will start playing later this week.

Cheers

Andy

Bob Preston
10th December 2007, 17:21
As a volunteer tutor in digital imaging I think PS5 is the dogs b*****ks. I don't think its worth buying PS6 yet, as my students are picking up legit copies of PS5 on eBay for between 12-50 and 25. It will do every thing you want and more besides, I'm a big fan. As for scanners, you pay your money and takes your chance.I have a HP professional thing, it was given to me, and now I know why!! Through lots of hints, it seems offspring have got me a Canon 8800f for Christmas. I'm a big believer in getting things at right price. If anyone is interested I will report back when I,ve got it up and running.

Bob

DAVIDJM
13th December 2007, 10:13
Gentlemen

I would like to thank you for this thread and all the advice given.

I have a few thousand slides I would dearly like to scan and improve. But I only have old Mustek 1200 UB scanner. I have held back in buying anything better until I can find one that will do the jobs I want, at a price I can afford.

The scanners you have mentioned now gives me an idea what to look for.

Thank you.

David

K urgess
13th December 2007, 12:22
The best thing to do, David, is to look at the galleries of the people who own the various scanners. That way you can see the results straight away.
My Epson 4870 Photo has done sterling service and is still going strong.(Thumb)

Jock3
25th January 2008, 17:25
Perhaps late in the day this but working with a newly acquired HP Scanjet G4050 which has replaced the Epsom results are excellent which they need to be as customers otherwise wont pay!
Cost is under 200 and it will scan 30 negs at a time

R831814
26th January 2008, 12:18
Perhaps late in the day this but working with a newly acquired HP Scanjet G4050 which has replaced the Epsom results are excellent which they need to be as customers otherwise wont pay!
Cost is under 200 and it will scan 30 negs at a time

Always worth posting. Might be too late for some but I have been deliberating about a scanner and have not considered this one. What were you using before?

Having a look round the internet it seems the Epson Perfection V500 and the HP Scanjet G4050 can be bought for around the same price.

Has anyone got any more experience of either of these?

K urgess
26th January 2008, 12:44
The thing to be careful of is the true optical dpi the scanner will do.
All scanners will say they do 9600 and some even more but most are interpolated from their best optical dpi.
If you're doing 35mm slides and negatives then an optical minimum dpi of 4800 is essential to give you the flexibility.
I use the Epson 4870 as stated before and find it very good. Paticularly the software which has always impressed reviewers as being about the best there is.
If I were to upgrade it would be to another Epson and then only for more bells and whistles. This is my second or third Epson and the only reason for changing was better optical dpi and convenience. This one has a built in neg/slide scanning light whereas the last one had a seperate unit that had to be fitted.

Jock3
26th January 2008, 14:02
Previously I had a loan of an Epsom 4990 whilst a mate was working overseas. When the Epsom went home the HP was subsequently recommended to me and having put it to extensive use I have no regrets at all and would recommend it.
Easy to use, impressive results and along with everything I guess, you make your choice and pay your money.
Cheers Jock

R831814
27th January 2008, 09:21
The thing to be careful of is the true optical dpi the scanner will do.
All scanners will say they do 9600 and some even more but most are interpolated from their best optical dpi.
If you're doing 35mm slides and negatives then an optical minimum dpi of 4800 is essential to give you the flexibility.
I use the Epson 4870 as stated before and find it very good. Paticularly the software which has always impressed reviewers as being about the best there is.
If I were to upgrade it would be to another Epson and then only for more bells and whistles. This is my second or third Epson and the only reason for changing was better optical dpi and convenience. This one has a built in neg/slide scanning light whereas the last one had a seperate unit that had to be fitted.

I agree Epson are hard to beat. The main differences between the Epson and HP seem to be that the Epson has higher resolution but the HP can scan more 35mm images at one go. Price difference is negligable.
Both features are attractive.

rickles23
22nd February 2008, 06:16
A good friend of mine had the same problem, old large negatives and no way to scan them.
My solution was to get my lightbox, place the negatives on top, switch on lightbox and photograph them with my digital camera with macro filters from my film camera.
I then downloaded the results into Photoshop and used the 'invert' command to bring them back to positives plus a bit of tweaking with 'contrast' etc. and
the result was very good.
Regards...(Thumb)

rickles23
23rd February 2008, 11:25
Added to my post of yesterday, this photograph was taken as described in the text. The negative, some 64 years old, was found in my late Father's Ditty Box. He is the one wearing the slouch hat.
Regards...(Wave)

andysk
29th February 2008, 23:05
I agree Epson are hard to beat. The main differences between the Epson and HP seem to be that the Epson has higher resolution but the HP can scan more 35mm images at one go. Price difference is negligable. Both features are attractive.

I've now got into a habit, workdays anyway, of setting up my Epson 4990 with the 8 slides, standard settings and digital ICE selected, hit the go button and go away for the morning ablutions and breakfast. About 45 mins later when I'm ready to go out of the front door it's all done.

To see the effects, take a look at the pics I've posted in the galleries - when it breaks, I'd go for another Epson.