The Steamers Box Boats

david freeman
13th August 2011, 13:09
I see I did not enter the information I had intended. Sorry for that.
I was wondering how many steam engineers had to retrain in motorships as theses boats in the late 60's early 70's were some of the last steam ships built. They had varios steam plant arrangements Twin Screw-double single and 11/2 boilers if I am correct, roof fired and what was then state of the art StalLaval steam turbine plant. I was just wondering if you had any stories from these days.(Thumb)

surfaceblow
13th August 2011, 19:50
My original license was for Third Assistant Engineer Steam and Motor any Horsepower which I raised rapidity to a Chief Engineer Steam and Third Motor Vessel. To raise my Motor License I took a one month course called Motor Vessels for Steam Engineers and observed for 90 days on Motor Vessels. A lot of the Engineers that I sailed with raised their license by this means.

After I raised by license I spent five years on motor vessels before going back to steam vessels by this time there was a general lack of steam experience. I had suffer from the First Assistant Engineer securing the Number 1 SSTG electrically and the Second Assistant secured the steam to the 2 SSTG while we were still in the channel leaving Tampa. I even had a 1 A/E that tried to remove the bonnet of the evap brine overboard skin valve after I told him to repack the brine overboard pump since the pump was not able to over come the vacuum on the evap shell. Some of the other problems I had with Diesel Engineers on steam ships that could not get the art of compounding a boiler or raising vacuum on a evaporator and even when to shift from the low settler suction to the high suction when the boiler flames start to flutter.

In the early 90's I left steam vessels for the most part and sailed on motor vessels I still had the problem with compounding the donkey boiler and the jacket water chemistry.

Joe

makko
15th August 2011, 03:54
The Bay Boats were very difficult following conversion, mainly as a result of the angle in order to direct couple to the original (steam driven) prop shafts. I only encountered a couple of steam queen, diesel wannabees. They were good...... Even if they had to defer to the 4/E on occasion!
Rgds.
Dave