Best Looking Bank Boats

Waighty
28th August 2011, 11:29
This is obviously going to be subjective but for my money, the best lookers were the last Fleetbank Class and the Fish Class, although the Harland's 16000dwt come very close.

Alistair Macnab
28th August 2011, 15:17
Its certainly subjective but I do think that for sheer pizzazz the 15,000 dwt from Doxford of the "Shirrabank" and "Ernebank" were the best looking. When full and down, they looked magnificent and unlike any other cargo ship on the seas. Except for trying to keep that darned buff painted signal mast clean that is!

China hand
28th August 2011, 18:26
As the lady said on the VHF in La Guaira: " Cedarbank, Cedarbank - Comanvena. Aiy 'sos muy bonita, una pictura verdad". Enuff said, all aboard highly chuffed. 1977.[=P]

Alan Rawlinson
28th August 2011, 18:47
For me, the compass class ships of long ago, full and down, with that big oversized funnel perched on the rear of the boat deck.

Waighty
29th August 2011, 10:45
Perhaps someone will start a "worst looking Bank Boat" thread! For me the Mara and Spey. They just didn't have that Bank Line look about them.

China hand
29th August 2011, 18:31
CORABANK class, absolute. I wouldn't wish that ass on my worst enemy's girlfriend!

John Dryden
29th August 2011, 19:58
Shirrabank for me.I have this photo as my desk top;
http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/173561/title/shirrabank/cat/510
Quite a few people (the landlubber type)have asked me if it was a trawler.Maybe it,s just a Hull thing but I can see there point on the shape of the hull.
Got a black signal mast Alistair so maybe your words did not fall on deaf ears!
Incidentally,any idea where this photo was taken or maybe someone could hazard a guess.

Alan Rawlinson
30th August 2011, 08:36
Shirrabank for me.I have this photo as my desk top;
http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/173561/title/shirrabank/cat/510
Quite a few people (the landlubber type)have asked me if it was a trawler.Maybe it,s just a Hull thing but I can see there point on the shape of the hull.
Got a black signal mast Alistair so maybe your words did not fall on deaf ears!
Incidentally,any idea where this photo was taken or maybe someone could hazard a guess.

Hi John,

Must admit that looks nice - like a ship. The thin black top on the funnel could have been a little broader. It would have shouted ' Bankline ' then, to anyone arriving in a port and seeing her there.

The least attractive ( very subjective, this!) were the so called ' white ships ' Isipingo and Inchanga, spoiled by the funnel design, as in most profiles, the funnel makes or breaks the visual appeal.

Alistair Macnab
30th August 2011, 15:22
Oh Boy! Alan. You have certainly put a cat among the pigeons by your criticism of the White Ships' appearance!

Yes, the funnel was ridiculous but that was the charm of them. Quite dated and screaming Belfast. They were unique. As I've said before, a cross between a huge private yacht and an intercolonial liner.

By the way, I agree that the "Shirrabank" could have been improved with a wider black to to the funnel but I absolutely condemn the necessity of painting the signal mast and the after sampson posts black. Captain Gale would never have allowed it! Better to put a modest extension on the main engine exhaust raising it above the rim of the funnel and the smuts would have been dispelled. We tried that on the "Ernebank" and it worked but had to take the extension back down because the Old Man got windy about what a superintendent would say.

China hand
30th August 2011, 18:19
Sorry, my comments about the CORABANK class were meant to refer to the WORST lookers.

Alan Rawlinson
31st August 2011, 09:42
Oh Boy! Alan. You have certainly put a cat among the pigeons by your criticism of the White Ships' appearance!

Yes, the funnel was ridiculous but that was the charm of them. Quite dated and screaming Belfast. They were unique. As I've said before, a cross between a huge private yacht and an intercolonial liner.

By the way, I agree that the "Shirrabank" could have been improved with a wider black to to the funnel but I absolutely condemn the necessity of painting the signal mast and the after sampson posts black. Captain Gale would never have allowed it! Better to put a modest extension on the main engine exhaust raising it above the rim of the funnel and the smuts would have been dispelled. We tried that on the "Ernebank" and it worked but had to take the extension back down because the Old Man got windy about what a superintendent would say.

I know what you mean Alistair, about the ' special' look that the white ships had. It was 1930's written over them. I am always amazed at the impact a slight change to the funnel outline has on vessels in general. I have tried pencilling in a new outline on a photocopy of various ships and the transformation is immediate.

Apart from the technical issues with flues etc.. the naval architect responsible for the design had tremendous scope to make his mark. The Gent ( name escapes me) who designed the Blue Funnel P class ( or was it J?) produced a stunningly proud looking vessel that has stood the test of time. He went on to design the ' baby' Bay class vessels of OCL which had his stamp on them in the shape of the funnel.

Waighty
4th September 2011, 12:50
Shirrabank for me.I have this photo as my desk top;
http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/173561/title/shirrabank/cat/510
Quite a few people (the landlubber type)have asked me if it was a trawler.Maybe it,s just a Hull thing but I can see there point on the shape of the hull.
Got a black signal mast Alistair so maybe your words did not fall on deaf ears!
Incidentally,any idea where this photo was taken or maybe someone could hazard a guess.

An excellent photo John. I've placed a couple of her in the gallery when we were entering Durban ex Chalna, circa 1978. As soon as we berthed we got a bollocking for not having the derricks up and ready! We did try but in the swell it was downright dangerous. Complete discharge at Durban and then she loaded out on the West Coast South America service; we paid offin Durban.

Waighty
4th September 2011, 12:57
CORABANK class, absolute. I wouldn't wish that ass on my worst enemy's girlfriend!

You're right China Hand, they weren't the best lookers even when full and down. You had to be a "deep tank meister" to luv 'em! (Pint)

Hamish Mackintosh
4th September 2011, 16:46
Nah you guys got it all wrong, the "Sams" were the best looking bank boats, and morgage lifters, but then this is coming from a guy that admires some of "Ma" Kellies coal burning submarines of circa 1910, and other vintage coasters! I shall now go and hide in the bunker tweendeck

China hand
4th September 2011, 18:24
You're right China Hand, they weren't the best lookers even when full and down. You had to be a "deep tank meister" to luv 'em! (Pint)

I was mate and then master on the beasts. I have been thru every cm of those tanks ( I'm a shortass and fitted quite well, even in the tunnel tanks). Hated them then, hate them now in memory.
But we are talking about looks? They just looked ungainly, awkward , unbalanced, unweatherly and wrong.
Only my view, many disagree.

Waighty
15th September 2011, 15:38
I was mate and then master on the beasts. I have been thru every cm of those tanks ( I'm a shortass and fitted quite well, even in the tunnel tanks). Hated them then, hate them now in memory.
But we are talking about looks? They just looked ungainly, awkward , unbalanced, unweatherly and wrong.
Only my view, many disagree.

I did three of them deep-sea and one coastal, should have been deep-sea but paid off for domestic reasons. They were effort consuming and sometimes downright painful if you caught a limb or head on some part of a deep tank's construction. I'd love to have done a plain old cargo trip on them after they were taken off the South Pacific runs, just to compare the difference. Worst one for me was Moraybank where 2/E, 6/E and I, plus appys spent a long time in the duct keel, breaking the main ballast line at each flange and sending topside for unblocking of solidified palm oil plus perolin and water residue! Before we joined someone had transferred washings from Nos 2 and 3 down said line to one of the aft tanks but without tracing lines it just set solid! No rose coloured spectacles for that episode. :sweat:

China hand
15th September 2011, 18:34
Yup, the Moraybank was not my favourite posting. Interesting point, nothing to do with looks: first trip on Moray as mate, crewlist 63 souls; first rip on Moray as master, crewlist 36 souls. Good eh?(Jester)

jimthehat
16th September 2011, 10:20
I know what you mean Alistair, about the ' special' look that the white ships had. It was 1930's written over them. I am always amazed at the impact a slight change to the funnel outline has on vessels in general. I have tried pencilling in a new outline on a photocopy of various ships and the transformation is immediate.

Apart from the technical issues with flues etc.. the naval architect responsible for the design had tremendous scope to make his mark. The Gent ( name escapes me) who designed the Blue Funnel P class ( or was it J?) produced a stunningly proud looking vessel that has stood the test of time. He went on to design the ' baby' Bay class vessels of OCL which had his stamp on them in the shape of the funnel.

ISIPINGO,along with the Inchanga best looking ships in the fleet,two years on them and you really deserved the tie.

jim

China hand
16th September 2011, 18:10
But wasn't that the "new, exciting, Motor Vessel" look? Everyone was doing it. Look at those low Union Castle liners that went from high smokestacks to "Inchanga" lookalike funnels. The point was : "LOOK at me, I am a motorship, classy and MODERN" Virtually every big company tried it. In their time, the little Bank Line white ships made a pretty good impression. I was with Inchanga at Sandheads, lovely sight. A week later up river in Cal, pretty dowdy. Times had changed.

pete
18th September 2011, 10:54
On the Spey and the Mara (sailed on both) we fitted 2x40 gall drums welded together on the funnel to stop the Funnel Fume flooding into the Bridge. It worked but when we arrived in Durban the Super said "gerrit awf" We did only to replace it after we sailed. Best lookers to me were the H&W 15000 tonners, great to sail on and good sea vessels hence my avatar of the Hazel.......pete

Waighty
20th September 2011, 21:05
Yup, the Moraybank was not my favourite posting. Interesting point, nothing to do with looks: first trip on Moray as mate, crewlist 63 souls; first rip on Moray as master, crewlist 36 souls. Good eh?(Jester)

Somehow I doubt if the workload reduced by a similar percentage!

I was lucky on one of them, could have been the Meadow, where I was actually Mate but on daywork! That at least was the description the crew dept (sorry marine personnel dept!) gave it; glut of 2nd Mates we had two. There was the odd day homeward, fully loaded, where daywork did occur and very pleasurable it was.

China hand
21st September 2011, 18:27
I think it was Forthbank, starting the Bank n Sav thing, we were a 4 mate ship. We had plonked all the container fittings on the hatch covers in drydock, even keel?; cranes reached, evybodyhappy.
Aussie, super wants to try to see if they worked. Ch.h was daywork mate. Super drives crane. Ship is in ballast and trimmed like only an empty Corabortion class can. Cranes can't reach, evybodyunhappy. Super lousy crane driver, knocks Ch.h off container, busts his shoulder.
Happy days.
Using bullwires attatched to container frames whilst safety superintendents looked on and spouted about time and money?
Loading palm oil through discharge lines 'cos bondstrand piping wasn't fast enuff, under supers eyes, and after reading the circular that said "OOOOh NO".
They were not nice looking ships, even when we still had enough paint.(Fly)

Waighty
24th September 2011, 20:09
I think it was Forthbank, starting the Bank n Sav thing, we were a 4 mate ship. We had plonked all the container fittings on the hatch covers in drydock, even keel?; cranes reached, evybodyhappy.
Aussie, super wants to try to see if they worked. Ch.h was daywork mate. Super drives crane. Ship is in ballast and trimmed like only an empty Corabortion class can. Cranes can't reach, evybodyunhappy. Super lousy crane driver, knocks Ch.h off container, busts his shoulder.
Happy days.
Using bullwires attatched to container frames whilst safety superintendents looked on and spouted about time and money?
Loading palm oil through discharge lines 'cos bondstrand piping wasn't fast enuff, under supers eyes, and after reading the circular that said "OOOOh NO".
They were not nice looking ships, even when we still had enough paint.(Fly)

I know exactly what you mean - we also loaded through discharge lines but someone forgot to close the drainage valves in the fwd pump room! Another occasion at Kimbe, deck jam packed with containers so bondstrand and any other flexible stuff we could utilise pressed into service up and over and under the boxes until we could load; anxious throughout!

I heard tell on one of the Cora class of an Appy deciding enough was enough and started chucking bondstrand pipe sections over the side!

Also remember loading all the aft tanks with coconut oil in Suva, our second outward port, and thus acquiring a 6 metre trim by the stern, so after that we had to use bullwires to assist in opening No3 hatch covers and then use them as preventers when opening No4 hatch covers. Oh happy days.

China hand
25th September 2011, 18:10
I would have loved to see them at Gadani beach, and I don't think that about many ships. I pity the poor wreckers who had to demolish anything to do with those rotten, stinking, foul, ill designed tanks, tunnels, pumprooms, etc. Probably had fun untangling the ermine shuffleboards as well. But they have gone, the world is a bit of scrap richer. Again, on looks, they did nothing for the shiplovers eye.(Thumb)

Waighty
27th September 2011, 10:44
Speaking of ermine hatches - I was 2nd Mate on Corabank in 1975 and we were alongside at Melbourne. I was late finish and waiting for the wharfies to leave No4. When they did I went down to close the ermine hatches, just as I started them off the mate called down from the deck, so I leaned out to listen and respond whilst keeping the control button pressed; disaster. One side failed to move while the other went perfectly resulting in a cascade of those bloody panels and the ratchet bar into the hold! Fortunately the mate spotted what was happening and yelled for me to stop, which I did. Half the panels were suspended in mid-air, being held by the good side and the wires, which didn't part thankfully. :@

About 4 hours later we got them all back together again and stowed but it was a salutory lesson and I treated the bloody things with a lot more respect after that. Good thing I wasn't on a promise that night!

I also recall on another of the class using a forklift in New Orleans on the closed for'd ermines in No4 stb'd with a bullwire attached to the aft ermines to assist in trying to close them. The forklift tyres giving off volumes of smoke. It worked though.

China hand
27th September 2011, 18:21
Dunnit, no T shirt though. The appy (who had been driving forklifts in his Dad's yard for years) was willing. China (mate), ever thoughtful of the safety of his charges, said no way. China jumps in forklift, majestically guns it over the ermines ( wires and ratchets looked like Granny's knitting): they split in the wrong place, forklift and China dropped about 50cm. Cut a long night short, rigged derricks, forklift out, bullwires, ermins yanked open with childish delight. Never drove another forklift in Bank Line. But then again, the only time I ever saw ermins again was in a barge alongside. Yet another Corabortion delight.
And they still didn't look good after I had finished.(Night)

PJW
4th October 2011, 19:39
Without doubt the best looker was the Gowanbank of 1968 the last Harland & Wolff built Bank boat!

Alan Rawlinson
9th July 2013, 13:28
Without doubt the best looker was the Gowanbank of 1968 the last Harland & Wolff built Bank boat!

Gowenbank below - Always used to admire the lines on the 'old' Shirrabank. Never sailed on her but was in port a few times with her and she always seemed to have an extra long foredeck, giving her a very sleek appearance, especially when loaded. Not sure about this, but someone out there might know the story.