Ebani

Julian Calvin
7th September 2011, 11:33
Sailed on the Ebani when she carried twelve Nigerian National Line cadets plus training officer.
Cadets were in old passenger cabins but doubled up so empty cabins could be filled with fridges, freezers, TVs etc.
One afternoon cadets were working on stbd bridge wing, two senior cdts lounging on port wing; when I asked what were they doing, response was "we are in charge, we don't have to work". Says it all really!!

Graham the pipe
24th December 2013, 19:54
Sailed on the Ebani when she carried twelve Nigerian National Line cadets plus training officer.
Cadets were in old passenger cabins but doubled up so empty cabins could be filled with fridges, freezers, TVs etc.
One afternoon cadets were working on stbd bridge wing, two senior cdts lounging on port wing; when I asked what were they doing, response was "we are in charge, we don't have to work". Says it all really!!

Hi Julian. Just found this! Thought it was about time someone actually commented on your thread. What year was this and what rank were you at the time?

This being an 'open forum' I'll choose my words carefully and say I'm glad it's you where you are and not me! Happy Yuletide to you and yours. G (Thumb)

stan mayes
24th December 2013, 22:14
Ebani -
As a rigger,during 1960 I was working on American Angler of US Lines..
she was on No1 quay Tilbury docks...Directly opposite on 32 quay was Ebani.
Chatting with the American Chief Officer he told me that he thought Ebani was the finest cargo ship he had ever seen.
The following day on his ship he told me that he had visited Ebani the previous
afternoon and he was critical of her design in getting from for'ard to aft in having to pass up and down on stairways and through internal alleyways.
I agreed with him....it was not easy for us to carry lashing materials ie coils
of rope and wire and bottlescrews from the foredeck to after deck.
Also I remember that to gain access to No3 hold was also from the internal
alleyway on port side.
Stan

stan mayes
25th December 2013, 11:15
I recall the time Ebani had the Nigerian apprentices aboard also 1960's
they seemed to be always washing the paintwork around the bridge.
Stan

Graham the pipe
25th December 2013, 12:09
Hi Stan! Trust you and yours are enjoying your day? We're back to our Tilbury days again, aren't we? I was an 'Eboe' man myself but as you well know, identical in respect of the 'negative factors' under discussion. Sorry but I'm not going to comment on the Nigerian cadets, after all it is Peace and goodwill to all men, I 'think'?

Julian Calvin
25th December 2013, 19:33
I was 2nd Mate for two trips in '76 when we had passengers first trip then changed to the Nigerian cadets. They had one English training officer to look after them although some of them did watches.
Remember asking who tested the bilges on NNSL ships but they didn't know what I was talking about and nearly rebelled when told what to do.
Main demise of the NNSL fleet was the lousy fuel consumption plus inefficient management. Shame really as some of them were quite good looking vessels.

Julian Calvin
25th December 2013, 19:37
Forgot to say, Old Man was Dickie Richards, Mate Pat Noonan and 3rd Mate s. Whitlock.

eldersuk
26th December 2013, 00:22
I was an Eboe man at one stage and can't remember the number of times I was called up to repair the whistle which had bits knocked off by the derricks at the trunk hatch. This was considered quite a perk for the 3/E in decent weather, an afternoon bronzying rather than sweltering down the E.R.

Derek

Rogerfrench
26th December 2013, 13:21
I sailed on both, my favourite ships despite their awkwardness getting fore to aft.