Taybank grounding.

Ian Harrod
14th November 2011, 02:59
My first ship as 3rd mate. Vibrated badly at speed. I remember someone saying that it was the result of a serious grounding (late 60's, early 70's.) in the Indian Ocean, possibly around the islands north of Madagascar.

Anyone got any knowledge of this?

Alistair Macnab
14th November 2011, 05:01
Ian....
I seem to remember several groundings that either you or I have mixed up in our heads over the years! The first I seem to recall was one of the Compass Boats that ran on to an uncharted underwater pinacle north of Madagascar. Early 50s(?) I think the ship's name now attaches to this previously unknown shoal. The second incident was when the "Taybank" (the 15000 tonner) ran onto a coral shoal off the Queensland Coast. Captain Ray from the Sydney office got "Taybank" afloat in a couple of days using the ship's own ground tackle and a rising tide. I was less fortunate, the more we worked at getting "Lindenbank" refloated with the help of two U.S. Navy salvage teams from Honolulu, the higher up the reef she went. A lee shore was to blame but also a hard coral outcrop under the after deeptanks upon which she pivoted when the two tugs pulled. The seaward side was, of course too deep to position ground tackle. I was not a happy camper when I got back to New York only to learn of Captain Ray's success to be compared to my failure!

Coastie
14th November 2011, 06:06
That really could not have been easy for you.

Alan Rawlinson
14th November 2011, 07:18
Ian....
I seem to remember several groundings that either you or I have mixed up in our heads over the years! The first I seem to recall was one of the Compass Boats that ran on to an uncharted underwater pinacle north of Madagascar. Early 50s(?) I think the ship's name now attaches to this previously unknown shoal. The second incident was when the "Taybank" (the 15000 tonner) ran onto a coral shoal off the Queensland Coast. Captain Ray from the Sydney office got "Taybank" afloat in a couple of days using the ship's own ground tackle and a rising tide. I was less fortunate, the more we worked at getting "Lindenbank" refloated with the help of two U.S. Navy salvage teams from Honolulu, the higher up the reef she went. A lee shore was to blame but also a hard coral outcrop under the after deeptanks upon which she pivoted when the two tugs pulled. The seaward side was, of course too deep to position ground tackle. I was not a happy camper when I got back to New York only to learn of Captain Ray's success to be compared to my failure!

I think your first one refers to the Westbank which grounded at full speed during the night, on the island of Juan De Nova, situated between Madagascar and the mainland. We have touched on the details before here in SN, but it was late in 1952, and Mr Carney was the unfortunate C/O on watch. He was exonerated later when his sight book was re worked at the London Office, and the cause was found to be ' an unusual current '. It didn't do a lot for his confidence, later. She was hauled off the island and temporarily repaired in Durban ( big steel girders slapped fore and aft at the bilges) and we sailed for Immingham with a fullish cargo of manganese ore, just perfect for a damaged hull - I don't think, although it would have been approved by all the authorities.

jimthehat
14th November 2011, 08:08
I think your first one refers to the Westbank which grounded at full speed during the night, on the island of Juan De Nova, situated between Madagascar and the mainland. We have touched on the details before here in SN, but it was late in 1952, and Mr Carney was the unfortunate C/O on watch. He was exonerated later when his sight book was re worked at the London Office, and the cause was found to be ' an unusual current '. It didn't do a lot for his confidence, later. She was hauled off the island and temporarily repaired in Durban ( big steel girders slapped fore and aft at the bilges) and we sailed for Immingham with a fullish cargo of manganese ore, just perfect for a damaged hull - I don't think, although it would have been approved by all the authorities.

Alan,were you on the westbank when she went aground,there was a well known story tha the lookout had spotted the island but did not report it cos there was no light(no bati sahib)

Alan Rawlinson
14th November 2011, 10:41
Alan,were you on the westbank when she went aground,there was a well known story tha the lookout had spotted the island but did not report it cos there was no light(no bati sahib)

Hi Jim,

It has a ring of truth about it!

I joined her after she had been pulled off in Durban, for a run home.

The story I heard was that Bruce Carney's morning sights had given a sort of ' rogue ' position, a long way from the D.R. , so was ignored, and it later turned out to be accurate. What a bummer!

We later sailed together, when he was Master, and I was Mate, and understandably, he was a bit jumpy when we were near islands. ( Nearly always in the Bankline!)

jimthehat
14th November 2011, 14:42
Hi Jim,

It has a ring of truth about it!

I joined her after she had been pulled off in Durban, for a run home.

The story I heard was that Bruce Carney's morning sights had given a sort of ' rogue ' position, a long way from the D.R. , so was ignored, and it later turned out to be accurate. What a bummer!

We later sailed together, when he was Master, and I was Mate, and understandably, he was a bit jumpy when we were near islands. ( Nearly always in the Bankline!)
Yes I had heard that he was so sure that his sights were right that he did not go out into the wheelhouse but started to re work the when all of a sudden there was a big bump.
Again another story doing the rounds that the master got promoted to super and the mate to master.

jim

Alan Rawlinson
14th November 2011, 15:40
Yes I had heard that he was so sure that his sights were right that he did not go out into the wheelhouse but started to re work the when all of a sudden there was a big bump.
Again another story doing the rounds that the master got promoted to super and the mate to master.

jim

Was more than a big bump! Can remember hearing the stories when I joined her, and believe it was the 3/0 who told me he was thrown out of his bunk as the ship came to a grinding halt - luckily on a sandy bottom. It must have been a bit dodgy down below, come to think of it.

The only time I ever touched bottom ( nautically speaking!) was on the IRISBANK in 1956 when we ran over the shoal outside of Chittagong, when I was on watch. It later turned out that the buoy had been displaced by storm conditions, but at the time we were not to know that. The event was a slow motion nightmare. I had the old wet paper echo sounder running in the chartroom, and it was visible from the wheelhouse and audible - as you may remember they made a clicking and whirring sound. I watched the line indicating the bottom come up steeply just prior to the bump. Visually, I could see the buoy away to starboard, but ahead the water was disturbed similar to when a shoal of fish are present - however it turned out to be the shallows, and we hit and rolled away to port. The derricks were up, and the lower hold hatches which went flying, had been stacked either side. - As we rolled a wave came over the starboard side, and the engineers got a shock as water went down the E.R. skylight. Captain Palmer, who had a dicky ticker, came running up to the bridge, but we sailed on without any obvious damage. He noted protest later, in Chittagong, and it was declared that the buoy had drifted. I don't remember any bottom damage at the next dry docking, so all was well in the end.

Waighty
14th November 2011, 17:04
I may be confusing things myself but didn't the Taybank ground somewhere north of Madagascar? I seem to recall reading a report of the Old Man keeping the radar off and only running on DR pos'ns after a morning position line. Something nagging my mind that Howe was the master. I might be completely wrong mind you!

The only grounding I experienced was on Moraybank (1979 August I think). We were loading homewards at Kimbe and rushing to get away to let the Fenbank, I think it was but I might be mistaken, alongside to discharge. Our pilot left and went directly to Fenbank. I left the foc'sle shortly afterwards and went down to the engine room to talk to the 2/E about steaming through the various pipelines and bondstrand sections which still had palm oil residue in them. We were just working up the speed when there was a sudden lurch and a ring to stop engines. I dashed up to the bridge to see what was what, only to discover that we had run up a reef! The usual events occurred after that, sounding round in and out which revealed that we weren't taking water but were aground at the forefoot. The pilot came back to us to help. Eventually after about 25 minutes off we came after astern movements, followed by dead slow ahead hard to stb'd then port, then finally full astern and off we went. This was followed by full ahead to stop us grounding again on the reef astern of us!

Round to Lae where Aussie divers reported a few scratches but no indentations or buckling. I imagine there was a report of the incident circulated fleeet wide although I don't recall seeing it.

John Campbell
14th November 2011, 18:45
Hi Jim,

It has a ring of truth about it!

I joined her after she had been pulled off in Durban, for a run home.

The story I heard was that Bruce Carney's morning sights had given a sort of ' rogue ' position, a long way from the D.R. , so was ignored, and it later turned out to be accurate. What a bummer!

We later sailed together, when he was Master, and I was Mate, and understandably, he was a bit jumpy when we were near islands. ( Nearly always in the Bankline!)

We had a first trip 3rd Mate , J Mclintock from Glasgow, on the Southbank and he told us many times that he was on the Westbank when they ran aground - she unlike the Southbank was not fitted with radar.

jimthehat
14th November 2011, 23:35
Was more than a big bump! Can remember hearing the stories when I joined her, and believe it was the 3/0 who told me he was thrown out of his bunk as the ship came to a grinding halt - luckily on a sandy bottom. It must have been a bit dodgy down below, come to think of it.

The only time I ever touched bottom ( nautically speaking!) was on the IRISBANK in 1956 when we ran over the shoal outside of Chittagong, when I was on watch. It later turned out that the buoy had been displaced by storm conditions, but at the time we were not to know that. The event was a slow motion nightmare. I had the old wet paper echo sounder running in the chartroom, and it was visible from the wheelhouse and audible - as you may remember they made a clicking and whirring sound. I watched the line indicating the bottom come up steeply just prior to the bump. Visually, I could see the buoy away to starboard, but ahead the water was disturbed similar to when a shoal of fish are present - however it turned out to be the shallows, and we hit and rolled away to port. The derricks were up, and the lower hold hatches which went flying, had been stacked either side. - As we rolled a wave came over the starboard side, and the engineers got a shock as water went down the E.R. skylight. Captain Palmer, who had a dicky ticker, came running up to the bridge, but we sailed on without any obvious damage. He noted protest later, in Chittagong, and it was declared that the buoy had drifted. I don't remember any bottom damage at the next dry docking, so all was well in the end.

28 years at sea and only aground once. (ON the maplebank)That was a deliberate job,we had a major e/r fire just as we were picking up the missippii pilot ,he advised the old man that we should run up on the beach and wait for the fire boat to turnup which they did a few hours later pi***d off cos they had been watching a world heavyweight fight.

jim

Ian Harrod
15th November 2011, 01:22
Grounded briefly in Townsville on the Testbank prior to loading sugar. Got off under our own power after about ten minutes.

Went back to Townsville years later when I was with Australian National Line and mentioned to the pilot on the way in that "last time I came here on a Bank boat the useless pilot put us in the mud". He just grunted and wouldn't talk to me for the rest of the pilotage! Not my fault that I didn't recognise him.

Joe C
15th November 2011, 13:45
Was more than a big bump! Can remember hearing the stories when I joined her, and believe it was the 3/0 who told me he was thrown out of his bunk as the ship came to a grinding halt - luckily on a sandy bottom. It must have been a bit dodgy down below, come to think of it.

The only time I ever touched bottom ( nautically speaking!) was on the IRISBANK in 1956 when we ran over the shoal outside of Chittagong, when I was on watch. It later turned out that the buoy had been displaced by storm conditions, but at the time we were not to know that. The event was a slow motion nightmare. I had the old wet paper echo sounder running in the chartroom, and it was visible from the wheelhouse and audible - as you may remember they made a clicking and whirring sound. I watched the line indicating the bottom come up steeply just prior to the bump. Visually, I could see the buoy away to starboard, but ahead the water was disturbed similar to when a shoal of fish are present - however it turned out to be the shallows, and we hit and rolled away to port. The derricks were up, and the lower hold hatches which went flying, had been stacked either side. - As we rolled a wave came over the starboard side, and the engineers got a shock as water went down the E.R. skylight. Captain Palmer, who had a dicky ticker, came running up to the bridge, but we sailed on without any obvious damage. He noted protest later, in Chittagong, and it was declared that the buoy had drifted. I don't remember any bottom damage at the next dry docking, so all was well in the end.
Earlier on the Irisbank we went on and off the mudbanks when leaving Baton Rouge.The Mississippi must have been very low as I recall,when we were alongside the wharf was level with the monkey island.

Alistair Macnab
15th November 2011, 17:09
Went around a bend in the Karnaphuli River on leaving Chittagong when the "Inchanga" took a long and lazy heel to port to indicate that the extra jute cargo we had packed into the No.3 and No.4trunkways had dangerously compromised our stability. The port side bilge keel came into contact with the river bank mud and the ship then flopped over to a heavy starboard list in a move that looked like it wasn't going to stop! Anxious eyes all round! And a hurried effort to harden up the DB tanks!
Probably the first time I even considered any Bank Boat's inherrent stability but it was a great lesson.

Winebuff
15th November 2011, 21:24
Bounced across the sandy bottom as we left Cairns with a full load of sugar bound for China on Firbank 1976.
Sat in Drydock in East London for 6 weeks while they replaced the double bottom tanks on Fleetbank after sale inspection found damage from stem to stern, 1981.