Days Of Trident Tankers ---ardlui & British Architect

Mike The Gas Man
23rd November 2011, 06:26
Hi Everyone!
Does anyone remember this incident back in 1970 ish? British Architect was tank cleaning in South China Sea off Philippines and she was struck by lightning. Her main deck was ripped apart in the resultant explosion! Ardlui was in the vicinity and rescued the crew!
Ardlui was in ballast and had sailed from Builders Yard in Japan on her maiden trip towards AG. Captain Cedric Ducker was the Master!
It was my last trip a Deck Cadet at the time!

Any info or photos would be great.
Regards, Mike.

mpr41410
25th April 2013, 12:12
The only thing I can remember about that incident involved the recovery of the ship, in itself a complex matter as I have a feeling she had been signed off as salvage.
The heresay (yarn?) that I recall was that the dashing chief engineering supt and ex spitfire pilot chartered a plane to view the ship to assess the damage and when the pilot wouldn't (or couldn't) get close enough yer man took the controls and made a really low pass.
At subsequent inaugurations of eng cadets he would recount this tale along with his spitfire exploits and on one occasion the dialogue dried up and a spotty oick from the floor piped up "tell us about the spitfires again".
Which went up like a lead balloon.
As I say hearsay, you might get a more informative answer if you asked on the british tankers section.

shipshapesailor
20th November 2013, 00:28
I realise that this is a very old post, however, Captain Ducker is my Grandad, so I have a lot of photographs and information about what happened if you are still interested.

R58484956
20th November 2013, 10:22
Greetings SSS and welcome to SN. We are always interested in maritime matters. Bon voyage.

Kelly12345
11th February 2014, 22:30
I've just noticed this post and I am happy to report that, yes, I recall this tanker explosion very well. My dad was the Radio Officer who called in the Mayday from the British Architect. He had many stories to tell of the explosion and indeed the rescue. The only photograph I have ever seen of the ship was a great front page photograph which was published on a Chinese newspaper after the explosion happened. There was a huge gap where the centre ship had been. Unfortunately the paper is long gone. I would love to hear more or see any photographs of the British Architect.

gadgee
12th February 2014, 20:41
Kelly12345

Try searching this Gallery. Here is one of her being repaired+

http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/55160/title/british-architect/cat/503

Danielle preston
20th January 2015, 17:16
I've just noticed this post and I am happy to report that, yes, I recall this tanker explosion very well. My dad was the Radio Officer who called in the Mayday from the British Architect. He had many stories to tell of the explosion and indeed the rescue. The only photograph I have ever seen of the ship was a great front page photograph which was published on a Chinese newspaper after the explosion happened. There was a huge gap where the centre ship had been. Unfortunately the paper is long gone. I would love to hear more or see any photographs of the British Architect.

Hi my uncle was on the british architect and hes always going on about talking to old crew members what was your dads name? My uncle is arnold turgoose x

Dartskipper
20th January 2015, 20:53
Hi Everyone!
Does anyone remember this incident back in 1970 ish? British Architect was tank cleaning in South China Sea off Philippines and she was struck by lightning. Her main deck was ripped apart in the resultant explosion! Ardlui was in the vicinity and rescued the crew!
Ardlui was in ballast and had sailed from Builders Yard in Japan on her maiden trip towards AG. Captain Cedric Ducker was the Master!
It was my last trip a Deck Cadet at the time!

Any info or photos would be great.
Regards, Mike.

Hi Mike, Cedric told me about this when he was a colleague of mine in the late 1980's. He had come ashore by then and we were working in Industrial Sales for a chemical company. Being a true seaman, he was fairly reticent about his seamanship and ship handling skills. I believe Cedric was the youngest master afloat in Trident Tankers at the time. He was quite a character, with a huge fund of interesting and humorous stories.
Best wishes, Roy.

retfordmackem
20th January 2015, 21:09
The only thing I can remember about that incident involved the recovery of the ship, in itself a complex matter as I have a feeling she had been signed off as salvage.
The heresay (yarn?) that I recall was that the dashing chief engineering supt and ex spitfire pilot chartered a plane to view the ship to assess the damage and when the pilot wouldn't (or couldn't) get close enough yer man took the controls and made a really low pass.
At subsequent inaugurations of eng cadets he would recount this tale along with his spitfire exploits and on one occasion the dialogue dried up and a spotty oick from the floor piped up "tell us about the spitfires again".
Which went up like a lead balloon.
As I say hearsay, you might get a more informative answer if you asked on the british tankers section.

Contact Graham Wallace on the BP shipping site .He has vast knowledge on BP disasters and shipping.
Isnt it strange 2 different threads on same ship

Bill Stilwell
8th May 2015, 21:48
I've just noticed this post and I am happy to report that, yes, I recall this tanker explosion very well. My dad was the Radio Officer who called in the Mayday from the British Architect. He had many stories to tell of the explosion and indeed the rescue. The only photograph I have ever seen of the ship was a great front page photograph which was published on a Chinese newspaper after the explosion happened. There was a huge gap where the centre ship had been. Unfortunately the paper is long gone. I would love to hear more or see any photographs of the British Architect.

I was 3rd mate on the ship at the time and if my memory serves me correctly,your dad must have been Bruce Tulloch.The photo was published in the South China Morning Post,they took it as we were being ferried ashore,after we were towed to Hong Kong.I should be in it.The radio operator was last man off,he was opperating the life boat winch.He had to jump from the bridge into the sea and we hauled him aboard the life boat.It was a right mess.

Graham Wallace
9th May 2015, 16:22
I was 3rd mate on the ship at the time and if my memory serves me correctly,your dad must have been Bruce Tulloch.The photo was published in the South China Morning Post,they took it as we were being ferried ashore,after we were towed to Hong Kong.I should be in it.The radio operator was last man off,he was opperating the life boat winch.He had to jump from the bridge into the sea and we hauled him aboard the life boat.It was a right mess.

Hi Bill,

I have sent you a shipsnostalgia private message.

I have crews lists fo the Architect from june 12th 1970 sailing from Chiba, then July 10th 1970 when she arrived in Hong Kong for repairs and finally for Sept 8th when she was indicated as arriving Yokohama 11th August for repairs.

On 12th June RO was CJ Kelly and Master A MacMillan.

Graham

Bill Stilwell
9th May 2015, 18:36
Hi Bill,

I have sent you a shipsnostalgia private message.

I have crews lists fo the Architect from june 12th 1970 sailing from Chiba, then July 10th 1970 when she arrived in Hong Kong for repairs and finally for Sept 8th when she was indicated as arriving Yokohama 11th August for repairs.

On 12th June RO was CJ Kelly and Master A MacMillan.

Graham

Appologies to KELLY12345 and thanks for putting me right.He must have thought I was crazy when I used to say Good Morning Bruce.

Bill

wheelerclan
13th May 2015, 05:04
I have read with interest the recent posts on this topic.
In 1970 I was 3rd mate on a ship sailing southwards towards New Guinea off the Phillipines We passed the tanker which was heading North.The extent of damage was unbelievable , like the ship had been opened end for end like a sardine can.I have often wondered what ship it was and what the circumstances were.Now I know.
It is good to note that none of the crew were hurt.
Neil W