BP Tankers - A Group Fleet History

John_F
10th January 2006, 09:58
Recently purchased a copy of the above book. It features photos of almost every vessel ever owned by the Group plus a short potted history of each vessel from launch to scrap. As a factual reference book it is very good but I was disappointed in some ways as there are very few anecdotes (& there must be many that could be told). For example, there is no mention of the collision between the Aviator & the Crystal Jewell, no mention of the fire aboard the Queen. However, the first few chapters on the development of the fleet from 1915 to the current day are excellent with plenty of illustrations & cutaway drawings of vessels & equipment. Not cheap at 40 but you can get a 10% discount if purchased direct from the publishers, Chatham Publishing. ISBN No:1861762518.
John_F

vix
10th January 2006, 20:54
I thought it was the Br Ambassador and the Crystal Jewell?

Hamish Mackintosh
11th January 2006, 01:33
Norman L Middlemiss also put out a book on BP,but I don't have the isbn#for it however he also put out two books titled "the travels of the Tramps" isbn#s 1871128080 and 1871128021 which explore the history of tramp ship companies,very interesting reading

John_F
11th January 2006, 08:31
I thought it was the Br Ambassador and the Crystal Jewell?
Vix,
It was definitely the Aviator that was in collision with the Crystal Jewell. The Ambassador had its own event when she sank while en route from Ras Tanura to Los Angeles, about 200 miles west of Iwojima, on 13th January 1975. There were no casualties.
Kind regards,
John F

John_F
11th January 2006, 08:35
Norman L Middlemiss also put out a book on BP,but I don't have the isbn#for it however he also put out two books titled "the travels of the Tramps" isbn#s 1871128080 and 1871128021 which explore the history of tramp ship companies,very interesting reading
Hamish,
The ISBN No for Norman Middlemiss's (revised May 2005) edition is 187112803X. This edition features a completely different set of photos from the previous 2 editions.
Regards,
John F.

JEAN GOODWILLIE
17th January 2006, 20:53
I was wondering if there was anything in the book about the British Chemist. My Dad, Jim Gillies, was a member of the crew during
World War 2. I would consider buying the book if there was either a
picture of her or something in the text.

glenn
18th January 2006, 00:47
here is the Radar plots of the CRYSTAL JEWEL & the BRITISH AVIATOR taken from the Times Atlas & Encylopaedia of the Sea. The full story is in there

John_F
18th January 2006, 12:30
I was wondering if there was anything in the book about the British Chemist. My Dad, Jim Gillies, was a member of the crew during
World War 2. I would consider buying the book if there was either a
picture of her or something in the text.
Jean,
There is no photo of the British Chemist although there is some text, giving her details, measurements, launch & scrap dates. There is a photo of her sister ship built by the same ship yard - the British Aviator which was built the year before the Chemist. If you don't want to incur the cost of the book for these details then send me a PM & I will forward them to you.
Regards,
John F

Frank Holleran
19th January 2006, 01:07
Anyone got a pic of the British Patrol,....running from Skoldvic to North Cape, blew a piston, one furnance front collapsed, couldn't hold pressure or water in boilers, chipped and buckled the blades on screw from ice, she was running like a lame dog..Rattled and shook back to Tilbury, and powers to be said that would be her last trip, (nackers yard material).....Going down the stream at Middlesbrough, and guess what we passed..as long as they could sail and make a quid, keep them afloat.
Regards
Frank.

John_F
19th January 2006, 09:18
Anyone got a pic of the British Patrol,....running from Skoldvic to North Cape, blew a piston, one furnance front collapsed, couldn't hold pressure or water in boilers, chipped and buckled the blades on screw from ice, she was running like a lame dog..Rattled and shook back to Tilbury, and powers to be said that would be her last trip, (nackers yard material).....Going down the stream at Middlesbrough, and guess what we passed..as long as they could sail and make a quid, keep them afloat.
Regards
Frank.
Frank,
Picture of the Patrol attached. She was built by Swan Hunter in 1954 for BP, of 16,518 dwt. In July 73 she was sold to Marifoam Shipping of Cyprus & renamed Maripatrol. In early 1980 she was sold again to Fiorito Maritime Agency, Cyprus & renamed Nono Maro. On 14.6.80 she suffered an explosion while lying alongside at Flushing. She was subsequently sold for scrap & arrived at Cartagena on 18.3.81 for demolition.
Details from Norman Middlemiss - The British Tankers.
Photo by J.K.Byass & taken from BP Tankers: A Group Fleet History.

Frank Holleran
19th January 2006, 19:54
Thanks for the pic John re: British Patrol..suprised to hear she went on so long after the late sixties..if there was an explosion, it wouldnt surprise me if it wasnt in the Boiler room, a bloody war zone in there. Thanks again.
Regards
Frank

richardc
19th January 2006, 21:18
Didn't the Patrol go "deep sea" in 1966 during the seamans strike along with the Workman. That must have been some trip. I was on the Centaur at the time and we spent weeks going from the Gulf to the Med via the Cape, a lot of the time at 12 1/2 knots.

Hamish Mackintosh
19th January 2006, 23:12
Greetings.
Any pictures of the "Splendour" and the "Reliance" circa 1954 out there?

Frank Holleran
20th January 2006, 00:03
Re:British Patrol...Dont know about the deep sea trip, but the trip up to the ice was a dog of a trip, joined her in the Isle of Grain and from a distance looked like the rust was holding her together...when we got back they anchored in the stream and filled the for'd tanks with sea water to lift her ar*e out of the water to inspect the damage done to the screw..but the word was she was finished...(then again dont 'listen to rumours')
Regards
Frank

John_F
20th January 2006, 10:54
Greetings.
Any pictures of the "Splendour" and the "Reliance" circa 1954 out there?
Hamish,
As requested, photos of the Splendour & Reliance attached.
British Reliance details: She was launched 23.9.1949 & completed by Sir J.Laing & Sons on 12.2.1950, of 16,687 dwt. In June 1973 she was sold to Atlantic Research Ltd., Bermuda, & renamed Bangor Bay. In 1974 she was sold again to Suffolk Navigation Co., Greece & renamed Ocean Princess. She eventually went for scrap in March 1975 at Castellon.
British Splendour details: She was launched 16.8.1950 & completed by Swan Hunter on 20.12.1950, of 16,823 dwt. She spent her entire life with BP before going for scrap in March 1972.
Details & photo of the Splendour from Norman Middlemiss: The British Tankers.
Photo of Reliance from BP Tankers: A Group Fleet History (World Ship Society photo)
Regards,
John F

Hamish Mackintosh
20th January 2006, 16:24
Thanks John!
You must have an "in" with BP as I did write to them re pictures,and was told they did not retain pictures of the old fleet, thanks again

tom
21st January 2006, 19:43
would anyone out there have a photo of the british vigilance. i sailed in her in 1958
also the british prestige 1963
tom

John_F
22nd January 2006, 12:59
would anyone out there have a photo of the british vigilance. i sailed in her in 1958
also the british prestige 1963
tom
Tom,
As requested, photos of the Vigilance & Prestige attached. I sailed on the Vigilance's only sister, the Renown in 1963 as 3/O & she was a very comfortable (but unhappy) ship.
British Vigilance details: She was completed by Sir J.Laing & Sons, Sunderland in May 1957. She spent her entire life with BP & was scrapped at Vinaroz in February 1973.
British Prestige details: She was completed by Vickers Armstrong, Barrow in February 1962. She spent her entire short life with BP & was scrapped at Kaohsiung in November 1975.
All details & photos from Norman Middlemiss: The British Tankers.
Kind regards,
John F

alastairjs
8th February 2006, 23:26
As a newly joined member I have read these posts with great interest as I joined the "Aviator" as a 2nd trip apprentice as part of her "new crew" on re-manning the vessel following her repairs after the collision. As was the company policy at the time, the whole of the crew on board during the collision were dispersed to the four corners of the fleet and a new crew signed on. There were lots of rumours about the ship being haunted by the ghost of the poor woman who lost her life in the collision but none of us ever saw her. She was, in fact, a very happy ship while I was on her and the scariest thing I encountered was when a lot of us took one of the motor life boats on a picnic and the lagging round the exhuast, (oil soaked), caught fire. The Mate promptly emptied the CTC extinguisher onto the fire which put it out but nearly did for us all with the Phosgene gas produced in the process! If you wanted a taste of trenches in 1914/18 just try one of these on a real fire!

promar
6th March 2006, 09:34
Thanks for the information about the book. Have just received my copy in the post this morning (32). From first perusal it certainly appears to be an excellent reference. Notwithstanding its focus on the tanker fleet I was a little disappointed to see the only photo of the "North Sea" vessels being represented by the Forties Kiwi. Your point about the fleet incidents like the 'Aviator collision and fire on the 'Queen are well taken, but there are probably so many that we are talking about another book!. Incidentally there is no mention about the British Baron and Duke, if my memeory serves me correctly, being designated towing vessels and equipped with special towing winches on the poop.

R58484956
6th March 2006, 15:41
Welcome promar to the site enjoy it and all it has to offer.

macjack
6th March 2006, 16:39
My close friend Stuart LeFevre, previewed the book Rtd.BP Marine Superintendent- some of you may recall him. his comments " It is titled BP Tankers: a Group History by W.J.Harvey and Dr R.J.Solly, published by Chatham Publishing, ISBN: 1-86176-251-8, 272 pages, 500 photographs,(all b & w) Price 40.00
The authors make no reference to any source within BP relying heavily on publications such as The Motor Ship, Fairplay and Shipping World & Shipbuilding. It is an exhaustively researched record of every ship owned or operated by BP. It makes an excellent companion volume to Middlemiss's revised edition of The British Tankers that abounds with colour photos.

John_F
6th March 2006, 16:50
Thanks for the information about the book. Have just received my copy in the post this morning (32). From first perusal it certainly appears to be an excellent reference. Notwithstanding its focus on the tanker fleet I was a little disappointed to see the only photo of the "North Sea" vessels being represented by the Forties Kiwi. Your point about the fleet incidents like the 'Aviator collision and fire on the 'Queen are well taken, but there are probably so many that we are talking about another book!. Incidentally there is no mention about the British Baron and Duke, if my memeory serves me correctly, being designated towing vessels and equipped with special towing winches on the poop.Welcome to the site Promar.
You're quite right - there must be so many anecdotes & other tales that could be told if only someone could amass them all & put them down on paper.
I believe the Baron & the Duke accomplished some quite long tows between them while they were in the Fleet. I seem to remember one story of the Duke towing the Princess, some time before the death of HM George VI. "The Duke with The Pricess in Tow" was, I think, picked up by the tabloids of that time as I remember seeing an article about it in the BP Apprentices Newsletter.
There are at least a couple of errors that I've come across so far but I haven't finished reading it yet.
Enjoy the site!
Kind regards,
John F.

richardc
6th March 2006, 21:17
Welcome to the site Macjac. I sailed with Stuart LeFevre when I was a first trip apprentice on the Power from oct 64 to apr 65, a nice chap. He was the Xtra Mate at the time and I seem to remember he had a taste for Lapsang tea on the bridge after tea at 1800. He also had a penchant for the ladies I seem to remember. The Power was a good ship at the time as we had a good bunch amidships and all got on together well.
Regards,
Richard.

promar
7th March 2006, 08:53
Welcome to the site Macjac. I sailed with Stuart LeFevre when I was a first trip apprentice on the Power from oct 64 to apr 65, a nice chap. He was the Xtra Mate at the time and I seem to remember he had a taste for Lapsang tea on the bridge after tea at 1800. He also had a penchant for the ladies I seem to remember. The Power was a good ship at the time as we had a good bunch amidships and all got on together well.
Regards,
Richard.

Here in Aberdeen there are quite few of Ex BP Mariners. We have annual get to together which Stuart usually manages to attend coming up from Devon. Stories about Stuart are so many they are worthy of a book! As for being a ladies man ...well I can support that but saying anthing more would compromise the rules of the forum!! Above all he remains a gentleman

macjack
7th March 2006, 17:56
Here in Aberdeen there are quite few of Ex BP Mariners. We have annual get to together which Stuart usually manages to attend coming up from Devon. Stories about Stuart are so many they are worthy of a book! As for being a ladies man ...well I can support that but saying anthing more would compromise the rules of the forum!! Above all he remains a gentleman

I first met Stuart 1957 upon joining the "British Industry" (new) John Browns,
he 2/0 I as 3/0 and remained friends ever since. Yes a gentleman yes a ladies man, however mainly a character.
BTC apprentice 1946 incl time as c/o Abadan river tug Daneshmand and coaster Empire Tesella as 2/0 all this during apprenticeship.
Very involved at h/o in development of fixed tank cleaning and oil pollution for VLCC's. "Le Fevre's Folly" ( accepted Internationally) also in development of VLCC gangway towers, also in use worldwide.
Master British Patrol for a period, then took over from dear old Ronnie Marsh as head of Cadet Training.
Returned to sea final command "British Reliance" 265,500 DW
Marine Superintendent Marine Operations, this involved a lot which included for example being helicoptered onto the stricken "Christos Bitas" first aboard, off Angle Bay.
Thereafter the "Forties Field" called, and living in Aberdeen where he "enjoyed Life" playing with his rigs and boats.
Yes indeed, a character, a wonderful guy, with time for all, with a great love of the sea. Now enjoys an early morning swim every day, bowls,gardening, rotary club, Hon Company of Master Mariners, local environmental group etc. etc. etc.
His main claim to fame - he introduced his childhood neighbour to me in 1958 and she has been my wife for 46 yrs.
Promar, as for being a great ladies man - like yourself -- I will not compromise the rules !!
Regards,
Mac.

janbonde
8th March 2006, 14:32
Hello Promar yes it was the Baron & Duke that had the towing winches on the poop.I was on the Baron in 52/53 on a nine month voyage but we never got a tow in that time.Also spent some time astern of her on the Earl being towed back to the UK with a broken crankshaft,that was only half of the tow.The other part of the tow was by the Fame or Faith [cannot be too sure hope someone can verify which when they read] this,after breaking down 10 days out of Abadan bound for Mombasa,we ended up being towed down to Madagascar then change of orders for Aden,so it was about ship and all the way back up through the Indian ocean to Aden.

trevor page
19th March 2006, 19:46
With regards to the "British Queen" I was in her on the 29th March 65,off Daz Island, had just turned in when the alarms sounded, never moved so fast since, apart from when I paid off the "George Peacock", spent all night fighting the fire, Grey funnel line came along side in the morning in the shape of "HMS Ashanti", just to help us out after we had done all the hard work. A generous BP paid us half a months wages for saving the ship. Happy days. Trevor Page

promar
21st March 2006, 08:58
Didn't the Patrol go "deep sea" in 1966 during the seamans strike along with the Workman. That must have been some trip. I was on the Centaur at the time and we spent weeks going from the Gulf to the Med via the Cape, a lot of the time at 12 1/2 knots.

There is an apochryphal story about when the Patrol had to her leave her long-time coastal trade pattern. Half way down the channel they suddenly realised that there were no sextants aboard. The trip to Port Said was interesting to say the least and followed a somewhat unathordox passage plan!

Argyll
23rd March 2006, 15:31
Anyone out there remember a apprentice by the name George Munn from Ardrossan. he would have finished his time in 1964. I was in the Watt college with him , I will give the reason for this request later beleive it is honourable.
Argyll

rushie
5th April 2006, 21:38
Hello Promar,

I read your comments with interest. I'm trying to get together stories, memories of characters etc for a possible publication (see Major new project thread in BP Shipping forum), and it sounds like your man Stuart may be just of those people who may be able to assist with relaying some tales!

I note that you say he lives in Devon, well so do I!

If you could possibly put me in contact with Stuart, I'd be grateful.

Thanks,

Rushie

Graham Wallace
10th May 2006, 23:25
Recently purchased a copy of the above book. It features photos of almost every vessel ever owned by the Group plus a short potted history of each vessel from launch to scrap. As a factual reference book it is very good but I was disappointed in some ways as there are very few anecdotes (& there must be many that could be told). For example, there is no mention of the collision between the Aviator & the Crystal Jewell, no mention of the fire aboard the Queen. However, the first few chapters on the development of the fleet from 1915 to the current day are excellent with plenty of illustrations & cutaway drawings of vessels & equipment. Not cheap at 40 but you can get a 10% discount if purchased direct from the publishers, Chatham Publishing. ISBN No:1861762518.
John_F
John, Is there anything from my website ( pics etc) in Ray Solly's book. He contacted me 2004 about info. I was wondering whether it was worth the $100 for me to get a copy?
Graham Wallace

Graham Wallace
10th May 2006, 23:28
Anyone out there remember a apprentice by the name George Munn from Ardrossan. he would have finished his time in 1964. I was in the Watt college with him , I will give the reason for this request later beleive it is honourable.
Argyll
I know a George Munn , 1952 "Engineering" apprentice. Same guy?
Graham Wallace

John_F
11th May 2006, 08:49
John, Is there anything from my website ( pics etc) in Ray Solly's book. He contacted me 2004 about info. I was wondering whether it was worth the $100 for me to get a copy?
Graham WallaceGraham,
I couldn't see anything in there that had been taken from your website.
The Crown (& her tragic end) is listed with her details along with every other vessel that has been through BP's hands.
As a work of reference it is superb but there are few anecdotes so the human side of the story of the Fleet is sadly lacking but that probably was not in their terms of reference. For me it was worth the money.
Kind regards,
John.

Ships Agent
5th June 2006, 23:18
Is there any mention of the B P Tanker British light that was at anchor at the tail of the bank when the Greek sugar ship Captayannis draged her anchor during a gale and collided with the anchor chain of the tanker ripping a hole in the CAPTAYANNIS wherafter she was beeched on a sand bank and has layen there ever since. Full story is available from www.clydesite.co.uk- the clyde's wreck-captayannis -the sugar boat

Ships Agent
5th June 2006, 23:24
Does any one remember the British trust that dates back to the mid to late seventies she broke down when discharging at finnart oil terminal Main engine failure and she was towed dead ship up river to the James watt dock Greenock Where she lay for several weeks while a local shipyard along with the ships engineers caried out repairs (Read)

John_F
6th June 2006, 08:51
John P
In Harvey & Solly's book there is no reference to either the British Light incident or the British Trust's breakdown. As I said, there are very few anecdotal stories in the book - it is first & foremost o book of reference. If the British Light had sunk as well as, or instead of, the Captayannis then it would have been stated under the British Light's fact file. The incident has been mentioned before on this site & I think there is a photo of the wreck in the gallery.
I remember the British Trust well as I was Third Mate on her for 6 months. She suffered at least 2 breakdowns while I was on her in 1964 which involved changing pistons. There is a photo in the Gallery of one of her 1964 breakdowns http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/17603/sort/1/cat/503/page/1
The breakdown to which you refer must have happened in the mid 70s as BP sold her in 1976 to the United Freighter Corp., Panama & she was renamed Jinjiang. She was sold again in 1979 to the Peoples Republic of China (where many of this class seemed to end up) & renamedTa Ching 235. In 1980 she was renamed Da Qing 235. It was reported that she was demolished by 1995. If she lasted 45 years then she did very well.
Kind regards,
John F

john martin
6th June 2006, 17:28
hi all,
i wonder if anyone has a photo of british lady as i cant seem to find mention of her anywhere.we were on the bombay burma run in 1955.
thanks
john martin

azimuth
27th June 2006, 12:32
Anyone remember the "British Scout?" Probably the smallest of the fleet and consequently was capable of performing some intersting gymnastic movement. I believe I have a photograph of her alongside at Plymouth. I was lucky enough to see a beautiful sustained example of St. Elmo's Fire play from stem to stern, from rail to mast-head. Spooky!

John_F
27th June 2006, 14:02
Azimuth,
There is a photo of her in the gallery:
http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/2550/sort/1/cat/503/page/1
She was built by Swan Hunter & completed on 13th October 1922. She got safely through the war & didn't go for scrap until April 1957 - 35 years with BP, not bad for a tanker.
Kind regards,
John F

non descript
27th June 2006, 14:10
here is the Radar plots of the CRYSTAL JEWEL & the BRITISH AVIATOR taken from the Times Atlas & Encylopaedia of the Sea. The full story is in there

Glenn, thanks for posting that - very useful and rather dramatic. (Applause)

+

John a great thread - well done Sir. (Applause)

azimuth
28th June 2006, 02:20
Azimuth,
There is a photo of her in the gallery:
http://www.shipsnostalgia.com/gallery/showphoto.php/photo/2550/sort/1/cat/503/page/1
She was built by Swan Hunter & completed on 13th October 1922. She got safely through the war & didn't go for scrap until April 1957 - 35 years with BP, not bad for a tanker.
Kind regards,
John F
Many thanks. More or less as I remember her with affection. The BP funnel logo is an addition since my time which is now more distant than I care to think about!

ernhelenbarrett
9th September 2006, 08:58
Hi Has anyone got a photo of Br Gratitude, she was my first "on my own"
ship as R/O in 1955, mostly on the Baltic/Norway/Grangemouth run and I believe she was the first BTC tanker to have a BP logo on the chimney, I
did hear a rumour she ran aground on Bornholm Island after I left her and was
shanghaid for a few years on the Indian Coast with BI
Ern Barrett

macjack
9th September 2006, 09:24
Hi Has anyone got a photo of Br Gratitude, she was my first "on my own"
ship as R/O in 1955, mostly on the Baltic/Norway/Grangemouth run and I believe she was the first BTC tanker to have a BP logo on the chimney, I
did hear a rumour she ran aground on Bornholm Island after I left her and was
shanghaid for a few years on the Indian Coast with BI
Ern Barrett
Ern,
Photo of British Gratitude prior to bp logo on funnel, on my website (must get round to updating it) www.macjackson.net page 2, can rescan from BP original and forward to you, send pm if required.
Regards,
Mac

john shaw
9th September 2006, 10:29
Anyone remember the "British Scout?" Probably the smallest of the fleet and consequently was capable of performing some intersting gymnastic movement. I believe I have a photograph of her alongside at Plymouth. I was lucky enough to see a beautiful sustained example of St. Elmo's Fire play from stem to stern, from rail to mast-head. Spooky!

I also put another pic of the Scout on the other BP thread-- attached again for your info

John_F
9th September 2006, 13:22
Hi Has anyone got a photo of Br Gratitude, she was my first "on my own"
ship as R/O in 1955, mostly on the Baltic/Norway/Grangemouth run and I believe she was the first BTC tanker to have a BP logo on the chimney, I
did hear a rumour she ran aground on Bornholm Island after I left her and was
shanghaid for a few years on the Indian Coast with BI
Ern BarrettErn,
Here's another one to complement Macjack's.
Taken from BP Tankers: A Group Fleet History (Harvey & Solly)
Kind regards,
John.

gordonclark
2nd October 2006, 19:53
I am building a website about the BP tugs and tuggies (my dad was engineerr on BP Warden), does the book have any info on Farahmand, Firuzmand renambed BP Guard and BP Warden after they escaped to Aden from persia ? I am very short of info for the site, so anything is likely to be of use !!! ...gordon-clark@blueyonder.co.uk

John_F
4th October 2006, 17:14
I am building a website about the BP tugs and tuggies (my dad was engineerr on BP Warden), does the book have any info on Farahmand, Firuzmand renambed BP Guard and BP Warden after they escaped to Aden from persia ? I am very short of info for the site, so anything is likely to be of use !!! ...gordon-clark@blueyonder.co.uk
Gordon,
Farahmand was launched in May 1950 by Ferguson Bros (Port Glasgow) Ltd for the Petroleum Steamship Company Ltd. She was completed in August of that year bor the British Tanker Co. (BP). In 1955 she was renamed BP Guard. In 1972 she was transferred to the BP Clyde Tanker Co. In 1975 she was sold to Gulf Shipping Co S.A. & renamed Farrokh. In 1998 her entry was removed from Lloyds Registry as her continued existence was in doubt.
Firuzmand was launched in November 1950 by Scott & Sons, Bowling, for the Petroleum Steamship Company Ltd. She was completed in February 1951 for the British Tanker Co. (BP). In 1955 she was renamed BP Warden. In 1972 she was transferred to the BP Clyde Tanker Co. In 1976 she was sold to Gulf Shipping Co S.A. & renamed Firouzmand. In 1998 her entry was removed from Lloyds Registry as her continued existence was in doubt.
Photo attached of Farahmand - Regret that I do not have one of Firuzmand.
Photo & details from BP Tankers - A Group Fleet History. (Harvey & Solly)
If you need measurements, tonnage, etc., let me know.
Kind regards,
John F.

MikeBrown
23rd November 2006, 18:11
Newbie here ..... I can confirm the Br Ambassador did sink. Minor correction - it was 600m from Iwo Jima. It was also bl&&dy cold and wet - especially in the lifeboat. I was 2/O at the time. An interesting voyage all round. 1/O &3/O both sent home in disgrace and then we sank. Deep joy !!!
Mike

janbonde
23rd November 2006, 19:37
I received on of the marine publications from Europe yesterday and I see in one of the pictures of the British Fidelity,that BP or BTC as it was known have reverted to their old stack marks of the early fifties,perhaps times are changing again they say everything goes round in circles,or is that just womens fashions

James_C
23rd November 2006, 19:55
They changed the funnel colorus back in the early 90s. The reason for this was that the PR department told them to get rid of the BP Shield from the funnel, as this would generate adverse publicity should there be an accident. That is, everyone would know who the ship belonged to!
They failed to grasp that it was easy enough if you had a copy of Lloyds List...
That and they still kept the 'British' prefix.
Shell, Esso and Chevron followed suit.

cessna
24th November 2006, 19:16
I, too sailed with Stew LeFevre, when I was first trip Apprentice and he 2/0 on the CORPORAL in 55/56. Great guy, he taught me how to iron shirts and his words stick with me to this day. His young son came on a coastal voyage with us and all he ever ate was a dollop of tomato sauce on his plate. If anyone does the book, I've got some photos! Thanks for the memory!
Best wishes
Rod

Roberth1
25th November 2006, 10:16
Hi macjak

I am really impressed that you have the little picture of "two whistles Joe" from the apprentices news letter from all those years ago, I wonder if anyone has a picture of "Rudolph" his engineering mate when the engineering apprentices appeared on the scene
Robert

Geoff_E
25th November 2006, 19:24
I sailed with Stuart LeFevre on probably his last seagoing command (Reliance, vlcc), perhaps just before he went to Aberdeen. Joined in Curacao and went round to the gulf, I think he left in Capetown. I was 2/0 and he was great to sail with, completely laid back, just let you get on with the job.
Geoff.

ernhelenbarrett
26th November 2006, 05:22
To John F
Many thanks for the photo of BR Gratitude, forgot my password so only got back onto the site yesterday Many thanks once again. Do you know if she did run aground in the Baltic
Regards Ern Barrett

John_F
26th November 2006, 18:41
To John F
Many thanks for the photo of BR Gratitude, forgot my password so only got back onto the site yesterday Many thanks once again. Do you know if she did run aground in the Baltic
Regards Ern Barrett
Ern,
Sorry - I've no information as to whether she went aground in the Baltic. Maybe Alastair or another BP member can help.
Kind regards,
John

alastairjs
27th November 2006, 23:34
Ern, had a good trawl through all my sources but couldn't find any mention of the British Gratitude grounding off Bornholm which doesn't mean she didn't, just can't find any evidence. Thought you might be interested in this snipit about the Gratitude which was news to me: "During 1952 BP signed contracts with BECHTEL of the USA and WIMPEY of the UK for building the new refinery at little Aden which began in November 1952. It was concluded after 21 months on 15th July 1954. The first British tanker - called British Gratitude- carrying Kuwaiti crude oil arrived at Aden on 29th July 1954." Nice trip for her!
Regards,
Alastair

macjack
28th November 2006, 16:32
I sailed with Stuart LeFevre on probably his last seagoing command (Reliance, vlcc), perhaps just before he went to Aberdeen. Joined in Curacao and went round to the gulf, I think he left in Capetown. I was 2/0 and he was great to sail with, completely laid back, just let you get on with the job.
Geoff.
Hello Geoff,
I sailed with Stuart maiden voyage "British Industry" Feb 1957(amongst the first with goal posts ? ) he 2/0 I as 3/0 Capt Jefferies. Stuart introduced me to my wife, still in touch. He is still as always "Laid Back" enjoying life, very involved with bowling club Woodland Trust, Rotary Club, swims most mornings.Stuart on bicycle " British Reliance" and Stuart prize winner 2005!.
Regards,
Mac.

macjack
28th November 2006, 17:01
Ern, had a good trawl through all my sources but couldn't find any mention of the British Gratitude grounding off Bornholm which doesn't mean she didn't, just can't find any evidence. Thought you might be interested in this snipit about the Gratitude which was news to me: "During 1952 BP signed contracts with BECHTEL of the USA and WIMPEY of the UK for building the new refinery at little Aden which began in November 1952. It was concluded after 21 months on 15th July 1954. The first British tanker - called British Gratitude- carrying Kuwaiti crude oil arrived at Aden on 29th July 1954." Nice trip for her!
Regards,
Alastair
I Joined "British Gratitude" Smiths Dock April 1955 signed off IOG Dec 1955Nav Apprentice, Capt Skea. I recall from discharge book (running agreement?) we were doing a lot of continental and Scandinavian runs, I also recall going aground for a short period in Scandinavia, I cannot recall any details whatsoever, or even that it was the Gratitude - 50 yrs ago, but it could tie in. The only other "coasting I did was on the Drummer 1957.
Regards,
Mac.

Captain2
26th February 2008, 01:36
You were right about the Duke sailed on her 1954
The towing winch was huge never did any towing though

blaamanden
25th March 2008, 21:24
Hello,

could you please tell me if the book "BP Tankers: A Group Fleet History" contains informations about the following tankers : BP Lavera and BP Oran (years 1953-54) ?
Thanks a lot

alastairjs
28th March 2008, 01:45
blaamanden,
The book has the following information on the vessels you are enquiring about in the section "Association Petroliere" page 188:
Artabaze (1935 -1952) Lloyds No. 334535
1922 Completed by Chantiers Navale Francaise, Blainville, Yard No. 27 for Societe Generale des Huiles de Petrole [Estrine & Co], Association Petroliere, managers. (Miramar has the completion date as March 1923)
435 GRT, 198 Net, 469DWT, 150' 8" LBP, 25' 8" Breadth, 12' 3" Summer Draught. Triple expansion steam engine (9", 15" & 28" x 18") driving a single screw shaft built by Cooper & Greig Ltd., Dundee, 245 ihp, 6.5 knot service speed.
1935 Transferred to Association Petroliere
1952 Reverted to Societe Generale des Huiles de Petrole
1954 Owners restyled as Societe Francaise Des Petroles BP, vessel renamed BP Lavera
1958 Sold to Ottavio Novella, Genoa, & renamed Sori.
Deleted from Lloyds Register in 1987.

Tomyris (1935 - 1952)
Completed January 1923 by Chantiers Navale Francaise, Blainville, Yard No. 26, for Societe Generale des Huiles de Petrole, [Estrine & Co], Association Petroliere, managers. 435 GRT, 210 Net, 150' 8" LBP, 25' 8" Breadth, 12' 3" Summer Draught. Triple expansion steam engine (9", 15" & 26" x 18") driving a single screw shaft built by Cooper & Greig Ltd., Dundee. 245 ihp, 7 knot service speed.
1935 Transferred to Association Petroliere
During WWII she was damaged whilst in the river Gironde and was still there in 1949.Eventually repaired and in
1952 Transferred to Societe Des Petroles (BP) d'Algerie
1955 Renamed BP Oran
1972 Condemned on survey
1973 Deleted from Lloyds Registry.
Hope that's of some help,
Regards,
Alastair

blaamanden
28th March 2008, 08:40
thanks for the informations ! I've a last question : is there pictures of these ships in the book "BP Tankers: A Group Fleet History" ?

Regards

alastairjs
28th March 2008, 19:30
Sorry blaamanden, there are no pictures of these ships in the book.
Regards,
Alastair

blaamanden
31st March 2008, 10:44
Thanks for the help

Regards

JohnBP
1st May 2008, 00:13
I lived in Aberdeen for 3 years before being transfered to Canada, and I sailed with BP on 5 ships, wish I knew that the BP guys met in Aberdeen.... love talking ships

georgepickles
24th September 2011, 14:48
I am building a website about the BP tugs and tuggies (my dad was engineerr on BP Warden), does the book have any info on Farahmand, Firuzmand renambed BP Guard and BP Warden after they escaped to Aden from persia ? I am very short of info for the site, so anything is likely to be of use !!! ...gordon-clark@blueyonder.co.uk
I was the Engineer on the Tug Firuzmand when she
escorted HMS Euryalus to Basra with the last of the Anglo Iranian Oil Workers. After all the passengers disembarked. the Firuzmand sailed back down the Shat-el-Arab river to Mena al Amadi in Kuwait I left the ship there, having declined to take over the duties as Chief Engineer on the Firuzmand. I completed my sea going career with BTC and returned to Leeds .

david freeman
24th September 2011, 17:09
Interesting Gabby King ex director MD wrote two books I know of about tankers: 1 was ships he had sailed in. The other tanker practice with details of how a tanker crude or products should be managed on a voyage for good practice. Both are time capsuals.

Hoppy
26th September 2011, 08:04
As a newly joined member I have read these posts with great interest as I joined the "Aviator" as a 2nd trip apprentice as part of her "new crew" on re-manning the vessel following her repairs after the collision. As was the company policy at the time, the whole of the crew on board during the collision were dispersed to the four corners of the fleet and a new crew signed on. There were lots of rumours about the ship being haunted by the ghost of the poor woman who lost her life in the collision but none of us ever saw her. She was, in fact, a very happy ship while I was on her and the scariest thing I encountered was when a lot of us took one of the motor life boats on a picnic and the lagging round the exhuast, (oil soaked), caught fire. The Mate promptly emptied the CTC extinguisher onto the fire which put it out but nearly did for us all with the Phosgene gas produced in the process! If you wanted a taste of trenches in 1914/18 just try one of these on a real fire!

I was on the Aviator as A J/E in 1976 and took her to scrap in Taiwan...the crew would never go anywhere near the Fo'c'sle alone ....

colin moore
30th September 2011, 19:24
just looked on the chatham publishers website and the book BP Tankers a group fleet history is shown as ISBN No; 978186176511 priced at 55. with free delivery in UK. is this the same book as previously mentioned as it certainly looks like it?

DaveM399
1st October 2011, 13:44
just looked on the chatham publishers website and the book BP Tankers a group fleet history is shown as ISBN No; 978186176511 priced at 55. with free delivery in UK. is this the same book as previously mentioned as it certainly looks like it?
Colin,

Amazon UK have a couple for sale at 46.75.

Dave

qprdude
22nd November 2012, 21:29
Was on the Aviator in 1969 (my last ship). Joined in Dubai with a C/E from Aberdeen . Did Kwinana. Back to Daz, Marcus Hook Pensalvania, Maricaibo, Gothenburg and paid off in Southampton.
Never bothered about the focastle, but being a steward, the furthest forward I got was midships. No chopper stores at Cape town as we bunkered and stored in Cape Verde.

ninabaker
24th November 2012, 00:22
I was on the Aviator as A J/E in 1976 and took her to scrap in Taiwan...the crew would never go anywhere near the Fo'c'sle alone ....

I was on the Aviator 23 September 1974 - 18 Feb 1975 as senior deck cadet. I liked the Aviator, very comfortable ship. We shuttled back and forth between Kharg and Bombay I think most of the time. I used to do double watches in Kharg in order to get extra time ashore in Bombay, which I loved.

I cannot now recall if this was the one ghost ship I was on. Whichever it was, the ghost was said be that of an engineroom crewman who died of a heart attack behind the boiler and wasnt found for ages. As the post-watch fire patrol route went through that area on the way to the aft steering flat, this was thought to be spooky, despite being well lit.

stevekelly10
24th November 2012, 12:50
I was on the Aviator 23 September 1974 - 18 Feb 1975 as senior deck cadet. I liked the Aviator, very comfortable ship. We shuttled back and forth between Kharg and Bombay I think most of the time. I used to do double watches in Kharg in order to get extra time ashore in Bombay, which I loved.

I cannot now recall if this was the one ghost ship I was on. Whichever it was, the ghost was said be that of an engineroom crewman who died of a heart attack behind the boiler and wasnt found for ages. As the post-watch fire patrol route went through that area on the way to the aft steering flat, this was thought to be spooky, despite being well lit.

The alleged "ghost" on the "Avaitor" was a female! This was as a result of the Avaitor's collision with the Crystal Jewel and she was the daughter of the Crystal Jewel's Captain, who ended up on the focsle of the Avaitor after the collision! I think there is a mention of this collision elsewhere on this forum?

brian3
24th November 2012, 13:05
hi to all you ex bp men i see by the companys magazine that bp shipping is to celebrate it's 100years in 2013 it's editor was requesting old photos stories etc

JohnBP
24th November 2012, 14:02
Here in Aberdeen there are quite few of Ex BP Mariners. We have annual get to together which Stuart usually manages to attend coming up from Devon. Stories about Stuart are so many they are worthy of a book! As for being a ladies man ...well I can support that but saying anthing more would compromise the rules of the forum!! Above all he remains a gentleman

Welcome promar.. spent may happy years in Aberdeen before being transfered to Canada, great people lovely city....

tzinieres
24th November 2012, 14:53
I was on the Aviator as A J/E in 1976 and took her to scrap in Taiwan...the crew would never go anywhere near the Fo'c'sle alone ....

I was on the Aviator in 1966, she did a lot of creaking and groaning in the fo'c's'le during rough weather.

xieriftips
25th November 2012, 19:07
Interesting Gabby King ex director MD wrote two books I know of about tankers: 1 was ships he had sailed in. The other tanker practice with details of how a tanker crude or products should be managed on a voyage for good practice. Both are time capsuals.

If you're after the REAL "time capsule" you have to go for the early edition of "Tanker Practice"; it was extensively updated (I believe) twice, the latter time in the early '70s.

ninabaker
25th November 2012, 23:23
hi to all you ex bp men i see by the companys magazine that bp shipping is to celebrate it's 100years in 2013 it's editor was requesting old photos stories etc

Ladies too???

Have you got an email for this editor person. I dont get the company mag, having left them in 1976.

derekhore
26th November 2012, 12:24
Have you got an email for this editor person. I dont get the company mag, having left them in 1976.


..... me neither, having left in 1977!

twogrumpy
26th November 2012, 16:07
The magazine is, or used to be available online, ensure you have a sickbag available.
Subject of the magazine has come up before, with some impolite comments on content. One of the chaps still serving said some of they seafarers had complained about it and he reckoned that they were told that it should not concern them as it was not produced for their benefit.
(Cloud)(Cloud)

brian3
26th November 2012, 19:53
re post79 forgive my political incorrectness there was an e-mail address
but i'm afraid i threw the mag out iwill try to find the e address

Long gone
26th November 2012, 20:21
The centenary is also mentioned in the latest copy of the Pensioners' Newsletter 'Tomorrow Today', which incidentally has a photo of Br. Faith on the front cover.

ninabaker
26th November 2012, 22:17
I found them on the interweb - centenary was 2009 but you can get the special edition for free if you ask:

"BP celebrated it’s centenary in 2009 – see the link below for the centenary issue of BP Magazine. If you do have any old photographs or information then our Archive would be delighted to receive them – address as follows:

BP Archive, University of Warwick
Coventry
West Midlands
CV4 7AL

http://www.bp.com/sectiongenericarticle.do?categoryId=9039594&contentId=7052273

If you would like to receive the centenary issue in hard copy and future issues of BP Magazine please let me carolyn.copland@bp.com have your full address including post-code. For information, 4 issues are published each year and all copies are sent out free of charge."

derekhore
27th November 2012, 09:32
Thanks Nina .. I have emailed them!

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

.... and further to that now - I have received a reply and been added to their mailing list!

tzinieres
6th December 2012, 13:34
What happened to the model tankers that were in the foyer of Britannic house in Finsbury Circus?

chris dalquen
10th December 2012, 07:51
I am building a website about the BP tugs and tuggies (my dad was engineerr on BP Warden), does the book have any info on Farahmand, Firuzmand renambed BP Guard and BP Warden after they escaped to Aden from persia ? I am very short of info for the site, so anything is likely to be of use !!! ...gordon-clark@blueyonder.co.uk

I remember those two tugs at aden they were quite big they used to work off whistle commands before the days of walkie talkies we were alngside on the power and it took them 5 hours to bring the british lan tern in and as soon as they got her along side she had a black out which was nothibg new on eyeties we used to have about 4 a week when i was on the star

A.D.FROST
10th December 2012, 09:23
Just to correct some engine types which are wrong in the book and a few more facts missing;
BRITISH CAVALIER/LANCER'42 8yl.4SCSA Hawthorn-Werkspoor and BRITISH CURLEW 7RSAD76 Stephens-Sulzer.Comparing the two photos. of NORDIC HAWK/HERON the NORDIC HERON appears to look longer(between bridge and bows)without any reference in the text?BRITISH ESCORT was re-engined witha 3cyl.Doxford with T/C and later (EASTHILL ESCORT) re-engined ELYS HARBOUR.BRITISH NAVIGATOR engine was put into VENCHARMIAN(ex.BRADFORD CITY)

BillH
10th December 2012, 16:25
Just to correct some engine types which are wrong in the book and a few more facts missing;
BRITISH CAVALIER/LANCER'42 8yl.4SCSA Hawthorn-Werkspoor and BRITISH CURLEW 7RSAD76 Stephens-Sulzer.Comparing the two photos. of NORDIC HAWK/HERON the NORDIC HERON appears to look longer(between bridge and bows)without any reference in the text?BRITISH ESCORT was re-engined witha 3cyl.Doxford with T/C and later (EASTHILL ESCORT) re-engined ELYS HARBOUR.BRITISH NAVIGATOR engine was put into VENCHARMIAN(ex.BRADFORD CITY)

Mr Frost,

You have already been advised elsewhere regarding the erroneous engine detail which you appear to relish highlighting on various forums. Two wrong types from over a thousand vessels is negligible, in the grand scheme of things especially when the reason for the error does not lay with the authors.

Being that, elsewhere, you have already been made aware of the reason for the machinery type error, perhaps you should add that reason to your posting and correct what I consider to be a slight on the credibility of the authors.

In a work of that magnitude, accessing contempory and other records, it would be close on a miracle if it were to be 100% error/glich free. The research end result is only as accurate as the available recorded data.

May I enquire as to the source and accuracy of the information you post. Is it a personal record you have collated over the years, or has it been gathered from contempory records? Are you 100% sure it error free? It is easy to criticise but you can then find yourself open to criticism if you are not 100% with your own details.

As for the Nordic deck length difference you quote, this was of little interest and outwith the preset "terms of reference" of the author's research. Perhaps a read of the section "Notes of ship histories" may clarify things a bit for you.

If every little difference was to be itemised then you potentially would need several volumes.

Perhaps you should take on the task of researching and cataloging all the differences and then publish your result.

I look forward to your response in due course, or perhaps, as you did last time you were challenged by one of the authors, you will become conspicuous by your absence.

stevekelly10
10th December 2012, 19:46
I remember those two tugs at aden they were quite big they used to work off whistle commands before the days of walkie talkies we were alngside on the power and it took them 5 hours to bring the british lan tern in and as soon as they got her along side she had a black out which was nothibg new on eyeties we used to have about 4 a week when i was on the star

I also remember those tugs aswell. On one occasion whilst they were assisting, turning the "Avaitor" before berthing, the aft tug started emitting a large number of sparks from its funnel and their standing orders in this situation was to "drop its towline" resulting in the "Avaitor" striking the jetty extremely hard! leaving a rather large dent in the ships side and a few sprung rivets!

sparks69
10th December 2012, 21:28
What happened to the model tankers that were in the foyer of Britannic house in Finsbury Circus?

Probably re-engined and going round the Cape at 6 knots !!

A.D.FROST
11th December 2012, 08:21
Mr Frost,

You have already been advised elsewhere regarding the erroneous engine detail which you appear to relish highlighting on various forums. Two wrong types from over a thousand vessels is negligible, in the grand scheme of things especially when the reason for the error does not lay with the authors.

Being that, elsewhere, you have already been made aware of the reason for the machinery type error, perhaps you should add that reason to your posting and correct what I consider to be a slight on the credibility of the authors.

In a work of that magnitude, accessing contempory and other records, it would be close on a miracle if it were to be 100% error/glich free. The research end result is only as accurate as the available recorded data.

May I enquire as to the source and accuracy of the information you post. Is it a personal record you have collated over the years, or has it been gathered from contempory records? Are you 100% sure it error free? It is easy to criticise but you can then find yourself open to criticism if you are not 100% with your own details.

As for the Nordic deck length difference you quote, this was of little interest and outwith the preset "terms of reference" of the author's research. Perhaps a read of the section "Notes of ship histories" may clarify things a bit for you.

If every little difference was to be itemised then you potentially would need several volumes.

Perhaps you should take on the task of researching and cataloging all the differences and then publish your result.

I look forward to your response in due course, or perhaps, as you did last time you were challenged by one of the authors, you will become conspicuous by your absence.
Since you do not acknowledge I am correct,may I give you some advice,Get your facts right before going to print.Since I explained in one of the forum you refer too how I got the information.Using various Lloyds regesters and Motor Ships, cross reference with the book,guess what the book is wrong.When I buy a Dickshonary I xpect the words to be corekt and not blame the printers for my mistakes,like wise when I buy disinfectant I want it to kill all germs and not 99.9% because the 0.1% may kill me.
Just for your records the BRITISH ESCORT Swan-Hunter bult 4cyl. Doxford was kept at 'Palmers Hill' Sunderland where the re-enging took place and used as a test engine until being scrapped.THE END. A.D.Frost (ex.Doxford engineer.)(Thumb)
31987

BillH
11th December 2012, 08:44
Since you do not acknowledge I am correct,may I give you some advice,Get your facts right before going to print.Since I explained in one of the forum you refer too how I got the information.Using various Lloyds regesters and Motor Ships, cross reference with the book,guess what the book is wrong.When I buy a Dickshonary I xpect the words to be corekt and not blame the printers for my mistakes,like wise when I buy disinfectant I want it to kill all germs and not 99.9% because the 0.1% may kill me.
Just for your records the BRITISH ESCORT Swan-Hunter bult 4cyl. Doxford was kept at 'Palmers Hill' Sunderland where the re-enging took place and used as a test engine until being scrapped.THE END. A.D.Frost (ex.Doxford engineer.)(Thumb)

Mr Frost thank you for a somewhat obnoxious reply.

Firstly, I have not disagreed that what you highlight about there being two wrong machinery types in the book is a fact, but the reason I gave you for being so, is also a fact, whether you like it or not.

Secondly, I do not acknowledge what you state as correct, because I am not party to your information sources at this time to validate as I would normally do.

Thirdly, I am not entering into a childish spat with you, only putting on record the fact that there are two sides to every story and I, as one of the authors, retain the right to reply to any criticism.

You have said what you wanted and I now also, so the matter is now closed as far as I am concerned.

tzinieres
11th December 2012, 12:17
I also remember those tugs aswell. On one occasion whilst they were assisting, turning the "Avaitor" before berthing, the aft tug started emitting a large number of sparks from its funnel and their standing orders in this situation was to "drop its towline" resulting in the "Avaitor" striking the jetty extremely hard! leaving a rather large dent in the ships side and a few sprung rivets!
the Aviator must of been jinxed. She hit the lock head at Antwerp in early 1966 and had to have several new plates fitted to her port bow.

cariad
17th December 2012, 01:21
the Aviator must of been jinxed. She hit the lock head at Antwerp in early 1966 and had to have several new plates fitted to her port bow.

Was a great ship when I joined at Swan Hunters for her maiden voyage in Nov 1958. I was a deck apprentice at that time. Energetic Captain Stook was the skipper. Met him again 20 years later in his retirement at Torbay. Anyone remember him?

ninabaker
18th December 2012, 22:32
Mention above that there are reunions of ex-BP types in Scotland. Sounds fun - can anyone else join in or is it a specific bunch of exshipmates?

Steve Hodges
8th January 2013, 21:53
I was on the Aviator 23 September 1974 - 18 Feb 1975 as senior deck cadet. I liked the Aviator, very comfortable ship. We shuttled back and forth between Kharg and Bombay I think most of the time. I used to do double watches in Kharg in order to get extra time ashore in Bombay, which I loved.

I cannot now recall if this was the one ghost ship I was on. Whichever it was, the ghost was said be that of an engineroom crewman who died of a heart attack behind the boiler and wasnt found for ages. As the post-watch fire patrol route went through that area on the way to the aft steering flat, this was thought to be spooky, despite being well lit.

I was on the Aviator at the same time, Nina, happiest ship I ever sailed on even though it was mostly Kharg, Bombay and Aden. I'm interested by your "ghost" story. I can't remember now for sure which ship it was on, but it was an old steamer and I was 4/E so that means it must have been the Destiny or the Aviator. I was round the back of the boilers by myself on one night 12-4 and somebody spoke to me, when I turned round there was no-one there - I was distinctly upset. The indian fireman was where I had last seen him, stripping and cleaning burners round the front of the boilers I remember thinking my J/E was buggering me about and setting off to have a go at him, but he was right down on the bottom plates of the E/R at the time.It made me quite uneasy for a while, but I don't recall telling anyone else. And I don't recall any bad vibes in the focsle at all, in fact I never learned of the collision till years later.

retfordmackem
3rd September 2013, 01:50
Hello Promar,

I read your comments with interest. I'm trying to get together stories, memories of characters etc for a possible publication (see Major new project thread in BP Shipping forum), and it sounds like your man Stuart may be just of those people who may be able to assist with relaying some tales!

I note that you say he lives in Devon, well so do I!

If you could possibly put me in contact with Stuart, I'd be grateful.

Thanks,

Rushie
If you need to write about characters in a future book then Chris Dalquen ought to be on your list.He has a lot of post and will have plenty Of stories for you.

retfordmackem
27th September 2013, 22:14
If you need to write about characters in a future book then Chris Dalquen ought to be on your list.He has a lot of post and will have plenty Of stories for you..P
PS the BP centenary was in 2009 and if you want a copy of this magazine and the monthly magazines,ring Carolyn Copland 02074964340. Or @uk.bp.com