Port Vindex

danny rafferty
28th December 2011, 13:10
I can remember sailing on the Vindex out to N/Z early 1958, Suez canal was closed at that time due to the Suez crisis of 56 so we had to go via the cape. I think we carried Morris motor cars to both north island and south island and my rate of pay was only 12/15s a month, overtime was 1s/9d an hour...I was only deck/boy at the time.On reaching N/Z and discharging cargo, I was asked if i would like to earn a bit of extra cash by stripping all the hatch;s of dunnage, I agreed to this; even though i had no idea what dunnage was. I got a great surprise when we got our money and i found they had paid us 1/6s an hour, i made as much in one day as i made as a peggy in a month. they told us they were short of shore workers, and we were paid the same rate as they would have got, we were well pleased and made a point of being available whenever they were short .......I recall we also carried 12 passengers

Pat Kennedy
28th December 2011, 16:48
Danny,
I remember shipmates talking about this happening on the NZ coast, and on the Aussie coast, but it was a bit before my time I think. Certainly the Australian unions would have gone apeshit at the thought of crew working cargo!
But it did happen, and I heard tales of the whole of the deck crowd driving winches and cranes, working cargo and getting shoreside pay including tonnage payments, and earning megabucks in the process.
Maybe others on here can confirm this.
Best regards,
Pat(Thumb)

John Rogers
28th December 2011, 17:41
Yes Pat I can confirm that it happened.I was on a bank boat in 1948 and while we were in Auckland the dockers stopped unloading us and the whole crew went to work unloading the ship. We had a hold full of Lamp Black and another with Sulfur,the other three holds were general cargo. We got double time for the lamp black, that was some nasty stuff.


John.

Pat Kennedy
28th December 2011, 18:26
Yes Pat I can confirm that it happened.I was on a bank boat in 1948 and while we were in Auckland the dockers stopped unloading us and the whole crew went to work unloading the ship. We had a hold full of Lamp Black and another with Sulfur,the other three holds were general cargo. We got double time for the lamp black, that was some nasty stuff.


John.
That lamp black John, otherwise known as Carbon Black, and the worst cargo I ever worked during my time on the Liverpool docks.
It attracted a large premium for the dockers handling it because it would penetrate gloves, facemasks, and all your clothes and impregnate the skin, and would take weeks before it finallly washed out.
They make it at a plant in Ellesmere Port, next to Stanlow Refinery.
regards,
Pat

spongebob
28th December 2011, 18:44
This happened during the 1951 waterfront strike when the NZ Docker's Union was de-registered and the police and NZ Armed services were brought in to handle cargo. The strike lasted 5 months and ship's crews were able to join the labour force on their time off to make a few extra quid.
The Auckland Union is again getting bolshie striking over the Christmas period and Merck have already diverted one shipping schedule from Auckland to Tauranga port .

Bob

DURANGO
28th December 2011, 18:46
Danny,
I remember shipmates talking about this happening on the NZ coast, and on the Aussie coast, but it was a bit before my time I think. Certainly the Australian unions would have gone apeshit at the thought of crew working cargo!
But it did happen, and I heard tales of the whole of the deck crowd driving winches and cranes, working cargo and getting shoreside pay including tonnage payments, and earning megabucks in the process.
Maybe others on here can confirm this.
Best regards,
Pat(Thumb) I think it was called sea gulling if my memory serves others will be able to put me right if I,m wrong ,I well remember going into the Wellington floating dry dock on the old Suevic and being asked if we wanted to work in the dry dock dirty work but well paid regards Dave .