m.v. Miranda - HM Coastguard Trawler Support Vessel

Gulpers
14th January 2006, 20:56
Trawler Support Vessel m.v. Miranda

Built in Sweden in 1942 as a four masted topsail schooner named Albatross and sailed as such with distinction, as a round the world sail training ship and oceanographical survey vessel. In 1967 she was sold and converted to a cargo vessel and renamed Donna under the Panamanian flag. In 1969 she was again sold and became Dorothea.

MIRANDA was a Government owned ship provided by the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI). She was operated by HM Coastguard under the direction of the Marine Division of the DTI and was managed by the Ellermans Wilson Line of Hull.

She was acquired in April 1970 as a result of the recommendations of the Holland Martin Committee of Enquiry into the safety at sea of British distant water trawlers.

Her master (Support Commander) and Medical Officer were appointed by DTI, and a Meteorological Officer was provided by the Met Office. Marconi Marine provided the Electronics Officer and Radio Officers. Ellermans Wilson Line provided the other officers and the crew, which included a fishing adviser (ex Trawler Skipper) to assist the Support Commander in technical matters peculiar to trawlers.

Miranda was "on station" in the Denmark Strait (between Iceland and Greenland) from the beginning of December until the end of April and crew reliefs were initially effected by air transport at Reykjavik and/or Isafjordur in Iceland.
During the "Cod wars" reliefs were effected at Lerwick, Aberdeen or her home port of Hull.

All the above information has been extracted from Nigel Hadley's excellent website about the vessel. There are plenty of illustrations, photographs and audio clips which you will find interesting (particularly ex Marconi R/Os). (Thumb)

Highly recommended: Nigel Hadley's website here. (http://nigelhadley.org.uk/index.html)

R651400
13th February 2015, 11:04
Thanks Neville I actually thought you were one of GKA's Miranda's GULL-wingers..
Honed yr link to Miranda site http://nigelhadley.org.uk/index.html

david freeman
13th February 2015, 19:33
Was the Miranda commissioned as a result of 3 UK Registered Trawlers in the late 60's early 70's coming to grief off Iceland, before the 'Cod Wars'. The name Rodregias Stirs in my memory.

RayJordandpo
13th February 2015, 19:56
When she was a trawler support vessel she had a unique launching device for her fast rescue craft (FRC). We had the same device on a dive support vessel I sailed on (Ugland Comex1) It was known as the "Miranda Clip"
Incidentally, our Captain, Derek Shorthouse sailed on the Miranda as CO for Ellerman Wilsons.

cueball44
13th February 2015, 19:57
Was the Miranda commissioned as a result of 3 UK Registered Trawlers in the late 60's early 70's coming to grief off Iceland, before the 'Cod Wars'. The name Rodregias Stirs in my memory.Roderigo H135 & Lorella H455 were overwhelmed with ice and capsized on the 26/1/1955. All hands lost.

trotterdotpom
13th February 2015, 22:05
Was the Miranda commissioned as a result of 3 UK Registered Trawlers in the late 60's early 70's coming to grief off Iceland, before the 'Cod Wars'. The name Rodregias Stirs in my memory.

Yes. They were Ross Cleveland, Kingston Peridot and St Romanus, David.

John T

Brian Davidson
13th February 2015, 23:07
Yes. They were Ross Cleveland, Kingston Peridot and St Romanus, David.

John T

Three trawlers sunk in a 3 week period. 58 men lost.
I had the privilege of sailing on Miranda in September 1973. A great experience.
Brian

david freeman
14th February 2015, 08:20
Was the Miranda commissioned as a result of 3 UK Registered Trawlers in the late 60's early 70's coming to grief off Iceland, before the 'Cod Wars'. The name Rodregias Stirs in my memory.

Following on from this during the 'Cod Wars' I believe Hull commisssioned some of the Factory Ships (BUT/ and Others-Othello-Ciero, Lord Nelson Ect.) to act as motherships, not to be involved in the actions of preventing the Icelandics from slicing through Trawl warps, but as providing asistance if the UK Fishing Fleet/vessel suffered lost of or injury to personnel. This was in additional to The RN fishery protection vessels???
It would be of interest to see or hear of the sea time commpleted per voyage on the Miranda, was it as a factory ship some 3 months, or as a wet fisher (Stern or side winder on average 21 days home port to home port).
The Cod Wars remind me! was it when the Icelandics declared the Home waters and fishing limits for all foriegn vessels was increased from 12 Miles -point to point to 200 miles Point to point. We in the UK were looking at the Northsea Oil and had gained 200 Mile of offshore limits to protect mineral rights. The Icelandics aurguement was that they had no mineral deposits, only fish, and that this or the fishing rights should be theirs within 200 miles of their coast line.
It was not only the Brits but the whole of the NW european fishing industry that was fishing before the Cod Wars within sight the coastline 12 mile limit?? off Iceland.(H):sweat:

Brian Davidson
14th February 2015, 20:59
Following on from this during the 'Cod Wars' I believe Hull commisssioned some of the Factory Ships (BUT/ and Others-Othello-Ciero, Lord Nelson Ect.) to act as motherships, not to be involved in the actions of preventing the Icelandics from slicing through Trawl warps, but as providing asistance if the UK Fishing Fleet/vessel suffered lost of or injury to personnel. This was in additional to The RN fishery protection vessels???
It would be of interest to see or hear of the sea time commpleted per voyage on the Miranda, was it as a factory ship some 3 months, or as a wet fisher (Stern or side winder on average 21 days home port to home port).
The Cod Wars remind me! was it when the Icelandics declared the Home waters and fishing limits for all foriegn vessels was increased from 12 Miles -point to point to 200 miles Point to point. We in the UK were looking at the Northsea Oil and had gained 200 Mile of offshore limits to protect mineral rights. The Icelandics aurguement was that they had no mineral deposits, only fish, and that this or the fishing rights should be theirs within 200 miles of their coast line.
It was not only the Brits but the whole of the NW european fishing industry that was fishing before the Cod Wars within sight the coastline 12 mile limit?? off Iceland.(H):sweat:

The deployment of mother ships was the government’s response following much pressure from fishermen's families after the loss of the three trawlers in 1968. The purpose of the mother ships was to provide medical aid, engineering support, first and second line electronic fault repair and localised weather forecasts. To this end they carried a doctor, an electronic officer, and a meteorologist. Engineering support was provided by the ships normal engineering staff. The mother ships were not engaged in any form of fishing activity themselves.
During the Cod Wars the mother ships were under instruction not get involved in the conflict. Even to the extent that they were not supposed to support a trawler in its fishing activities. For example - It was not unusual for a trawler skipper to ask for help to repair a broken fish finder. This was not allowed - however the skipper was always asked if the fish finder could also be used to aid the safe navigation of his vessel. Hopefully the reply to that question was yes! In that case support could be provided!
I sailed on Miranda in September 1973 and Othello in January 1976. At these times there were three support vessels - Miranda, Othello and Hausa. There were always two vessels on station at any one time, whilst the third was back in the home port carrying out a crew change and replenishing supplies etc. Voyages lasted around six weeks.

ben27
18th February 2015, 23:37
good day r651400.sm.13th feb 2015.21:04.#2 re:mv miranda,just to comment on the photo of the miranda on the link.brilliant.they were certainly heavy seas.great post.regards ben27

Manchester
19th February 2015, 14:24
Hi Brian,
I was Electronics Officer on "Othello" in September 1973 so we must have had a chat sometime. Great job but a bit disconcerting one time when having fixed the steering gear on one trawler when the skipper asked me to check with sparks as to why he could only use r/t on his tx. Found the morse key was completely seized up! Bit of WD40 or equivalent at the time got him back on air!!

The other point is when we had heavy seas off Iceland - most of the time - the trawlers needing assistance tended to call us rather than "Miranda" as we were more stable in heavy seas and more likely to get to them in a reasonable time. Miranda seemed to spend more time hove to!

Manchester
19th February 2015, 15:03
I think the other ship up there was the "Ranger Brises" (spellng?)

Manchester
19th February 2015, 15:21
Sorry should read "Ranger Briseis" later became "Hausa"

http://sterntrawlers.shippedia.com/vessel.php?id=15&n=Ranger%20Briseis&r=SN30

Brian Davidson
20th February 2015, 21:56
Hi Brian,
I was Electronics Officer on "Othello" in September 1973 so we must have had a chat sometime. Great job but a bit disconcerting one time when having fixed the steering gear on one trawler when the skipper asked me to check with sparks as to why he could only use r/t on his tx. Found the morse key was completely seized up! Bit of WD40 or equivalent at the time got him back on air!!

The other point is when we had heavy seas off Iceland - most of the time - the trawlers needing assistance tended to call us rather than "Miranda" as we were more stable in heavy seas and more likely to get to them in a reasonable time. Miranda seemed to spend more time hove to!


Hi Manchester

Miranda was a very bad 'sea boat' with a maximum speed of around 9 knots on a good day. That reduced considerably in a heavy sea. I recall at the time that there was a deep sense of frustration that a support vessel there to aid others, should be so slow and underpowered.

swannee15
2nd April 2015, 14:06
Nice to read the forum on Miranda. I served on her in March/April 1976 as Radio Officer (12-4 shift). it was interesting trip to say the least. Really good crew on her though. Disappointed though not to see much of Iceland. Joined her straight from Keflavik and after a quick kip, had to go on watch immediately. We only put into Rekyavik briefly mid trip so never managed a run ashore.
The standing joke throughout the fleet, was that if they needed assistance, they would come looking for us, rather than the other way round, it was quicker. As stated elsewhere on here, flat out with a following wind and tide, we barely scraped 9 knots. I think we took a week to get from Iceland to Hull on the journey home.
Some real characters though. Old Eric my 8-12 oppo. Bob the weather man and his favourite sport of dropping "Bathythermographs". And then there was the Doc. At least 2 bottles of Martini a day and a million stories. I once saw him walk up the central corridor (after tea, well hammered), rolling in perfect opposition to the ship. Made my head spin a bit.
Good ship, good crew, good crack. A real education

Dave