Stag Line Shipping North Shields

Robert
16th January 2006, 21:52
Seeking Info On This Company Plus Any X Crew Members Who Worked On These Ships Rob

trotterdotpom
16th January 2006, 22:47
Seeking Info On This Company Plus Any X Crew Members Who Worked On These Ships Rob

Enter "Stag Line" in the Search Forums of this site and quite a few mentions of the company and former employees (including myself, very briefly) come up. There is also a direction to a Stag Line website belonging to 'Oceantramp'.
Enjoy.

John T.

gdynia
17th January 2006, 03:54
Seeking Info On This Company Plus Any X Crew Members Who Worked On These Ships Rob
Robert

9 years with Staggies 1969 t0 1978 vessels sailed on Zinnia,Ixia,Photinia and Gloxinia
Rgds Gdynia

janbonde
17th January 2006, 20:13
I knew a Capt-Reekie with Stag Line he came from a place he called the East Nook or Neuk,I heard from sources that he passed away about four or five years ago he must have been in his nineties

gdynia
18th January 2006, 06:38
I knew a Capt-Reekie with Stag Line he came from a place he called the East Nook or Neuk,I heard from sources that he passed away about four or five years ago he must have been in his nineties
Janblonde

Capt Reekie was my first Master in 1969, he was near retirement age then. He was from the Fife coast and his famous saying was "Thats an awful lot of money for a young man" when you asked him for a cash advance. He was a real character.
Rgds Gdynia

John Hewett
1st February 2006, 15:11
I joined Stag Line in 1972 as a navigating cadet until transferred to Huntings and James Fishers (takeovers) and eventually made redundant in 1983.
Ships sailed on were Gloxinia, Ixia, Zinnia, Photinia (New Zealand 1977) and Begonia.

Have lost contact with all those sailed with.

Pat McCardle
2nd February 2006, 15:14
Seeking Info On This Company Plus Any X Crew Members Who Worked On These Ships Rob

Hi! Robert I've posted a shot, today, of the stag Line office & rest in gallery Ports & Harbours. (Thumb)

R58484956
2nd February 2006, 15:37
Welcome John to the site enjoy it and all it has to offer

oceantramp
5th February 2006, 10:49
Seeking Info On This Company Plus Any X Crew Members Who Worked On These Ships Rob

Hi Robert
I sailed with Stag Line 1952 to 1966 I have a small web site at
http://stag-line.mysite.wanadoo-members.co.uk
All the best oceantramp

R58484956
5th February 2006, 11:06
Ocean tramp yours is an interesting website, thanks for high lighting it.

firey
5th February 2006, 11:56
Ocean Tramp , checked out your web site ,some great photos taken in the Nort Atlantic,respect! (Thumb)

Firey

sfmillsy
9th February 2006, 19:05
Hello,

I was at South Shields Marine and Tech with a couple of blokes from Stag line, one I think by the name of Pete Cowley.This was in the 1970's

We all had long hair in those days.

I remember watching the Zinnia come into the Tyne and all the girls in the offices waving things at the ship...might even have been 'under garments'.

Was it true that when they came into the Tyne they painted the Starb'd side of the ship only as this was the only side that could bee seen from the Stag Line offices?

Good memories.

All the best
Steve Mills........I worked for Common Brothers by the way.

sam2182sw
9th February 2006, 19:54
i have a photo of the PHOTINIA in KING GEORGE DOCK HULL with all her cable laying gear on the bow i dont know if she was just going to lay the cable or she had just finished but she had just discharged a full cargo of grain so she must have done a trip with the gear still on sam

gdynia
9th February 2006, 20:43
Hello,

I was at South Shields Marine and Tech with a couple of blokes from Stag line, one I think by the name of Pete Cowley.This was in the 1970's

We all had long hair in those days.

I remember watching the Zinnia come into the Tyne and all the girls in the offices waving things at the ship...might even have been 'under garments'.

Was it true that when they came into the Tyne they painted the Starb'd side of the ship only as this was the only side that could bee seen from the Stag Line offices?

Good memories.


All the best
Steve Mills........I worked for Common Brothers by the way.
Steve
It would of been Peter Cowling as we were both in Stag Line at the same time. There were several Common Bros cadets with us. Its only a myth the story as they would of had to paint the port side for departing or sail at night

sfmillsy
9th February 2006, 21:42
Shows how old age can play tricks, mind you I think I did pretty well getting the name nearly right. Thanks for your post.

I have a photo of some of the guys from my course, could have been 1st mates, who used to have a kick around on the playing fields at the back of the college.

I must post it 'cos I think Pete may be on the photo.

The story about the painting is a good yarn anyway.

all the best

Steve Mills (I also worked for UASC)

Ray Woodward
20th March 2006, 12:14
I served on the "Zinnia" for a while aug to nov 1960 had two good trips on her to Nofolk VA, and up the Great lakes. I got my rate to steward on her. I would appriciate a photo of her if anyone has got a copy. Ray Woodward

wa002f0328
20th March 2006, 13:51
Hi All
Can anyone remember Jimmy Young, 2nd mate in the latter years of Stag Line?

wa002f0328
1st March 2007, 21:57
Has anyoneone sailed out of the Tyne lately, and observed the most famous Stag in the world, I have and was disgusted, the Stag is red and the background is even worse, White on Red is the order of the day. Do,s anyone know when the colours were changed? we must have an answer.

ronjohn
2nd September 2007, 19:20
sailed on the Gardinia April 1962 Tyne to Seven Islands


Ron John

Britannia
26th October 2007, 22:43
[QUOTE=ronjohn;148919]sailed on the Gardinia April 1962 Tyne to Seven Islands

Hi Ron.
With being new to this web site I have been trawling through the various pages recently with particular reference to Stag Line with whom I sailed with from 1968 - 1974. I thought you may be interested in the old photograph I have of your old ship.
regards
Mike B

Mikkum
29th October 2007, 07:51
Hi all,
I sailed on the Ixia in 1978. We joined it in Barcelona after three days in a hotel and paid off in Kiel three months later. We loaded grain in Duluth and discharged it in Riga after about six weeks at anchor.
I remember the Chief Steward was from Sunderland by the name of Tommy Brown.
Best regards
Mick

wa002f0328
29th October 2007, 09:09
Good Morning all Staggies, next wednesday 7th november 2007, the old Stag Line building is having an open day to celebrate the buildings 200th birthday, I will be going along to see if I can pick up on any Stag Line history.
Rgds Bill

AlexBooth
29th October 2007, 22:41
Either I'm going senile or just plan loopy, I seem to recall meeting at one Stag ship in Trincomalee (Oh I loved that place, after a month or so in Calcutta, t'was like paradise just a couple of barges of tea a day to load ...... but I diversify, excuse me) early/mid 70's - modern looking job (at the time), 4 For'd 1 aft, maybe 12,000 DWT. large funnel like the BluFlus of the time with simular designed ships. I think there was some interaction between our ships, As I recall I thought they where liner-carriers and on this case running jointly (or against) BluFlu/Ben's services to/from Near/far East. Can any clarify for me ?

Cheers(Pint) (Smoke)

Amblejohn
5th November 2007, 16:08
I may well see you at 1, Howard Street, I'll certainly be popping along in my lunch break, almost said hour.

maritiem
26th November 2007, 06:35
HISTORY STAG
The Founder, James Robinson, was born in the North Yorkshire port of Whitby in 1768. He was the son of a sailor and, like his father, he also took to the sea and in due course became 1 st. Mate on a Whitby vessel. In 1796, however, he signed off in London and moved to North Shields where he settled and in the following year married a Northumbrian girl. Of their eight children, two were to take up seafaring careers and thus maintain a family tradition. It was some time however, before the Robinson family were to acquire a vessel of their own. This opportunity came when there was a reduction in the demand for shipping and a consequent drop in the value of ships at the end of the Napoleonic wars. In 1817 Captain James Robinson took his chance to buy the brig BLESSING of 221 tons, which had been built at Sunderland twelve years previously, in the year of Trafalgar.
In the late 1820's a further recession in trade caused him to raise money by a loan against the ship. James Robinson died in 1833 and the management of the BLESSING passed to his wife Grace. Their sons. Captain John and Captain Joseph Robinson commanded the BLESSING from time to time. In 1843 Joseph (always known as Captain Joseph) took over the loan and when his mother Grace died in the following year he became sole owner of the ship.
In March 1846 the BLESSING was lost and it would appear that Joseph, using the insurance money, ordered a new vessel from Luke, Blumer and Bushel! of South Shields and named her STAG. The prevalent method of shipowning was to divide the ownership into 64 shares, known as the 64ther system. Of the 64 shares in the STAG, Joseph took 28, his brother Thomas, a tailor, took 22 and James Miller, a previous employer, took 14 shares. A stag trippant is the crest of a North Yorkshire branch of the Robinson family and was adopted as the house flag. "Trippant" is a heraldic term where an animal has one foot raised in a trotting action.
Over the next quarter century the demand for shipping expanded due to the Industrial Revolution, the increase in the population of the United Kingdom and the importation of foreign grain due to the repealing of the Corn Laws. This gave Joseph the right conditions to increase the fleet and in 1848 the FELLOWSHIP was purchased secondhand but was sold in the following year and replaced by the newly-built ELEANOR GRACE. A painting shows her flying a Stag flag on her main mast. She was followed in 1853 with the purchase of the eleven year old ALBERT and in 1856 the ROBINSONS was completed at Sunderland. From 1850 onwards the fleet was managed by Joseph Robinson and Company. Joseph owned a large portion of the 64th. shares in each ship whilst other shares were owned by his relations, local traders and professional men. The first ship with a flower name was the barque CAMELLIA, built in 1858. By 1871 Joseph had built up a fleet of one brig and eight barques totalling 3,282 tons in all.
The development of the compound steam engine in 1852 and the opening of the Suez Canal in 1869 persuaded many British shipowners to change from sail to steam. In 1871 the STEPHANOTIS was the Company's first steam ship and, carrying a stag on her funnel, was delivered by Iliff, Mounsey and Company of Sunderland. In addition to sails she had a 98 h.p. steam engine and was of 1,042 tons gross. Eight years later there were no sailing ships left in the fleet which then consisted of eleven steamers of 16,113 tons.
In October 1880 the Company had the misfortune to lose two vessels in unusual circumstances. The steamers STAG and ROBINIA, both on passage from New Orleans to French ports, were at anchor at Punta Delgada, Azores. During a severe storm the anchors of both vessels dragged and the two ships collided. The anchors of the British steamer BENELLA also failed to hold and she collided with the ROBINIA. When the storm had passed the three ships were to be seen lying wrecked in the harbour.
The management firm of Joseph Robinson and Company was changed to Joseph Robinson and Sons in 1883 after three sons had joined the partnership. In 1889 Captain Joseph Robinson died, having seen the fleet grow to sixteen steamers of 28,302 tons. He was typical of those hard-working, thrusting Victorians who built up the nineteenth century prosperity of Britain. In 1891 Joseph Robinson and Sons moved its office to No. 1 Howard Street, North Shields which was to be its home for ninety years. The building had been erected as the first Subscription Library in the North of England, the foundation stone being laid in 1806.
In 1895, due to the high cost of insuring each ship individually on the market, it was arranged with all the 64th shareholders to transfer the ships to a limited company known as "Stag Line", Ltd. which would carry its own insurance. Of the shares in the new company 72 were held by the family with the balance being held by friends and local traders. Joseph Robinson and Sons continued as managers and also acted as directors of the limited company. "Stag Line", Ltd. was established with a paid up capital ot £148,032 divided into 16,448 shares of £9.
In 1896, with shipbuilders quoting keen prices, the first order for 13 years was placed for a steamer with triple expansion engines and 4,310 tons carrying capacity at a cost of £27,860. This compared with £31,250 paid for the STAG of 2,900 tons and built in 1884. The new ship was completed inJanuary 1897 as GLOXINIA and marked the beginning of a policy to sell the older ships and replace them with larger and more modern vessels. Three more steamers followed during the next three years and continued the long association with the Tyne Iron Shipbuilding Co. Ltd. who delivered two more ships in 1904. By 1904 two brothers and a cousin of the fourth generation of Robinsons were at the helm with a fleet of ten ships of 29,414 tons. In the same year, with a more encouraging freight market, orders were placed for two Doxford turret steamers of 6,600 tons. These two ships were completed in 1907 as EUPHORBIA and CLINTONIA. The policy of replacing ships continued whilst some of the older vessels were fitted for the carriage of molasses in bulk.
When the War broke out in 1914 the Company had a fleet of twelve steamers with a carrying capacity of 65,460 tons. Seven ships were lost during the conflict including the EUPHORBIA completed in 1917 and the BEGONIA built in 1918.

26.12.1914 LINARIA Mined and sunk near Filey on voyage London to Tyne.
1.8.1915 CLINTONIA Torpedoed and sunk 30 m WSW of Ushant.
16.7.1916 EUPHORBIA Torpedoed and sunk 56 m NE of Algiers.
27.9.1916 CYDONIA Wrecked on Holy Island on voyage Burntisland/Brest.
27.11.1917 CAMELLIA Sailed from Dakar for U.K. and disappeared.
1.12.1917 EUPHORBIA Torpedoed and sunk 14 m SE of Royal Sovereign Light Vessel.
21.3.1918 BEGONIA Torpedoed and sunk 44 m SW of Wolf Rock.

In order to replace war losses and older less efficient ships that had been sold, the managers in 1916 obtained permission from the shareholders to build six new steamers but due to Government restrictions on the building of ships for private investment it was only possible to build limited replacement tonnage.
When the War ended in 1918 the Company had only two ships the GARDENIA of 1914 and the CLINTONIA of 1917, with an order for a third ship deferred due to Government restrictions.
As there was little prospect of building new ships for some time, it was decided to reconstitute the Company and distribute surplus cash to the shareholders. The new company, named Stag Line, Ltd. was registered on the 26th August 1918 with two ships totalling 10,700 tons deadweight. The Company returned to the Tyne Iron Shipbuilding Co. Ltd. for the first ship of the post-war building programme. She was, however, to be the last ship to be built at the yard for Stag Line and marked the end of a long association between owner and builder. The GLOXINIA was completed as a cargo steamer in September 1920 but was immediately handed over to Smith's Dock Co. Ltd. at North Shields and converted into a tanker.
Her total cost including that of conversion came to a staggering £236,234.

The IXIA joined the fleet in July 1922 and served the Company until 30th June 1929 when she was wrecked on The Brisons. The loss of the IXIA had far-reaching effects and became the leading case, decided by the House of Lords, on the complicated subject of reasonable deviation of course. The IXIA was fitted with a superheater and when she sailed from Swansea on passage to Constantinople with a cargo of coal there were two shore engineers on board for the purpose of observing the working of the superheater at the beginning of the voyage. The two engineers were subsequently transferred from the ship in St. Ives Bay by a boat which put out from the shore. In order to effect this transfer, the vessel deviated some five miles off the normal course for the Mediterranean so as to enter St. Ives Bay. Thereafter the IXIA kept closer to the Cornish coast than if she had been on the normal course. Shortly afterwards she ran aground and was lost with her cargo, though the weather conditions were fairly good at the time. The charterers claimed the full value of the cargo from the shipowners. The Company maintained that a clause in the Bill of Lading provided for such a deviation of course but the House of Lords ruled against the Company.
Two ships were delivered by the Sunderland Shipbuilding Co. Ltd. in 1924 and named LINARIA and EUPHORBIA. The next ship to be delivered to the Company was the steamer CYDONIA. The keel of this ship had been laid down at the North Dock yard of J. Blumer and Co. Ltd., Sunderland in 1922.
The hull of the ship stood on the stocks for four years whilst the shipyard was closed. It was not until December 1926 that the vessel was launched after the shipyard had reopened. The ship was purchased by Stag Line and as the
CYDONIA she sailed from Sunderland in January 1927. A sistership which had been built in similar circumstances was completed in December 1926 as the USWORTH, having been purchased by the Dalgleish Steam Shipping Co.
Ltd., Newcastle. The completion of the CYDONIA however, marked the end of shipbuilding at the North Dock, Sunderland.

In December 1928 the Company took delivery of the GARDENIA. This ship had been launched as the STRONGARM, having been commenced on speculation by Armstrong, Whitworth and Co. Ltd., Newcastle. The fleet had been built up to six ships totalling 35,173 tons when the slump started in 1930. All the vessels were laid up for extended periods and the tanker GLOXINIA lay idle at Stanhope Buoys in the River Tyne from 14th. October 1930 until 26th January 1937. It was eight years before full depreciation had been provided and it was possible to recommend the payment of dividends again. Despite this however, the bank overdraft never exceeded £4,750.

The dry-cargo fleet at the beginning of the depression was five tramps: CLINTONIA, LINARIA, EUPHORBIA, CYDONIA and GARDENIA.

GLOXINIA was re-activated by the strong demand created by the Spanish Civil War and carried 8 cargoes from Batum to Spain. On one voyage she called at Marseilles and was quickly cleared for her destination of Valencia. She was seen approaching there by German bombers, who then heavily attacked that harbour during the night but GLOXINIA escaped after a quick discharge and moved along the coast to Barcelona during the night.

By September 1939, when the Second World War started, the fleet totalled seven ships, following the purchase of the HOPEDENE from Hopemount Shipping Co. Ltd, Newcastle in 1938 which was renamed PHOTINIA.

12.3.1940 GARDENIA Mined and sunk NE of Cromer.
19.10.1940 CLINTONIA Torpedoed and sunk to W of Hebrides.
14.12.1940 EUPHORBIA Torpedoed and sunk in North Atlantic.
24.2.1941 LINARIA Torpedoed/sunk by Italian submarine in North Atlantic.
Although in 1940 the Company had agreed to purchase the steamer HOLLINSIDE 4172/30 from Charlton, McAllum and Co., Ltd., Newcastle and had selected the name BEGONIA for her, a disagreement arose over the condition of the ship and the terms of the final contract and Stag Line withdrew. On the following voyage her stern frame fractured and the HOLLINSIDE had to be towed into Punta Delgada, Azores where she arrived on 16th March 1941. In 1943 the Company purchased the ELIZABETH MASSEY but wartime regulations prevented the renaming of the ship and so it was in 1945 that she took the name BEGONIA. The steamer BRIARWOOD was purchased from Joseph Constantine in 1945 and application was made to change her name to ZINNIA. In fact she was renamed GARDENIA on 13th December 1945.
In 1946 Nicholas Robinson, after serving six years in the Royal Corps of Signals, joined his cousin David as a partner in Joseph Robinson and Sons. Their cousin, Robin Pender, joined the firm in 1954 and became a partner in 1957 to complete the fifth generation team. During the immediate post-war years the Company purchased four war-built steamers. The EMPIRE KUMASI became the IXIA whilst H.M.S. SANCROFT, formerly the EMPIRE BAFFIN, was renamed CLINTONIA. Both the ships had been previously managed by the Company and were converted from coal to oil firing before entering service with Stag Line. H.M.S. MORAY FIRTH had been laid down as EMPIRE PITCAIRN but completed as a maintenance repair ship for the Admiralty whilst H.M.S. PORTLAND BILL had been similarly employed. These two ships, after conversion back to dry cargo carriers, were renamed LINARIA and ZINNIA respectively.
The CYDONIA was one of the ships which survived the war although on 28th February 1945 she had struck a mine in the North Sea and arrived at Hull in a damaged condition. On 21st. October 1949 she again had the misfortune to strike a mine. The ship was on passage from Workington to Cardiff when the mine was seen on the surface about 200 yards away. Avoiding action was taken but owing to the force of the wind she drifted down on to the mine. The engine room flooded rapidly and a greaser on watch lost his life. The remainder of the crew was rescued by the ST. CLEARS (4308/36) of the South American Saint Line Ltd. and the ship was towed to Milford Haven by the tug ENGLISHMAN (762/45). She was found to be badly damaged however, and was sold to be broken up.
In 1950 the first steps were taken to replace the fleet with modern dry cargo bulk carriers and an order was placed with J. Readhead and Sons Ltd., South Shields. This ship was completed in February 1953 as CAMELLIA and was the first motorship in the fleet. She was followed in 1955 by the steamer CYDONIA from the same yard. During the ice-free season of 1956 the BEGONIA, CAMELLIA, CLINTONIA and GARDENIA each made two voyages to Churchill in Hudson Bay, Canada, and lifted a total of 59,112 tons of grain. This was regarded at the time as a record outloading in one season by one shipping company. The BEGONIA was sold at the end of 1956 and other steamers were also sold as new tonnage was delivered. In May 1958 the motorship GLOXINIA was completed to bring the fleet to six ships.

A notable achievement of the Stag Line management was their quickness off the mark in recognising the importance of the St. Lawrence Seaway, opened in 1959. Before construction had finished, visits were made to Canada and the Great Lakes to discover its potential for deep-sea ships. The CAMELLIA and GARDENIA had the distinction of being the first deep-sea ships to be chartered to load in the Great Lakes when they were fixed on 12th November 1958. The vessels were fitted with equipment for the St. Lawrence Seaway in April 1959 prior to sailing from the River Tyne. They both entered the Seaway on 3rd May 1959, eight days after it had opened to commercial traffic.
In March 1961 the PHOTINIA was completed by J. Readhead and Sons Ltd., South Shields. Just before she was delivered, arrangements had been made to timecharter her to British Insulated Callender's Cable Company to lay three 5" diameter power cables across Cook Strait between North and South Island, New Zealand. After a few months trading the ship returned to the builder's yard to be fitted with cable laying equipment. On 7th March 1 962 she sailed from the River Tyne and carried out laying trials in Loch Fyne before returning to the shipyard at the end of April to have the equipment removed. The PHOTINIA then resumed normal trading until the manufacture of the 75 miles of cable had been completed. In February 1964 the ship arrived at South Shields for the cable laying equipment to be refitted and then proceeded to Loch Fyne for more trials before sailing to Manchester to take on board three 25 mile lengths of 5" diameter high voltage submarine power cable. The PHOTINIA sailed from Manchester on 22nd August 1964 and successfully completed the laying of the cable in November. After returning to the United Kingdom the ship loaded a further 25 mile length of cable which she laid between Trinidad and Tobago during September 1965. With her cable laying tasks completed, the PHOTINIA returned to the River Tyne where the equipment was landed and she reverted to her normal role as a bulk carrier.
During 1964 the Company sold the last of the pre-war and war built tonnage, and the fleet was strengthened with the delivery of the IXIA by Austin and Pickersgill Ltd., Sunderland. She was the largest ship that the Company had owned up to that time whilst her dimensions and equipment enabled her to trade to the St. Lawrence Seaway. In 1965 the IXIA arrived in the River Mersey with a cargo of 23,1 92 tons of grain from Canada which, at the time, was the largest bulk grain cargo to be discharged in the river. The CYDONIA had the distinction in October 1965 of making the fiftieth voyage to the Seaway by a Stag Line ship when she discharged a cargo of ferro manganese from Boulogne and loaded a cargo of grain homewards.
The Company placed an order with J. Readhead and Sons Ltd. in 1966 for another bulk carrier and in October 1968 she was completed as ZINNIA. The CYDONIA was the last steamer in the fleet and in August 1969 she was sold to Liberian-flag owners. During 1969 the managing partnership of Joseph Robinson and Sons was absorbed into Stag Line, Ltd. and with an improved freight market the company was in a position to benefit from the trading by its fleet of modern bulk carriers. The motorship CAMELLIA was sold in 1972 and the year closed with the Company operating a fleet of four ships.
Early in 1974 it was announced that Ropner Holdings Ltd. had purchased a shareholding in Stag Line, Ltd. which represented 27.94 of the issued share capital.
The Company acquired two ships in April 1975 for which bareboat charters had been arranged. These vessels were renamed KIELDER STAG and SILLOTH STAG and were engaged in the coastal and short sea trades. In January 1976, following the cancellation of a number of their orders. Swan Hunter Shipbuilders Ltd. submitted an attractive offer to build a third 26,000 ton deadweight bulkcarrier which was named BEGONIA and delivered in May 1978. This was a valuable order for the Tyneside shipyard and was followed later in 1976 with a contract for J. Readhead and Sons Ltd. to refit the PHOTINIA for a further cable laying operation. A fault had developed in one of the Cook Strait cables and so in October 1976 the PHOTINIA commenced conversion prior to making the voyage to New Zealand. On 20th August 1977 the repair was completed and the ship sailed for the River Tyne. She was then once more converted back to her bulk carrier role but, unfortunately, her career ended in May 1978 when she was driven aground by a storm off Milwaukee and was declared a total loss.
Sadly, on 3rd March 1977 David Robinson C.B.E., J.P. died suddenly whilst on business in London. He had retired as chairman of Stag Line in 1975 but had remained on the board. In addition to his association with Stag Line, he had held several other posts and was a past president of the Chamber of Shipping.
The BEGONIA was completed in May 1978 and to finance her the GLOXINIA was sold during 1977 and the KIELDER STAG was sold in the following year. With freight rates at rock bottom and 400 dry cargo ships totalling 13 million tons deadweight laid up, the Company had difficulty in meeting the Government loan repayments. However, the granting of a three year deferment helped the Company through the worst of the depression and with a strong demand for tonnage following the failure of the U.S.S.R. grain harvest, the Company moved back into profitability in 1980. With a second U.S.S.R. grain failure, a forecasted increase in demand for coal to replace a continuing shortage and high cost of oil and with the lowest dry cargo laid up figures since 1975 (just over 2 million tonnes deadweight) the trading prospects for 1981 looked very good.
Early in 1981, Ropner Holdings Ltd. who had bought a total of 29 of the shares in Stag Line in 1974, sold their holding to Hunting Gibson pic. who then made a public offer for all the shares. Stag Line Directors recommended acceptance as this was in the best interests of all concerned and Stag Line, Ltd. became a wholly owned subsidiary of Hunting Gibson on 1 st April 1981. Hunting Stag Management Ltd. was set up in Newcastle to absorb the sea going and shore based staff of Hunting and Son and Stag Line, and to manage the Hunting and Stag fleets. Nicholas J. Robinson, however, stayed with Stag Line as non-executive chairman until 31st December 1982. In October 1981 the offices in 1 Howard Street, North Shields, occupied by Stag Line for 90 years, were sold.
Unfortunately, the deepening world recession caused a drop in the demand for raw materials, the U.S.S.R. met much of her demand for grain from Europe's bumper harvest and the delivery of many large bulk carriers ordered during 1980 and 1981 resulted in freight rates starting to fall during 1981. By the end of 1982 the number of dry cargo ships laid up due to lack of employment had reached 1,146 of 24 million tonnes deadweight, 7% of the world dry cargo fleet. Medium sized bulk carriers under the British flag, if trading, were losing around £1,000 a day and shipowning faced a worse situation than during the 1930's depression. To reduce losses the IXIA was sold in February 1982, when 17 years old, for just over her building price. The SILLOTH STAG together with Hunting Stag Management Ltd. were sold to James Fisher and Sons, Barrow in July, Stag Line, Ltd. remained a subsidiary of Hunting Gibson but in November 1982 the ZINNIA was sold to Singapore buyers, then in March 1983 the BEGONIA, the remaining Stag Line ship, was also sold to Singapore buyers.
The sale of the BEGONIA highlights the end of an era, not only for Stag Line (1817-1983) but, maybe, also for British Tramp Shipping.

Mainsources;
Stag Line 1817-1983, N. Robinson, WSS, 1984.
Travel of the Tramps, twenty Tramp fleets Vol. II, N.L. Middlemiss, Shield Publication, 1991.

maritiem
26th November 2007, 06:38
FLEET LIST

BLESSING (1817 - 1846) Snow.
221n, 88.0 x 24.5 x 14.1 feet.
1805: Built by Benjamin Howard, Southwick, Sunderland for Nicholas and John Richardson
7.181: Purchased by James Robinson, Master Mariner (Sixty four shares) 5.1828: James Robinson transferred by indenture sixty four shares to George Stroman, Shadwell who on 24.4.1832 transferred them by indenture to Robert and Richard Brown of St. Mary at Hill London. 10.2.1833: Captain James Robinson died and management of the vessel was transferred to his widow. Grace Robinson. 8.6.1843: Robert and Richard Brown sold all sixty four shares to Grace and Joseph Robinson (widow and son of Captain James Robinson) 7.10 1844: Grace Robinson died and ownership of the vessel was transferred to Joseph Robinson. 28.3.1846: Lost off Flamborough Head.

STAG (1) (1846 - 1858) Snow later Briq O.N. 130/1846.
182n, 82.5 x 21.2 x 12.9 feet.
1846: Built by Luke, Blumer and Bushell, South Shields for Joseph Robinson (28 shares) Thomas Robinson (22 shares) and James Miller (14 shares). Joseph Robinson who was Master from 23rd May 1846 to 11th October 1848 and again between 5th March 1851 and 29th June 1851 is described as a Master Mariner, Thomas Robinson as a Tailor and James Miller as a shipowner 26.5.1846: Sailed on her maiden voyage from Newcastle to London with Captain Joseph Robinson in command. 12.1.1850: Re-registered as a brig. 6.3.1858: Sank after beinq run down off Southwold by an unknown vessel whilst on a voyage from Shields to London with a cargo of coal. The crew were landed safely.

FELLOWSHIP (1848 - 1849) Ship O.N. 2851 (issued in 1855).
201 n, 92.0 x 21.7 x 12.8 feet.
1840: Built by Nicholas Mosher, Newport, Nova Scotia as FELLOWSHIP for his own account 1848: Sold to E. H. Hogg and 78.5.1848 re-registered at North Shields. 18.12.1848: Purchased by Joseph Robinson, Thomas Robinson and Eleanor Johnson. 20.1.1849: Sold to Thomas Rutherford and William Nicholson, Seaham. 1857: Transferred to Thomas Rutherford 1863: Foundered in heavy weather 30 miles off Lowestoft whilst on a voyage from Seaham Harbour-to London with a cargo of coal. All the crew were saved.

ELEANOR GRACE (1) (1849 - 1857) Ship. O.N. 14649. 224n
86.8 x 22.3 x 14.6 feet.
7.7.1849: Completed by Thomas Seymour, Walker on Tyne for Joseph Robinson (40 shares) Thomas Robinson (16 shares) and Eleanor Johnson (8 shares). 24.2.1857- Wrecked whilst on a voyage from Belfast to Newcastle.

ALBERT (1853 - 1871) Brig. O.N. 34801. 161n
72.8 x 20.8 x 14.0 feet.
5.1842: Completed by Peter and James Tait, Stromness as ALBERT for James Spence of Stromness, a Shipmaster (8 shares) and others including George Hobbs (9 shares) and Peter Tait (5 shares). 3.10.1850: Sold to James Leask, Kirkwall, a Master Mariner (64 shares) 19.8 1852: Sold to Anthony Wood and Co., Newcastle upon Tyne. 30.5.1853: Purchased by Joseph Robinson (40 shares) and Thomas Robinson (24 shares). 10.4.1856: Registered tonnaqe increased to 198.69 tons. 1871: Sold to Edward Wilkinson, BIyth. 1878: Sold to George Smee Maldon. 7.1.1890: Sold to James Watson, Newcastle upon Tyne and re-registered with dimensions 92.3x24.2x13.2 feet and registered tonnage 191.29 tons 23.5.1891: Foundered off Sunderland.

ROBINSONS (1856 - 1871) Barque. O.N. 1 7045. 327n
110.0 x 26.8 x 1 6.5 feet.
1856: Built by W. Stothard, Sunderland for Joseph Robinson (40 shares), Thomas Robinson (16 shares) an Beanor Johnson (8 shares). 4.5.187 1: Sold to William Robinson and others BIyth 4.1881: Sold to W. Svendsen, Norway and renamed ALETTE. 37.7.1886: Wrecked on a voyaqe from London to Kristiansand.

CAMELLIA (1) (1858 - 1877) Barque. O.N. 20439. 312n
108.4 x 26.2 x 16.8 feet.
1858: Completed at Sunderland for Joseph Robinson (44 shares) and Thomas Robinson (20 shares). 16.2.1858: Sailed on her maiden voyage to the Mediterranean. 1869: Lengthened by 14.6 feet to 123.0 feet and registered tonnage increased to 332 tons. 1872: Insured value £ 3,300 25.3.1877: wrecked at Pipas near Montevideo whilst on a voyage from Trey Ventos to the U.K. with a cargo of hides. Insured value £3,000.

CLINTONIA (1) (1861 - 1865) Barque. O.N. 29704. 336n
110.0 x 26.2 x 1 6.7 feet.
1867; Built at Sunderland for Joseph Robinson (64 shares). 10.8.1865: Sailed from Taganrog on a voyage to America and after sailing from Constantinople on 6.9.1865 disappeared with all hands.

GLADIOLUS (1) (1863 - 1879) Barque. O.N. 45601. 345g, 306n
113.1 x 27.2 x 16.8 feet.
3.1863: Completed by John Robinson, Sunderland for Joseph Robinson and 6.4.1863 sailed on her maiden voyage to the Black Sea. 20.2.1872; Insured value £2,800. 13.10.1879: Wrecked at Yallachs Bay, Jamaica whilst awaiting cargo for Liverpool. Insured value £1,500.

STAG (2) (1866 - 1873) Barque. O.N. 53482. 296n
111.6 x 26.0 x 1 6.0 feet.
8.1866: Completed by John Robinson, Sunderland for Joseph Robinson and 31.8.1866 sailed on her maiden voyage to Cronstadt. 20.2.1872; Insured value £2,800. 30.3.1873: Wrecked on English Bank, River Plate. Insured for £2,800 at the time of her loss.

ELEANOR GRACE (2) (1867 - 1879) Barque. O.N. 56499. 336n
120.3 x 26.8 x 16.7 feet.
5.1867; Completed by John Robinson, Sunderland for Joseph Robinson and 8.6.1867 sailed on her maiden voyage to the Black Sea. 20.2.7872; Insured value £3,200. 7.1877: Her master, Captain John Spence, was empowered to sell the ship within nine months for not less than £3,000 but in fact no sale took place. 2.1.1879 Sailed from Plymouth whilst on a voyage from Taganrog to Stockton on Tees with a cargo of linseed and disappeared with all hands Insured for £2,400 at the time of her loss.

JOHN BARING (1870 - 1875) Barque. O.N. 30106. 547g
124.4 x 30.2 x'23.2 feet.
1834: Built at Stonington, U.S.A. for unknown owners. 1856: Sold to Octavius Swan and Thomas Swan (52 shares) and John Crutwell (12 shares), rigged as a ship and registered in Malta. 26.7.1859: John Swan acquired the 52 shares from Octavius and Thomas Swan. Subsequently the ship's figurehead was changed from a man's bust to a stag's head but there is no indication of any Robinson interest in the ship at this time. 1865: Sold to George Hurford (31 shares) and others. Re-registered as a barque. 4.1865: Sold to Thomas Gibson (52 shares) and on his death 3.8.1865 George Hurford was appointed executor. 9.5.1870: Joseph Robinson, the Younger, purchased 52 shares and two days later he acquired the remaining 12 shares. He then sold to Thomas Robinson (8 shares), John Robinson (8 shares), Nicholas J. Robinson (8 shares), James Hunter (8 shares) and in the following year to Joseph Green (8 shares) and William Russell (8 shares). 20.2.1872: Insured value £1,600. 31.5.1875: Wrecked at the mouth of the Frontenac River, Tabasco Province, Mexico whilst outward bound, under pilot's orders, with a cargo of 600 tons of mahogany and cedarwood. She was on a voyage from Belize to Tabasco and was insured for £1,600 at the time of her loss.

CADUCEUS (1870 - 1872) Barque. O.N. 12598. 411g, 395n 660d
124.1 x 27.8 x 18.1 feet.
3.1857: Completed by John Davison, Sunderland as CADUCEUS for Edmund H. Hogg (36 shares), John Lucas (6 shares) and others. 1.1.1858; Following certain mortgage transactions, Mrs. Mary Fawcett became the principal shareholder with 28 shares. 23.3.1868: Mrs. Mary Fawcett died and William H. Cave and Mrs. Ann Hogg (widow of Edmund H. Hogg) were appointed executors. Mrs. Ann Hogg became the principal shareholder with 28 shares together with William H. Cave (16 shares) and Mrs. D. Lucas (14 shares). 7.7.1870: Joseph Robinson, the Younger, purchased 58 shares. 1872: Sold to Mrs. A. Hogg and Mrs. D. Lucas. 4.1873: Sold to
Thomas Knox, North Shields. 6.1875: Sold to James Bolt (24 shares) and others. 7.1877: James Bolt acquired a further 8 shares. 28.11.1887: Stranded and broke in two on Chichester Bank, near Portsmouth, whilst on a voyage from the River Tyne to Salerno with a cargo of coal.

TELEGRAM (1871 - 1873) Barque. O.N. 27240. 517g
134.0 x 30.8 x 18.8 feet.
1857: Built at Somerset, Massachusetts as GREENFIELD for unknown owners and later renamed TELEGRAM. 21.5.1859: Sold to George Croshaw, London. 3.6.1859: Sold to John Lash, Croydon Common. 15.8.1863; Sold to James Turpie, North Shields. 7.12.1870; Sold to John F. Middleton (32 shares) and others. North Shields. 28.2.1877: Purchased by Joseph Robinson, the Younger (56 shares). 3.1877: Joseph Robinson, the Younger sold 48 shares. 20.2.1872: Insured value £1,400. 3.2.1873; Abandoned in the Bay of Biscay whilst on a voyage from Newport to Jamaica with a cargo of coal. At the time of her loss six shareholders held 8 shares each and one (John Hedley) held 16 shares. The vessel was insured for £1,400.

STEPHANOTIS (1) (1871 - 1898) Iron Steamship. O.N. 65382. 1042g, 678n, 1530d
220.5 x 30.6 x 19.2 feet.
2 cylinder inverted single expansion steam engine by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co.,
Sunderland. Replaced in 1877 by a C.2-cyl. by R. and W. Hawthorn and Co., Newcastle upon
Tyne.
2.1877: Launched and 3.1877: Completed by Iliff. Mounsey and Co., Sunderland for Joseph Robinson. Cost £16,800. 5.1877: Joseph Robinson sold 46 shares to 17 shareholders, including Joseph Robinson, the Younger (4 shares), Nicholas J. Robinson (1 share) and Thomas Robinson (5 shares). 20.2.1872: Insured value £18,000. 1883: Insured value £15,000. 2.9.1895: Transferred to "Stag Line", Ltd. for £4,608. 7.9.1898: Sold to Robson, Brown and Sons Ltd., Sunderland. 30.4.1901 Sank off Whitby following a collision with the British steamer GUYERS, (522/73) whilst on a voyage from Bilbao to Middlesbrough with a cargo of iron ore. The GUYERS was also lost.

WELLINGTON (1871) Barque. 527g, 487n
122.4 x 29.9 x 200 feet.
1847: Built at Sunderland for Mr. Fenwick. 19.10.1871 Purchased by Joseph Robinson, the Younger. 16.12.1871: Foundered off Madeira after being abandoned in heavy weather whilst on a voyage from the River Tyne to Guadeloupe with a cargo of coal.

NYMPHAEA (1) (1871 - 1881) Iron Steamship. O.N. 65410. 1138g, 739n
230.6 x 30.1 x 18.0 feet.
C.2-cyl by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co., Sunderland.
2.9.1871: Launched by lliff, Mounsey and Co., Sunderland for Joseph Robinson cost £15,940. 20.2.1872 Insured value £18,000.28.10.1872: Joseph Robinson sold 45 shares to 18 shareholders, including Nicholas J. Robinson ( 4 shares) and Joseph Robinson the Younger ( 4 shares). 1880:Insured value £16,000. 4.1.1881: Wrecked on Sunk Sand at tehe entrance to the river Thames whilst on a voyage from Shields to Piraeus with a cargo of coal.

NUPHAR (1) (1872 - 1878) Iron Steamship. O.N. 65445 1137g, 731n
230.5 x 30.0 x 18 feet.
C.2-cyl by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co., Sunderland.
8.1872: Launched by lliff, Mounsey and Co., Sunderland for Joseph Robinson. 21.10.1873: Joseph Robinson sold 47 shares to 21 shareholders including Nicholas J. Robinson ( 4 shares) and Joseph Robinson the Younger ( 4 shares). 12.12.1878: Stranded and broke in two near Honfleur whilst on a voyage from Konigsberg to Rouen with a cargo of wheat and flax. Insured for £1 7,000 at the time of her loss.

DANAE (1873 - 1877). Iron Steamship. O.N. 65456. 1157g, 745n
230.0 x 30.3 x 18.2 feet.
C.2-cyl by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co., Sunderland.
1.1873: Launched by lliff, Mounsey and Co., Sunderland for Joseph Robinson and on delivery insured for £20.000. 3.3.1874. Joseph Robinson sold 48 shares to 23 shareholders including Nicholas J. Robinson ( 2 shares) and Joseph Robinson the Younger ( 4 shares). 25.12.1877: Foundered off Horns Reef whilst on a voyage from Copenhagen and Reval to London whit a cargo of wheat. Insured for £17,000 at the time of her loss.

STAG (3) (1874 - 1880) Iron Steamship. O.N. 70386. 1558g, 1006n
259.4 x 33.5 x 24.3 feet
C. 2-cyl. by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co., Sunderland.
8.1874: Launched by Bartram, Haswell and Co., Sunderland for Joseph Robinson and Co. Cost £30,300 and on delivery insured for £32,300.
2.10.1880: Wrecked at Punta Delgada, Azores after colliding with the company’s steamer ROBINA (1816/76) when her anchors dragged during a fierce gale. She was on a voyage from New Orleans to Marseilles. Insured £28,000 at the time of her loss.

AMY DORA (1875 - 1889) Iron Steamship. O.N. 70402. 1708g, 1107n
265.0 x 34.0 x 24.4 feet.
C. 2-cyl. by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co., Sunderland.
6.1875: Launched by Cole Bros, Newcastle upon Tyne for Joseph Robinson and Co. Cost £28,000 and on delivery insured for £30,000. 1883: Insured value reduced to £27,000. 5.10.1889: Wrecked on Watchapreague Shoals, Virginia whilst on a voyage from Savannah via Newport News to Genoa with a cargo of cotton.

AMARYLLIS (1) (1875 - 1899) Iron Steamship. O.N.70405. 1714g,1109n, 2575d
264.4 x 34.0 x 24.3 feet.
C. 2-cyl. by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co., Sunderland.
10.1875: Launched by Cole Bros, Newcastle upon Tyne for Joseph Robinson and Co. Cost £28,000 and on delivery insured for £30,000.
1883: Insured value reduced to £27,000. 30.9.1895 Transferred to “Stag Line” Ltd for £6,912. 1899: Sold to Amaryllis Shipping Co. Ltd. ( W. Coupland and Co., managers), Newcastle upon Tyne. 7.11.1900 Foundered off Ushant after a collision with the German steamer INDIA (1551/81) whilst on a voyage from the River Tyne to Savona with a cargo of coal. When the collision occurred, the INDIA was attempting to take the crew off the AMARYLLIS, which was drifting without power and listing heavily.

CYDONIA (1) (1876 - 1899) Iron Steamship O.N. 70415. 1693g, 1093n, 2540d
265.0 x 34.0 x 24.4 feet.
C. 2-cyl. by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co., Sunderland.
4.1876: Launched by Cole Bros, Newcastle upon Tyne for Joseph Robinson and Co. Cost £28,220 and on delivery insured for £30,000.
1883: Insured value reduced to £27,000. 30.9. 895 Transferred to “Stag Line” Ltd for £6,912. 1899: Sold to Dunford and Elliott, Newcastle upon Tyne. 1904: Sold to Doi Kametaro, Japan and renamed NANIWA MARU. 1910: Sold to K. Yokoyama, Japan. 1912: Sold to C. Tanaka, Japan. 1920: Sold to Tanaka Kozan Kabushiki Kaisha, Japan. 8.7.1922: Wrecked at Shikotsisaki whilst on voyage from Muroran to Kamaishi with a cargo of coal and beans. She later slipped off the rocks and sank in deep water.

ROBINIA (1) (1876 - 1880) Iron Steamship. O.N. 76631. 1816g, 1181n
280.5 x 34.0 x 24.6 feet.
C. 2-cyl. by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co., Sunderland.
12.1876: Launched by C. Mitchell and Co., Newcastle upon Tyne for Joseph Robinson and Co. Cost £28,500 and on delivery insured for £31,000. 2.10.1880: Wrecked at Punta Delgada, Azores after colliding with the company’s steamer STAG (1558/74) and the British steamer Benella (1229/80) when all three vessels dreagged their anchors during a fierce gale. She was on a voyage from New Orleans to Le Havre. Insured for £29,000 at the time of her loss.





AZALEA (1877 1897) Iron Steamship. O.N. 76634. 1828g, 1188n, 2637d
280.5 x 34.0 x 24.6 feet.
C. 2-cyl. by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co., Sunderland.
12.1876: Launched by C. Mitchell and Co., Newcastle upon Tyne for Joseph Robinson and Co. Cost £28,850 and on delivery insured for £31,000. 1883: Insured value reduced to £28,000. 26.9.1895: Transferred to “Stag Line” Ltd for £7,488. 21.11.1897: Sailed from Baltimore bound for Stettin and after passing Cape Henry the following day, disappeared with all hands.

LAURESTINA (1) (1877 - 1878) Iron Steamship. O.N. 76650. 1919g, 1238n
286.2 x 34.2 x 24.8 feet.
C. 2-cyl. by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co., Sunderland.
9.1877: Launched byTyne lron Shipbuilding Co., Newcastle upon Tyne for Joseph Robinson and Co. 29.12.l878: Wrecked at Kopparsten Rocks, Sandhamn whilst on a voyage from Reval to Rotterdam with a cargo of grain.

CAMELLIA (2) (1878 - 1898) Iron Steamship. O.N. 79208. 1363g, 880n, 1975d
258.0 x 32.0 x 21.2 feet.
C. 2-cyl. by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co., Sunderland.
8.1878: Launched by Tyne Iron Shipbuilding Co., Newcastle upon Tyne for Joseph Robinson and Co. Costs £20.780 and on delivery insured for £23,000. 1883: Insured value reduced to £20,780. 2.9.1895: Transferred to "Stag Line", Ltd for £6,912. 1898: Sold to Tyneside Line Ltd (J. Ridley, Son and Tully managers), Newcastle upon Tyne. 16.5.1910: Extensively damaged in a collision off Cross Sands with the British steamer WINKFIELD, (4009/00) whilst on a voyaqe from Ghent to the River Tyne in ballast. Arrived in the Tyne and found to be not worth repairing Sold to R. Blake and broken up at Sunderland.

EGLANTINE (1878 - 1898) Iron Steamship. O.N. 79212. 1357g, 874n, 1975d
258.0 x 32.0 x 21.1 feet.
C. 2-cyl. by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co., Sunderland.
9.1878: Launched by Tyne Iron Shipbuilding Co., Newcastle upon Tyne for Joseph Robinson and Co. Cost £20,780 and on delivery insured for £23,000. 1883; Insured value reduced to £21,000. 16.9.1895: Transferred to "Stag Line", Ltd. for £6,912. 1898: Sold to Tyneside Line Ltd. (J. Ridley, Son and Tully managers), Newcastle upon Tyne. 16.4.1915: Wrecked on Filey Brig during an attempt to avoid an enemy submarine whilst on a voyage from the River Tvne to Le Havre with a cargo of coal.

CORONILLA (1878 - 1898) Iron Steamship. O.N. 79215. 1361g, 875n, 1975d
258.0 x 32.0 x 21.1 feet.
C. 2-cyl. by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co., Sunderland. Replaced in 1906 by a T 3-cyl. by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co. Ltd., Newcastle upon Tyne.
12.1878: Launched by Tyne Iron Shipbuilding Co., Newcastle upon Tyne for Joseph Robinson and Co. Cost £20.780 and on delivery insured for £23,000. 1883: Insured value reduced to £21,000. 16.9.1895:Transferred to "Stag Line", Ltd. for £6,912. 1898: Sold to Tyneside Line Ltd. (J. Ridley, Son and Tully managers), Newcastle upon Tyne. 8.1919: Sold to Llewellyn Shipping Co., Cardiff. 11.1919: Sold to J. G. Bouboulis, Greece and renamed BOUBOULINA. 8.6.7927: Mined and sunk off Englezonissia, Gulf of Smyrna, whilst on a voyage from Smyrna to Piraeus.

GARDENIA (1) (1879 - 1901) Iron Steamship. O.N. 79224. 1967g, 1276n, 2700d
280.0 x 35.0 x 24.7 feet.
C. 2-cyl. by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co., Sunderland.
8.1879: Launched by Tyne Iron Shipbuilding Co., Newcastle upon Tyne for Joseph Robinson and Co. Cost £28,000 and on delivery insured for £30,000. 1883: Insured value reduced to £29,000. 2.10.1895: Transferred to "Stag Line", Ltd for £9,216. 1901: Sold to Montauk Steam Ship Co. Ltd. (W. Coupland and Co., managers), Newcastle upon Tyne. 4.10.1913: Sank with the loss of 18 crew following a collision with the British steamer CORNWOOD (2152/11) near Middle Cross Sand, North Sea. She had been on a voyage from Benisaf to Middlesbrough with a cargo of iron ore.

VIOLA (1879 - 1900) Iron Steamship. O.N. 79226. 1963g, 1270n, 2729d
280.0 x 35.0 x 24.7 feet.
C. 2-cyl. by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co., Sunderland.
10.1879: Launched by Tyne Iron Shipbuilding Co., Newcastle upon Tyne for Joseph Robinson and Co. Cost £28,000 and on delivery insured for £30,000. 1883: Insured value reduced to £29,000. 4.9.1895: Transferred to "Stag Line", Ltd. for £9,216. 1900: Sold to Montauk Steam Ship Co. Ltd. (W. Coupland and Co. managers), Newcastle upon Tyne.179.9.1903: Wrecked in thick fog 7 mile S. of Kettleness Point, near Whitby, whilst on a voyage from Carthagena to Middlesbrough with a cargo of iron ore. Her crew of 20 men was rescued by the Runswick lifeboat and two weeks later the vessel broke in half.

GLADIOLUS (2) (1880 - 1901) Iron Steamship. O.N. 79237. 1941g, 1258n, 2800d
280.6 x 36.0 x 22.6 feet.
C. 2-cyl. by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co., Sunderland.
7.1880: Launched by Tyne Iron Shipbuilding Co., Newcastle upon Tyne for Joseph Robinson and Co. Cost £26,500 and on delivery insured for £28,000. 1883: Insured value increased to £29,000. 18.9.1895: Transferred to "Stag Line", Ltd. for £10,368. 1901: Sold to Amaryllis Shipping Co. Ltd. (W. Coupland and Co. managers), Newcastle upon Tyne. 1912: Sold to C.H.C. Sunderman and broken up at Dordrecht.

CLINTONIA (2) (1881 - 1897) Iron Steamship. O.N. 84857. 1970g, 1287n, 2850d
287.0 x 37.0 x 21.8 feet.
C. 2-cyl. by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co., Sunderland.
8.1881: Launched by Tyne Iron Shipbuilding Co., Newcastle upon Tyne for Joseph Robinson and Co. Cost £27,900 and on delivery insured for £30,000. 24.10.1895: Transferred to "Stag Line", Ltd. for £10,944. 26.4.1897: Severely damaged by fire at Newport News after arriving from Cuba and declared a constructive total loss. Sold to L. Luckenbach, U.S.A. and converted to a barge. 1903; Transferred to Luckenbach Transportation and Wrecking Co. U.S.A. 1911:Transferred to Estate, of L. Luckenbach, U.S.A. 1911: Transferred to E. F. Luckenbach, U.S.A. 4.4.1915: Abandoned in a position 35.12N. 74.51W. whilst on a voyage from Brunswick to Newhaven, Conn. with a cargo of railroad ties.

IXIA (1) (1881 - 1916) Iron Steamship. O.N. 84858. 1970g, 1254n, 2850d
287.0 x 37.0 x 21.9 feet.
C. 2-cyl. by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co., Sunderland.
10.1881: Launched by Tyne Iron Shipbuilding Co., Newcastle upon Tyne for Joseph Robinson and Co. Cost £27,900 and on delivery insured for £30,000. 14.10.1895: Transferred to "Stag Line", Ltd. for £10,944. 1911: Fitted for the carriage of molasses in bulk. 1916: Sold toTres Ltd. (Houlder, Middleton and Co. Ltd. managers), London. 1917: Renamed SAGUA. 1921: Sold to United States Food Products Corp., U.S.A. 1922: Sold to Sagua Corporation, (C. D. Mallory and Co. managers), Dominica. 1923: Sold to Macoris S.S. Corporation, Dominica. 1930: Sold to shipbreakers.

NUPHAR (2) (1881 - 1882) Iron Steamship. O.N. 84860. 1963g, 1280n, 2850d
287.0 x 37.0 x 21.9 feet.
C. 2-cyl. by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co., Sunderland.
11.1881: Launched by Tyne Iron Shipbuilding Co., Newcastle upon Tyne for Joseph Robinson and Co. Insured on delivery for £30,000. 23.9.1882: Wrecked at Cape May whilst on a voyage from Shields to Philadelphia with a cargo of pig iron.

NYMPHAEA (2) (1882 - 1914) Iron Steamship. O.N. 84861. 1969g, 1249n, 28784d
286.9 x 37.0 x 21.8 feet.
C. 2-cyl. by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co., Sunderland
1 1882: Launched by Tyne Iron Shipbuilding Co., Newcastle upon Tyne for Joseph Robinson and Co. Cost £28,900 and on delivery insured for £30,000. 11.12.1895: Transferred to "Stag Line", Ltd. for £10,944. 1908: Fitted for the carriage of molasses in bulk. 14.7.1914: Wrecked 25 miles N. of Aberdeen whilst on a voyage from the River Tyne to Cienfuegos, Cuba in ballast.

STAG (4) (1884— 1916) Iron Steamship ON. 84899. 2052g, 1302n, 2890d
287.0 x 37.0 x 22.0 feet.
C. 2-cyl. by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co. Ltd., Newcastle upon Tyne
3.1884: Launched by Tyne Iron Shipbuilding Co., Newcastle upon Tyne for Joseph Robinson and Sons. Cost £31,250. 2.10.1895: Transferred to "Stag Line", Ltd. for £13,248. 1907: Fitted for the carriage of molasses in bulk. 1916: Sold to Tres Ltd. (Houlder, Middleton and Co Ltd, managers), London. 1917: Renamed Macoris. 1921: Sold to Macoris S.S. Corporation: Dominica 1923: Sold to Luigi Ghio, Italy to be broken up at Venice. 4.1.1924: Foundered off Crete whilst on her final voyage from Piraeus to Venice in ballast.

LAURESTINA (2) (1884- 1895) Iron Steamship O.N. 89794. 2051 g, 1336n, 2900d
287.0 x 37.0 x 22.0 feet.
C. 2-cyl. by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co. Ltd., Newcastle upon Tyne .
5.1884: Launched by Tyne Iron Shipbuilding Co., Newcastle upon Tyne for Joseph Robinson and Sons. Cost £31,250. 5.10.1895: Transferred to "Stag Line", Ltd. for £13,248. 6.12.1895: Sailed from Baltimore bound for Sligo and, after passing Cape Henry on the following day disappeared with her crew of 25 men.

ROBINIA (2) (1884 - 1904) Iron Steamship. O.N. 89798. 2058g, 1314n, 2900d
287.0 x 37.0 x 22.1 feet.
C. 2-cyl. by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co. Ltd., Newcastle upon Tyne.
8.1884: Launched by Tyne Iron Shipbuilding Co. Ltd., Newcastle upon Tyne for Joseph Robinson and Sons. Cost £31,250. 30.9.1885: Transferred to "Stag Line", Ltd. for £13,248. 1904: Sold to D. Bozzo fu Nicolo, Italy for £5,950. 1905: Renamed CONCETTA B. 1910: Sold to D. & E. Flli Bozzo, Italy. 1915: Sold to Ditta Giovanni Pantaleo, Italy and renamed G. PANTALEO. 1916: Sold to Liguria Commerciale di Nav., Italy and renamed ALBERTO. 6.10.1916: Mined and sunk 12 miles from Cape Carovedo.

GLOXINIA (1) (1897- 1916) Steel Steamship. O.N. 105217. 2540g, 1618n, 4310d
313.0 x 45.0 x 20.7 feet.
T. 3-cyl. by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co. Ltd., Newcastle upon Tyne
1.1897: Completed by Tyne Iron Shipbuilding Co. Ltd., Newcastle upon Tyne for "Stag Line" Ltd. Cost £27,860. 1.1916: Sold to Bolivian General Enterprise Ltd. (Leopold Walford (London) Ltd. managers), London and renamed PETINGAUDET. 1921: Sold to M.V. Uravain Spain and renamed FRANCISCA URAVAIN. 1928: Sold to Velilla y Candina Soc. Ltda., Spain and renamed CANDINA. 1930: Sold to Cia. Nav. Bidasoa (A. Candina and Co. managers) Spain. 1941: Sold to Cia. Nav. Espanola S.A., Spain. 1966: Sold to Spanish shipbreakers and arrived at Santander on 8.6.1966 to be broken up.

CLEMATIS (1898 - 1916) Steel Steamship. O.N. 109887. 3406g, 2161n, 5717d
344.5 x 46.0 x 16.8 feet.
T. 3-cyl. by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co. Ltd., Newcastle upon Tyne.
7.1898: Completed by Tyne Iron Shipbuilding Co. Ltd., Newcastle upon Tyne for "Stag Line", Ltd. Cost £33,800. 1916: Sold to Leeston Shipping Co. Ltd., Cardiff. 1920: Sold to John Holt and Co. (Liverpool) Ltd., Liverpool. 1926: Sold to Societa Anon. Marittima Catanese (G. Napoli and Figli managers), Italy. 1929: Sold to Italian shipbreakers.

BEGONIA (1) (1899 - 1916) Steel Steamship. O.N. 109908. 3653g, 2346n, 5712d
344.9 x 46.0 x 16.9 feet.
T. 3-cyl. by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co. Ltd., Newcastle upon Tyne.
12.1899: Completed by Tyne Iron Shipbuilding Co. Ltd., Newcastle upon Tyne for "Stag Line", Ltd. Cost £38,750. 1916: Sold to Maindy Shipping Co. Ltd. (Jenkins, Richards and Evans Ltd., managers), Cardiff and renamed MAINDY BRIDGE. 8.12.1917: Torpedoed and sunk by a German submarine 4 miles E.N.E. of Sunderland whilst on a voyage from Middlesbrough to the River Tyne in ballast. Two members of the crew were lost.

ZINNIA (1) (1900 - 1912) Steel Steamship. O.N. 113064. 3642g, 2339n, 5717d
345.0 x 46.1 x 16.9 feet.
T. 3-cyl. by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co. Ltd., Newcastle upon Tyne.
2.1900: Completed by Tyne Iron Shipbuilding Co. Ltd., Newcastle upon Tyne for "Stag Line", Ltd. Cost £38,750. 27.3.1912: Beached off Cape Comorin after a fire had broken out during a voyage from Calcutta to Karachi with a cargo of coal. Subsequently declared a total loss.

STEPHANOTIS (2) (1904 - 1915) Steel Steamship. O.N. 117961. 4060g, 2584n, 6309d
350.0 x 48.0 x 17.9 feet.
T. 3-cyl. by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co. Ltd., Newcastle upon Tyne.
5.1904: Completed by Tyne Iron Shipbuilding Co. Ltd., Newcastle upon Tyne for "Stag Line" Ltd. Cost £38,750. 17.6.1915: Sold to Hackensack S.S. Co. Ltd. (Brown, Jenkinson and Co managers), London and renamed HACKENSACK. 25.4.1917: Torpedoed and sunk 180 miles N.W. by W. of Fastnet by the German submarine U.82 whilst on a voyage from Cienfuegos and Halifax to Queenstown with a cargo of sugar. Six of her crew were lost.

AMARYLLIS (2) (1904 - 1908) Steel Steamship. O.N. 117962. 4064g, 2587n, 6309d
350.0 x 48.0 x 17.9 feet.
T. 3-cyl. by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co. Ltd., Newcastle upon Tyne.
7.1904: Completed by Tyne Iron Shipbuilding Co. Ltd., Newcastle upon Tyne for "Stag Line", Ltd. Cost £38,750. 7.2.1908: Wrecked at Kalkudah, Ceylon whilst on a voyage from Calcutta to Bombay with a cargo of coal. £34,601 paid by insurers.




EUPHORBIA (1) (1907 - 1916) Steel Steamship. O.N. 117972. 3837g, 2444n, 6600d
350.1 x 50.1 x 22.4 feet.
T. 3-cyl. by the Shipbuilders.
1907: Completed by W. Doxford and Sons Ltd., Sunderland for "Stag Line", Ltd. Cost £38,901. 1 6.7.1916: Torpedoed and sunk 56 miles N.E. of Algiers by the German submarine U.39 whilst on a voyage from Calcutta to London with general cargo. Eleven of her crew were lost.

CLINTONIA (3) (1907 - 1915) Steel Steamship. O.N. 117975. 3830g, 2440n, 6600d
350.1 x 50.1 x 22.4 feet.
T. 3-cyl. by the Shipbuilders.
1907: Completed by W. Doxford and Sons Ltd., Sunderland for "Stag Line", Ltd. Cost £38,901. 1.8.1915: Torpedoed and sunk 30 miles S.W. by W. of Ushant by the German submarine U.28 whilst on a voyage from Marseilles to the River Tyne in ballast. Ten members of her crew were lost.

CYDONIA (2) (1910 - 1916) Steel Steamship. O.N. 127107. 3085g, 1890n, 5370d
331.5 x 48.0 x 22.2 feet.
T. 3-cyl. by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co. Ltd., Newcastle upon Tyne.
1910: Completed by W. Dobson and Co., Newcastle upon Tyne for "Stag Line", Ltd. Cost £30,226. 1914: Requisitioned by the Admiralty. 27.9.1916: Wrecked on Castle Rocks, Holy Island whilst on a voyage from Burntisland to Brest with a cargo of coal.

LINARIA (1) (1911 - 1914) Steel Steamship. O.N. 127121. 3081g, 1881n, 5340d
331.4 x 48.0 x 22.2 feet.
T. 3-cyl. by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co. Ltd., Newcastle upon Tyne.
1911: Completed by W. Dobson and Co., Newcastle upon Tyne for "Stag Line", Ltd. Cost £32,778. 26.12.1914: Mined and sunk 2 ½ miles N.N.E. of Filey whilst on a voyage from London to the River Tyne in ballast.

PHOTINIA (1) (1913 - 1917) Steel Steamship. O.N. 133314. 4584g, 2835n, 8300d
383.0 x 51.7 x 26.6 feet.
T. 3-cyl. by G. Cark Ltd., Sunderland.
7.1913: Completed by W. Pickersgill and Sons Ltd., Sunderland for "Stag Line" Ltd Cost £57,122. 1917: Sold to National S.S. Co. Ltd. (Fisher, Alimonda and Co. Ltd., managers) London and renamed FOTINIA. 1929: Management transferred to J. and C. Harrison Ltd. 1932: Sold to S. Perivolaris, Greece and renamed MARGARITIS. 1939: Sold to Mrs. A. Perry (S. Perivolaris manager), Panama and renamed AURORA. 1947: Sold to Kokoku Kisen K.K., Japan and renamed EIZAN MARU. 18.1.1942: Torpedoed and sunk by the American submarine PLUNGER in a position 33.30N. 135.00E.

GARDENIA (2) (1914 - 1923) Steel Steamship. O.N. 133327. 3108g, 1899n, 5350d
331.2 x 48.0 x 22.2 feet.
T. 3-cyl. by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co. Ltd., Newcastle upon Tyne.
1914: Completed by Tyne Iron Shipbuilding Co. Ltd., Newcastle upon Tyne for "Stag Line" Ltd Cost £44,337. 1923: Sold to Charlton Steam Shipping Co. Ltd. (Charlton, McAllum and Co. Ltd., managers), Newcastle upon Tyne and renamed HAVENSIDE. 1927: Sold to Crandon Shipping Co. Ltd., Cardiff and renamed CRANDON. 1933: Sold to New Era S.S. Co. Ltd. (Frank S. Dawson Ltd., managers), Newcastle upon Tyne and renamed DAVID DAWSON. 1935: Sold to Sovtorgflot U.S.S.R. and renamed KUZBASS. 26.9.1944: Wrecked in a position 64.25N. 173 57W whilst on a voyage from Ugolnaya Bay to Providenia.

CAMELLIA (3) (1914 - 1917) Steel Steamship. O.N. 133525. 3157g, 1957n, 5500d
331.0 x 47.7 x 22.5 feet.
T. 3-cyl. by J. Dickinson and Sons Ltd., Sunderland.
2.1913: Completed by J. Blumer and Co., Sunderland as TYNEHOME for Home Shipping Co. Ltd. (Common Bros. managers), Newcastle upon Tyne. 29.12.1914: Purchased by "Stag Line" Ltd for £42,000 and renamed CAMELLIA. 27.11.1917: Sailed from Dakar on a voyage to the U.K. and disappeared with all hands.

CLINTONIA (4) (1917 - 1940) Steel Steamship. O.N. 139879. 3106g, 1882n, 5330d
331.0 x 48.0 x 22.2 feet.
T. 3-cyl. by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co. Ltd., Newcastle upon Tyne.
1917: Completed by W. Dobson and Co., Newcastle upon Tyne for "Stag Line", Ltd. Cost £71,515. 19.10.1940: Torpedoed by the German submarine U.99 and sunk by gunfire from the German submarine U.123 W. of St. Kilda in a position 57.10N. 11.20W. The ship was sailing in Convoy S.C.7 at the time of the sinking and was on a voyage from St. Francis N.S. to Manchester with a cargo of pulpwood.

EUPHORBIA (2) (1917) Steel Steamship. O.N. 139880. 3109g, 1 887n, 5350d
331.1 x 48.0 x 22.2 feet.
T. 3-cyl. by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co. Ltd., Newcastle upon Tyne.
1917: Completed by W. Dobson and Co., Newcastle upon Tyne for "Stag Line", Ltd. Cost £75,508. 1.12.1917: Torpedoed and sunk 14 miles E. by S. from the Royal Sovereign lightship by the German submarine UC.75 whilst on a voyage from Bassein to London with a cargo of rice. Fourteen members of the crew were lost.

BEGONIA (2) (1918) Steel Steamship. O.N. 139882. 2929g, 1783n, 5000d
331.0 x 48.0 x 22.2 feet.
T. 3-cyl. by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co. Ltd., Newcastle upon Tyne.
1918: Completed by W. Dobson and Co., Newcastle upon Tyne for "Stag Line", Ltd. Cost £94,801. 27.3.1918: Torpedoed and sunk 44 miles S. by W. from Wolf Rock by the German submarine UB.55 whilst on a voyage from the River Tyne and Plymouth to Salonica with Admiralty cargo.

GLOXINIA (2) (1920 - 1952) Steel Steam Tanker. O.N. 139896. 3336g, 1961n, 5542d
331.5 x 47.9 x 23.0 feet.
T. 3-cyl. by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co. Ltd., Newcastle upon Tyne.
9.1920: Completed by Tyne Iron Shipbuilding Co. Ltd., Newcastle upon Tyne for Stag Line, Ltd. as a dry cargo ship. 4.1927: Delivered after conversion to a tanker by Smith's Dock Co. Ltd., North Shields. Cost, including conversion, £236,235. 7.1952: Sold to Imera Siciliana di Nav., Italy for £115,000 and renamed VITTORIA O. 1955: Sold to "SOARMA" Soc. Armamento Marittimo, Italy and converted to a dry cargo ship. 3.4.1959: Arrived at Spezia to be broken up by Cantieri Navali Santa Maria.

IXIA (2) (1922 - 1929) Steel Steamship. O.N. 139897 2985g, 1828n, 5010d
331.0 x 47.7 x 21.9 feet.
T.3-cyl. by J. Dickinson and Sons Ltd., Sunderland.
7.1922: Completed by J. Blumer and Co., Sunderland having been originally ordered by Norwegian owners. Cost £44,706. 30.6.1929: Wrecked on the Brisons, Cape Cornwall, whilst on a voyage from Swansea to Constantinople with a cargo of coal.

LINARIA (2) (1924 - 1941) Steel Steamship. O.N. 139904. 3385g, 2014n, 5700d
331.0 x 48.0 x 23.2 feet.
T. 3-cyl. by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co. Ltd., Sunderland.
1924: Completed by Sunderland Shipbuilding Co., Ltd., Sunderland for Stag Line Ltd. Cost £58,633. 29.2.1941: Torpedoed and sunk by the Italian submarine BIANCHI in a position 61N. 25W. approx. whilst on a voyage from the River Tyne and Loch Ewe to Halifax N.S. The ship hab been sailing in Convoy O.B. 288 wich hab been ordered to disperse. Her crew of 35 men was lost.

EUPHORBIA (3) (1924 - 1940) Steel Steamship. O.N. 139905. 3380g, 2011 n, 5700d
331.0 x 48.0 x 23.2 feet.
T. 3-cyl. by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co. Ltd., Sunderland.
1924: Completed by Sunderland Shipbuilding Co. Ltd., Sunderland for Stag Line, Ltd. Cost £57,745. 14.12.1940: Torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U.100 in the North Atlantic whilst on a voyage from Swansea and Milford Haven to Lynn, Massachusetts. Her crew of 33 men and 1 gunner were lost.

CYDONIA (3) (1927 - 1949) Steel Steamship. O.N. 148802. 3517g, 2175n, 6493d
356.3 x 48.7 x 23.9 feet.
T. 3-cyl. by J. Dickinson and Sons Ltd., Sunderland.
1922: Laid down by J. Blumer and Co. Ltd., Sunderland but not launched until 3.1 2.1926 as the shipyard had been closed in the meantime. 1.1927: Completed for Stag Line, Ltd. Cost £58,000. 21.10.1949: Severely damaged by a mine 32 miles N. of Strumble Head whilst on a voyage from Workington to Cardiff and beached on the following day. 2.11.1949: Refloated but found to be damaged beyond economical repair. Sold to British Iron and Steel Corporation, allocated to T.W. Ward Ltd. and broken up at Milford Haven. Insurance paid £103,516.

GARDENIA (3) (1928 - 1940) steel Steamship. O.N. 148804 3745g, 2316n, 6495d
360.8 x 48.3 x 25.1 feet
T. 3-cyl. by the Shipbuilders.
18.4.1928: Launched by Armstrong, Whitworth and Co. Ltd., Newcastle upon Tyne as STRONGARM having been built as a speculation.12.1928: Completed as GARDENIA for Stag Line, Ltd 12.3.1940. Mined and sunk N.E. of Cromer in a position 53.04N 01 33E whilst on a voyage from Casablanca to Billingham and Leith with a cargo of phosphates

PHOTINIA (2) (1938 - 1950) Steel Steamship. O.N. 161545 4010g, 2457n, 6750d
364.5 x 50.7 x 24.4 feet 7
T. 3-cyl. By North Eastern Marine Engineering Co. Ltd., Sunderland.
12.1929: Completed by Swan, Hunter and Wighham Richardson Ltd., Sunderland as HOPEDENE for Hopemount Shipping Co. Ltd. (A. Stott and Co. Ltd, managers), Newcastle upon Tyne. 1938: Purchased by “Stag Line”, Ltd, for £446,736 and renamed PHOTINIA. 1948: Converted from coal to oil burning. 1950: SoId to Rederi A/B Asta ( Arthur Andersson, manager), Finland for £110,000 and renamed ATLAS. 1956: Management transferred to Lennart Karlsson. 1968: Sold to Cia. De Nav. Pinares S.A. Somaliland. 1973: Sold to Brodospas and 22.1.1974: arrived at Split to be broken up.

ELIZABETH MASSEY/BEGONIA (3) (1943 - 1956) Steel Steamship. O.N. 162690. 4323g, 2598n, 7718d
370.5 x 51.7 x 25.4 feet.
T. 3-cyl. by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co. Ltd., Sunderland.
7.1929: Completed by W. Doxford and Sons Ltd., Sunderland as JULIET for Hans Hannevig, Norway. 1931: Sold to Essex Line Ltd. (Meldrum and Swinson, managers), London and renamed ESSEX NOBLE. 1933: Sold to The Red "R" Steamship Co. Ltd. (Stephens, Sutton Ltd., managers), Newcastle upon Tyne and renamed REAVELEY. 1939: Sold to W. A. Massey and Sons Ltd., Hull and renamed ELIZABETH MASSEY. 1943: Purchased by Stag Line, Ltd. for £80,495. 1945: Renamed BEGONIA. 1949: Converted from coal to oil burning at a cost of £16,080. 1956: Sold to Pio Tomei, Italy for £250,000 and renamed PEONIA. 1964: Sold to Cantieri Navali del Golfo who commenced demolition 11.5.1964 at La Spezia.

GARDENIA (4) (1945 - 1964) Steel Steamship. O.N. 160733. 4125g, 2463n, 6485d
364.8 x 51.0 x 24.9 feet.
T. 3-cyl. by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co. Ltd., Newcastle upon Tyne.
7.1930: Completed by Northumberland Shipbuilding Co. (1927) Ltd., Newcastle upon Tyne as BRIARWOOD for Constantine Shipping Co. Ltd., Middlesbrough. 1932: Transferred to Joseph Constantine S.S. Line Ltd. 1943: Purchased by “Stag Line”, Ltd. for £70,468 and renamed GARDENIA. 1947: Converted from coal to oil burning. 1964: Sold to Amfitriti Cia. Nav. S.A., Panama for £75,000 and renamed AIS NICOLAS. 1965: Sold to Astrosplendor Cia. Nav. S.A., Panama. 20.10.1968: Extensively damaged when fire broke out in the engineroom whilst undergoing repairs at Port Said and declared a total loss. Sold to Adly Makari and broken up at Port Said.

IXIA (3) (1946 - 1951) Steel Steamship. O.N. 169517. 7201 g, 4935n, 9653d
432.7 x 56.2 x 34.4 feet.
T. 3-cyl. by Fairfield Shipbuilding and Engineering Co. Ltd., Glasgow.
12.1944: Completed by Wm. Hamilton and Co. Ltd., Port Glasgow as EMPIRE KUMASI for the Ministry of War Transport (Joseph Robinson and Sons managers). 1946: Purchased by “Stag Line”, Ltd. for £137,000. Converted from coal to oilburning at a cost of £52,479. 1947:Renamed IXIA. 11.1951: Sold to Century Shipping Corporation, Liberia for £425,000 and renamed EMPIRE TRADER. 1954: Sold to Cia. Atlantica Pacifica S.A., Liberia and renamed NORTH RIVER. 19601 Sold to Italian shipbreakers and 31.1.1960 arrived at Spezia to be broken up by A.R.D.E.M.

CLINTONIA (5) (1946- 1959) Steel Steamship. O.N. 168968. 7013g, 4226n, 10170d
431.0 x 56.2 x 34.2 feet.
T. 3-cyl. by D. Rowan and Co. Ltd., Glasgow.
10.1941: Completed by Lithgows Ltd., Port Glasgow as EMPIRE BAFFIN for the Ministry of War Transport (Joseph Robinson and Sons managers). 1943: Commissioned by the Admiralty and renamed H.M.S. SANCROFT. Converted for pipelaying duties in connection with the PLUTO (Pipe Line Under The Ocean) operation. 1946: Purchased by Stag Line, Ltd. for £30,000. Converted back to a dry cargo ship and from coal to oil burning at a cost of £137,911. 1947: Renamed CLINTONIA. 10.12.1959: Sold to Alcestis Shipping Co. S.A., Greece for £62,500 and renamed ASPIS. 1963: Sold to Japanese shipbreakers for £14 per light weight ton.

LINARIA (3) (1947 - 1954). Steel Steamship. O.N. 148816. 7333g, 4222n, 10065d
431.2 x 56.3 x 35.6 feet
T. 3-cyl. by the Shipbuilders.
10.7.1944: Launched by J. Readhead and Sons Ltd, South Shields as the maintenance ship H.M.S. MORAY FIRTH for the Admiralty. She had been laid down as EMPIRE PITCAIRN for the Ministry of War Transport. 12.1947: Purchased by “Stag Line” Ltd. for £80,500. Converted to a dry cargo ship by Tvne Dock Engineering Co. Ltd., South Shields at a cost of £98,597 Renamed LINARIA. 4.1948: Commenced trading. 11.1954: Sold to Chellew Navigation Co. Ltd., London for £230,000 and renamed ESKGLEN. 1956: Owners restyled as Esk Shipping Co Ltd 1961: Sold to Fortune Shipping Co. Ltd., Hong Kong and renamed MARINE FORTUNE. 1961: Sold to Herald Shipping Co. Ltd. (World Wide (Shipping) Ltd. managers). Hong Kong. 1967: Sold to Japanese shipbreakers and 8.6.1967 arrived at Yokosuka to be broken up.

ZINNIA (2) (1951 - 1964) Steel Steamship. O.N. 148819. 7292g, 3921n, 10550d
424.6 x 57.2 x 34.9 feet.
T 3-cyl. by Dominion Engine Works Ltd., Lachine.
12.1945: Completed by Burrard Dry Dock Co. Ltd., Vancouver as the maintenance and repairship HMS PORTLAND BILL for the Admiralty. 1.1951: Purchased by “Stag Line” Ltd.for £61,700. Converted to a dry cargo ship by Mercantile Dry Dock Co. Ltd., Jarrow on Tyne at a cost of £109,171. Renamed ZINNIA. 18.6.1951: Commenced trading. 12.1964: Sold to Astrosuerte Ciai Nav SA Liberia for £63,500 and renamed CHRYSOPOLIS. 1965: Sold to Formosan (Taiwan) shipbreakers and 18.5.1965 arrived at Kaohsiung to be broken up.

CAMELLIA (4) (1953 - 1972) Steel Motorship. O.N. 148820. 6161g,3168n, 7800d
434'6" x 55'8" x 23.7 feet.
4-cyl. 2 S.C.S.A. Doxford oil engine by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co. (1938) Ltd., Wallsend on Tyne.
2.1953: Completed by J. Readhead and Sons Ltd., South Shields for “Stag Line” Ltd. Cost £482,136. 6.1972: Sold to Compania Navegacao Somerset S.A Panama for £96,000 and renamed GALICIA. 1977: Sold to Hughes Bolckow Ltd. and 21.4.1977 arrived at BIyth to be broken up.

CYDONIA (4) (1955 - 1969) Steel Steamship. O.N. 148822. 6231g, 3219n, 8180d
433'9" x 57'0" x 24'1"
T. 3-cyl. with low pressure steam turbine by the Shipbuilders.
10.1955: Completed by J. Readhead and Sons Ltd., South Shields for Stag Line, Ltd. Cost £578,071. 29.8.1969: Sold to Republic Maritime Corporation, Liberia for U.S.$635,000 and renamed VERMONT I. 9.1972: Sold to Renaissance Shipping Co., Liberia and renamed RENAISSANCE. 1973: Sold to Cristobal Nav. Corporation, Liberia and renamed SOVEREIGN EDITH. 1975: Sold to Anchor Marine Enterprises Ltd., Liberia and renamed JOY. 8.6.1977: Sank about 100 miles S.E. of the mouth of the River Mississippi in a position 27.55N. 88.26W. after three explosions in the engine room. The ship was being towed to New Orleans at the time after developing rudder trouble whilst on a voyage from Acajutia to New Orleans.

GLOXINIA (3) (1958 - 1977) Steel Motorship. O.N. 187929. 7665g, 3943n, 10350d
479'8" x 60'3" x 25'7"
4-cyl. 2 S.C.S.A. Doxford oil engine by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co. Ltd., Wallsend on Tyne.
5.1958: Completed by J. Readhead and Sons Ltd., South Shields for Stag Line, Ltd. Cost £958,611. 1.1.1977: Sold to Panous Shipping Co. Inc., Liberia for U.S.$925,000 and renamed VIRGINIA M. 30.4.1981: Sailed from Lagos, with crankshaft damage, in tow of the German tug LUNEPLATE (226/65) and 10.6.1981 arrived at Piraeus to be laid up. 7.1982: Sold to Greek shipbreakers who commenced demolition 2.8.1982 at Perama.

PHOTINIA (3) (1961 - 1978) Steel Motorship. O.N. 187933. 7676g, 3946n, 10340d
479'8" x 60'3" x 25'7"
4-cyl. 2 S.C.S.A. Doxford oil engine by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co. Ltd. Wallsend on Tyne.
3.1961: Completed by J. Readhead and Sons Ltd., South Shields for Stag Line Ltd Cost £919,216. 12.5.1978: Driven aground at Milwaukee after dragging her anchors in a storm. She was awaiting a berth at Milwaukee after arriving from Chicago. 15.5.1978: Declared a constructive total loss and abandoned to the underwriters. $1,760,000 (£953426) paid by insurers. 6.1978: Sold "as is, as lies" for $5,000 to Selvick Marine Towing Corporation, U.S.A. 7.7.1978: Refloated with the aid of six tugs and towed to Sturgeon Bay where her machinery was removed. 12.1978: Towed to Chicago. 15.11.1979: Arrived in tow at Kewaunee Wisconsin to be broken up by Baskins Bros.

IXIA (4) (1964 - 1982) Steel Motorship. O.N. 187944. 15910g, 10237n, 24000d
595'0" x 75'0" x 32'8"
6-cyl. 2 S.C.S.A. Sulzer oil engine by Geo. Clark and N.E.M. Ltd., Sunderland.
11.1964: Completed by Austin and Pickersgill Ltd., Sunderland for Stag Line, Ltd. Cost £1,337,575. 5.2.1982: Sold to Telemachus Shipping Co. S.a.r.l., Lebanon for U.S. $2,850,000 less 3% and renamed TELEMACHUS. 1985: Broken up Shanghai.

ZINNIA (3) (1968 — 1982) Steel Motorship. O.N. 187949. 16122g, 10199n, 26603d
597'0" x 74'9" x 46'4"
6-cyl. 2 S.C.S.A. Sulzer oil engine by Geo. Clark and N.E.M. Ltd., Sunderland.
10.1968: Completed by J. Readhead and Sons Ltd., South Shields for Stag Line, Ltd. Cost £1,625,552 less £382,119 Government Grant = £1,243,433. 7.11.1982: Sold to Norbulk Pte. Ltd. (Thome and Co. Pte. Ltd. managers), Singapore for U.S. $1,750,000 (£1,054,216) and renamed TIMUR SWIFT. 7953.- Sold to Arm. Ermione S.A., Liberia and renamed ERMIONE. 1985 Sold renamed ZENOVIA. 1990: Renamed IONIA. 1990: After engineroom fire towed to Chittagong and scrapped.

KIELDER STAG (1975 - 1978) Steel Motorship. O.N. 364012. 726g, 440n, 1017d
53.04 x 10.16 x 4.40 metres.
8-cyl. 4 S.C.S.A. oil engine by Naval-Stork-Werkspoor S.A., Cadiz.
9.1969: Completed by Astilleros de Murueta S.A., Murueta as BEGONA DE ASTOBIZA for Naviera Murueta S.A., Spain. 1.4.1975: Purchased by Stag Line, Ltd. for £361,075, including £26,552 to bring her up to British flag requirements, and renamed KIELDER STAG. 1.5.1975: Commenced a two year bareboat charter to Kielder Shipping Ltd., Newcastle upon Tyne. 22.7.7976; Bareboat charter ceased on the liquidation of Kielder Shipping Ltd. and management transferred to G.T. Gillie and Blair Ltd., Newcastle upon Tyne. 20.5.1978: Sold to Northumbria Shipping Ltd. (same managers), Newcastle upon Tyne for £300,000 and renamed NORTHUMBRIA ROSE.

SILLOTH STAG (1975 - 1982) Steel Motorship. O.N. 338115. 799g, 435n, 1165d
57.61 x 10.20x 4.58 metres
8-cyl. 4 S.C.S.A. oil engine by W.H. Allen, Sons and co. Ltd., Bedford.
31.12.1974: Launched by Beverley Shipbuilding and Engineering Co. Ltd., Beverley as TILSTONE MAID for Tiling Construction Co. Ltd., London. 3.1975: Completed but not registered. 10.4.1975: Purchased by “Stag Line” for for £585,412 including minor modifications and renamed SILLOTH STAG. 21.4.1975: commenced a four year bareboat charter to Silloth Shipping Ltd., Annan of which the shareholders were Carrs Milling Industries Ltd., Carlisle David Gardmer Securities Ltd., Dumfries and from 11.1975 Stag Line Ltd. 27.5.1982: Redelivered from bareboat charter and management transferred to G.T. Gillie and Blair Ltd., Newcastle upon Tyne 1.7.1982: sold to Westfield Shipping Co. Ltd. which had recently been purchased by James Fisher and Sons p.l.c., Barrow, G.T. Gillie and Blair Ltd. continued as managers. 1985: Sold renamed ROBRIX.

BEGONIA (4) (1978 - 1983) Steel Motorship. O.N. 36401. l6329g, 10687n, 26320d
173.74 x 22.94 x 14.38 metres
6-cyl. 2 S.C.S.A. Sulzer oil engine by Barclay, Curle and Co. Ltd., Glasgow
5.1978: Completed by Swan, Hunter Shipbuilders Ltd., Walker Shipyard, Newcastle upon Tyne for Stag Line Ltd. Cost £7,019,035 assisted by a loan of £4,760,000 under the UK Government Shipbuilding Credit Scheme. 29.3.1983: Sold to Southbuk Shipping Pte. Ltd., Singapore for $4,750,000 (£3,275,682) and renamed TIMUR SWALLOW. 1985: Sold renamed JENNIFER JANE.

MAINSOURCES
Stag Line 1817-1983, N. Robinson, WSS, 1984.
Travel of the Tramps, twenty Tramp fleets Vol. II, N.L. Middlemiss, Shield Publication, 1991.
Marine News
Internet

maritiem
26th November 2007, 06:53
FLEET LIST

BLESSING (1817 - 1846) Snow.
221n, 88.0 x 24.5 x 14.1 feet.
1805: Built by Benjamin Howard, Southwick, Sunderland for Nicholas and John Richardson
7.181: Purchased by James Robinson, Master Mariner (Sixty four shares) 5.1828: James Robinson transferred by indenture sixty four shares to George Stroman, Shadwell who on 24.4.1832 transferred them by indenture to Robert and Richard Brown of St. Mary at Hill London. 10.2.1833: Captain James Robinson died and management of the vessel was transferred to his widow. Grace Robinson. 8.6.1843: Robert and Richard Brown sold all sixty four shares to Grace and Joseph Robinson (widow and son of Captain James Robinson) 7.10 1844: Grace Robinson died and ownership of the vessel was transferred to Joseph Robinson. 28.3.1846: Lost off Flamborough Head.

MAINSOURCES:
Stag Line 1817-1983, N. Robinson, WSS, 1984.
Travel of the Tramps, twenty Tramp fleets Vol. II, N.L. Middlemiss, Shield Publication, 1991.
Marine News (WSS)
Internet

STAG (1) (1846 - 1858) Snow later Briq O.N. 130/1846.
182n, 82.5 x 21.2 x 12.9 feet.
1846: Built by Luke, Blumer and Bushell, South Shields for Joseph Robinson (28 shares) Thomas Robinson (22 shares) and James Miller (14 shares). Joseph Robinson who was Master from 23rd May 1846 to 11th October 1848 and again between 5th March 1851 and 29th June 1851 is described as a Master Mariner, Thomas Robinson as a Tailor and James Miller as a shipowner 26.5.1846: Sailed on her maiden voyage from Newcastle to London with Captain Joseph Robinson in command. 12.1.1850: Re-registered as a brig. 6.3.1858: Sank after beinq run down off Southwold by an unknown vessel whilst on a voyage from Shields to London with a cargo of coal. The crew were landed safely.

FELLOWSHIP (1848 - 1849) Ship O.N. 2851 (issued in 1855).
201 n, 92.0 x 21.7 x 12.8 feet.
1840: Built by Nicholas Mosher, Newport, Nova Scotia as FELLOWSHIP for his own account 1848: Sold to E. H. Hogg and 78.5.1848 re-registered at North Shields. 18.12.1848: Purchased by Joseph Robinson, Thomas Robinson and Eleanor Johnson. 20.1.1849: Sold to Thomas Rutherford and William Nicholson, Seaham. 1857: Transferred to Thomas Rutherford 1863: Foundered in heavy weather 30 miles off Lowestoft whilst on a voyage from Seaham Harbour-to London with a cargo of coal. All the crew were saved.

ELEANOR GRACE (1) (1849 - 1857) Ship. O.N. 14649. 224n
86.8 x 22.3 x 14.6 feet.
7.7.1849: Completed by Thomas Seymour, Walker on Tyne for Joseph Robinson (40 shares) Thomas Robinson (16 shares) and Eleanor Johnson (8 shares). 24.2.1857- Wrecked whilst on a voyage from Belfast to Newcastle.

ALBERT (1853 - 1871) Brig. O.N. 34801. 161n
72.8 x 20.8 x 14.0 feet.
5.1842: Completed by Peter and James Tait, Stromness as ALBERT for James Spence of Stromness, a Shipmaster (8 shares) and others including George Hobbs (9 shares) and Peter Tait (5 shares). 3.10.1850: Sold to James Leask, Kirkwall, a Master Mariner (64 shares) 19.8 1852: Sold to Anthony Wood and Co., Newcastle upon Tyne. 30.5.1853: Purchased by Joseph Robinson (40 shares) and Thomas Robinson (24 shares). 10.4.1856: Registered tonnaqe increased to 198.69 tons. 1871: Sold to Edward Wilkinson, BIyth. 1878: Sold to George Smee Maldon. 7.1.1890: Sold to James Watson, Newcastle upon Tyne and re-registered with dimensions 92.3x24.2x13.2 feet and registered tonnage 191.29 tons 23.5.1891: Foundered off Sunderland.

ROBINSONS (1856 - 1871) Barque. O.N. 1 7045. 327n
110.0 x 26.8 x 1 6.5 feet.
1856: Built by W. Stothard, Sunderland for Joseph Robinson (40 shares), Thomas Robinson (16 shares) an Beanor Johnson (8 shares). 4.5.187 1: Sold to William Robinson and others BIyth 4.1881: Sold to W. Svendsen, Norway and renamed ALETTE. 37.7.1886: Wrecked on a voyaqe from London to Kristiansand.

CAMELLIA (1) (1858 - 1877) Barque. O.N. 20439. 312n
108.4 x 26.2 x 16.8 feet.
1858: Completed at Sunderland for Joseph Robinson (44 shares) and Thomas Robinson (20 shares). 16.2.1858: Sailed on her maiden voyage to the Mediterranean. 1869: Lengthened by 14.6 feet to 123.0 feet and registered tonnage increased to 332 tons. 1872: Insured value £ 3,300 25.3.1877: wrecked at Pipas near Montevideo whilst on a voyage from Trey Ventos to the U.K. with a cargo of hides. Insured value £3,000.

CLINTONIA (1) (1861 - 1865) Barque. O.N. 29704. 336n
110.0 x 26.2 x 1 6.7 feet.
1867; Built at Sunderland for Joseph Robinson (64 shares). 10.8.1865: Sailed from Taganrog on a voyage to America and after sailing from Constantinople on 6.9.1865 disappeared with all hands.

GLADIOLUS (1) (1863 - 1879) Barque. O.N. 45601. 345g, 306n
113.1 x 27.2 x 16.8 feet.
3.1863: Completed by John Robinson, Sunderland for Joseph Robinson and 6.4.1863 sailed on her maiden voyage to the Black Sea. 20.2.1872; Insured value £2,800. 13.10.1879: Wrecked at Yallachs Bay, Jamaica whilst awaiting cargo for Liverpool. Insured value £1,500.

STAG (2) (1866 - 1873) Barque. O.N. 53482. 296n
111.6 x 26.0 x 1 6.0 feet.
8.1866: Completed by John Robinson, Sunderland for Joseph Robinson and 31.8.1866 sailed on her maiden voyage to Cronstadt. 20.2.1872; Insured value £2,800. 30.3.1873: Wrecked on English Bank, River Plate. Insured for £2,800 at the time of her loss.

ELEANOR GRACE (2) (1867 - 1879) Barque. O.N. 56499. 336n
120.3 x 26.8 x 16.7 feet.
5.1867; Completed by John Robinson, Sunderland for Joseph Robinson and 8.6.1867 sailed on her maiden voyage to the Black Sea. 20.2.7872; Insured value £3,200. 7.1877: Her master, Captain John Spence, was empowered to sell the ship within nine months for not less than £3,000 but in fact no sale took place. 2.1.1879 Sailed from Plymouth whilst on a voyage from Taganrog to Stockton on Tees with a cargo of linseed and disappeared with all hands Insured for £2,400 at the time of her loss.

JOHN BARING (1870 - 1875) Barque. O.N. 30106. 547g
124.4 x 30.2 x'23.2 feet.
1834: Built at Stonington, U.S.A. for unknown owners. 1856: Sold to Octavius Swan and Thomas Swan (52 shares) and John Crutwell (12 shares), rigged as a ship and registered in Malta. 26.7.1859: John Swan acquired the 52 shares from Octavius and Thomas Swan. Subsequently the ship's figurehead was changed from a man's bust to a stag's head but there is no indication of any Robinson interest in the ship at this time. 1865: Sold to George Hurford (31 shares) and others. Re-registered as a barque. 4.1865: Sold to Thomas Gibson (52 shares) and on his death 3.8.1865 George Hurford was appointed executor. 9.5.1870: Joseph Robinson, the Younger, purchased 52 shares and two days later he acquired the remaining 12 shares. He then sold to Thomas Robinson (8 shares), John Robinson (8 shares), Nicholas J. Robinson (8 shares), James Hunter (8 shares) and in the following year to Joseph Green (8 shares) and William Russell (8 shares). 20.2.1872: Insured value £1,600. 31.5.1875: Wrecked at the mouth of the Frontenac River, Tabasco Province, Mexico whilst outward bound, under pilot's orders, with a cargo of 600 tons of mahogany and cedarwood. She was on a voyage from Belize to Tabasco and was insured for £1,600 at the time of her loss.

CADUCEUS (1870 - 1872) Barque. O.N. 12598. 411g, 395n 660d
124.1 x 27.8 x 18.1 feet.
3.1857: Completed by John Davison, Sunderland as CADUCEUS for Edmund H. Hogg (36 shares), John Lucas (6 shares) and others. 1.1.1858; Following certain mortgage transactions, Mrs. Mary Fawcett became the principal shareholder with 28 shares. 23.3.1868: Mrs. Mary Fawcett died and William H. Cave and Mrs. Ann Hogg (widow of Edmund H. Hogg) were appointed executors. Mrs. Ann Hogg became the principal shareholder with 28 shares together with William H. Cave (16 shares) and Mrs. D. Lucas (14 shares). 7.7.1870: Joseph Robinson, the Younger, purchased 58 shares. 1872: Sold to Mrs. A. Hogg and Mrs. D. Lucas. 4.1873: Sold to
Thomas Knox, North Shields. 6.1875: Sold to James Bolt (24 shares) and others. 7.1877: James Bolt acquired a further 8 shares. 28.11.1887: Stranded and broke in two on Chichester Bank, near Portsmouth, whilst on a voyage from the River Tyne to Salerno with a cargo of coal.

TELEGRAM (1871 - 1873) Barque. O.N. 27240. 517g
134.0 x 30.8 x 18.8 feet.
1857: Built at Somerset, Massachusetts as GREENFIELD for unknown owners and later renamed TELEGRAM. 21.5.1859: Sold to George Croshaw, London. 3.6.1859: Sold to John Lash, Croydon Common. 15.8.1863; Sold to James Turpie, North Shields. 7.12.1870; Sold to John F. Middleton (32 shares) and others. North Shields. 28.2.1877: Purchased by Joseph Robinson, the Younger (56 shares). 3.1877: Joseph Robinson, the Younger sold 48 shares. 20.2.1872: Insured value £1,400. 3.2.1873; Abandoned in the Bay of Biscay whilst on a voyage from Newport to Jamaica with a cargo of coal. At the time of her loss six shareholders held 8 shares each and one (John Hedley) held 16 shares. The vessel was insured for £1,400.

STEPHANOTIS (1) (1871 - 1898) Iron Steamship. O.N. 65382. 1042g, 678n, 1530d
220.5 x 30.6 x 19.2 feet.
2 cylinder inverted single expansion steam engine by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co.,
Sunderland. Replaced in 1877 by a C.2-cyl. by R. and W. Hawthorn and Co., Newcastle upon
Tyne.
2.1877: Launched and 3.1877: Completed by Iliff. Mounsey and Co., Sunderland for Joseph Robinson. Cost £16,800. 5.1877: Joseph Robinson sold 46 shares to 17 shareholders, including Joseph Robinson, the Younger (4 shares), Nicholas J. Robinson (1 share) and Thomas Robinson (5 shares). 20.2.1872: Insured value £18,000. 1883: Insured value £15,000. 2.9.1895: Transferred to "Stag Line", Ltd. for £4,608. 7.9.1898: Sold to Robson, Brown and Sons Ltd., Sunderland. 30.4.1901 Sank off Whitby following a collision with the British steamer GUYERS, (522/73) whilst on a voyage from Bilbao to Middlesbrough with a cargo of iron ore. The GUYERS was also lost.

WELLINGTON (1871) Barque. 527g, 487n
122.4 x 29.9 x 200 feet.
1847: Built at Sunderland for Mr. Fenwick. 19.10.1871 Purchased by Joseph Robinson, the Younger. 16.12.1871: Foundered off Madeira after being abandoned in heavy weather whilst on a voyage from the River Tyne to Guadeloupe with a cargo of coal.

NYMPHAEA (1) (1871 - 1881) Iron Steamship. O.N. 65410. 1138g, 739n
230.6 x 30.1 x 18.0 feet.
C.2-cyl by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co., Sunderland.
2.9.1871: Launched by lliff, Mounsey and Co., Sunderland for Joseph Robinson cost £15,940. 20.2.1872 Insured value £18,000.28.10.1872: Joseph Robinson sold 45 shares to 18 shareholders, including Nicholas J. Robinson ( 4 shares) and Joseph Robinson the Younger ( 4 shares). 1880:Insured value £16,000. 4.1.1881: Wrecked on Sunk Sand at tehe entrance to the river Thames whilst on a voyage from Shields to Piraeus with a cargo of coal.

NUPHAR (1) (1872 - 1878) Iron Steamship. O.N. 65445 1137g, 731n
230.5 x 30.0 x 18 feet.
C.2-cyl by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co., Sunderland.
8.1872: Launched by lliff, Mounsey and Co., Sunderland for Joseph Robinson. 21.10.1873: Joseph Robinson sold 47 shares to 21 shareholders including Nicholas J. Robinson ( 4 shares) and Joseph Robinson the Younger ( 4 shares). 12.12.1878: Stranded and broke in two near Honfleur whilst on a voyage from Konigsberg to Rouen with a cargo of wheat and flax. Insured for £1 7,000 at the time of her loss.

DANAE (1873 - 1877). Iron Steamship. O.N. 65456. 1157g, 745n
230.0 x 30.3 x 18.2 feet.
C.2-cyl by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co., Sunderland.
1.1873: Launched by lliff, Mounsey and Co., Sunderland for Joseph Robinson and on delivery insured for £20.000. 3.3.1874. Joseph Robinson sold 48 shares to 23 shareholders including Nicholas J. Robinson ( 2 shares) and Joseph Robinson the Younger ( 4 shares). 25.12.1877: Foundered off Horns Reef whilst on a voyage from Copenhagen and Reval to London whit a cargo of wheat. Insured for £17,000 at the time of her loss.

STAG (3) (1874 - 1880) Iron Steamship. O.N. 70386. 1558g, 1006n
259.4 x 33.5 x 24.3 feet
C. 2-cyl. by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co., Sunderland.
8.1874: Launched by Bartram, Haswell and Co., Sunderland for Joseph Robinson and Co. Cost £30,300 and on delivery insured for £32,300.
2.10.1880: Wrecked at Punta Delgada, Azores after colliding with the company’s steamer ROBINA (1816/76) when her anchors dragged during a fierce gale. She was on a voyage from New Orleans to Marseilles. Insured £28,000 at the time of her loss.

AMY DORA (1875 - 1889) Iron Steamship. O.N. 70402. 1708g, 1107n
265.0 x 34.0 x 24.4 feet.
C. 2-cyl. by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co., Sunderland.
6.1875: Launched by Cole Bros, Newcastle upon Tyne for Joseph Robinson and Co. Cost £28,000 and on delivery insured for £30,000. 1883: Insured value reduced to £27,000. 5.10.1889: Wrecked on Watchapreague Shoals, Virginia whilst on a voyage from Savannah via Newport News to Genoa with a cargo of cotton.

AMARYLLIS (1) (1875 - 1899) Iron Steamship. O.N.70405. 1714g,1109n, 2575d
264.4 x 34.0 x 24.3 feet.
C. 2-cyl. by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co., Sunderland.
10.1875: Launched by Cole Bros, Newcastle upon Tyne for Joseph Robinson and Co. Cost £28,000 and on delivery insured for £30,000.
1883: Insured value reduced to £27,000. 30.9.1895 Transferred to “Stag Line” Ltd for £6,912. 1899: Sold to Amaryllis Shipping Co. Ltd. ( W. Coupland and Co., managers), Newcastle upon Tyne. 7.11.1900 Foundered off Ushant after a collision with the German steamer INDIA (1551/81) whilst on a voyage from the River Tyne to Savona with a cargo of coal. When the collision occurred, the INDIA was attempting to take the crew off the AMARYLLIS, which was drifting without power and listing heavily.

CYDONIA (1) (1876 - 1899) Iron Steamship O.N. 70415. 1693g, 1093n, 2540d
265.0 x 34.0 x 24.4 feet.
C. 2-cyl. by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co., Sunderland.
4.1876: Launched by Cole Bros, Newcastle upon Tyne for Joseph Robinson and Co. Cost £28,220 and on delivery insured for £30,000.
1883: Insured value reduced to £27,000. 30.9. 895 Transferred to “Stag Line” Ltd for £6,912. 1899: Sold to Dunford and Elliott, Newcastle upon Tyne. 1904: Sold to Doi Kametaro, Japan and renamed NANIWA MARU. 1910: Sold to K. Yokoyama, Japan. 1912: Sold to C. Tanaka, Japan. 1920: Sold to Tanaka Kozan Kabushiki Kaisha, Japan. 8.7.1922: Wrecked at Shikotsisaki whilst on voyage from Muroran to Kamaishi with a cargo of coal and beans. She later slipped off the rocks and sank in deep water.

ROBINIA (1) (1876 - 1880) Iron Steamship. O.N. 76631. 1816g, 1181n
280.5 x 34.0 x 24.6 feet.
C. 2-cyl. by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co., Sunderland.
12.1876: Launched by C. Mitchell and Co., Newcastle upon Tyne for Joseph Robinson and Co. Cost £28,500 and on delivery insured for £31,000. 2.10.1880: Wrecked at Punta Delgada, Azores after colliding with the company’s steamer STAG (1558/74) and the British steamer Benella (1229/80) when all three vessels dreagged their anchors during a fierce gale. She was on a voyage from New Orleans to Le Havre. Insured for £29,000 at the time of her loss.





AZALEA (1877 1897) Iron Steamship. O.N. 76634. 1828g, 1188n, 2637d
280.5 x 34.0 x 24.6 feet.
C. 2-cyl. by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co., Sunderland.
12.1876: Launched by C. Mitchell and Co., Newcastle upon Tyne for Joseph Robinson and Co. Cost £28,850 and on delivery insured for £31,000. 1883: Insured value reduced to £28,000. 26.9.1895: Transferred to “Stag Line” Ltd for £7,488. 21.11.1897: Sailed from Baltimore bound for Stettin and after passing Cape Henry the following day, disappeared with all hands.

LAURESTINA (1) (1877 - 1878) Iron Steamship. O.N. 76650. 1919g, 1238n
286.2 x 34.2 x 24.8 feet.
C. 2-cyl. by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co., Sunderland.
9.1877: Launched byTyne lron Shipbuilding Co., Newcastle upon Tyne for Joseph Robinson and Co. 29.12.l878: Wrecked at Kopparsten Rocks, Sandhamn whilst on a voyage from Reval to Rotterdam with a cargo of grain.

CAMELLIA (2) (1878 - 1898) Iron Steamship. O.N. 79208. 1363g, 880n, 1975d
258.0 x 32.0 x 21.2 feet.
C. 2-cyl. by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co., Sunderland.
8.1878: Launched by Tyne Iron Shipbuilding Co., Newcastle upon Tyne for Joseph Robinson and Co. Costs £20.780 and on delivery insured for £23,000. 1883: Insured value reduced to £20,780. 2.9.1895: Transferred to "Stag Line", Ltd for £6,912. 1898: Sold to Tyneside Line Ltd (J. Ridley, Son and Tully managers), Newcastle upon Tyne. 16.5.1910: Extensively damaged in a collision off Cross Sands with the British steamer WINKFIELD, (4009/00) whilst on a voyaqe from Ghent to the River Tyne in ballast. Arrived in the Tyne and found to be not worth repairing Sold to R. Blake and broken up at Sunderland.

EGLANTINE (1878 - 1898) Iron Steamship. O.N. 79212. 1357g, 874n, 1975d
258.0 x 32.0 x 21.1 feet.
C. 2-cyl. by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co., Sunderland.
9.1878: Launched by Tyne Iron Shipbuilding Co., Newcastle upon Tyne for Joseph Robinson and Co. Cost £20,780 and on delivery insured for £23,000. 1883; Insured value reduced to £21,000. 16.9.1895: Transferred to "Stag Line", Ltd. for £6,912. 1898: Sold to Tyneside Line Ltd. (J. Ridley, Son and Tully managers), Newcastle upon Tyne. 16.4.1915: Wrecked on Filey Brig during an attempt to avoid an enemy submarine whilst on a voyage from the River Tvne to Le Havre with a cargo of coal.

CORONILLA (1878 - 1898) Iron Steamship. O.N. 79215. 1361g, 875n, 1975d
258.0 x 32.0 x 21.1 feet.
C. 2-cyl. by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co., Sunderland. Replaced in 1906 by a T 3-cyl. by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co. Ltd., Newcastle upon Tyne.
12.1878: Launched by Tyne Iron Shipbuilding Co., Newcastle upon Tyne for Joseph Robinson and Co. Cost £20.780 and on delivery insured for £23,000. 1883: Insured value reduced to £21,000. 16.9.1895:Transferred to "Stag Line", Ltd. for £6,912. 1898: Sold to Tyneside Line Ltd. (J. Ridley, Son and Tully managers), Newcastle upon Tyne. 8.1919: Sold to Llewellyn Shipping Co., Cardiff. 11.1919: Sold to J. G. Bouboulis, Greece and renamed BOUBOULINA. 8.6.7927: Mined and sunk off Englezonissia, Gulf of Smyrna, whilst on a voyage from Smyrna to Piraeus.

GARDENIA (1) (1879 - 1901) Iron Steamship. O.N. 79224. 1967g, 1276n, 2700d
280.0 x 35.0 x 24.7 feet.
C. 2-cyl. by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co., Sunderland.
8.1879: Launched by Tyne Iron Shipbuilding Co., Newcastle upon Tyne for Joseph Robinson and Co. Cost £28,000 and on delivery insured for £30,000. 1883: Insured value reduced to £29,000. 2.10.1895: Transferred to "Stag Line", Ltd for £9,216. 1901: Sold to Montauk Steam Ship Co. Ltd. (W. Coupland and Co., managers), Newcastle upon Tyne. 4.10.1913: Sank with the loss of 18 crew following a collision with the British steamer CORNWOOD (2152/11) near Middle Cross Sand, North Sea. She had been on a voyage from Benisaf to Middlesbrough with a cargo of iron ore.

VIOLA (1879 - 1900) Iron Steamship. O.N. 79226. 1963g, 1270n, 2729d
280.0 x 35.0 x 24.7 feet.
C. 2-cyl. by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co., Sunderland.
10.1879: Launched by Tyne Iron Shipbuilding Co., Newcastle upon Tyne for Joseph Robinson and Co. Cost £28,000 and on delivery insured for £30,000. 1883: Insured value reduced to £29,000. 4.9.1895: Transferred to "Stag Line", Ltd. for £9,216. 1900: Sold to Montauk Steam Ship Co. Ltd. (W. Coupland and Co. managers), Newcastle upon Tyne.179.9.1903: Wrecked in thick fog 7 mile S. of Kettleness Point, near Whitby, whilst on a voyage from Carthagena to Middlesbrough with a cargo of iron ore. Her crew of 20 men was rescued by the Runswick lifeboat and two weeks later the vessel broke in half.

GLADIOLUS (2) (1880 - 1901) Iron Steamship. O.N. 79237. 1941g, 1258n, 2800d
280.6 x 36.0 x 22.6 feet.
C. 2-cyl. by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co., Sunderland.
7.1880: Launched by Tyne Iron Shipbuilding Co., Newcastle upon Tyne for Joseph Robinson and Co. Cost £26,500 and on delivery insured for £28,000. 1883: Insured value increased to £29,000. 18.9.1895: Transferred to "Stag Line", Ltd. for £10,368. 1901: Sold to Amaryllis Shipping Co. Ltd. (W. Coupland and Co. managers), Newcastle upon Tyne. 1912: Sold to C.H.C. Sunderman and broken up at Dordrecht.

CLINTONIA (2) (1881 - 1897) Iron Steamship. O.N. 84857. 1970g, 1287n, 2850d
287.0 x 37.0 x 21.8 feet.
C. 2-cyl. by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co., Sunderland.
8.1881: Launched by Tyne Iron Shipbuilding Co., Newcastle upon Tyne for Joseph Robinson and Co. Cost £27,900 and on delivery insured for £30,000. 24.10.1895: Transferred to "Stag Line", Ltd. for £10,944. 26.4.1897: Severely damaged by fire at Newport News after arriving from Cuba and declared a constructive total loss. Sold to L. Luckenbach, U.S.A. and converted to a barge. 1903; Transferred to Luckenbach Transportation and Wrecking Co. U.S.A. 1911:Transferred to Estate, of L. Luckenbach, U.S.A. 1911: Transferred to E. F. Luckenbach, U.S.A. 4.4.1915: Abandoned in a position 35.12N. 74.51W. whilst on a voyage from Brunswick to Newhaven, Conn. with a cargo of railroad ties.

IXIA (1) (1881 - 1916) Iron Steamship. O.N. 84858. 1970g, 1254n, 2850d
287.0 x 37.0 x 21.9 feet.
C. 2-cyl. by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co., Sunderland.
10.1881: Launched by Tyne Iron Shipbuilding Co., Newcastle upon Tyne for Joseph Robinson and Co. Cost £27,900 and on delivery insured for £30,000. 14.10.1895: Transferred to "Stag Line", Ltd. for £10,944. 1911: Fitted for the carriage of molasses in bulk. 1916: Sold toTres Ltd. (Houlder, Middleton and Co. Ltd. managers), London. 1917: Renamed SAGUA. 1921: Sold to United States Food Products Corp., U.S.A. 1922: Sold to Sagua Corporation, (C. D. Mallory and Co. managers), Dominica. 1923: Sold to Macoris S.S. Corporation, Dominica. 1930: Sold to shipbreakers.

NUPHAR (2) (1881 - 1882) Iron Steamship. O.N. 84860. 1963g, 1280n, 2850d
287.0 x 37.0 x 21.9 feet.
C. 2-cyl. by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co., Sunderland.
11.1881: Launched by Tyne Iron Shipbuilding Co., Newcastle upon Tyne for Joseph Robinson and Co. Insured on delivery for £30,000. 23.9.1882: Wrecked at Cape May whilst on a voyage from Shields to Philadelphia with a cargo of pig iron.

NYMPHAEA (2) (1882 - 1914) Iron Steamship. O.N. 84861. 1969g, 1249n, 28784d
286.9 x 37.0 x 21.8 feet.
C. 2-cyl. by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co., Sunderland
1 1882: Launched by Tyne Iron Shipbuilding Co., Newcastle upon Tyne for Joseph Robinson and Co. Cost £28,900 and on delivery insured for £30,000. 11.12.1895: Transferred to "Stag Line", Ltd. for £10,944. 1908: Fitted for the carriage of molasses in bulk. 14.7.1914: Wrecked 25 miles N. of Aberdeen whilst on a voyage from the River Tyne to Cienfuegos, Cuba in ballast.

STAG (4) (1884— 1916) Iron Steamship ON. 84899. 2052g, 1302n, 2890d
287.0 x 37.0 x 22.0 feet.
C. 2-cyl. by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co. Ltd., Newcastle upon Tyne
3.1884: Launched by Tyne Iron Shipbuilding Co., Newcastle upon Tyne for Joseph Robinson and Sons. Cost £31,250. 2.10.1895: Transferred to "Stag Line", Ltd. for £13,248. 1907: Fitted for the carriage of molasses in bulk. 1916: Sold to Tres Ltd. (Houlder, Middleton and Co Ltd, managers), London. 1917: Renamed Macoris. 1921: Sold to Macoris S.S. Corporation: Dominica 1923: Sold to Luigi Ghio, Italy to be broken up at Venice. 4.1.1924: Foundered off Crete whilst on her final voyage from Piraeus to Venice in ballast.

LAURESTINA (2) (1884- 1895) Iron Steamship O.N. 89794. 2051 g, 1336n, 2900d
287.0 x 37.0 x 22.0 feet.
C. 2-cyl. by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co. Ltd., Newcastle upon Tyne .
5.1884: Launched by Tyne Iron Shipbuilding Co., Newcastle upon Tyne for Joseph Robinson and Sons. Cost £31,250. 5.10.1895: Transferred to "Stag Line", Ltd. for £13,248. 6.12.1895: Sailed from Baltimore bound for Sligo and, after passing Cape Henry on the following day disappeared with her crew of 25 men.

ROBINIA (2) (1884 - 1904) Iron Steamship. O.N. 89798. 2058g, 1314n, 2900d
287.0 x 37.0 x 22.1 feet.
C. 2-cyl. by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co. Ltd., Newcastle upon Tyne.
8.1884: Launched by Tyne Iron Shipbuilding Co. Ltd., Newcastle upon Tyne for Joseph Robinson and Sons. Cost £31,250. 30.9.1885: Transferred to "Stag Line", Ltd. for £13,248. 1904: Sold to D. Bozzo fu Nicolo, Italy for £5,950. 1905: Renamed CONCETTA B. 1910: Sold to D. & E. Flli Bozzo, Italy. 1915: Sold to Ditta Giovanni Pantaleo, Italy and renamed G. PANTALEO. 1916: Sold to Liguria Commerciale di Nav., Italy and renamed ALBERTO. 6.10.1916: Mined and sunk 12 miles from Cape Carovedo.

GLOXINIA (1) (1897- 1916) Steel Steamship. O.N. 105217. 2540g, 1618n, 4310d
313.0 x 45.0 x 20.7 feet.
T. 3-cyl. by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co. Ltd., Newcastle upon Tyne
1.1897: Completed by Tyne Iron Shipbuilding Co. Ltd., Newcastle upon Tyne for "Stag Line" Ltd. Cost £27,860. 1.1916: Sold to Bolivian General Enterprise Ltd. (Leopold Walford (London) Ltd. managers), London and renamed PETINGAUDET. 1921: Sold to M.V. Uravain Spain and renamed FRANCISCA URAVAIN. 1928: Sold to Velilla y Candina Soc. Ltda., Spain and renamed CANDINA. 1930: Sold to Cia. Nav. Bidasoa (A. Candina and Co. managers) Spain. 1941: Sold to Cia. Nav. Espanola S.A., Spain. 1966: Sold to Spanish shipbreakers and arrived at Santander on 8.6.1966 to be broken up.

CLEMATIS (1898 - 1916) Steel Steamship. O.N. 109887. 3406g, 2161n, 5717d
344.5 x 46.0 x 16.8 feet.
T. 3-cyl. by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co. Ltd., Newcastle upon Tyne.
7.1898: Completed by Tyne Iron Shipbuilding Co. Ltd., Newcastle upon Tyne for "Stag Line", Ltd. Cost £33,800. 1916: Sold to Leeston Shipping Co. Ltd., Cardiff. 1920: Sold to John Holt and Co. (Liverpool) Ltd., Liverpool. 1926: Sold to Societa Anon. Marittima Catanese (G. Napoli and Figli managers), Italy. 1929: Sold to Italian shipbreakers.

BEGONIA (1) (1899 - 1916) Steel Steamship. O.N. 109908. 3653g, 2346n, 5712d
344.9 x 46.0 x 16.9 feet.
T. 3-cyl. by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co. Ltd., Newcastle upon Tyne.
12.1899: Completed by Tyne Iron Shipbuilding Co. Ltd., Newcastle upon Tyne for "Stag Line", Ltd. Cost £38,750. 1916: Sold to Maindy Shipping Co. Ltd. (Jenkins, Richards and Evans Ltd., managers), Cardiff and renamed MAINDY BRIDGE. 8.12.1917: Torpedoed and sunk by a German submarine 4 miles E.N.E. of Sunderland whilst on a voyage from Middlesbrough to the River Tyne in ballast. Two members of the crew were lost.

ZINNIA (1) (1900 - 1912) Steel Steamship. O.N. 113064. 3642g, 2339n, 5717d
345.0 x 46.1 x 16.9 feet.
T. 3-cyl. by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co. Ltd., Newcastle upon Tyne.
2.1900: Completed by Tyne Iron Shipbuilding Co. Ltd., Newcastle upon Tyne for "Stag Line", Ltd. Cost £38,750. 27.3.1912: Beached off Cape Comorin after a fire had broken out during a voyage from Calcutta to Karachi with a cargo of coal. Subsequently declared a total loss.

STEPHANOTIS (2) (1904 - 1915) Steel Steamship. O.N. 117961. 4060g, 2584n, 6309d
350.0 x 48.0 x 17.9 feet.
T. 3-cyl. by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co. Ltd., Newcastle upon Tyne.
5.1904: Completed by Tyne Iron Shipbuilding Co. Ltd., Newcastle upon Tyne for "Stag Line" Ltd. Cost £38,750. 17.6.1915: Sold to Hackensack S.S. Co. Ltd. (Brown, Jenkinson and Co managers), London and renamed HACKENSACK. 25.4.1917: Torpedoed and sunk 180 miles N.W. by W. of Fastnet by the German submarine U.82 whilst on a voyage from Cienfuegos and Halifax to Queenstown with a cargo of sugar. Six of her crew were lost.

AMARYLLIS (2) (1904 - 1908) Steel Steamship. O.N. 117962. 4064g, 2587n, 6309d
350.0 x 48.0 x 17.9 feet.
T. 3-cyl. by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co. Ltd., Newcastle upon Tyne.
7.1904: Completed by Tyne Iron Shipbuilding Co. Ltd., Newcastle upon Tyne for "Stag Line", Ltd. Cost £38,750. 7.2.1908: Wrecked at Kalkudah, Ceylon whilst on a voyage from Calcutta to Bombay with a cargo of coal. £34,601 paid by insurers.




EUPHORBIA (1) (1907 - 1916) Steel Steamship. O.N. 117972. 3837g, 2444n, 6600d
350.1 x 50.1 x 22.4 feet.
T. 3-cyl. by the Shipbuilders.
1907: Completed by W. Doxford and Sons Ltd., Sunderland for "Stag Line", Ltd. Cost £38,901. 1 6.7.1916: Torpedoed and sunk 56 miles N.E. of Algiers by the German submarine U.39 whilst on a voyage from Calcutta to London with general cargo. Eleven of her crew were lost.

CLINTONIA (3) (1907 - 1915) Steel Steamship. O.N. 117975. 3830g, 2440n, 6600d
350.1 x 50.1 x 22.4 feet.
T. 3-cyl. by the Shipbuilders.
1907: Completed by W. Doxford and Sons Ltd., Sunderland for "Stag Line", Ltd. Cost £38,901. 1.8.1915: Torpedoed and sunk 30 miles S.W. by W. of Ushant by the German submarine U.28 whilst on a voyage from Marseilles to the River Tyne in ballast. Ten members of her crew were lost.

CYDONIA (2) (1910 - 1916) Steel Steamship. O.N. 127107. 3085g, 1890n, 5370d
331.5 x 48.0 x 22.2 feet.
T. 3-cyl. by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co. Ltd., Newcastle upon Tyne.
1910: Completed by W. Dobson and Co., Newcastle upon Tyne for "Stag Line", Ltd. Cost £30,226. 1914: Requisitioned by the Admiralty. 27.9.1916: Wrecked on Castle Rocks, Holy Island whilst on a voyage from Burntisland to Brest with a cargo of coal.

LINARIA (1) (1911 - 1914) Steel Steamship. O.N. 127121. 3081g, 1881n, 5340d
331.4 x 48.0 x 22.2 feet.
T. 3-cyl. by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co. Ltd., Newcastle upon Tyne.
1911: Completed by W. Dobson and Co., Newcastle upon Tyne for "Stag Line", Ltd. Cost £32,778. 26.12.1914: Mined and sunk 2 ½ miles N.N.E. of Filey whilst on a voyage from London to the River Tyne in ballast.

PHOTINIA (1) (1913 - 1917) Steel Steamship. O.N. 133314. 4584g, 2835n, 8300d
383.0 x 51.7 x 26.6 feet.
T. 3-cyl. by G. Cark Ltd., Sunderland.
7.1913: Completed by W. Pickersgill and Sons Ltd., Sunderland for "Stag Line" Ltd Cost £57,122. 1917: Sold to National S.S. Co. Ltd. (Fisher, Alimonda and Co. Ltd., managers) London and renamed FOTINIA. 1929: Management transferred to J. and C. Harrison Ltd. 1932: Sold to S. Perivolaris, Greece and renamed MARGARITIS. 1939: Sold to Mrs. A. Perry (S. Perivolaris manager), Panama and renamed AURORA. 1947: Sold to Kokoku Kisen K.K., Japan and renamed EIZAN MARU. 18.1.1942: Torpedoed and sunk by the American submarine PLUNGER in a position 33.30N. 135.00E.

GARDENIA (2) (1914 - 1923) Steel Steamship. O.N. 133327. 3108g, 1899n, 5350d
331.2 x 48.0 x 22.2 feet.
T. 3-cyl. by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co. Ltd., Newcastle upon Tyne.
1914: Completed by Tyne Iron Shipbuilding Co. Ltd., Newcastle upon Tyne for "Stag Line" Ltd Cost £44,337. 1923: Sold to Charlton Steam Shipping Co. Ltd. (Charlton, McAllum and Co. Ltd., managers), Newcastle upon Tyne and renamed HAVENSIDE. 1927: Sold to Crandon Shipping Co. Ltd., Cardiff and renamed CRANDON. 1933: Sold to New Era S.S. Co. Ltd. (Frank S. Dawson Ltd., managers), Newcastle upon Tyne and renamed DAVID DAWSON. 1935: Sold to Sovtorgflot U.S.S.R. and renamed KUZBASS. 26.9.1944: Wrecked in a position 64.25N. 173 57W whilst on a voyage from Ugolnaya Bay to Providenia.

CAMELLIA (3) (1914 - 1917) Steel Steamship. O.N. 133525. 3157g, 1957n, 5500d
331.0 x 47.7 x 22.5 feet.
T. 3-cyl. by J. Dickinson and Sons Ltd., Sunderland.
2.1913: Completed by J. Blumer and Co., Sunderland as TYNEHOME for Home Shipping Co. Ltd. (Common Bros. managers), Newcastle upon Tyne. 29.12.1914: Purchased by "Stag Line" Ltd for £42,000 and renamed CAMELLIA. 27.11.1917: Sailed from Dakar on a voyage to the U.K. and disappeared with all hands.

CLINTONIA (4) (1917 - 1940) Steel Steamship. O.N. 139879. 3106g, 1882n, 5330d
331.0 x 48.0 x 22.2 feet.
T. 3-cyl. by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co. Ltd., Newcastle upon Tyne.
1917: Completed by W. Dobson and Co., Newcastle upon Tyne for "Stag Line", Ltd. Cost £71,515. 19.10.1940: Torpedoed by the German submarine U.99 and sunk by gunfire from the German submarine U.123 W. of St. Kilda in a position 57.10N. 11.20W. The ship was sailing in Convoy S.C.7 at the time of the sinking and was on a voyage from St. Francis N.S. to Manchester with a cargo of pulpwood.

EUPHORBIA (2) (1917) Steel Steamship. O.N. 139880. 3109g, 1 887n, 5350d
331.1 x 48.0 x 22.2 feet.
T. 3-cyl. by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co. Ltd., Newcastle upon Tyne.
1917: Completed by W. Dobson and Co., Newcastle upon Tyne for "Stag Line", Ltd. Cost £75,508. 1.12.1917: Torpedoed and sunk 14 miles E. by S. from the Royal Sovereign lightship by the German submarine UC.75 whilst on a voyage from Bassein to London with a cargo of rice. Fourteen members of the crew were lost.

BEGONIA (2) (1918) Steel Steamship. O.N. 139882. 2929g, 1783n, 5000d
331.0 x 48.0 x 22.2 feet.
T. 3-cyl. by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co. Ltd., Newcastle upon Tyne.
1918: Completed by W. Dobson and Co., Newcastle upon Tyne for "Stag Line", Ltd. Cost £94,801. 27.3.1918: Torpedoed and sunk 44 miles S. by W. from Wolf Rock by the German submarine UB.55 whilst on a voyage from the River Tyne and Plymouth to Salonica with Admiralty cargo.

GLOXINIA (2) (1920 - 1952) Steel Steam Tanker. O.N. 139896. 3336g, 1961n, 5542d
331.5 x 47.9 x 23.0 feet.
T. 3-cyl. by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co. Ltd., Newcastle upon Tyne.
9.1920: Completed by Tyne Iron Shipbuilding Co. Ltd., Newcastle upon Tyne for Stag Line, Ltd. as a dry cargo ship. 4.1927: Delivered after conversion to a tanker by Smith's Dock Co. Ltd., North Shields. Cost, including conversion, £236,235. 7.1952: Sold to Imera Siciliana di Nav., Italy for £115,000 and renamed VITTORIA O. 1955: Sold to "SOARMA" Soc. Armamento Marittimo, Italy and converted to a dry cargo ship. 3.4.1959: Arrived at Spezia to be broken up by Cantieri Navali Santa Maria.

IXIA (2) (1922 - 1929) Steel Steamship. O.N. 139897 2985g, 1828n, 5010d
331.0 x 47.7 x 21.9 feet.
T.3-cyl. by J. Dickinson and Sons Ltd., Sunderland.
7.1922: Completed by J. Blumer and Co., Sunderland having been originally ordered by Norwegian owners. Cost £44,706. 30.6.1929: Wrecked on the Brisons, Cape Cornwall, whilst on a voyage from Swansea to Constantinople with a cargo of coal.

LINARIA (2) (1924 - 1941) Steel Steamship. O.N. 139904. 3385g, 2014n, 5700d
331.0 x 48.0 x 23.2 feet.
T. 3-cyl. by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co. Ltd., Sunderland.
1924: Completed by Sunderland Shipbuilding Co., Ltd., Sunderland for Stag Line Ltd. Cost £58,633. 29.2.1941: Torpedoed and sunk by the Italian submarine BIANCHI in a position 61N. 25W. approx. whilst on a voyage from the River Tyne and Loch Ewe to Halifax N.S. The ship hab been sailing in Convoy O.B. 288 wich hab been ordered to disperse. Her crew of 35 men was lost.

EUPHORBIA (3) (1924 - 1940) Steel Steamship. O.N. 139905. 3380g, 2011 n, 5700d
331.0 x 48.0 x 23.2 feet.
T. 3-cyl. by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co. Ltd., Sunderland.
1924: Completed by Sunderland Shipbuilding Co. Ltd., Sunderland for Stag Line, Ltd. Cost £57,745. 14.12.1940: Torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U.100 in the North Atlantic whilst on a voyage from Swansea and Milford Haven to Lynn, Massachusetts. Her crew of 33 men and 1 gunner were lost.

CYDONIA (3) (1927 - 1949) Steel Steamship. O.N. 148802. 3517g, 2175n, 6493d
356.3 x 48.7 x 23.9 feet.
T. 3-cyl. by J. Dickinson and Sons Ltd., Sunderland.
1922: Laid down by J. Blumer and Co. Ltd., Sunderland but not launched until 3.1 2.1926 as the shipyard had been closed in the meantime. 1.1927: Completed for Stag Line, Ltd. Cost £58,000. 21.10.1949: Severely damaged by a mine 32 miles N. of Strumble Head whilst on a voyage from Workington to Cardiff and beached on the following day. 2.11.1949: Refloated but found to be damaged beyond economical repair. Sold to British Iron and Steel Corporation, allocated to T.W. Ward Ltd. and broken up at Milford Haven. Insurance paid £103,516.

GARDENIA (3) (1928 - 1940) steel Steamship. O.N. 148804 3745g, 2316n, 6495d
360.8 x 48.3 x 25.1 feet
T. 3-cyl. by the Shipbuilders.
18.4.1928: Launched by Armstrong, Whitworth and Co. Ltd., Newcastle upon Tyne as STRONGARM having been built as a speculation.12.1928: Completed as GARDENIA for Stag Line, Ltd 12.3.1940. Mined and sunk N.E. of Cromer in a position 53.04N 01 33E whilst on a voyage from Casablanca to Billingham and Leith with a cargo of phosphates

PHOTINIA (2) (1938 - 1950) Steel Steamship. O.N. 161545 4010g, 2457n, 6750d
364.5 x 50.7 x 24.4 feet 7
T. 3-cyl. By North Eastern Marine Engineering Co. Ltd., Sunderland.
12.1929: Completed by Swan, Hunter and Wighham Richardson Ltd., Sunderland as HOPEDENE for Hopemount Shipping Co. Ltd. (A. Stott and Co. Ltd, managers), Newcastle upon Tyne. 1938: Purchased by “Stag Line”, Ltd, for £446,736 and renamed PHOTINIA. 1948: Converted from coal to oil burning. 1950: SoId to Rederi A/B Asta ( Arthur Andersson, manager), Finland for £110,000 and renamed ATLAS. 1956: Management transferred to Lennart Karlsson. 1968: Sold to Cia. De Nav. Pinares S.A. Somaliland. 1973: Sold to Brodospas and 22.1.1974: arrived at Split to be broken up.

ELIZABETH MASSEY/BEGONIA (3) (1943 - 1956) Steel Steamship. O.N. 162690. 4323g, 2598n, 7718d
370.5 x 51.7 x 25.4 feet.
T. 3-cyl. by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co. Ltd., Sunderland.
7.1929: Completed by W. Doxford and Sons Ltd., Sunderland as JULIET for Hans Hannevig, Norway. 1931: Sold to Essex Line Ltd. (Meldrum and Swinson, managers), London and renamed ESSEX NOBLE. 1933: Sold to The Red "R" Steamship Co. Ltd. (Stephens, Sutton Ltd., managers), Newcastle upon Tyne and renamed REAVELEY. 1939: Sold to W. A. Massey and Sons Ltd., Hull and renamed ELIZABETH MASSEY. 1943: Purchased by Stag Line, Ltd. for £80,495. 1945: Renamed BEGONIA. 1949: Converted from coal to oil burning at a cost of £16,080. 1956: Sold to Pio Tomei, Italy for £250,000 and renamed PEONIA. 1964: Sold to Cantieri Navali del Golfo who commenced demolition 11.5.1964 at La Spezia.

GARDENIA (4) (1945 - 1964) Steel Steamship. O.N. 160733. 4125g, 2463n, 6485d
364.8 x 51.0 x 24.9 feet.
T. 3-cyl. by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co. Ltd., Newcastle upon Tyne.
7.1930: Completed by Northumberland Shipbuilding Co. (1927) Ltd., Newcastle upon Tyne as BRIARWOOD for Constantine Shipping Co. Ltd., Middlesbrough. 1932: Transferred to Joseph Constantine S.S. Line Ltd. 1943: Purchased by “Stag Line”, Ltd. for £70,468 and renamed GARDENIA. 1947: Converted from coal to oil burning. 1964: Sold to Amfitriti Cia. Nav. S.A., Panama for £75,000 and renamed AIS NICOLAS. 1965: Sold to Astrosplendor Cia. Nav. S.A., Panama. 20.10.1968: Extensively damaged when fire broke out in the engineroom whilst undergoing repairs at Port Said and declared a total loss. Sold to Adly Makari and broken up at Port Said.

IXIA (3) (1946 - 1951) Steel Steamship. O.N. 169517. 7201 g, 4935n, 9653d
432.7 x 56.2 x 34.4 feet.
T. 3-cyl. by Fairfield Shipbuilding and Engineering Co. Ltd., Glasgow.
12.1944: Completed by Wm. Hamilton and Co. Ltd., Port Glasgow as EMPIRE KUMASI for the Ministry of War Transport (Joseph Robinson and Sons managers). 1946: Purchased by “Stag Line”, Ltd. for £137,000. Converted from coal to oilburning at a cost of £52,479. 1947:Renamed IXIA. 11.1951: Sold to Century Shipping Corporation, Liberia for £425,000 and renamed EMPIRE TRADER. 1954: Sold to Cia. Atlantica Pacifica S.A., Liberia and renamed NORTH RIVER. 19601 Sold to Italian shipbreakers and 31.1.1960 arrived at Spezia to be broken up by A.R.D.E.M.

CLINTONIA (5) (1946- 1959) Steel Steamship. O.N. 168968. 7013g, 4226n, 10170d
431.0 x 56.2 x 34.2 feet.
T. 3-cyl. by D. Rowan and Co. Ltd., Glasgow.
10.1941: Completed by Lithgows Ltd., Port Glasgow as EMPIRE BAFFIN for the Ministry of War Transport (Joseph Robinson and Sons managers). 1943: Commissioned by the Admiralty and renamed H.M.S. SANCROFT. Converted for pipelaying duties in connection with the PLUTO (Pipe Line Under The Ocean) operation. 1946: Purchased by Stag Line, Ltd. for £30,000. Converted back to a dry cargo ship and from coal to oil burning at a cost of £137,911. 1947: Renamed CLINTONIA. 10.12.1959: Sold to Alcestis Shipping Co. S.A., Greece for £62,500 and renamed ASPIS. 1963: Sold to Japanese shipbreakers for £14 per light weight ton.

LINARIA (3) (1947 - 1954). Steel Steamship. O.N. 148816. 7333g, 4222n, 10065d
431.2 x 56.3 x 35.6 feet
T. 3-cyl. by the Shipbuilders.
10.7.1944: Launched by J. Readhead and Sons Ltd, South Shields as the maintenance ship H.M.S. MORAY FIRTH for the Admiralty. She had been laid down as EMPIRE PITCAIRN for the Ministry of War Transport. 12.1947: Purchased by “Stag Line” Ltd. for £80,500. Converted to a dry cargo ship by Tvne Dock Engineering Co. Ltd., South Shields at a cost of £98,597 Renamed LINARIA. 4.1948: Commenced trading. 11.1954: Sold to Chellew Navigation Co. Ltd., London for £230,000 and renamed ESKGLEN. 1956: Owners restyled as Esk Shipping Co Ltd 1961: Sold to Fortune Shipping Co. Ltd., Hong Kong and renamed MARINE FORTUNE. 1961: Sold to Herald Shipping Co. Ltd. (World Wide (Shipping) Ltd. managers). Hong Kong. 1967: Sold to Japanese shipbreakers and 8.6.1967 arrived at Yokosuka to be broken up.

ZINNIA (2) (1951 - 1964) Steel Steamship. O.N. 148819. 7292g, 3921n, 10550d
424.6 x 57.2 x 34.9 feet.
T 3-cyl. by Dominion Engine Works Ltd., Lachine.
12.1945: Completed by Burrard Dry Dock Co. Ltd., Vancouver as the maintenance and repairship HMS PORTLAND BILL for the Admiralty. 1.1951: Purchased by “Stag Line” Ltd.for £61,700. Converted to a dry cargo ship by Mercantile Dry Dock Co. Ltd., Jarrow on Tyne at a cost of £109,171. Renamed ZINNIA. 18.6.1951: Commenced trading. 12.1964: Sold to Astrosuerte Ciai Nav SA Liberia for £63,500 and renamed CHRYSOPOLIS. 1965: Sold to Formosan (Taiwan) shipbreakers and 18.5.1965 arrived at Kaohsiung to be broken up.

CAMELLIA (4) (1953 - 1972) Steel Motorship. O.N. 148820. 6161g,3168n, 7800d
434'6" x 55'8" x 23.7 feet.
4-cyl. 2 S.C.S.A. Doxford oil engine by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co. (1938) Ltd., Wallsend on Tyne.
2.1953: Completed by J. Readhead and Sons Ltd., South Shields for “Stag Line” Ltd. Cost £482,136. 6.1972: Sold to Compania Navegacao Somerset S.A Panama for £96,000 and renamed GALICIA. 1977: Sold to Hughes Bolckow Ltd. and 21.4.1977 arrived at BIyth to be broken up.

CYDONIA (4) (1955 - 1969) Steel Steamship. O.N. 148822. 6231g, 3219n, 8180d
433'9" x 57'0" x 24'1"
T. 3-cyl. with low pressure steam turbine by the Shipbuilders.
10.1955: Completed by J. Readhead and Sons Ltd., South Shields for Stag Line, Ltd. Cost £578,071. 29.8.1969: Sold to Republic Maritime Corporation, Liberia for U.S.$635,000 and renamed VERMONT I. 9.1972: Sold to Renaissance Shipping Co., Liberia and renamed RENAISSANCE. 1973: Sold to Cristobal Nav. Corporation, Liberia and renamed SOVEREIGN EDITH. 1975: Sold to Anchor Marine Enterprises Ltd., Liberia and renamed JOY. 8.6.1977: Sank about 100 miles S.E. of the mouth of the River Mississippi in a position 27.55N. 88.26W. after three explosions in the engine room. The ship was being towed to New Orleans at the time after developing rudder trouble whilst on a voyage from Acajutia to New Orleans.

GLOXINIA (3) (1958 - 1977) Steel Motorship. O.N. 187929. 7665g, 3943n, 10350d
479'8" x 60'3" x 25'7"
4-cyl. 2 S.C.S.A. Doxford oil engine by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co. Ltd., Wallsend on Tyne.
5.1958: Completed by J. Readhead and Sons Ltd., South Shields for Stag Line, Ltd. Cost £958,611. 1.1.1977: Sold to Panous Shipping Co. Inc., Liberia for U.S.$925,000 and renamed VIRGINIA M. 30.4.1981: Sailed from Lagos, with crankshaft damage, in tow of the German tug LUNEPLATE (226/65) and 10.6.1981 arrived at Piraeus to be laid up. 7.1982: Sold to Greek shipbreakers who commenced demolition 2.8.1982 at Perama.

PHOTINIA (3) (1961 - 1978) Steel Motorship. O.N. 187933. 7676g, 3946n, 10340d
479'8" x 60'3" x 25'7"
4-cyl. 2 S.C.S.A. Doxford oil engine by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co. Ltd. Wallsend on Tyne.
3.1961: Completed by J. Readhead and Sons Ltd., South Shields for Stag Line Ltd Cost £919,216. 12.5.1978: Driven aground at Milwaukee after dragging her anchors in a storm. She was awaiting a berth at Milwaukee after arriving from Chicago. 15.5.1978: Declared a constructive total loss and abandoned to the underwriters. $1,760,000 (£953426) paid by insurers. 6.1978: Sold "as is, as lies" for $5,000 to Selvick Marine Towing Corporation, U.S.A. 7.7.1978: Refloated with the aid of six tugs and towed to Sturgeon Bay where her machinery was removed. 12.1978: Towed to Chicago. 15.11.1979: Arrived in tow at Kewaunee Wisconsin to be broken up by Baskins Bros.

IXIA (4) (1964 - 1982) Steel Motorship. O.N. 187944. 15910g, 10237n, 24000d
595'0" x 75'0" x 32'8"
6-cyl. 2 S.C.S.A. Sulzer oil engine by Geo. Clark and N.E.M. Ltd., Sunderland.
11.1964: Completed by Austin and Pickersgill Ltd., Sunderland for Stag Line, Ltd. Cost £1,337,575. 5.2.1982: Sold to Telemachus Shipping Co. S.a.r.l., Lebanon for U.S. $2,850,000 less 3% and renamed TELEMACHUS. 1985: Broken up Shanghai.

ZINNIA (3) (1968 — 1982) Steel Motorship. O.N. 187949. 16122g, 10199n, 26603d
597'0" x 74'9" x 46'4"
6-cyl. 2 S.C.S.A. Sulzer oil engine by Geo. Clark and N.E.M. Ltd., Sunderland.
10.1968: Completed by J. Readhead and Sons Ltd., South Shields for Stag Line, Ltd. Cost £1,625,552 less £382,119 Government Grant = £1,243,433. 7.11.1982: Sold to Norbulk Pte. Ltd. (Thome and Co. Pte. Ltd. managers), Singapore for U.S. $1,750,000 (£1,054,216) and renamed TIMUR SWIFT. 7953.- Sold to Arm. Ermione S.A., Liberia and renamed ERMIONE. 1985 Sold renamed ZENOVIA. 1990: Renamed IONIA. 1990: After engineroom fire towed to Chittagong and scrapped.

KIELDER STAG (1975 - 1978) Steel Motorship. O.N. 364012. 726g, 440n, 1017d
53.04 x 10.16 x 4.40 metres.
8-cyl. 4 S.C.S.A. oil engine by Naval-Stork-Werkspoor S.A., Cadiz.
9.1969: Completed by Astilleros de Murueta S.A., Murueta as BEGONA DE ASTOBIZA for Naviera Murueta S.A., Spain. 1.4.1975: Purchased by Stag Line, Ltd. for £361,075, including £26,552 to bring her up to British flag requirements, and renamed KIELDER STAG. 1.5.1975: Commenced a two year bareboat charter to Kielder Shipping Ltd., Newcastle upon Tyne. 22.7.7976; Bareboat charter ceased on the liquidation of Kielder Shipping Ltd. and management transferred to G.T. Gillie and Blair Ltd., Newcastle upon Tyne. 20.5.1978: Sold to Northumbria Shipping Ltd. (same managers), Newcastle upon Tyne for £300,000 and renamed NORTHUMBRIA ROSE.

SILLOTH STAG (1975 - 1982) Steel Motorship. O.N. 338115. 799g, 435n, 1165d
57.61 x 10.20x 4.58 metres
8-cyl. 4 S.C.S.A. oil engine by W.H. Allen, Sons and co. Ltd., Bedford.
31.12.1974: Launched by Beverley Shipbuilding and Engineering Co. Ltd., Beverley as TILSTONE MAID for Tiling Construction Co. Ltd., London. 3.1975: Completed but not registered. 10.4.1975: Purchased by “Stag Line” for for £585,412 including minor modifications and renamed SILLOTH STAG. 21.4.1975: commenced a four year bareboat charter to Silloth Shipping Ltd., Annan of which the shareholders were Carrs Milling Industries Ltd., Carlisle David Gardmer Securities Ltd., Dumfries and from 11.1975 Stag Line Ltd. 27.5.1982: Redelivered from bareboat charter and management transferred to G.T. Gillie and Blair Ltd., Newcastle upon Tyne 1.7.1982: sold to Westfield Shipping Co. Ltd. which had recently been purchased by James Fisher and Sons p.l.c., Barrow, G.T. Gillie and Blair Ltd. continued as managers. 1985: Sold renamed ROBRIX.

BEGONIA (4) (1978 - 1983) Steel Motorship. O.N. 36401. l6329g, 10687n, 26320d
173.74 x 22.94 x 14.38 metres
6-cyl. 2 S.C.S.A. Sulzer oil engine by Barclay, Curle and Co. Ltd., Glasgow
5.1978: Completed by Swan, Hunter Shipbuilders Ltd., Walker Shipyard, Newcastle upon Tyne for Stag Line Ltd. Cost £7,019,035 assisted by a loan of £4,760,000 under the UK Government Shipbuilding Credit Scheme. 29.3.1983: Sold to Southbuk Shipping Pte. Ltd., Singapore for $4,750,000 (£3,275,682) and renamed TIMUR SWALLOW. 1985: Sold renamed JENNIFER JANE.

Malcolm Frost
27th November 2007, 17:18
Seeking Info On This Company Plus Any X Crew Members Who Worked On These Ships Rob

Hi
Just read your message,I sailed on the ZINNIA in 1972 from Tilbury to Roterdam via New Orleans & Callao Peru.
Left the ship to attend fathers funeral on 25/8/72.
I was an assistant steward.
Malcolm

Story
9th May 2008, 17:06
NUPHAR (1) (1872 - 1878) Iron Steamship. O.N. 65445 1137g, 731n
230.5 x 30.0 x 18 feet.
C.2-cyl by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co., Sunderland.
8.1872: Launched by lliff, Mounsey and Co., Sunderland for Joseph Robinson. 21.10.1873: Joseph Robinson sold 47 shares to 21 shareholders including Nicholas J. Robinson ( 4 shares) and Joseph Robinson the Younger ( 4 shares). 12.12.1878: Stranded and broke in two near Honfleur whilst on a voyage from Konigsberg to Rouen with a cargo of wheat and flax. Insured for £1 7,000 at the time of her loss.


NUPHAR (2) (1881 - 1882) Iron Steamship. O.N. 84860. 1963g, 1280n, 2850d
287.0 x 37.0 x 21.9 feet.
C. 2-cyl. by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co., Sunderland.
11.1881: Launched by Tyne Iron Shipbuilding Co., Newcastle upon Tyne for Joseph Robinson and Co. Insured on delivery for £30,000. 23.9.1882: Wrecked at Cape May whilst on a voyage from Shields to Philadelphia with a cargo of pig iron.

Something I've read in Lloyd's registry in 1881 indicated that the 2nd Robinson NUPHAR was a rebuild of the 1st's salvaged hulk.

I'd be interested in hearing directly from anyone who has specific information on the Nuphar.

This from the New York Times in 1882
SEAVILLE, N.J., Sept. 23.

--The steam-ship Nuphar, Capt. Brooks, from North Shields, England, for Philadelphia, with pig-iron and drugs, grounded on Townsend Inlet bar, about 20 miles above Cape May, at 4 o clock this morning, and now lies directly across the inlet. She was a new iron steam-ship. [built by Joseph Robinson and sons] of North 6. and was built at that place last year at a coat of S200.000. She is consigned to L. Co., of Philadelphia. The value of her Is about Q50,000. At a late hour this she was to Ro to , as a south-east wind has been all the afternoon, and the sea is over her. The Captain and crew are on shore, cared for at Life-saving Station No. NEw

Story
12th May 2008, 23:05
DANAE (1873 - 1877). Iron Steamship. O.N. 65456. 1157g, 745n
230.0 x 30.3 x 18.2 feet.
C.2-cyl by North Eastern Marine Engineering Co., Sunderland.
1.1873: Launched by lliff, Mounsey and Co., Sunderland for Joseph Robinson and on delivery insured for £20.000. 3.3.1874. Joseph Robinson sold 48 shares to 23 shareholders including Nicholas J. Robinson ( 2 shares) and Joseph Robinson the Younger ( 4 shares). 25.12.1877: Foundered off Horns Reef whilst on a voyage from Copenhagen and Reval to London whit a cargo of wheat. Insured for £17,000 at the time of her loss.

Found the following report on her loss.
http://www.plimsoll.org/resources/SCCLibraries/WreckReports/14278.asp

Kaytee
24th July 2008, 10:50
i have a photo of the PHOTINIA in KING GEORGE DOCK HULL with all her cable laying gear on the bow i dont know if she was just going to lay the cable or she had just finished but she had just discharged a full cargo of grain so she must have done a trip with the gear still on sam

Hi
I was R/O on Photinia for several years. We had just returned from NZ after laying 3 power cables. 10 months UK to UK, loaded grain atThevenard SA n way home. After that we laid further cables between Trinidad and Tobago, after that she was restored to a bulk carrier, but later came down to NZ again to lay a replacement cable. I was living in NZ by that time
Ken

Vinchristo
11th August 2008, 18:17
Hi Oceantramp,
I have just joined and tried to access your site. The URL appears then I am sent to Orange's website maker page. Is your website still active ??

Vinchristo

Stagline Junior
11th August 2008, 21:11
Hi,
I'm hoping you can help me. I'm doing research to learn more about my family - The Robinson family as I'm one of the only few living desendants. My grandparents have both passed away however I have found memories of the stags head that sat in my grandads house which used the hang in the office of my great grandfather. Any information that you have about the robinson family or where I can find it would be fantastic. I'm not in contact with my Mum who is my only other living link.
Many thanks

Vinchristo
19th August 2008, 15:09
There is also a direction to a Stag Line website belonging to 'Oceantramp'.
Enjoy.

John T.[/QUOTE]

Hi, Is anyone having the same problem as I am? I have been attempting to access Oceantramp's website for some few days now, but always end up at Orange's website for free webpage making. I thought it may have been a bug on my computer but it is the same with my sister's system.

Vinchristo

K urgess
19th August 2008, 15:17
It looks like the site's gone, Vin christo.
Let's hope Oceantramp comes back to this thread and explains or you could send him a PM.
Regards
Kris

oceantramp
19th August 2008, 20:03
My website was with wanadoo and orange has taken over this company they have deleted my website. I have to build a new one with orange that is why orange web builder comes up.when my old web address is clicked. (A)

Vinchristo
19th August 2008, 22:08
Hello oceantramp,

Please ignore my reply to your PM - you are way ahead of me. I'm sure everyone else with an interest in Stag history will be awaiting news of its return.
best of luck,

Vinchristo.

K urgess
19th August 2008, 22:17
Thanks for setting us straight so quickly, oceantramp. (Thumb)
Much appreciated.
Cheers
Kris

ov24604
8th October 2008, 16:44
Hi,
I'm hoping you can help me. I'm doing research to learn more about my family - The Robinson family as I'm one of the only few living desendants. My grandparents have both passed away however I have found memories of the stags head that sat in my grandads house which used the hang in the office of my great grandfather. Any information that you have about the robinson family or where I can find it would be fantastic. I'm not in contact with my Mum who is my only other living link.
Many thanks

Hello, I am also doing family research on the Stag Line and the Robinson family. I have emailed you as well but I do have a Robinson family tree that could be of some use.

jasmacpm
8th October 2008, 17:49
I know a fella, Jimmy Purdie, who was an engineer with Stag Line, Donaldson'r and RFA, for a while, if anyone knew him?

Jimmy.

Bombersman
12th October 2008, 17:20
I attended a wedding in the Maritime Building in North Shields yesterday and was probably more interested in the pictures of Stag Line ships and earlier maps of the area which adorned the reception area than I was in the wedding. I thought that the inscription on the blue plaque may be of interest to those who don’t live nearby.

“Built 1806-7 as a subscription library for Tynemouth literary and philosophical society. Occupied 1895-1980 by Stag Line Ltd.. one of Tyneside’ oldest family – owned shipping companies. The building still bears the stag emblem. “

I was with Houlder Bros and had no conection with Stag line.

Kind regards

Bob W.

trotterdotpom
13th October 2008, 01:07
Hope you weren't the Groom, Bombersman.

John T.

Bombersman
13th October 2008, 09:45
No way. :-) I don't think I would re marry at 68, in any case I don't think my wife of 42 years would stand for it. LOL

This was my oldest son's second wedding, the mad impetuous fool.

Kind regards

Bob W.

trotterdotpom
13th October 2008, 11:25
A two time loser, is that why he opted for a Stag Day instead of a Stag Night?

John T.

Bombersman
13th October 2008, 11:43
"...is that why he opted for a Stag Day instead of a Stag Night?"
I like it, I should have thought of that. ;-)

Bob W.

trotterdotpom
13th October 2008, 11:46
Use it at his next wedding, Bob!

John T.

Albert Bishop
13th October 2008, 12:02
Maybe stating something already known, but the old Stag Line office building in North Shields is now a listed building and does registry wedding services.
Been to one or two and they do a pretty good job of them. So at least the old place is being put to good use. Albi

Bombersman
13th October 2008, 15:25
Use it at his next wedding, Bob!
God forbid John. (Jester)

Been to one or two and they do a pretty good job of them.
I can vouch for that Albi, despite my earlier somewhat cynical post, the wedding on Saturday was a huge success and carried out with care and due decorum.

Rightly or wrongly I could imagine the room where the ceremony was carried out, resounding to talk of Stag Line activities. It have may have been the boardroom perhaps?

In the reception area were photos that included the "Photinia"and "Cydonia".

Kind regards

Bob W.

barga
9th November 2008, 15:21
I joined Stag line in June 1969 , first ship was the Cydonia which I joined in Belfast as a Deck Cadet it was her last trip before being sold and I paid off in Rotterdam handing her over to the new owners. I stayed with Stag line till I finished my cadetship then I went to work for the Kuwaite's .
Would be happy to get in touch with any old shipmates.

custom house
6th December 2008, 03:53
G'Day All !
I did one trip on the Eskglen in 1954/55. Signed on in Rotterdam, and she went to Shanghai and Chefoo for a full cargo of peanuts. Had a memorable time in Aden on New Years Eve. With being the youngest member of the crew I was told to get up on the Foc,sle, and ring sixteen bells. No sooner did that when Aden seemed to come alive. You could hear all the troops singing their heads off clear across the harbour from the NAAFI Club.
Every ship was giving it their best to make the most sound. I was gobsmacked to say the least, thinking "Christ" did I start all that. Anyway it made one very happy memory for a newbie Pantry Boy on his second trip to sea. The crew were great blokes 50/50 English and Dutch (Learnt my first swear word in Dutch off them. (grin). The we made our way to Hamburg to unload where I was introduced to the delights of the REEPERBAHN and Ten mark Allee. Nuff said. I always think of the Eskglen with fondness.

kudu
25th February 2009, 19:29
I joined Stag line in June 1969 , first ship was the Cydonia which I joined in Belfast as a Deck Cadet it was her last trip before being sold and I paid off in Rotterdam handing her over to the new owners. I stayed with Stag line till I finished my cadetship then I went to work for the Kuwaite's .
Would be happy to get in touch with any old shipmates.

Hi barga,
I know this is a bit late,but I have just read your message.I left Stag Line
just before you joined.I am trying to find out what became of some other
apprentices I sailed with.Peter Rowlands,John (jock) Chalmers,Graham
Robinson.Yoy may have sailed with them.
Kudu.

Clive Spencer
28th March 2009, 06:08
Hello! Clive Spencer here a retired shipmaster living in New Zealand. Having taken my qualifications at South Shields I got to meet quite a few lads out of the Stag Line - geordies one and all, the salt of the Earth! A yarn I once heard that was whilst at anchor in one of the Great Lakes the apprentices from another Tyneside tramp (maybe one of Runciman's - my old firm) went aboard at the dead of night and painted "large appendages" on the stags on both sides of the funnel. Her Master was not amused.

All the best...Clive

Signorini
20th May 2009, 18:19
I knew a Capt-Reekie with Stag Line he came from a place he called the East Nook or Neuk,I heard from sources that he passed away about four or five years ago he must have been in his nineties

I also sailed with Capt Reekie on the Begona (built 1931) during 1954 as a deck apprentice. Smoked 60 cigarettes a day until well into his nineties. He came from Anstruther, Fife where his offspring have a large general business - everying from a needle to an anchor. I visited Capt Reekie at his home - opposite the "Craws Nest Hotel" in Anstruther a year or so before he died - still fit and well. He had'nt seen or heard from me for close on forty years and he knew me right away. His family are still in Anstruther and Capt Reekie was well known in the town.

Signorini
20th May 2009, 20:08
Robert

9 years with Staggies 1969 t0 1978 vessels sailed on Zinnia,Ixia,Photinia and Gloxinia
Rgds Gdynia

I also sailed on the Zinnia as a first trip deck apprentice in 1953.

Oliver

Signorini
20th May 2009, 20:10
Hi Robert
I sailed with Stag Line 1952 to 1966 I have a small web site at
http://stag-line.mysite.wanadoo-members.co.uk
All the best oceantramp

I also sailed with Stag Line as a deck apprentice - 1953 until 1957

Oliver

peter3807
20th May 2009, 21:26
I also sailed with Capt Reekie on the Begona (built 1931) during 1954 as a deck apprentice. Smoked 60 cigarettes a day until well into his nineties. He came from Anstruther, Fife where his offspring have a large general business - everying from a needle to an anchor. I visited Capt Reekie at his home - opposite the "Craws Nest Hotel" in Anstruther a year or so before he died - still fit and well. He had'nt seen or heard from me for close on forty years and he knew me right away. His family are still in Anstruther and Capt Reekie was well known in the town.

I also sailed with Capt Reekie on the Photinia as cadet on a trip to Paranagua, Brazil. Early 1970's. Back to Trafford Park with Maize. I can confirm his smoking habit. It was a sad trip as we lost the third mate Willie Fallon. I believe he had sailed with Capt Reekie for many years probably back to war time. You may remember him from your time with Stag Line.

Peter

gdynia
21st May 2009, 19:25
Peter
I sailed with Captain Reekie on his last trip on Photinia can always remember him saying"Is that no to much money for a young man"

peter3807
21st May 2009, 20:35
Peter
I sailed with Captain Reekie on his last trip on Photinia can always remember him saying"Is that no to much money for a young man"

Nev.

He was a bit reluctant to give subs to cadets. No doubt looking after our best interests. Myself and two others went to ask for a sub while alongside at Trafford Park. We said we wanted bus fare into town, money for a hair cut, money for writing paper and envelopes to write home and money for some new socks. We got £5 each. We gave each other a very poor hair cut, walked as far as the Trafford Park Hotel and spent the money on beer. You could get a lot for a fiver in the early 70,s. We had to good grace to feel guilty about it.
He was a fine Old Man from a different generation who served through the war years, you had to admire him.

Peter

gdynia
21st May 2009, 23:24
Yesyou did Peter I think that was my first trip with you and Chris Brackenberry

joebuckham
11th June 2009, 10:19
this first appeared in j&j denholms sub forum

In this Evenings Shields Gazette, it reports the death of Captain David Mustarde on the 3rd of June He was 69. He was with Denholms for quite some time.

garybowes
18th June 2009, 19:54
i have a photo of the PHOTINIA in KING GEORGE DOCK HULL with all her cable laying gear on the bow i dont know if she was just going to lay the cable or she had just finished but she had just discharged a full cargo of grain so she must have done a trip with the gear still on sam

She did a cable from north to south island of New Zealand ( Cook Strait ), I knew Davey Barton who was on that trip 68 I think, he was my Senior Apprentice when I joined the old Cydonia in Belfast. She went for scrap to Rotterdam ! Some great lads !

alan brett mckenzie
30th August 2009, 16:00
Robert

9 years with Staggies 1969 to 1978 vessels sailed on Zinnia,Ixia,Photinia and Gloxinia
Rgds Gdynia

Helo Gdynia

You were there longerthan me.
I was on the Cydonia as Junior and 4th Engineer, Captain Riekie, Chief Eng Mustard, 2nd was John Snowdon. two seasons on the Great Lakes
Transferred to Ixia 69 or there-abouts, joined her in Boston. Bob Chambers was Chief, 2nd was Hughie Shotton. Capt was Mortimer. We lost an anchor off Cape Hattras lightship in rough weather, did three weeks in NY for repairs, to the Fwd B/Head which was a mess. We then headed South to catch Hurricane Camile in Gulf Port, another mess, cargo of sulphur got blown away. Local bar was not there the day after we had been it Interesting trip. I see Bob Chambers most weeks, now spends his time in his allotment.

Do you recall Ernie Lamb, he is still going according to Bob

Recall seeing the Zinnia being fitted out, was it Redheads Yard?

Alan McKenzie
Whitley Bay
0191 2371283

alan brett mckenzie
30th August 2009, 16:16
Enter "Stag Line" in the Search Forums of this site and quite a few mentions of the company and former employees (including myself, very briefly) come up. There is also a direction to a Stag Line website belonging to 'Oceantramp'.
Enjoy.

John T.

John T

Are you the John T that lived near Widdrington Station? was it Stobswood?
Cydonia with Captain Riekie and Old Mustard the Chief, Mervyn the 3rd Mate?

Alan McKenzie
Whitley Bay

Bigmo
30th August 2009, 17:39
Haven't been on the Stag site for a while, any mention of "Robbie" always brings back memories, coming alongside Slaford lay-by I think, on the Cydonia, the pilot remarked, "No linesmen here yet" a minute later he says "It's ok , there's one here now," it was Robbie! He'd shot down onto the quay, always remember his remark to me when I tapped the baramoter, "Aye Mister Mate, if it was ment to be tapped there would be a hammer!" Hugh Shottonused to wind him up. Was John Snowdon the 2nd. who would go ashore very smartly dressed and with a briefcase? Happy days, Ernie Lamb standing on the lock with my wife and child, I knew nothing of their joining but Ernie was prepared to let them sail if I stayed on for a trip to Australia, no way, I was due to go study for Masters, a great fellow was Ernie.

alan brett mckenzie
31st August 2009, 16:32
Hi Bigmo,

Thanks for your response.
I guess there are many, many stories connected to "Robbie" as you call him. He was a remarkable man.
I recall John Snowdon going ashore at River Rouge, in his white mac and a brolly and him getting it jammed in the mezanine floor of the bridge astern of the ship. Do you recall this berth? I had a lot of time for John.
Ernie was instrumental in me leaving MacGreggors the hatch cover people, to complete my apprenticeship, "Only a 6 week trip to the States" I signed off the Cydonia 11 months later in Leith. It was a great first trip.
Where do you live these days In have not wandered far from North Shields. I drink in the Old Wooden Doll on the quayside just below the Stag Line office. (Now the Prince of Wales).

Alan McK

alan brett mckenzie
5th September 2009, 10:31
I joined Stag line in June 1969 , first ship was the Cydonia which I joined in Belfast as a Deck Cadet it was her last trip before being sold and I paid off in Rotterdam handing her over to the new owners. I stayed with Stag line till I finished my cadetship then I went to work for the Kuwaite's .
Would be happy to get in touch with any old shipmates.

Hello Barge,

I was on the Cydonia around that date who did you sail with?

Alan Mckenzie
Whitley Bay

john morgan (wales)
8th September 2009, 17:04
Seeking Info On This Company Plus Any X Crew Members Who Worked On These Ships Rob

my name is john morgan from swansea i joined stag line as an apprentice 1955
i served on the gardenia zinnia gloxinia clintonia and as third mate on cydonia with jas shaw captain have only just joined nostalgia my e-mail is johnandmoy@supanet.com get in touch (K)

john morgan (wales)
8th September 2009, 17:17
Hi Robert
I sailed with Stag Line 1952 to 1966 I have a small web site at
http://stag-line.mysite.wanadoo-members.co.uk
All the best oceantramp

Hi Robert
I joind stag line as an apprentice 1955-1960 my ships were Gardenia Zinnia
Gloxinia Clintonia and as third mate on Cydonia then went with hains of st Ives(K)

Kraffy
22nd September 2009, 14:45
I did one trip on Gardenia as steward in 1960 up Great Lakes. I loved this old ship but unforseen circumstances forced me to leave at last minute prior to re-signing on.

mikeh_001au
24th September 2009, 05:51
Hello Stag Line crew...

I have just joined the list and feeling my way around, looking for information on Stag Line. My interest is through my late father, Capt (William) Raymond Hunter.

Already I have seen names that I recall and ships that I visited or sailed on as a child - Zinnia (SS), Cydonia, Gloxinia, Begonia, Ixia, Zinnia (mv)...

...Hughie Shotten (was my job to watch out for black smoke out of the funnel and promptly ring the engine room to get Hughie to take his socks off the boiler); Cyril Bradley (always smiling and fixing things); Shaun Highland (taught me navigation, how to use a sextant, learned and raised the flags); spanish bosun (Cydonia, 1967) taught me rope work, splicing and started on wire-hawser before leaving ship), Stan Fuller (ice-cream, jam sandwiches and tea with strange-tasting milk from a can)...all good folk and happy memories.

peter3807
24th September 2009, 16:59
Hello Stag Line crew...

I have just joined the list and feeling my way around, looking for information on Stag Line. My interest is through my late father, Capt (William) Raymond Hunter.

Already I have seen names that I recall and ships that I visited or sailed on as a child - Zinnia (SS), Cydonia, Gloxinia, Begonia, Ixia, Zinnia (mv)...

...Hughie Shotten (was my job to watch out for black smoke out of the funnel and promptly ring the engine room to get Hughie to take his socks off the boiler); Cyril Bradley (always smiling and fixing things); Shaun Highland (taught me navigation, how to use a sextant, learned and raised the flags); spanish bosun (Cydonia, 1967) taught me rope work, splicing and started on wire-hawser before leaving ship), Stan Fuller (ice-cream, jam sandwiches and tea with strange-tasting milk from a can)...all good folk and happy memories.

Mike,

I sailed with your father a number of times in the 70,s when I was 2nd mate. All on the Zinnia. You father was a perfect gentleman and a great old man to sail with. I remember we were down bound in the channel on one occasion when your father had me take the Zinnia close inshore to Prawle Point where your mother was watching us pass.
Happy memories of voyages with your father.

Peter

william middleton
17th October 2009, 12:43
reply for info on STAG LINE.my name is bill middleton and i sailed on the DALEBY from 24/1/56 to13/7/56 three voyages to usa and the 4th was running between new york and canada carrying gypsum.i remember that the overtime money was paid in american dollars.does any one remember this trip

WilliamH
17th October 2009, 16:44
reply for info on STAG LINE.my name is bill middleton and i sailed on the DALEBY from 24/1/56 to13/7/56 three voyages to usa and the 4th was running between new york and canada carrying gypsum.i remember that the overtime money was paid in american dollars.does any one remember this trip

I think the Daleby was a Ropners ship, the company was based in Darlington. Stag Line ships in the 1950's were all named after flowers/flowering srubs, their office was in North Shields

John Hewett
17th November 2009, 12:36
I sailed with Jimmy Young on the Gloxinia and Photinia in the 1970s. I remember that he was a professional 2nd Mate.

John Hewett

John Hewett
17th November 2009, 12:40
Ken - did you visit Photinia when she was in Wellington in 1977? I was extra 2nd Mate on her at the time (along with Jim Sams (R/O), Hughie Selkirk (Master), Eddie lamb (Mate), Brian Hildred (2nd Mate), Steve Andrucci (3rd Mate) mongst others far too many to remember.

John Hewett

hosanna
24th December 2009, 06:45
Hello Stag Line crew...

I have just joined the list and feeling my way around, looking for information on Stag Line. My interest is through my late father, Capt (William) Raymond Hunter.

Already I have seen names that I recall and ships that I visited or sailed on as a child - Zinnia (SS), Cydonia, Gloxinia, Begonia, Ixia, Zinnia (mv)...

...Hughie Shotten (was my job to watch out for black smoke out of the funnel and promptly ring the engine room to get Hughie to take his socks off the boiler); Cyril Bradley (always smiling and fixing things); Shaun Highland (taught me navigation, how to use a sextant, learned and raised the flags); spanish bosun (Cydonia, 1967) taught me rope work, splicing and started on wire-hawser before leaving ship), Stan Fuller (ice-cream, jam sandwiches and tea with strange-tasting milk from a can)...all good folk and happy memories.

Hi
Patrick Hyland here (Shaun's son) Dad married my mum Rosemary and adopted the three of us (always up for a challenge was dad!) he moved on from Stag to the RFA and then relocated us to South Africa where he sailed for Safmarine on a variety of general cargo, bulk and container ships. Most of his career as master was spent on the Big Whites (SA Sederberg et al). As I recall Dad always thought of Capt. Hunter as a bit of a mentor to him.
Unfortunately, Dad passed away 5 years ago.
Anyway that's my bit...also new here and feeling my way around.
Regards

oceantramp
27th December 2009, 14:12
Hi Patrick Your Dad and I were very good Mates and sailed together on quite a few of Stag Line ships.
I left Stag Line in 1966 and lost touch with Shaun, but I did meet him a few years later when he was Mate on the Cydonia which was berthed in Belfast.
I did hear from Harry Mountain that he had passed away. Bill

Nigel Reid
14th November 2013, 20:16
Joined Stag line in 1970, Camellia first and 2nd trip, then Ixia for 9 months, Gloxinia on a Great Lakes charter. Duluth to Halifax and back all season with grain and an occasional Flourspar cargo through the straits of Canso. Then Zinnia for two trips finishing on the Begonia for Stag Line. Ended up on the Bessegan on the paper trail before being ship wrecked by Bella Coola shipping and Huntings'!!!!!!!!