Captains Inspections

skymaster
26th January 2006, 16:58
Anybody remember much about these?It seems to me they occurred at sea once a week,with Captains and Chief Officers either showing little interest or down to a fine tooth comb[white gloves]I remember Captain Jackson Mathura and Clifford-Hicks being very strict with us apprentices.Hvaing said that it did no harm.Any memories from Brocklebanks?

Mike

eldersuk
26th January 2006, 17:44
March of the unemployed!!

wa002f0328
26th January 2006, 18:52
I used to put a bit of jam on top of the light switch, and the chief enngineer used to go away ruubing his fingers together for the rest of the inspection

John Rogers
26th January 2006, 19:25
Yes I remember them well,white gloves and all.
John.

Tom Haywood
26th January 2006, 21:42
Used to be a regular thing with NZSCo vessels especially the cadet ships, Sunday mornings if my memory serves me well

KPC
26th January 2006, 23:41
Regular occurrence with Union Steam.......some very picky but most I think seeing how the "other half" live ?
Our motto...."Drift and Dream with Union Steam"

sean
26th January 2006, 23:57
remember well my first trip with Bankline , had only joined a matter of hours when this rather large barefoot person entered my cabin wearing a string vest and a grubby pair of
empire builders quote" hows it goin sparks just doing my inspection ,beer in my cabin in a minute ok". My type of inspection- eat yer heart out all the bull**** companies

jim barnes
27th January 2006, 00:47
used to have them on PSNC amongst others, remember one Sunday morning Captain, cheif Eng cheif stwd, second steward and any one else with a uniform doing their inspection, got to one of the ABs cabin 12 to 4 watch i think, Captain knocked on the door and opened it to find the AB still in his bunk asleep who woke up to hear the Captain say "Cabin inspection" the AB (SCOUSE) replied F***K off and make a appointment? Captain closed the door and carried on with his inspection and nothing more was said !! (Night)

KPC
27th January 2006, 07:01
And exactly as it should be...........we never got to inspect his cabin lol

Keltic Star
27th January 2006, 07:23
It was on Sunday mornings on Furness Withy & Prince Line. The apprentices got Saturday afternoon off to clean up their shacks which was a nice break from the 18 hours on / stay on routine. Had to keep the parrots a couple of cabins ahead of the Old Man on the "Tudor Prince".

billyboy
27th January 2006, 07:32
remember once the old man ran his white gloved fingers along the top of my cabin door and got them dirty. i was not rated as popular over that either with him or the chief. never mind, i learnt from the experience ... LOl

J Boyde
27th January 2006, 07:35
Some captains thought they were the greatest person in earth. Others I sailed with know that the inspection had to be done and did them as quickly as possible. All to often, they were the ones who got the best results.
Jim B

vix
27th January 2006, 07:54
It was on Sunday mornings on Furness Withy & Prince Line. The apprentices got Saturday afternoon off to clean up their shacks which was a nice break from the 18 hours on / stay on routine. Had to keep the parrots a couple of cabins ahead of the Old Man on the "Tudor Prince".
Yes Siree, I well remember Baie Como, Quebec: we tied up opposite a Spanish ship and managed to buy x amounts of bottles of Spanish brandy for $C1.00 each...party my cabin! Result was a thick tongue in the morning...Sunday...there were pop dispensing machines on the jetty and I decided to go and taste some, just to take the fur from the back of my throat...you understand? Just before I left my cabin I noticed a load of empty bottles sticking out of my waste bin and a few lying around the deck...I had a sudden inspiration to hide the evidence...which I did. I duly got my drink and I was ambling back to the ship when I met up with the Skipper & Johnny the One...The Skipper made a point of walking up to me and bellowing...it's Sunday...I replied I was well aware of the fact, thank you...then he bellowed..."Sunday! Captain's inspection day...at sea or in port...YOU-DIDN'T-MAKE-YOUR-BUNK!" That could be a logging offence Johnny chipped in...Yes, Sirs! As we walked in opposite directions I head one say...I wonder why he was grinning like a Cheshire Cat...even when we threatened the logging? If only they had known...if only I hadn't picked up those bottles...if...if...if...Vix (Night)

lakercapt
27th January 2006, 16:07
Captains inspections were one of my least favourite chores.
They were required as were board of trade sports, by company regulations or law to be done.
The inspections were mainly to see that there were no safety or fire hazards nor damage to the ships property.
The only people that were given special attention were the cadets.
Many had had their mummies looking after all their needs and having to clean and do laundry was a new acheivement.
The others were to see the latest Pin Ups from Penthouse ect and have a chat with crew members to see how things were going etc.

Alan Hill
27th January 2006, 19:05
Not Merchant Marine but Naval in this case, same inspection. In mid-60s was berthed in a two officer cabin upper berth on a 3500 ton Destroyer Escort. Whenever we would have to get up at 0200ish for the General Quarters alarm I would smack my head on a thwartships pipe over my bunk. Cured that by wrapping it in foam. Next Executive Officer's Cabin Inspection, weekly, he said with that foam up there our cabin would flunk inspection, secretly he understood my reason. With tongue in cheek I sort of said "so be it". So, also with tongue in cheek, he told the Yeoman accompanying him to flunk our cabin for the next year straight, and we did flunk for a year. Neat little warship and crew! Bouncing up and down as only 3500 tons squashed into 350 feet can do! Alan Hill Bridgeport, Pa. USA

John Leary
27th January 2006, 19:32
If my memory serves correctly Captain's inspections on Brocklebank ships were carried out on a Sunday morning. On the Mahseer in 1963 I remember being told that on one inspection the Master (Gobby) Nuttall placed a penny on the top of a wardrobe in the apprentices cabin, presumably to check whether it was dusted regularly or not. When he made a visit the following week it had been replaced by two halfpennies. He was not best pleased and extra duties were the reward!. The rest of the officers had a great laugh and the apprentices were rewarded with a few tins of the amber liquid.

John

gwzm
27th January 2006, 20:18
Hi John,

Gobby hadn't changed then! I did my first trip on the Mahseer as a rookie Chota Marconi Sahib, sailing from London in April 1963 so I guess it was the voyage before you. The Burrah Marconi Sahib was Harry Jefferson, a great character, but the Master, John (aka Gobby) Nuttall was something else again. He had a huge girth and the Calcutta tailors used to say "Eeh-Captain Nuttall, eeh biggest gut in all eeh-Brocklibank!" I used to avoid going "upstairs" to the bridge whenever possible when he was around.

= salaams es bv = John/GWZM + VA

Tony Crompton
27th January 2006, 20:47
Capt Gob Nutall was Master on my first trip on "Malancha" in 1956. He could only be described as a bully to all on the ship.

In later years when I was a Pilot on the Tees I always vowed if ever I had to pilot his ship I would frighten him to death without actually doing any damage.

Anyway it never happened as I was never on his ship and probably I would have chickened out anyway!!!
----------------------------------
Salaams,
Tony C

Pat McCardle
27th January 2006, 20:56
On Somerset inspection was on a Thursday. With the ship being I.D.F. articles we, the deck & catering crew, got 1 hours overtime for seeing that all was OK. ie Carpet swept, bunks made & ALL brass fittings were painted over!! All dead lights were big & brass aswell as all door steps. Some went through as if we were all 'Scum of the earth'.(The P&O Wallahs) The 'Real' NZSCo & FSNCo men knew the score & kept it!! Whatever happened to likes of Cap'ns Sandy Stalker & Brian Austen-Smith (or was that Smythe?) Great ship, Great crew. May the departed souls be forever guided by fair winds & clam seas (Thumb)

Frank P
27th January 2006, 22:02
Hi Pat,
an interesting story you have told, but what does I.D.F. mean????

Frank

vix
28th January 2006, 02:30
Hi Pat,
an interesting story you have told, but what does I.D.F. mean????

Frank
One BP tanker...BR Industry...had half deck crew from Grimsby...all ex fishermen...and proud of it. One in particular used to bait the skipper with his pin-ups. He would cut out, and stick on the bulhead by his bunk, any picture or advert for TAMPAX. The skipper bailed him up one day and asked..."Why?" the answer was..."Because!" The skipper was seen to walk away shaking his head and muttering...it takes all types...the Skipper was E. J. (Killer) Simpson.

raybnz
28th January 2006, 08:37
In Shaw Savill it was I think Thursday for the inspection. We use to carry dogs out for Krufts as deck cargo.

As a bit of a dog lover I used to take pity on one and usually it ended with me in my cabin. This time on the Waipawa I had a nice black Lab and since I was on the 12 _ 4 I usually was asleep when in inspection took place.

The dog in its usually postion on the day bed and when the captain stuck his head in the door all hell let loose. The dog was going to have him.Hence to say the dog was confined to its kennel from there on. But at least it caused a laugh or too.

Bill Lambert
28th January 2006, 08:57
IDF = Inter Departmental Fluctuation.
To work i different ships departments.
Where, for eg, an AB could double up as an Engineroom Wiper. Usually they took it in turns. Comon on coasters, especially Middle Trade, etc.

Frank P
28th January 2006, 09:54
Bill thanks for the explanation,
I mostly worked on Norwegian and German ships, so I am not familiar with alot of the British abbreviations.
On the Norwegian ships that I worked on, the Captains inspection did not happen on a set day, by doing it that way the crew could not prepare their cabins the night before, everything had to be reasonable all the time.
As for the Captains being good or bad, all the Norwegian Captains and Officers that I worked with had worked their way up from Deckboy to Captain so I think that they were more in touch with the crew and what was going on onboard.

Frank

Pat McCardle
28th January 2006, 10:21
Hi Pat,
an interesting story you have told, but what does I.D.F. mean????

Frank

Inter Departmental Flexibility. Catering crew painting on Deck, Deck crew in Engine room, Donkeyman & Greasers helping with mooring etc. A cheaper form of General purpose, no training neccessary? Basically a good form of 'Starting an arguement' (Thumb)

trotterdotpom
28th January 2006, 10:46
Raybnz's dog story reminded me of returning to the ship one night in Bombay. A trader outside the gate sold me a couple of Java Sparrows that were probably as drunk as I was - they ran up my arm and went to sleep under my shirt collar.

I had a book shelf in my cabin which I turned into a bird house but it turns out that Java Sparrows are nasty b******s when they're sober - I couldn't get near them, but I was lumbered with them.

Needless to say, on the first Captain's inspection they were discovered and they had to go. Fortunately the Old Man was a bit of a bird lover and he let me keep them until we got to the next port. Unfortunately, after a nightmare time chasing the birds through the porthole, I looked out and saw a couple of soaring kites with what appeared to be grins on their faces.

I hope they made it and learned the perils of strong drink.

John T.

jim barnes
28th January 2006, 13:08
Hi Pat,
an interesting story you have told, but what does I.D.F. mean????

Frank
I too was on the Somerset(P&O) when IDF was introduced(1973) Captain came into mess room to explain what was going to happen before we sailed regarding IDF we would be required to be flexible in our work for 10 per month i think it was, a couple of hours per month (deckies eng room, stwds deck. firemen greasers deck) all was fine i suppose untill one day Jimmy the captains stwd had to come on deck for a few hrs needless to say Jimmy was what could be said was verry camp, we kitted him out with wooly hat tee shirt and a skimpy pair of shorts, Knife and spike and of he went in hot persute af the bosun shouting "BO BO what shall i do". any way IDF= Inter Departmental Flexability

Pat McCardle
28th January 2006, 18:10
I too was on the Somerset(P&O) when IDF was introduced(1973) Captain came into mess room to explain what was going to happen before we sailed regarding IDF we would be required to be flexible in our work for 10 per month i think it was, a couple of hours per month (deckies eng room, stwds deck. firemen greasers deck) all was fine i suppose untill one day Jimmy the captains stwd had to come on deck for a few hrs needless to say Jimmy was what could be said was verry camp, we kitted him out with wooly hat tee shirt and a skimpy pair of shorts, Knife and spike and of he went in hot persute af the bosun shouting "BO BO what shall i do". any way IDF= Inter Departmental Flexability

Hi! Jim. Not to mention the cut down in crew too? I was on Her with Bo'sun, Bo'sun Mate OR Chippy, 6 ABs, 4 EDH & 2 Deck Boys or JOS/SOS 14 on deck as opposed to 20+ before I.D.F. Engine room had 1 Donkeyman & 3 Greasers, don't know how many Greasers there were before change but there was a load of empty cabins on the st'bd side leading to the Bar. Catering wasn't affected, Cook & 2nd Cook/Baker, 2nd St'wd, 2 AS, Messman & 2 Boys, not forgetting Ch/Stwd-Purser

jrx
29th January 2006, 09:55
Used to have them in Shell every sunday morning the old man, Chief Engineer and chief Steward. It seemed to me that the Chief engineer would be picky with the Deck Cadets which would stir the old man into meticulose examination and vociferous criticism of the engineer cadet accomodation (Cloud)

pilot
29th January 2006, 11:55
Inter Departmental Flexibility. Catering crew painting on Deck, Deck crew in Engine room, Donkeyman & Greasers helping with mooring etc. A cheaper form of General purpose, no training neccessary? Basically a good form of 'Starting an arguement' (Thumb)


I.D.F? Better known as "I DO F.....ALL"

Regards. Martin

akbruton
29th January 2006, 12:36
First trip to sea as Galley boy after six months the cabin boy and myself changed jobs,I cleaned the engineers cabins. Sunday inspection on the British Cavalier was on reflection as if the King was aboard. The Old Man Capt Galley did the inspection and found dust on top of the air duct in the 2nds cabin,he put a penny on top to see if I cleaned it before next inspection. The 2nd told me about it and suggested that I changed the penny for two halfpennies which I did . This cost me 5 logging for insubordination, iI only earnt 6 plus danger money a month. Alan Bruton

trotterdotpom
29th January 2006, 13:14
First trip to sea as Galley boy after six months the cabin boy and myself changed jobs,I cleaned the engineers cabins. Sunday inspection on the British Cavalier was on reflection as if the King was aboard. The Old Man Capt Galley did the inspection and found dust on top of the air duct in the 2nds cabin,he put a penny on top to see if I cleaned it before next inspection. The 2nd told me about it and suggested that I changed the penny for two halfpennies which I did . This cost me 5 logging for insubordination, iI only earnt 6 plus danger money a month. Alan Bruton

Was it that dangerous cleaning the engineers' cabins? Nice story, Alan. It would have been a pain at the time, but still worth the five quid fine. Pity you couldn't have given him 2400 halfpennies (I just worked it out at 240d per pound).

John T.

rstimaru
29th January 2006, 14:49
I remember Captain Edmondson in Elder Dempster he was a *****

KPC
29th January 2006, 21:03
On Australian Coast designated as IR = Integrated Rating

mcgurggle
29th January 2006, 21:50
I remember on the 'Inishowen Head' we were all called together in the crew messroom for an explanation of the 'new fangled' G.P. agreements. 1st Mate says, "Anyone know what I.D.F. means ?"..........pregnant pause..............."OK", says the Skipper, "It means Inter-Departmental Flexability"............."D'you know what that is ?" (Fly)
(Voice from the back of messroom) "Aye, Its one of Everards"!
Fekin' laugh..Thought they'd never dry..........! :sweat:

Pat McCardle
29th January 2006, 22:43
I remember on the 'Inishowen Head' we were all called together in the crew messroom for an explanation of the 'new fangled' G.P. agreements. 1st Mate says, "Anyone know what I.D.F. means ?"..........pregnant pause..............."OK", says the Skipper, "It means Inter-Departmental Flexability"............."D'you know what that is ?" (Fly)
(Voice from the back of messroom) "Aye, Its one of Everards"!
Fekin' laugh..Thought they'd never dry..........! :sweat:

Nice one (Applause)

vix
30th January 2006, 06:05
I remember on the 'Inishowen Head' we were all called together in the crew messroom for an explanation of the 'new fangled' G.P. agreements. 1st Mate says, "Anyone know what I.D.F. means ?"..........pregnant pause..............."OK", says the Skipper, "It means Inter-Departmental Flexability"............."D'you know what that is ?" (Fly)
(Voice from the back of messroom) "Aye, Its one of Everards"!
Fekin' laugh..Thought they'd never dry..........! :sweat:
That is the best laugh I've had for years: Nearly as good as - One of Everards Chief Engineers was supposed to have walked off the ship: GPO telegram boy, riding a BSA bantam, brought the skipper C/E's resignation. Skipper, "Can you strip that bike and put it back together again? GPO boy, "Yes, Sir." Skipper, "Would you like to sign on as C/E? Laughed until I cried, wife thinks I'm ready for a straitjacket! (Applause) (Night)

cboots
30th January 2006, 23:59
As I recall the "master's inspection" was generally known as the "march of the unemployed" and was held in utter contempt by all hands. My personal opinion was that its only purpose was to give them a bit of exercise prior to getting stuck into the serious drinking session that took place most afternoons but especially on a Sunday.
CBoots

KIWI
3rd August 2007, 23:18
Best captains inspection I encountered was on Strathmore when I was a passenger to Sydney from Bombay.We had just been swimming & going up to the bar for my round encountered the captain & his entourage doing their thing.The beer when we started drinking was really great,not watered down.Guess wth all the brass watching it couldn't be done.In a diplomatic manner mentioned this fact to the stewards & thereafter we had the good stuff. Would mention our Wine Account was still active & although we paid at ships bars we could,unlike regular passengers,buy bottles of spirits for use in our cabins at staff rates.Kiwi

notnila
4th August 2007, 00:23
Maiden voyage of Oriana1,my turn to "Stand by"4berth boy ratings cabin.Captain Edgecomb run white gloved finger along top of diddy box.Said box promptly fell off baulkhead.Held up by Cellotape,(Scotchtape forour N.American members),Then with his foot ,lifted a corner of the mat, revealing everything I had swept under it.C.O said"I wouldn't keep pigs in here."
"I would!"said Frenchie the Purser.It took me years to realise what a great line in insult that was.

Geoff Garrett
4th August 2007, 00:32
. This cost me 5 logging for insubordination, iI only earnt 6 plus danger money a month. Alan Bruton

Don't believe a word of it!

Mick Spear
4th August 2007, 02:48
Rounds! Still have them today. A legal requirement. One for accommodation (safety, damage and general cleanliness) the other for Food storerooms and water supplies; entered into the Log Book acordingly and a list of defects/pick up points drafted and promulgated.

I remember Geest Line being Sundays. Blue Star was Tuesdays and Fridays. I think Joe Shell was Sundays In RFA we have them on Fridays, however some COs prefer to have the Catering areas on Thursdays and accommodation on Fridays. Only time i ever saw white gloves was on Geest Star - Captain Boon (looney boony).

Mick S